Page 1

ISSN 1614-4600 · NOV · DEC £13 · US$  24.50 · €18.90

English Edition

Review of Architecture and Construction Details · Roofs · Vol. 2016 · 6


∂ Review of Architecture Vol. 6, 2016 • Roofs Editorial office: E-mail: redaktion@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89 38 16 20-57 Dr. Sandra Hofmeister (editor-in-chief, (V. i. S. d. P.), Sabine Drey, Andreas Gabriel, Frank ­Kaltenbach, Julia Liese, Michaela Linder, Peter Popp, Maria Remter, Jakob Schoof, Edith Walter, Heide Wessely Emilia Margaretha, Christa Schicker (freelance ­assistants) Dejanira Ornelas Bitterer, Marion Griese, Emese M. Köszegi, Simon Kramer ­(drawings) Editorial team DETAIL product ­information: Thomas Jakob, Jenny Clay Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-0 Peter Green (pp. 543 – 556, 560 – 610) Giovanna Dunmall (p. 558) Marc Selway (pp. 612– 637) (English translations) Advertising: E-mail: anzeigen@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-48 Advertisement Sales Representative Cézanne Sales Services Denise Cézanne-Güttich Rotdornstr. 2 D–41352 Korschenbroich T: +49 (0)2182 578 39 73 F: +49 (0)2182 578 39 75 M: +49 (0)172 821 0095 E: dcg_detail@cezannesales.com Distribution and marketing: E-mail: mail@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-0 Subscription contact and customer service: Vertriebsunion Meynen Grosse Hub 10 65344 Eltville, Germany E-mail: detailabo@vertriebsunion.de Tel.: +49 (0) 61-23 92 38-211 Fax: +49 (0) 61-23 92 38-212 Publisher and editorial office: Institut für internationale ArchitekturDokumentation GmbH & Co. KG Hackerbrücke 6 80335 Munich Germany Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-0 Fax: +49 (0) 89-39 86 70 www.detail.de/english


Editorial Over the past 25 years, the world of architecture has witnessed many changes. Two and a half decades ago, Zaha Hadid had realized none of her powerful structures. In Japan, Tadao Ando had just achieved an international breakthrough with his Church of the Light in Ibaraki, and Foster had still not set his dome on the Reichstag building in Berlin. In the early 1990s, nobody spoke of “sustainable building” and certainly not of “BIM”. The world of professional journals was quite different, too. The internet was not a rival medium. The first computers were only just beginning to appear in editorial offices, and the precise drawings found in DETAIL were still being neatly rendered in ink on tracing paper. In those days, the very small editorial team worked on six issues of the journal a year plus a Construction Manual every two or three years. Today, roughly 15 books are produced annually as well as many more journals, including “Concept” and “Green”, “Inside” and “Structure”. After being responsible for the content of DETAIL for 25 years, the time has now come for me to hand over the reins. This is the final issue of which I shall be editor-in-chief, and I should like to thank readers for the great trust they have shown. The high degree of recognition we have gained for our work – on an international level, too – has always been a tremendous spur for me and the entire editorial team. I shall not be taking my leave entirely, however, for my links with DETAIL will be maintained in the form of further contributions I shall make from time to time. Christian Schittich


Discussion 546 Architecture and Nature – the Roof as a Design Element in the Landscape Sabine Drey

Reports 554 Temporary Spatial Modules: Research Building in Dübendorf Alexander Felix 556 Books

Documentation 560 Museum and Conference Centre, Xiangshan Central Campus Kengo Kuma & Associates, Tokyo 565 Grace Farms Foundation Centre in New Canaan Sanaa, Tokyo 570 Holiday Cottages in Brekkuskógur PK Arkitektar, Reykjavik 574 House in Dresden Löser Lott Architects, Berlin/Gornsdorf 578 “Minna no Mori” – Media Cosmos in Gifu Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Tokyo 584 Childcare Centre in Vétroz Savioz Fabrizzi Architects, Sion 588 Summit Station in the Toggenburg Region Herzog & de Meuron, Basle 593 Theatre in Gdańsk Renato Rizzi, Venice

Technology 600 Armadillo Vault – A Complex Shell Structure Consisting of 399 Stone Blocks Philippe Block, Tom Van Mele, Matthias Rippmann, Matthew DeJong, John Ochsendorf, Matt Escobedo, David Escobedo 604 A Baldachin for Mumbai – Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport Terminal 2 Charles Besjak

Products 612 620 628 634 637

Roof and Drainage Sustainable Remodelling Health and Leisure Solar PV and Solar Thermal On the Spot

638 Service 644 Persons and organizations involved in the planning • Contractors and suppliers 646 Programme • Photo credits • Editorial and publishing data


Discussion


Reports


554

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

Temporary Spatial Modules: Research Building in Dübendorf Alexander Felix

Architects: Gramazio Kohler Architects

The latest building by the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA) bears the title “Next Evolution in Sustainable Building Tech­ nologies” (NEST). Situated in Dübendorf, north-west of Zurich, it is no ordinary ­structure. Set in a heterogeneous built environment of existing commercial developments and new housing, it enjoys a special and form­ ally striking status. Immediately beyond the entrance to the EMPA site stands an irregu­ larly shaped stack of open concrete slabs. Designed by the Zurich architects Fabio Gramazio and Matthias Kohler, the NEST complex is a research building where ex­

periments can be carried out in the field of construction technology. At the same time, it serves as a guest house for people in­ volved in research and for visitors. Inaugurated at the end of May 2016, the development comprises two parts: a per­ manent “backbone” and various inter­ changeable elements – the so-called “units”. The latter serve the needs of re­ search, and at the end of a project, they can be removed and replaced by different ones. The backbone consists of an exposed con­ crete core – with staircases, service shafts and various spaces for flexible use – as well as three cantilevered floor slabs.


