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ISSN 1614-4600 · MAY · JUNE £13 · US$  24.50 · €18.90

English Edition

Visitor Centres · Review of Architecture and Construction Details · Vol. 2016 · 3

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∂ Review of Architecture Vol. 3, 2016 • Visitor and Cultural Centres Editorial office: E-mail: redaktion@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89 38 16 20-57 Christian Schittich (editor-in-chief) Sabine Drey, Andreas Gabriel, Frank Kaltenbach, Julia Liese, Thomas Madlener, Emilia Margaretha, Peter Popp, Maria Remter, Edith Walter; Sophie Karst, Christa Schicker (freelance assistants) Dejanira Ornelas Bitterer, Marion Griese, Emese M. Köszegi, Simon Kramer (drawings) Product editors: Meike Regina Weber (editor-in-chief) Katja Reich, Hildegard Wänger, Tim Westphal, Jenny Clay Elise Feiersinger (pp. 220 –234, 250 –284); Peter Green (pp. 236 –249); Marc Selway (pp. 286 – 313) (English translations) Advertising: E-mail: anzeigen@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-48 Advertisement Sales Representative Cézanne Sales Services Denise Cézanne-Güttich Rotdornstr. 2 D–41352 Korschenbroich T: +49 (0)2182 578 39 73 F: +49 (0)2182 578 39 75 M: +49 (0)172 821 0095 E: dcg_detail@cezannesales.com Distribution and marketing: E-mail: mail@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-0 Subscription contact and customer service: Vertriebsunion Meynen Grosse Hub 10 65344 Eltville, Germany E-mail: detailabo@vertriebsunion.de Tel.: +49 (0) 61-23 92 38-211 Fax: +49 (0) 61-23 92 38-212 Publisher and editorial office: Institut für internationale ArchitekturDokumentation GmbH & Co. KG Hackerbrücke 6 80335 Munich Germany Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-0 Fax: +49 (0) 89-39 86 70 www.detail.de/english


Discussion 220 Editorial 222 Instrumentalised Otherness – On the Origins of the Visitor Centre Hans Wolfgang Hoffmann

Reports 230 Refurbishment of and Addition to the Unterlinden Museum in Colmar Architects: Herzog & de Meuron, Basel; DeA Architectes, Mulhouse 234 Books, Exhibitions

Typology 236 Community Centre in London LYN Atelier, London 239 Community Centre in Aalst De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten, Rotterdam/Antwerpen 242 Visitor Centre in Yushu Team Minus, Beijing 244 Visitor Centre in Pombal Comoco Arquitectos, Coimbra 246 Civic Centre in Visegrád aplusarchitects, Pécs 249 Cultural Centre on the Azores Menos é Mais Arquitectos, Porto 253 Visitor Centre in Middelfart AART architects, Aarhus 256 Visitor Centre in Cuxhaven Holzer Kobler Architekturen, Zurich/Berlin

Process 260 Giant’s Causeway Visitor Centre Heneghan Peng Architects, Dublin 274 Visitor Centre in Niederstotzingen Ritter Jockisch, Munich

Products 286 Building for the Community 294 Facades 300 Bathrooms and Sanitary Ware 306 Landscaping and Outdoor Living 310 On the Spot 314 Service 319 Persons and organizations involved in the planning • Contractors and suppliers 322 Programme • Photo credits • Editorial and publishing data


Editorial

Visitor Centres As a classical multi-purpose building, the typical visitor centre must fulfil a variety of functions. It receives visitors, provides information about the specific place, serves as point of departure for guided tours and ­individual sightseeing, and contains both culinary ­offerings and the obligatory souvenir shop. The form it takes varies as markedly as the accompanying attraction. The gateway to Giant’s Causeway – a spectacular cliff on the coast of Northern Ireland – is sensitively inserted in the landscape, while the centre at Sahlenberg National Park stands out against the backdrop of a sublime landscape. Further facilities in this issue welcome visitors to a medieval castle in Portugal and a Buddhist site in China’s Qinghai province. As a contemporary reinterpretation of vernacular construction methods, the latter helps reinstill a sense of local identity following a recent major earthquake.