∂   2016 ¥ 6

Report

555

Site plan scale 1:8000 Section • Floor plans scale 1:750 1 2 3 4 5 6

Reception Atrium Discussion space Mechanical services Multipurpose space Experiments

aa

At the centre of the core is a spacious ­atrium, the exposed concrete walls of which form an inner facade of restrained design. Here, a number of circular windows of various sizes open up further views and allow daylight into the adjoining spaces. Large numeral reliefs indicate the relevant storey. The high-quality fittings and finishings were executed with a few carefully detailed wood and metal elements. Handrails and wooden gratings are subtly contrasted with the large areas of exposed concrete, for example, and the design is complemented by suspended soffits made of finely modu­ lated metal cylinders.

6

6

5

5

2

2

6

6

First floor

a

a

4

Ground floor

4

2

2

1

1

a

a

3

3

The backbone structure links the various areas for experimental work and also acts as a meeting place for all users of the house. On the ground floor is a reception area with a foyer and exhibition spaces as well as two conference rooms. The circula­ tion areas and three communal spaces on the upper floors are reached via two straight-flight staircases that are set oppo­ site each other in the central atrium and that lead to an impressive “promenade”. The architects conceived the building as a series of vertically stacked building plots. These are in the form of three column-free floor slabs 500 –700 m2 in area that provide space for up to 18 independent units. The

first two levels can accommodate singlestorey additions, whereas on the upper­ most slab two-storey units are possible. The trapezoidal-shaped floors are offset to each other, thereby creating scope for units of ­different layout. The cantilevered areas extend out from the core by up to 12.5 m and have to bear imposed loads of 10 –12 kN/m2 where additional units are foreseen. This, in turn, placed great de­ mands on the structural planning. For that reason, prestressed ribbon cables were laid in the 45– 60 cm reinforced concrete slabs to reduce deformation in the floors. The units are docked to the backbone, where numerous service runs (for drinking


556

Temporary Spatial Modules: Research Building in Dübendorf

water, various forms of waste water, air, electricity, gas, etc.) are housed in large shafts. These connect the generous ­spaces for mechanical services in the basement with the various storeys. In addi­ tion, there is ample scope for upgrading with further installations and media that may be required in the future. The NEST was built for research and devel­ opment in various fields: construction ma­ terials and insulation, services technology, furnishings, fittings and energy manage­ ment. The concept foresees joint research projects conducted by teams drawn from universities, building concerns and archi­ tectural practices with the aim of bringing

new technologies more quickly on the mar­ ket. Furthermore, an interaction is foreseen between the units and the locality to afford fresh insights into new material and energy cycles and ways of making them available on a municipal level. The energy needs of each unit are recorded and evaluated. One of the first units to be installed was Vision Wood. The module was constructed with beech plywood, and a nanofibrillated cellulose coating was tested on the facade. Mineralized-wood doors were used inter­ nally to improve fire resistance, and these were fitted with antimicrobial handles. In addition, a washbasin and shower walls were made from hydrophobic wood.

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

In the coming months, further units will be installed and taken into use. Guided tours of the backbone and the units are availa­ ble. NEST is still largely a promise for the future, however. One must wait and see what will be hatched out there and what technologies and materials are brought on to the market.

Alexander Felix studied architecture at the University of Technology, Munich. He has worked in architectur­ al offices in that city as well as in the editorial depart­ ments of “Detail” in Munich and “Tec21” in Zurich. ­Today, he is an editor with Birkhäuser publishers in Basle.


Documentation


570

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

Holiday Cottages in Brekkuskógur Architects: PK Arkitektar, Reykjavik Team: Pálmar Kristmundsson, Andrew Burges, Fernando de Mendonca, Erna Vestmann, Sunna Dóra Sigurjónsdóttir, Liidia Grinko Structural engineers: Verkfræðistofa Þráinn og Benedikt, Reykjavik Others involved in the project: see page 644

Some 90 minutes by car from Reykjavik, set amidst Arctic vegetation and with a view of the nearby mountains and Lake Laugarvatn, stand two identical cottages. They are a modern interpretation of traditional Icelandic turf houses that seem to merge with the landscape. The folded roofs of the present cottages are covered with a layer of vegeta­ tion, which was removed from the site prior to construction and set aside for reuse. An embankment created from excavated soil shields the terrace from the wind and forms a transition between house and landscape. The architects firmly believe in meticulous planning as a means of ensuring economi­ cal design. The cottages have a straight­ forward layout with only a small circulation area and simple detailing. High quality materials were used to guaran­ tee durability and minimize maintenance costs. The timber structure is clad externally with vertical hardwood strips, the surfaces of which were charred to optimize their re­ sistance to the elements. Internally, the strip finishings to the ceiling follow the same grid. Restrained colours – white walls and grey polished concrete floors – plus the simple furnishings and large areas of glazing mean that the natural Icelandic surroundings play a central role in the interior. The energy sup­ ply is from geothermal sources, so that the two cottages can be used on an emissionfree basis.

Site plan scale 1:5000 Sections Layout plan scale 1:200 1 Room 2 Kitchen 3 Living / Dining room 4 Store 5 Refuse space 6 “Hot pot”

aa

bb

b

a

a

b

1

2

1

1

1

2

1

1

b

3 b

4 3 4

a

a

6

5

6

5

b


∂   2016 ¥ 6

Documentation

571


572

Holiday Cottages in Brekkuskógur

6

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

4

9

cc

1

2

3

4

5

5

7

8


∂   2016 ¥ 6

Documentation

1

573

2

3

4

dd

d

d

Horizontal section Vertical sections scale 1:20 1

2 3

90 mm two-layer turf extensive roof planting filter layer two-layer plastic seal 18 mm plywood sheeting 70/35 mm battens 25/25 mm counterbattens windproof paper 45/220 mm wood rafters with 200 mm thermal insulation between vapour barrier 35 mm sound-insulating panel black sound-insulating foil 60/25 mm and 30/20 mm pine strips 100/200 mm steel Å-joist Ø 32 mm ventilation tube

4 5 6

7 8

9

double glazing in aluminium frame fabric sunblind 60/50 –70 mm sawn hardwood strips with charred finish black windproof paper 35/45 mm battens 9 mm plywood sheeting 45/145 timber studding with 150 mm rock-wool thermal insulation between vapour barrier 35/35 mm wood battens 2≈ 13 mm gypsum plasterboard steel Å-section column 100 mm deep 130 mm reinforced concrete floor with acid-polished surface and underfloor heating 100 mm rigid-foam thermal insulation 90/90 mm steel SHS column

9

c

6

c


578

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

“Minna no Mori” – Media Cosmos in Gifu Architects: Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects, Tokyo Team: Toyo Ito, Takeo Higashi, Toyohiko Kobayashi, Yoshitaka Ihara, Toshimitsu Minami, Mitsuyo Yabuki, Ryo Chosokabe Structural engineers: Arup, Tokyo Others involved in the project: see page 644

17

16

18

8

Minna no Mori – “a forest for everyone” – is the name of the new Japanese media centre in Gifu. In this spirit, the large reading room, with its striking wooden roof construction, reveals itself to be a generous and welcoming open space. Covering an area of roughly 7,500 m2, the complex adopts the nearby Kinka Mountains as the formal theme for its gently curving roof. On the ground floor, visitors are greeted by various public zones laid out around a glazed archive for books. Only when one comes to the reading room, however, which occupies the entire upper floor, does one see the “globes” that lend the building its unmistakable expression. Translucent light shades of woven polyester

with applied fabric patterns diffuse the daylight, as well as the artificial light from the lamps suspended within. The wooden roof curves upwards in a series of canopy-like forms that reach their highest points over the tops of the 11 shades. Here, warm air can be extracted via roof-light openings, and the construction layers are reduced to a diaphanous latticework. The load-bearing system of the globes consists of innumerable cypress wood slats only 12 ≈ 2 cm in section, but built up in a series of three- to seven-layer laminated cross-strips. This basket-like mesh lends the hall a welcoming atmosphere that encourages people to sit and read in the “islands” beneath.


∂   2016 ¥ 6

Documentation

aa

8

19 19 19 19 19 19

19 19 19

Site plan scale 1:10,000

19 19 19

19 19 19

Section Floor plans scale 1:1000

21 21 21

20 20 20

8

8 8

 1  2  3  4  5  6  7

19 19 19

8 8

19 19 19

8

 8  9 10

8 8

11

1 12 12 12

1 1

11 11 11

8

a

a a

17 17 17

16 16 16

14 14 14

8 8

9

9 9

7 1

13 13 13

1 1

4

10 10 10

15 15 15

3 7 7

4 4

2

6

6 6 5

1

3 3

2 2

5 5

a

18 18 18

8

1

1 1

8 8

1 1

a a

Entrance Foyer Reception Shop Restaurant Kitchen Multipurpose space Terrace Dance studio Working space Children’s area

12 Audio/Video studio 13 Garden 14 Office space 15 Archives/ Store 16 Auditorium 17 Mechanical services 18 Exhibitions 19 Library reading area 20 Information 21 Quiet zone

579


582

“Minna no Mori” – Media Cosmos in Gifu

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

1 1 1

6 6 6

2 2 2

3 3 3

2 2

4 4 4

cc

2

5 5 5 7 7

dd

7

Vertical section scale 1:20 1

2

3

4 5

s heet-steel laminated with vinyl-chloride resin 1 mm butyl-rubber layer 25 mm fire-resisting fibre-bonded lightweight wood-wool sheeting 25 mm phenol-foam layer 100/200 mm steel channel supports with 100 mm glass-wool thermal insulation between butyl-rubber layer 15 + 25 mm fibre-bonded lightweight wood-wool sheeting Ø 190/7 mm tubular steel column with/without rainwater drainage 16 mm steel head plate multilayer load-bearing soffit lattice: 120/20 mm cypress strips with glazed finish 100/40 mm cypress distance pieces 4.5 mm steel head plate

  6 3.2 mm sheet steel 8 mm polyolefin sheeting 100/50 mm steel RHS   7 8 mm + 12 mm + 8 mm glazing with low-E coating   8 2≈ 12.5 mm gypsum plaster board 65 mm vertical supporting structure services cavity 25 mm polyurethane foam 30 mm rock wool 9 mm sheet steel   9 198/50 mm cypress sill fixed to 50/22 mm steel strip with 100/9 mm steel flat 10 19/90 mm cedar strip 11 200/50/32 mm steel T-section post 12 100 mm coated screed 50 mm thermal insulation with underfloor heating/cooling 300 mm hollow reinforced concrete floor 13 air-conditioning duct 14 15 mm plywood with glazed finish