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Refurbishment of and Addition to the Unterlinden Museum in Colmar

Architects: Herzog & de Meuron, Basle DeA Architectes, Mulhouse Richard Duplat, Fontenay-le-Fleury

With a population of nearly 70,000, Colmar is the third largest city in Alsace. It is home not only to picturesque taverns and timberframed structures, but also to one of the greatest treasures of the late middle ages. The Isenheim Altarpiece, which Matthias Grünewald painted exactly five hundred years ago for a monastery of the Order of St. Anthony just south of Colmar, has been on view since 1853 at the Unterlinden ­Museum. The three-year-long refurbishment of and addition to the museum – which is ­situated on the edge of the historic centre – was completed in time for the jubilee. Herzog & de Meuron and their French partner architects DeA and Richard Duplat have

www.detail.de carefully brought the former Dominican ­ onvent up to contemporary standards – c part of their approach was to reveal layers of earlier periods wherever possible. The plasterboard covering the dark beams has been removed; the church windows were refurbished; and a new wood floor was laid in the former convent church. The latter ­contains the Isenheim Altarpiece. New wood doors with a restrained design grace the ­entrances, and there is new beaver-tail tiling on the roof. In addition to the refurbishment of the convent, the scope of the 44 million euro project (net costs) included the construction of two new buildings and the refurbishment of a

former art nouveau municipal bath house with swimming indoor pool. These measures have nearly doubled the floor area ­accessible to the public: it is now 8000 m2. Above all, the museum’s collection of paintings – which includes works by Schongauer, ­Monet, Dubuffet and Picasso – now has ­significantly more space. And two new halls were erected for temporary exhibitions and events. Moreover, the citizens of Colmar have had a public space returned to them that had served as bus stop and parking lot. The ­Canal de la Sinn once again flows in an open channel, flanked by broad seating steps of variegated sandstone. The Place d’Unterlinden is now the heart of the museum complex; from here one also has access to the adjacent convent and the museum addition to the north. The architects’ concept reinterprets the convent complex, reawakening it for a new use; this is in keeping with their overarching goal to instil a sense of tranquillity. The idiosyncratic brick pavilion with sweeping hip roof situated on the channel’s northern edge symbolises this quest. Its form and volume make reference to a mill that stood here centuries ago. Like a lantern hung from the eaves – but, in this case, positioned on the ground – it supplies daylight to the underground passage connecting the museum and one of the additions. It has two windows, which are set back deep in the wall, but no door. The pavilion’s role is primarily to act as a placeholder: the otherwise mostly hidden museum makes its presence known in the public realm. Herzog & de Meuron used a similar symbol in 2003 at the entrance of another museum: the “Schaulager” in Basel. In both cases, a small structure draws attention to larger halls nearby that sport the same palette of materials. In Colmar the so-called “Ackerhof”, a three-storey structure, makes up the larger part of the newly built massing. The lower two levels accommodate the museum’s department of modern art. The top floor, situated in a space with a height of 11.5 metres below the gable roof, hosts


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Former convent Place d’Unterlinden “Ackerhof” Former art nouveau swimming pool Administration wing “Pomarium”

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Visitor Centre in Yushu Architects: Team Minus, Peking Brian Zhang Li Team: Rui Pan, Guanglu Dou, Naizhen Li, Rongqin Chen, Yunan Duan, Zihan Yan, Hao Wang Structural engineers: Mingqi Zhang, Peking Others involved in the project: see page 320

The city of Yushu, in the southwest of China’s Qinghai province, is an important centre of Tibetan Buddhism, renowned in part for the Jianamani Memorial. Stones bearing prayer mantras have accrued here for some 300 years, and it is estimated that there are in the meantime some 250 million of them. Because an ever greater number of pilgrims visit this site, nearly half the population now earns its living by processing and engraving the Mani stones. The new visitor centre was created to serve two separate groups of people. First, tourists and pilgrims can meet and gather information about Jianamani and its history here. And second, the members of the local com-

munity will frequent the building’s everyday amenities. These include a post office, clinic, and public restrooms. The building’s square floor plan and accompanying central courtyard correspond formally to the region’s vernacular construction methods. Thanks to the eleven linked viewing platforms crowning the visitor centre, everyone who comes here may enjoy the views of the surrounding holy sites. The wood used was reclaimed from buildings that were almost completely destroyed by the earthquake that struck the region in 2010. The rubble masonry, laid by local craftsmen, is from a quarry in the vicinity; the Mani stones also originate in this quarry.