12 12 12

8 8 8

9 9 9

11 11 11 13 13 13

14 14 14

10 10 10

7 7 7


Technology


600

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

Armadillo Vault – A Complex Shell Structure Consisting of 399 Stone Blocks Philippe Block, Tom Van Mele, Matthias Rippmann, Matthew DeJong, John Ochsendorf, Matt Escobedo, David Escobedo Others involved in the project: see page 645

www.detail.de The “Beyond Bending” exhibition at the 2016 Architecture Biennale in Venice advocates the logic of compression-only structural forms, not only because of their uniquely expressive aesthetics, but also in view of their potential for efficiency and the stability resulting from their geometry. The Armadillo Vault, the centrepiece of the exhibition in the Corderie dell’Arsenale, is an unreinforced, stone structure comprising 399 cut limestone blocks assembled without structural connections or mortar (ills. 3, 5). The outer face of the vault resembles the shell of an armadillo, while the underside has a rough striped texture. The vault, covering an area of 75 m2 and spanning more than 15 m in

2

1

various directions, has a minimum thickness of only 5 cm. Its shape is roughly triangular on plan, with four linear supports – three along the edges and one internally. Two large openings allowed the structure to be drawn round existing columns in the heri­ tage listed exhibition space (ill. 1). One of the openings extends further down to afford a more interesting visual perspective and to create greater curvature, which in turn increases the stability (ill. 2). The footings for the structure consist of 20 mm steel plates, which were designed to distribute the weight of the vault evenly over a large enough area to reduce the load on the floor of the protected building to the pre-

scribed limit of 600 kg/m2. A system of steel ties connects the supports and resists horizontal loads. The ties, which were necessary because physical connections to the floor were not permitted, were left exposed as a visual expression of the load-bearing system. Structural design and analysis The special geometry of the vault, which ­allows it to stand like “an intricate threedimensional puzzle” subject only to compression loading, was the outcome of a form-finding and optimization process based on thrust network analysis (ill. 4). This new, computer-based method offers greater


∂   2016 ¥ 6

1

2 3 4

Technology

601

 op view of vault  scale 1:500 T Two openings in the vault allow it to be drawn round the existing columns in the listed space. Steel floor ties are shown with dotted lines. Steel tie members resist horizontal loads at the bearing points. The vault has a span of 15 m in various directions and a minimum thickness of only 5 cm. a  Layout diagram showing distribution of forces b Layout diagram showing horizontal loads c  Distribution of various thicknesses of vault d  Local stress distribution

3

scope for the structural exploration of (inverted) suspended models – comparable to the physical form-finding techniques that were used in the construction of shell structures by designers like Antoni Gaudí and the engineer Heinz Isler. The dead weight of the vault was taken into account to define the central geometry of the structure. By establishing local thicknesses, it was possible to determine the inner and outer surfaces – the intrados and extrados. Based on material tests, the minimum required thickness of the individual blocks was specified as 5 cm in order to avoid spalling of the stone as a result of eccentric

loading at the interfaces. For both structural and aesthetic reasons, the thickness was increased towards the footings: to 8 cm along the linear supports and 12 cm at the central bearing point. The form of the vault, defined by its internal and external faces, was divided into courses, which in turn were articulated into individual blocks (ill. 8). By staggering the blocks and aligning the courses in accordance with the flow of forces and the edge lines, a firm interlocking of all stones was guaranteed. The stability of the unreinforced, dry assembly when subject to different forms of loading – including point loads, settlement at the supports, and earthquakes – was analysed and

a

the results verified using the discrete element method (DEM). Architectural geometry and fabrication To optimize their fabrication, the individual blocks have only convex top and bottom faces, which facilitates an efficient fitting process using a circular saw. Since the vault has a number of areas with negative Gaussian curvature, it was not possible to create the requisite geometry with both plane and convex surfaces. Adjacent flat and convex areas of the outer face were, therefore, separated, and a stepped exterior was created to the vault. In view of the limited time frame and the large number of

b

5 kN

1m c

5 cm

4

12 cm

d

0.006 MPa

0.096 MPa


602

Armadillo Vault – A Complex Shell Structure Consisting of 399 Stone Blocks

5 6 7

 he 399 stone blocks are laid without mortar or T structural connections. Curved inner face (intrados) shaped by cutting a ­series of fins with a circular saw The comb-like fins on the underside are hammered off manually to create a rough-textured, double-curved surface.

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

  8 a  Equilibrium diagram as three-dimensional grid b  Lines defining stone courses c  Layout of cutting lines on underside of vault d  Tessellation of individual stones   9 Wooden wedges are used to ensure a perfect fit of individual blocks. The precise position of stones is registered on their side faces. 10 The stone blocks are supported by centring during the assembly process.

5

blocks to be laid, the main goal in the fabrication process was to reduce the average cutting time for each stone. In fact, the time taken to process each block was less than one hour. In addition, since there is no mortar between the stones to provide tolerances, the interfaces had to be finished flush and therefore precisely cut and set. The outer face of each stone is flat. This was the outcome of the planar underside of the original block, which, as a result, did not have to be turned while machining the other surfaces. The underside was formed by closely spaced cutting with a circular saw, leaving thin, comb-like stone fins (ill. 6).