Site area: 3,510 m2 Gross floor area: 1,100 m2 Building area: 1,478 m2 No. of workplaces: 15 Construction costs: 60,000 US$

Site plan scale 1:1500 Section • Layout plans scale 1:750 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Main entrance Security Corridor Post office Public WC Interior courtyard Souvenir shop

  8 Clinic   9 Stairs up to viewing platform 10 Workshop 11 Exhibition space 12 Office 13 Police


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Cultural Centre on the Azores Architects: Menos é Mais Arquitectos, Porto João Mendes Ribeiro Arquitecto, Coimbra Structural engineers: Sopsec, Porto Others involved in the project: see page 320

The exteriors of the new cultural centre in Ribeira Grande – on São Miguel, one of the Azorean islands – are characterised by ­solid-masonry gable walls of volcanic rock and coarse concrete surfaces. On the grounds of a former tobacco and alcohol factory, a new campus has been created that interweaves the new structures with the existing buildings dating to the late nineteenth century. The project was initiated by the minister of culture, whose goal is to foster contemporary art and architecture and furnish a new space for it on an island with an area of only 700 km2. In addition to exhibitions of, among other things, its own col­ lection of modern art, there are now spaces

for workshops, conferences, concerts and special events. The new Arquipélago Contemporary Arts Centre is a city within the city: it has its own network of paths, including squares and points of access, and also uses the 3000 m2 outdoor space to present art. The former manufacturing facilities were ­gutted; then the buildings were comprehensively refurbished. They now provide the generously scaled framework for exhibitions. The rooms requiring a higher technical standard – e.g. event spaces, workshops and ateliers – are situated in the new buildings. The desire to keep the wall surfaces free of technical installations led to the decision to employ double walls, which necessi-

tated high-precision planning of all components and built-in units. The solid concrete walls are part of the passive energy concept: the considerable thermal mass, combined with the thermal inertia of the material, ensures that the temperatures inside is comfortable. In order to bring together old and new, the architects took cues from the existing structures and carefully fine-tuned size, form and materiality. The two monolithicseeming buildings of dark exposed concrete – the dark tone was obtained by mixing local basalt in the concrete – now stand across from the existing solid-masonry buildings. This produces a forceful dialogue and preserves the compound’s industrial flair.


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Entrance Foyer and reception Exhibition space Assembly /Disassembly of exhibitions Workshop/Carpentry Storage Auditorium/Multipurpose space Museum shop/Bookstore Void Library Lecture space


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Diagrams of functions

Publicly accessible areas Ateliers Building services and administration

Site plan scale 1:2000 Gross floor area: 12,914 m2 Effective floor area: 9,736 m2 External area: 3,178 m2 Multipurpose space: 263 m², for about 260 persons No. of workplaces: 20

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Process


Giant’s Causeway Visitor Centre Heneghan Peng Architects, Dublin

The giant Finn MacCool, a hunter and warrior, wanted to walk from Northern Ireland to Scotland without getting his feet wet to battle his enemy Benandonner. And so he threw gigantic boulders from the cliffs into the sea and created a paved path – Giant’s Causeway. The Irish love legends, so it comes as no surprise that they came up with a myth to explain the astounding geometrical rock formations of mostly hexagonal basalt stones arranged nearly without seams on Northern Ireland’s Antrim Coast. For many years scientists sought an explanation and eventually came to the conclusion that there had been involvement neither from humans, nor from giants. ­Instead, temperature shifts some 60 million years ago caused the ­lava flow to solidify in this eccentric form. In keeping with the giant’s valiant gesture the architects Róisín Heneghan and Shih-Fu Peng made an intervention in the UNESCO World Heritage site and cut two folds into the ground nearby; they lifted one corner and inserted the visitor centre underneath it, and lowered the other one to make room for cars to park. Between them a grass ramp leads straight to the ridgeline. The structure is carefully nestled in the landscape, leaves the view to the coast – a certified Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) – intact and, with the help of the grass roof and basalt stone facade, becomes an integral yet barely visible part of the site. In cooperation with the client (the National Trust) and the specialists of the different firms, they developed the architectural entrée to World Heritage, in the literal sense, “stone by stone”.

Others involved in the project: see page 321


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On Politics and Lava Stone – In Conversation with Heneghan Peng

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DETAIL: Giant’s Causeway is a United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage site. How did you approach the design of a site of such significance? Heneghan Peng: The point of departure was the idea that the visitor centre would not only mark the gateway to Giant’s Causeway, but also to the entire coast. We wanted an open transition and didn’t want a building that would block the view of the silhouette of the cliff. In summer a large number of visitors come to Giant’s Causeway by car, so it was essential that not just the building, but also the parking be integrated in the design. We used the ten metre difference in level between the edge of the cliff and the site to unobtrusively insert the parking lot in the landscape. Two right angles are inscribed in the landscape. One of them is the edge of the square. The other, offset from the first, is lifted at the corner, allowing the building massing to be situated below it. Between them a grass ramp leads directly to the coast. The two linear folds in the ground are the essence of the concept, and there are several other subordinate ideas.

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DETAIL: What is the origin of the building’s layout and functionality? Heneghan Peng: First we had to think about how to handle the great fluctuation, depending on the season, in the number of visitors to the centre. In August they come in droves, while in winter very few visitors come. On the one hand, it was a matter of guiding and distributing the masses. On the other hand, it was important that the building not appear empty in winter. That’s why we designed the interior as a very generously scaled, flexible space that we zoned in a way that makes it possible to freely arrange the items on display. The visitors arrive at the parking lot and enter the rampshaped building where the fold reaches its highest point. From there they may take the shortest path to the stones, passing by the ticket counters and toilets. If they have time when they return, they might take a look at the exhibition, browse in the shop, or have a coffee. The functions can be changed any time if needed. The floor area for sales or for the exhibition can be enlarged, the entrance relocated. DETAIL: The flexible use, with multiple points of access, almost allows visitors to pass through the building without buying a ticket. Was that your intention? Heneghan Peng: We spent a lot of time discussing how to organise the access and the ticketing. Ultimately we tried to casually guide the visitors into the building without putting up fences. To us it seemed fair to charge for parking. In contrast, hikers coming from the other side via the grass ramp past the building can head directly to the Causeway. But it’s impossible to close off the entire coast anyway. Our client, the National Trust, must bring in money with the visitor centre. After all, the organisation manages the World Heritage site on a long stretch of coast, and, in addition to covering the construction costs, is also responsible for the maintenance of the paths and much more. Doing this requires having a considerable number of employees on location. To keep the costs down, the building is intend-

ed to “animate” visitors to come in and buy a ticket. The National Trust proceeded on the assumption that about 70 per cent of the visitors would buy a ticket, but it turns out that nearly everyone does. DETAIL: Was the ticketing already foreseen during the competition phase? Heneghan Peng: The competition brief foresaw free entrance. That’s why we situated the main entrance on the side, accessible directly from the parking area. The second entrance at the tip of the building was originally only intended for the café. But the parameters have changed since then. The adjacent land with the hotel and the stretch of the coast belongs to the National Trust, which was not the original client. The government of Northern Ireland held the competition, so we had to stay within the site’s boundaries. When the National Trust took over the project, we could share some resources. For example, we relocated the delivery to the hotel and the extended the floor surface slightly towards the hotel. But the requirements changed and ticketing became a stipulation of the program. DETAIL: How did the change of clients come about? Heneghan Peng: That’s a complicated story that has to do with politics of Northern Ireland. At first the government of Northern Ireland was the client. But in order to avoid a conflict of interest between the public and private sectors, it put the project on hold, which, in turn, angered the citizens. Then the National Trust, an organisation that fosters nature conservation and historic preservation, took on responsibility for the project. The National Trust is very interested in a high-quality, sustainable implementation, and has local contacts, as well as employees on location and experience with UNESCO World Heritage sites in Great ­Britain. Consequently, they knew which problems might arise when a large number of visitors shows up at once. They were able to give us very practical tips regarding how to make it work.