These were subsequently hammered off manually to create a rough-textured, double-curved surface (ill. 7). The side faces at right-angles to the flow of forces were custom processed with profiling tools to create plane tongued-and-grooved surfaces. The grooves serve primarily as a reference geometry to aid the assembly, although they also prevent local movement between stones. The other edges in contact with adjoining stones were cut to create a simple, planar finish. Construction A test assembly of the vault was carried out to allow the stonemasons to familiarize

themselves with the process. At the construction stage, all stones were supported by a centring structure, consisting of stan­ dard scaffolding with a custom-made wooden grid on top (ill. 10). The blocks were laid manually, starting at the supports and converging upwards towards the “keystone” courses at the top. The correct placement of each stone was controlled with a tachymeter and registration marks on the load-bearing interfaces, and the blocks were adjusted in position with wooden wedges according to precise measurements at their outer corners when the structure was almost complete (ill. 9). Finally, the keystones were cut, based on measurements of the partially

a

b

c

d

6

7

8


Products


612

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

Roofs and Drainage

Putting the heat on

Restoration, but without the drama

Icopal’s Parabit Duo and Solo Hot Melt Membrane Systems are designed to provide optimum waterproofing, allowing large roof areas to be covered quickly. Duo flexible monolithic waterproofing membrane is a blend of bitumen synthetic rubbers, polymers and other additives, combined with a spun-bond polyester fabric and high-performance elastomeric membrane. The bitumen compound is heated to a liquid and applied directly to the structural deck, forming a full and continuous bond to the substrate.

Welsh Slate’s natural Cwt Y Bugail Countygrade roof slates feature in the refurbishment of a historic seaside villa in the conservation area of Lyme Regis in Dorset. Some 150 m2 of various-sized slates were used on the stables and Grade II* listed main house, now a Landmark Trust holiday let. The £1.8 million restoration of the 18th century property, above, complete with observation tower took two years, but the roof design was straightforward, with a parapet gutter to the front, valley gutter in the centre and drain to guttering at the rear. The slate was specified not least for its quality and longevity but also because it was the original material, so it needed to be in keeping with the building. The trust said it favours natural products which are in tune with historic buildings.

Solo is described as notably time-efficient, as the multiple waterproofing layers are installed in a single operation, and detailing such as upstands and plinths can be completed before main system application. The systems are said to be particularly compatible with four types of roof build-up: inverted roofs, plaza or podium decks, terraces and balconies and green roofs. Extensive or intensive green roof build-ups can be installed above the completed hot melt waterproofing layer, acting as a ballast and water-attenuation system. ¥ Icopal United Kingdom � +44 (0)161 865 4444 www.icopal.co.uk

An existing Welsh Slate roof has also been renewed on a Grade ll listed building at the heart of London’s King’s Cross regeneration project. More than 600 m2 of 500 ≈ 300 mm Penrhyn Heather Blue County-grade slates were used in the refurbishment of the 1860s German Gymnasium – the first purpose-built gym in England – in its new guise as a designer restaurant. Said Andrew Rixson of architects Allies and Morrison, “The design of the roof is complicated by the increased

depth of the new roof build-up in that the additional thickness of the roof sets the new slate tiles above the level of the brickwork details of the existing gable parapets. “To resolve this, our design approach separates the slates from the brickwork by introducing hidden gutters, valleys and leadwork detailing around the perimeters of the roof. These details are adapted into various different forms due to the variety of conditions found within the existing roof and the deformation of the timber roof structure over time but they reconcile the precisely constructed new roof elements with the unevenness of the Victorian brickwork.” Penrhyn Heather Blue slates were also used in the redevelopment of the northern end of York racecourse, as seen below, to complement the listed buildings – on the stables, which feature a 30� roof pitch, on the circular roof of the Winning Connections building and on the 40� pitched roof weigh-in building, which features mitred hips and valleys and concealed gutters. ¥ Welsh Slate United Kingdom � +44 (0)1248 600656 www.welshslate.com


620

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

Sustainable Remodelling

Quietly comfortable

Nightclub aims to match original design ethos

An extensive refurb project incorporating Black Millwork windows and doors into a listed property in London’s Covent Garden has reduced noise levels for residents and improved energy ratings. The five-storey building has a ground-floor shop and four flats on each of the upper floors. The company says its timber windows are aesthetically identical to traditional Victorian fittings and, with the correct glass specification, possess excellent sound-reduction qualities, they also provide exceptional energy-efficiency results, offering an overall U-value of 1.5 W/m2K. High-spec French and rear entrance doors were also supplied and noiselevel testing after installation is said to have shown a reduction of 46 db.

Designed by architect Luis Gutiérrez Soto and opened in 1931, the Barcelo Theatre in Madrid, Spain is entering a new phase as a nightclub having undergone a complete redesign. Neolith compact sintered surfaces by TheSize were specified for floors, walls and items of furniture. “The open space deserved luxury surfaces, modern furnishings and an interior design that was practical,” said Jose Manuel Fernandez, executive director of designers Cuarto Interior. “In hightraffic areas by the DJ booth and large LED screen we needed flooring that would withstand scratches and high impact but still leave a lasting aesthetic impression.”