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A Aerial photo B Site plan 1  Visitor centre 2  Parking area 3  Causeway Hotel 4  Giant’s Causeway 5  The Nook (pub) C Sketch of design principle D Giant’s Causeway, volcanic stone E Rendering of design

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DETAIL: The Trust supported the pared-down design. The facility manager praised the design, calling it “strikingly simple”. Heneghan Peng: Of course! The National Trust is involved, above all, in the preservation of historic buildings. The visitor centre is probably one of the first buildings that they have developed within a World Heritage site. Through the work with landmarks the employees have considerable knowledge, including of highly specific details. For example, they are very knowledgeable about green spaces. We had intended to implement a standard green roof, with sealing layer, substrate layer and the standard grass seed, and had discussed it with the subcontractor. But for ecological reasons we couldn’t execute it that way. For two years employees of the National Trust collected grass seed on site and tested how well the lawn would hold up to intense use. We never could have accomplished that without the National Trust employees on location. In addition to the extensive vegetation with local grasses, the Trust placed great value on the use of locally sourced lava stone for the facade.

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DETAIL: Wasn’t the basalt stone facade already part of your competition design? Heneghan Peng: Yes, we did choose basalt for the competition design, but did not go into detail. The client was determined that locally sourced basalt from the same lava flow as the Giant’s Causeway should be used. Stone testing was carried out, and we were aware that the stone blocks had a lot of crack, which carried risks for the procurement of the stone. In addition, the stone was weak in tension and could not be cut thin enough to be used in a conventional cladding scenario. So we had to stack the stone to obtain supporting columns. We had no guarantee whatsoever that we would find enough material at the quarry in the quality and size we needed. And in the end it did turn out that we had to use smaller formats than planned. DETAIL: What kind of support did you have in the development of the structural system? Heneghan Peng: We worked with, among others, an architect who advises the Trust, and he in turn, had a geologist as advisor. The geologist supervised the tests that de-

termined the dimensions of the modules. But the idea to stack the modules came from an engineer who was actually working on the glazing. He determined that the stone can withstand compression loads well. In combination with stainless-steel rods for the tension loads, the result was workable. The specialists spent months at the quarry choosing the stone piece by piece. Then they further processed the rough-hewn pieces in the workshop. In addition to the considerable effort required to process the material, there was a high percentage of stone waste: 60 per cent. At first we had our doubts about the sustainability of the local basalt as compared to a “low-maintenance” stone that has to be transported from a great distance. In the end, by using smaller pieces and using the “leftover” pieces for the floors, overall it is clearly a sustainable material. DETAIL: The link between the columns in the facades and the Causeway seems obvious to me. Why don’t you ever mention this reference? Heneghan Peng: Sometimes design pro-


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 1 coping: 200 mm basalt   2 lawn: domestic grass seed 250 mm substrate EPDM sealing layer 250 mm extruded polystyrene thermal ­insulation waterproofing 500 mm reinforced concrete with 70 % GGBS in cement   3 200 mm basalt column cladding   4 280/280 mm steel SHS column   5 stainless-steel tie plate   6 Ø 20 mm stainless-steel tension rod   7 coping: 3 mm stainless-steel sheet   8 100/12 mm duplex-steel railing   9 double glazing: 8 mm toughened glass + 16 mm cavity + 2≈ 4 mm laminated safety glass 10 solid column: 200 mm basalt sealing layer 60 mm insulation sealing layer 2≈ 225 mm basalt 11 stainless-steel dowel 12 200 mm basalt cladding 60 mm rigid foam insulation 500 mm reinforced concrete sealing layer 60 mm rigid foam insulation subsoil 13 50 mm screed with basalt chips, polished 14 frame welded of 6/115 mm steel flat 15 nylon isolator

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Products


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Building for the Community

The architectural realisation of the Paul & Henri Carnal Hall at the Institut Le Rosey in Rolle With its new Carnal Hall extension, Switzerland’s oldest private school, the Institut Le Rosey, is aiming to provide a new platform for artistic education. Besides an auditorium with 900 seats for concerts, theatre performances and conferences, the domed building has a diameter of 80 m and secondary rooms for music lessons and workshops. The unusual architecture of the building is impressive on account of its simplicity, modernity and beauty. The stainless-steel roof covers an area of 4900 m2 and spans a 570-tonne steel structure. The integrated skylights have a glass surface of 150 m2. French-Swiss architect Bernard Tschumi from Bernard Tschumi Architects, New York, has paid particular attention to the material aspects of the building. Inside, steel, glass and wood dominate, while externally a shimmering stainless steel shell covers the entire roof structure and cleverly stands out from the large glass fronts. Developed with the engineers of Arup in New York, the sophisticated geometry of the dome structure with its arches and axis system that runs from top to bottom not only complicated the structural analysis of the entire building by engineering firm Alberti Ingénieurs SA, Lausanne, it also required steel construction specialists Tuchschmid to provide detailed static calcula-

tions for every single joint. Even during the planning phase thought had to be given to the assembly concept and the material logistics. The planning work for the radial, arched and round intersections and joints was particularly challenging. The planning of the stainless steel cover, too, was very complex, as the joint lines run diagonally at regular parallel distances to each other across the roof structure, and with the exception of the edge sheets, all the stainless steel parts have the same dimensions. Using the geometric data provided by the architect, Tuchschmid’s planning department created a 3D model of the steel structure. The dome comprises a regularly arranged axis system with 24 main axes. The purlins are made up of welded 4-edged ­hollow profiles (700 ≈ 300 mm) and are ­supported by a total of 26 steel columns (Ø 300 mm) connected to each other on the concrete. Round steel pipes (Ø 406 mm) were used as steel rafters, which were inserted and screwed into the purlins. In the upper dome area, a steel structure made of massive H-beams was created, which is recessed with HEB girders. The encircling axis structure is interrupted by three skylight strips that follow the geometry in the upper part of the building.

One challenge was the incisions in the southern and northern areas of the building for the respective roof terraces and balcony rows that break through the set geometry and which had a major impact on the statics and arrangement of the steel structure. In the central, upper roof area, a special, curved steel structure made of welded Hplate girders and HEB beams was created. This steel structure was covered with 150-mm-thick corrugated sheets and thus forms the substructure for the concrete slab that lies on it, which serves as soundproofing for the concert hall. Another important element for the statics and planning was the encircling steel canopy construction, which connects to the main structure. Besides the steel substructure, Tuchschmid remit also encompassed the entire complex roof structure. The elements were manufactured according to the field size and precisely fitted onto the encircling field structure. The roof structure consists of a central wooden sandwich panel with integrated insulation and a suspended, perforated acoustic sheet, and a structure comprising insulation, a membrane and a standingseam metal sheet. The knobs of the standing-seam metal sheet have special aluminium profiles for receiving the stainless-steel sheets. The rectangular, folded stainlesssteel roof panels were clamped at various points and screwed onto the profiles. They form the external edge of the roof. Stainlesssteel sheets were used for all roof and terrace soffits as well as for the balcony balustrades. Three skylights were installed in the roof structure that conform with the geometry of the roof. A steel frame forms the connection to the roof structure. The trapezoidal insulating glass with its sun-protection coating was installed later and has a pane size of up to 2 m. ¥ Tuchschmid AG, Swizerland � +41 52 728 81 11 www.tuchschmid.ch


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Light and shade

Improved performance follows theatre refurb

The £15 million extension to The Whitworth gallery in Manchester employs a solar shading solution coupled with an intelligent lighting control system provided by Levolux. Designed by London-based architecture studio MUMA, the extension comprises two new wings formed from brick and glass.