A range of energy-efficient aluminium windows incorporating a number of contemporary designs is also available from the company, in a variety of RAL colours and bespoke shapes and sizes. It says these can deliver U-values as low as 0.7 W/m2K whilst having the benefit of being an extremely sustainable specification choice. ¥ Black Millwork United Kingdom � +44 (0)1283 511122 www.blackmillwork.co.uk

Estatuario, inspired by Carrara marble, with intertwining thick but subtle veins on a pure white base, was chosen from the Classtone collection. Particularly attractive to the designers was the option to bookmatch the slabs, creating a mirror effect to add to the sense of uniformity yet, and still in keeping with the work of Gutiérrez Soto. Working with a floorplan in the shape of a cross, symmetry was created on either side of the central spine by raising the two opposing reserved seating areas and using Estatuario for the supporting pillars (not shown here). This concept was imple-

mented throughout the project. To merge with the bookmatch effect of the flooring, the lighting was also organised in symmetry and was strategically placed to magnify the veins of the flooring. The completed project displays a harmonious mix of coppery, earthy tones against the white background of the Neolith Estatuario surfaces. Another marble design from the Classtone collection is Calacatta, which is shown below as a kitchen worktop. This design has won several awards including the Red Dot for Product Design. Neolith surfaces are all of 100 % natural origin, composed of clays, feldspar, silica and natural mineral oxides, and are recyclable. The near-zero porosity means the product is hygienic, heat- and stain-resistant, easy to clean and impervious to chemicals. Having a natural base, the colours do not vary when exposed to UV rays. Also the product is lightweight and easy to install, making Neolith suitable for a range of indoor and outdoor surfaces. ¥ TheSize Spain � +34 (0)964 652 233 www.neolith.com


research

During BAU 2017, the world‘s leading trade fair for architecture, materials and systems, the DETAIL research Forum “Building the Future” will on six afternoons present differentiated perspectives on practical technologies and insights into national and international projects, as well as scenarios for present and future construction. Experience renowned, international architects and planners in dialogue with an experienced team of moderators.

detail.de/research

Forum – Building the Future BAU 2017 | 16 to 21 January 2017, Munich

Monday, January 16, 2017, 2:30 pm

Thursday, January 19, 2017, 2:30 pm

Chaired by Martin Prösler | Managing Director – Prösler Kommunikation, Stuttgart

Chaired by Dr. Sandra Hofmeister | DETAIL Editor-in-Chief, Munich

Paradigm Change? A New Architecture for 2050 Martin Haas | haascookzemmrich STUDIO 2050, Stuttgart

Modular Timber Construction: Diversity and Potential Prof. Hermann Kaufmann | Architekten Hermann Kaufmann ZT, Schwarzach, Vorarlberg

Intelligent Buildings

Between Technology and Technophobia Elisabeth Endres | Ingenieurbüro Hausladen, Kirchheim/ Munich Planning 4.0 – Processes, Structures, Cultures Prof. Christoph Achammer | ATP Architekten, Innsbruck

Systematic Building

Diversity in Modular Design Wolfram Putz | GRAFT Architekten, Berlin

Panel discussion

More with Less – The Parametric Approach Prof. Tobias Wallisser | LAVA Laboratory for Visionary Architecture, Berlin

Tuesday, January 17, 2017, 2:30 pm

Friday, January 20, 2017, 2:30 pm

Chaired by Dr. Sandra Hofmeister | DETAIL Editor-in-Chief, Munich

Chaired by Dr. Sandra Hofmeister | DETAIL Editor-in-Chief, Munich

“Stay a While!” Prof. Peter Haimerl | Peter Haimerl . Architektur, Munich

“As You Like It” Prof. Raphael Frei | pool Architekten, Zurich

Solutions for Spaces: A New Approach Prof. Barbara Holzer | Holzer Kobler Architekturen, Zurich

Architecture for the Public Sphere Prof. Marc Frohn | FAR Frohn&Rojas, Berlin

Energy: New from Old Prof. Muck Petzet | Muck Petzet Architekten, Munich Panel discussion

The Urbanisation of Everything Prof. Hubert Klumpner | ETH Zurich, Department Architektur, Zurich

Wednesday, January 18, 2017, 2:30 pm

Saturday, January 21, 2017, 2:30 pm

Chaired by Martin Prösler | Managing Director – Prösler Kommunikation, Stuttgart

Chaired by Dr. Thomas Welter | Secretary General – Association of German Architects (BDA), Berlin

To Plan Integrally: Free Geometries, Hybrid Structures Dr.-Ing. Lutz Schöne | LEICHT S.e.a.s.c. GmbH, Rosenheim

Big Data & Design Tobias Nolte | Certain Measures, Berlin/Cambridge/USA

Extending Underground: Düsseldorf Public Transport Prof. Heike Klussmann | Uni Kassel FB 06 – Architektur, Stadt- und Landschaftsplanung, Kassel

Paradoxes in BIM: Theory vs. Practice Hanns-Jochen Weyland | Störmer Murphy & Partners, Hamburg

Existing Structures as a Resource

Facade System

Panel discussion

Building for All

Panel discussion

Digital Buildings?

Facing the City: Between Context and Functionality Werner Frosch | Henning Larsen Architects Munich

Designing Processes Prof. Dr.-Ing. Oliver Tessmann | TU Darmstadt, Digital Design Unit, Darmstadt

Panel discussion

Panel discussion with the speakers and Guido Hagel | BBSR, Bonn All Talks in German and English.

Venue: Messe München, Hall A4 / 338. The event is free of charge. For more information visit www.detail-online.com

Strategic Partners:

Research Partners:


∂   2016 ¥ 6

Sustainable Remodelling

627

The sun shines again on revitalised swimming pool‘s space-age design The Tournesol (or Sunflower) swimming pool opens its ‘petals’ when the sun comes out, and was designed by Bernard Schoeller for a French government programme entitled ‘1,000 Pools’ carried out in the 1970s and 1980s. The pool in Lingolsheim, Strasbourg has been restored and extended without altering the futuristic, space-age design. The dome has been renovated, energy-saving improvements put in place and the mecha-

nism allowing the structure to slide open 120 � was retained. To give space for three separate pools the changing rooms are now housed in a separate extension, along with the offices and technical facilities.

with the existing structure and clad the arched form, whose surface is punctuated with portholes. The hard-wearing material was also used for washbasins and in the reception area as a counter and seating.

Architects Urbane Kultur used Hi-Macs acrylic stone by LG Hausys in Alpine White for the interior of the domed ceiling, thermoformed into a double curvature to merge

¥ LG Hausys United Kingdom � +44 (0)1892 704074 www.himacs.eu

WEST ENTRANCE STAND 06

VISIT US AT BAU 2017 JANUARY 16 – 21 · MUNICH

detail-online.com


∂   2016 ¥ 6

Product Information Index

637

Product Information Index Roofs and Drainage Putting the heat on (Icopal)  Restoration, but without the drama (Welsh Slate) Refurbishment project looks to the long term (Marley Alutec) Board certification (Building Innovation Ltd)  Raising the standard (Sahtas) The height of luxury (VMZinc) A flexible solution (Firestone Building Product) A greener future (GrufeKit) Character building with old and new styles (Monier Redland Ltd) Lightweight modular system, and a bespoke arrangement for market renovation (Eurocell plc)

DETAIL at BAU 2017 BAU, the leading trade fair for architecture, materials and systems, is a meeting place and information platform for everyone involved in construction and will be held in Munich from 16 to 21 January 2017. At the exhibition DETAIL research will strengthen the dialogue between architects, planners and representatives from industry on a variety of topics and formats. This includes the DETAIL research event series in the ‘Building the Future’ forum (Hall A4/338), which is taken place on all six trade-fair days. Here a total of 18 internationally renowned speakers will offer differentiated perspectives on practical technologies and insights into national and international projects, as well as scenarios for present and future construction. Besides BAU 2017, the forum’s strategic partners are the companies Alho, Cosentino and Vaillant, whilst the research partners are Germany’s Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) and the Zukunft Bau research initiative. During guided tours in the foyer of the International Congress Centre, the DETAIL research lab will, show registered visitors what applied innovation looks like using developments from the research departments of companies and universities. Prize-winning projects from the DETAIL Prize 2016 will be presented in the gallery at the east entrance. This competition is organised by DETAIL every two years in conjunction with BAU, and is sponsored by BMUB. At DETAIL’s stand (Stand 6) at the west entrance, visitors can familiarise themselves with DETAIL’s wide-ranging publications, including textbooks for architects and DETAIL journal volumes, as well as finding out about the DETAIL inspiration online database. For more information, visit: www.detail-online.com

Sustainable Remodelling Quietly comfortable (Black Millwork) Nightclub aims to match original design ethos (TheSize) High-performance insulation for floor, walls and roof (Kingspan Insulation)  M&E transformation (Greenways Building Services) Windows and doors conserve the period styling (Mumford & Wood) Get the low-down (Discrete Heat)  Victorian building begins its latest chapter (Lomax + Wood)  Curtain up on new look (Prater)  The sun shines again on revitalised swimming pool‘s space-age design (LG Hausys) Health and Leisure Luxurious bathing (Antolini Luigi & C. SpA)  A different angle on attracting visitors to the pier (Technal))  Child-friendly design (Prater) Practical choices (Gerflor) Entertaining ideas (Alma Design srl) Work, rest and play for la dolce vita in London (Technogym) The perfect plan (Waterworks) Steel frame for the seaside (voestalpine Metsec plc) New collection echoes architect’s signature style (Porcelanosa) Solar PV and Solar Thermal Smart glass is the choice for research institute (Okalux GmbH) Patterned sunscreens (GKD) Innovative fin design (Levolux) Bespoke shutter solution with motorised control (Hunter Douglas) Slide, fold and stack (P C Henderson Ltd) Adaptable solar slates offer a choice of fixings (Cupa Pizarras) On the Spot Detail at BAU 2017

612 612 614 614 616 616 616 618 618 619 620 620 622 622 624 624 626 626 627 628 628 630 630 630 632 632 633 633

634 634 635 635 636 636 637


646

Cover 6_2016: Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport Terminal 2 SOM Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, IND – Mumbai Black-and-white photos introducing main sections: page 545: Biesbosch Museum Isle in Werkendam Architect: Studio Marco Vermeulen, NL – Rotterdam page 553: Research Building in Dübendorf Architects: Gramazio Kohler Architects, CH – Zurich page 559: Summit Station in the Toggenburg ­Region Architekten: Herzog & de Meuron, CH – Basle page 599: Vaulted Structure at the Architecture ­Biennale, Venice, 2016 Venedig 2016 Architects: Block Research Group, ETH Zurich CH – Zurich page 611: Theatre in Gdańsk Architects: Renato Rizzi, I – Venice Photo credits: Photos for which no credit is given were either provided by the respective architects or they are product photos from the DETAIL archives. p. 544: drawings: Toyo Ito, J – Tokyo pp. 545, 546, 547 top left: Ronald Tillemann, NL – Rotterdam pp. 547 bottom, 548 top: Ossip van Duivenbode, NL – Rotterdam p. 547 top right, 548 bottom: Bas Princen, NL – Rotterdam pp. 549, 550: Su Shengliang/Vector Architects p. 551: Ketsiree Wongwan p. 552 top: Wojciech Radwański p. 552 bottom: Juliusz Sokolowski pp. 559, 588 – 592: Katalin Deér, chaeserrugg.ch pp. 560 – 564: Eiichi Kano, CHN – Shanghai p. 565 top, 569 bottom: ©A.Zahner Co. pp. 565 bottom, 568, 578 bottom, 579, 580, 582, 583, 600, 602 top: Iwan Baan, NL – Amsterdam pp. 566, 567, 569 top: Dean Kaufman, USA – New York p. 570: Bjarni Kristinsson, IS – Reykjavík pp. 571 – 573: Rafael Pinho, BR – São Paulo pp. 574 – 577: Löser Lott Architekten