An extensive refurbishment programme for Liverpool’s Royal Court Theatre has seen Phase 2 reach its conclusion, resulting in a more energy-efficient, sustainable building. New box office and public areas were created by extending the ground floor to fill the space under the existing canopy. The aim was to enable the theatre to stay open as much as possible during the refurb; the building services design was carried out by Steven A Hunt & Associates, which worked closely with architects Allford Hall Monaghan Morris and the theatre’s team to build this requirement into the design.

The BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rated, two-storey extension doubles the size of the gallery, learning and storage zones, and benefits from large expanses of glazing to maximise natural daylight and allow good visibility across Whitworth Park to the south. To prevent excessive glare and unwanted solar heat gain, 48 roller blinds and 30 Skyvane systems are all motorised and linked to an intelligent control system. Unguided, guided and zipped roller blinds are fitted with a range of fabrics chosen for their particular light transmission or light exclusion properties. The Skyvane system, a form of non-retractable Venetian blind, has been applied internally against inclined glazed openings in three vaulted ceilings: the 85 mm wide extruded aluminium slats, with a pitch of 75 mm, have a natural anodised finish and can be rotated through approximately 100 � from fully open to fully closed. When closed they interlock for maximum light exclusion.

The power distribution was still operating from the original 1938 panel board � no longer fit for purpose, it was isolated and made safe but retained for historical interest. The new distribution system involves amalgamation of the two existing switch rooms into one, and work to move over to

the new supply had to be delivered out of hours to avoid any risk of power outages. Rewiring and lighting refurbishment of the auditorium had already been completed in the first phase of works but, as the whole building is on the same network, upgrades to the electrical distribution in Phase 2 had to be designed to ensure that any isolations did not affect performances. The lighting theme is black and gold and there are twin recessed downlights throughout the foyer with black and gold wall lights in the stairways and break-out spaces. Hidden lighting in the lobby pelmets provides a soft ambient light, and glass pendants over the lobby were included to add drama. The lighting is linked to scene-setting controls to enable adjustments depending on the time of day and the type of event being held. All fittings are LED, including the rewired and re-lamped existing fittings in the basement. PIR presence and absence detection has been included for the toilets. Externally, recessed striplights in the terrace floor light the facade, with further striplighting under handrails and recessed downlights lighting the entrance to the foyer, all controlled by timers and photocell daylight sensors.

The solar shading is linked to a lighting control system monitoring multiple internal and external light sensors and presence detectors that can be individually configured. The control system automatically adjusts the lighting and blinds, taking into account the position of the sun, the changing seasons and the museum’s opening and closing times, thereby generating significant reductions in energy consumption.

The heating system utilises the existing gasfired boiler, now enhanced with a weathercompensated, variable temperature radiator circuit with intelligent controls to maintain a constant optimum temperature and ensure energy is not wasted. Flat panel radiators around the building optimise heat circulation and are designed into furniture where possible to blend unobtrusively into the interior design. A mechanical ventilation system with high-efficiency heat recovery units further limits demand on the heating system.

¥ Levolux United Kingdom � +44 (0)20 8863 9111 www.levolux.com

¥ Steven A Hunt & Associates United Kingdom � +44 (0)151 427 8009 www.stevenhunt.com


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Resilient flooring

Flexible design

Handrail options

Offering a variety of community-based services, Old Trafford Youth Centre in Manchester needed a warm, easy-to-maintain floor for a multi-use area that could be used as a nursery during the day as well as hosting a number of activities, such as sports, at other times. The centre’s Jill Carding commented, “We have 16 members of staff in every day, with 40 to 50 families using our facilities every week, and having suitable flooring is a must for us.”

Walsall Arboretum in the West Midlands is benefiting from a new visitor centre, with its internal space maximised by the use of moveable partitioning walls. The Victorian public park is set in 73.5 hectares of land, with iconic buildings and structures such as a clock tower, boathouse and bandstand, and has undergone significant redevelopment, with the new visitor centre located at the heart of the park.

SG System Products designs, manufactures and installs handrails and balustrades for public and other sectors. Stargard, a Disability Discrimination Act (DDA)-compliant, warm-to-the-touch handrail suited to the education sector, comprises a tubular system of galvanised steel sleeved with 4 mm-thick PVC. It can be teamed with either Stargard or Sentinel (stainless steel) balusters for a robust and minimal maintenance solution. Single and double handrails and infill panel options add to the design possibilities.