2016 ¥ 6   ∂

p. 578 top: Kai Nakamura p. 581: Daici Ano pp. 584 – 587: Thomas Jantscher, CH – Colombier pp. 593 – 596, 611: Matteo Piazza, I – Mailand p. 598: photo: ©Architektura-murator/Marcin Czechowicz p. 599: Frank Kaltenbach, D – Munich pp. 601 – 603 top: Anna Maragkoudaki p. 602 middle: Aman Johnson, USA – Austin, TX p. 602 bottom: David Escobedo p. 603 bottom: Nick Krouwel pp. 604, 606, 607 top right, 608, 609, 610 top left: ©SOM pp. 605, 607 top left, 610 bottom: Image courtesy SOM, ©Robert Polidori, Mumbai International Airport Pvt. Ltd p. 612 top: The Landmark Trust p. 627: Jean-Baptiste Dorner p. 632 top left and centre, bottom left and centre: Will Pryce p. 632 top right, bottom right: The Perfect Bath by Barbara Sallick, ­Rizzoli New York, 2016 p. 633 top left, bottom left: Nick Railer p.634 top centre, bottom left: Yohan Zerdoun /Okalux GmbH p. 634 top right, bottom right: Nancy Blum p. 637: Messe München International

CAD drawings All CAD drawings contained in the “Documentation” section of the journal were ­produced with VectorWorks®.

∂ Review of Architecture + Construction Detail

DETAIL English appears in 2016 on 16 January, 1 March, 2 May, 1 July, 1 September, 2 November.

Published by: Institut für internationale ArchitekturDokumentation GmbH & Co. KG, Hackerbrücke 6, 80335 Munich, Germany Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-0 www.detail.de

Prices for DETAIL English (incl. 7 % VAT (EU)):

PO Box: Postfach 20 10 54, 80010 Munich, Germany Limited partner: ATEC Business Information GmbH General partner: Institut für interna­tionale ArchitekturDokumentation Verwaltungs-GmbH, a 100 per cent subsidiary of ATEC ­Business Information GmbH. Managing director: Karin Lang Publishing director: Claudia Langert Editorial team: (address as above) Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-57 E-mail: redaktion@detail.de Dr. Sandra Hofmeister (editor-in-chief, (V. i. S. d. P.)), Sabine Drey, Andreas Gabriel, Frank Kaltenbach, Julia Liese, Thomas ­Madlener, Emilia Margaretha, Peter Popp, Maria Remter, Jakob Schoof, Edith Walter, Heide Wessely Dejanira Ornelas Bitterer, Marion ­Griese, ­Emese M. Köszegi, Simon Kramer ­(drawings) Editorial team DETAIL product ­information: Thomas Jakob, Jenny Clay Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-0 English translations: Peter Green (pp. 543–556, 560 – 610) Giovanna Dunmall (p. 558) Marc Selway (pp. 612– 637) Production /DTP: Peter Gensmantel (manager), Michael Georgi, Cornelia Kohn, Andrea Linke, Roswitha Siegler, Simone Soesters Distribution & Marketing: Kristina Weiss (manager). Irene Schweiger (sales) Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-25 Advertising: Annett Köberlein (manager), Claudia Wach (sales administrator) Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-24 Advertisement Sales Representative Cézanne Sales Services Denise Cézanne-Güttich Rotdornstr. 2 D–41352 Korschenbroich T: +49 (0)2182 578 39 73 F: +49 (0)2182 578 39 75 M: +49 (0)172 821 0095 E: dcg_detail@cezannesales.com

Subscription: 8 issues per year (incl. 2 DETAIL green issues in April and November) € 131.– for students € 82,– £ 92.–, for students £ 58.50 US$ 179.–, for students US$ 109.50 (Proof of student status must be ­provided to obtain student rates.) All prices include postage/packing ­(surface mail). Single issues: DETAIL English: € 18.90, £ 13.–, US$ 24.50 DETAIL green: € 18.90, £ 113.60, US$ 24.50 plus postage /packing All rights reserved. Distributed by IMX. Subscription contact: mail@detail.de Subscription service (subscriptions and changes of address): Vertriebsunion Meynen, Grosse Hub 10, 65344 Eltville, Germany Tel.: +49 (0)61 23-92 38-211, Fax: -212 E-mail: mail@detail.de The publishers bear no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts and ­photos. No part of DETAIL may be reprinted with­out permission from the publishers. No guarantee can be given for the ­completeness or correctness of the ­published contributions. Reprographics: Martin Härtl OHG Kistlerhofstrasse 70 81379 Munich, Germany Printers: W. Kohlhammer Druckerei GmbH + Co.KG Augsburger Straße 722, 70329 Stuttgart, Germany No claims can be accepted for non-­delivery resulting from industrial disputes or where not caused by an omission on the part of the publishers. This journal is printed on chlorine-free bleached paper. The entire contents of DETAIL are ­protected by copyright. Any use of contributions in whole or in part (including drawings) is per­mitted solely within the terms of relevant copyright law and is subject to fee payment. Any contravention of these conditions will be subject to penalty as defined by copyright law.

DETAIL English 6/2016 - Roofs  
DETAIL English 6/2016 - Roofs