Trafford Borough Council is already using Gerflor products in some of its schools and community centres, and Taraflex™ MultiUse 6.2 was chosen for this project. In a wood-effect design in five colourways, benefits include a P1 category shock absorption with indentation resistance said to be twice that required by EN Standard 14904, an abrasion resistance three times the standard’s requirement and high resistance to static and rolling heavy loads providing 25 to 35 % of shock absorption. Environmentally friendly, it has anti-bacterial properties and doesn’t need polishing. ¥ Gerflor United Kingdom � +44 (0)1926 622600 www.gerflor.co.uk

The building provides educational areas for schools, as well as recreational spaces, a spacious café and offices. Moveable walls were specified so that the café can be divided to accommodate the needs of the local community. Two continuously hinged sliding/folding walls allow smaller rooms to be quickly created and opened out for larger gatherings. In light grey laminate to complement the decor, the SWG folding walls, for which Style is sole UK supplier, are fitted with double PVC seals for high acoustic integrity between adjacent spaces. They slide into place along a ceiling track, creating a firm wall with pass door within minutes. ¥ Style, United Kingdom � +44 (0)1202 874044 www.style-partitions.co.uk

A recent addition to the company’s portfolio is the Illumine handrail with discreet LED inserts, which provides direct lighting to stairs and can be specified on Stargard, Sentinel and Citadel handrails and all balustrade products. Sentinel offers a range of infills including glass and perforated metal sheet, whilst Citadel is a brass handrail and balustrade system for a rich, traditional appearance in buildings of all types. In bright or satin polish finish or with a clear lacquer applied after polishing, it is complemented by a range of infill panel options. ¥ SG System Products United Kingdom � +44 (0)1473 240055 www.handrailsuk.co.uk


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Building for the Community

2016 ¥ 3   ∂

Art of waterproofing

Acrylic stone helps blend the old with the new

Kemper System Kemperol 2K-PUR has replaced the failing waterproofing membrane at a National Historic Landmark housing an important art collection in New Canaan, Connecticut in the USA. This was under threat from an inherent problem of the basement structure: moisture infiltration and inconsistent temperature and humidity levels had resulted in mould growth. Dating back to 1965, the earth-berm structure, designed as a modern interpretation of the Treasury of Atreus in Mycenae, was built to house Philip Johnson’s private art collection and was later donated to the US National Trust.

The public services areas of Almere Town Hall in the Netherlands, above, have been completely refurbished and include extensive use of Hi-Macs® acrylic stone from LG Hausys. The brief for architects Fokkema & Partners was to emphasise the original characteristics, and at the same time create an interior with unique touches. Previously it was a dark building, and its concrete structure and height and the gold slabs embedded in the columns were not very visible, but the remodelling has highlighted and enhanced the main features.

Test pits were dug to determine the condition of the waterproofing beneath the earthberm roof; the existing membrane had undergone piecemeal repairs over the years, and sections that were intact were assessed as at the end of their useful life. It was held in place by 50 red coping stones, each weighing up to 650 kg, and these had to be removed by crane and returned to their exact location on site following installation of the new Kemperol membrane. ¥ Kemper System United Kingdom � +44 (0)1925 445532 www.kempersystem.co.uk

A new layout for the ground floor means the public services are accessed straight from the main entrance, creating a more dynamic space along its length. The public counters and consultation and waiting rooms are located in an open environment, whilst the vast proportions of the reception area stand out due to the light diffused with the use of Arctic White acrylic stone, which combines well with the original structure. As well as the counters, the touch screens for public use are in the same material, creating a visual consistency across the whole area. Hi-Macs has also been employed in the transformation of the Tourism Office seen below, located in the Casa de la Panadería

in Madrid, Spain. There are two areas � the vaulted space where the old bakery stood and the area that was the courtyard of the house. Although viewed as a whole, it has a number of separate sections including a general information area, a shop selling souvenirs, bus and theatre tickets etc. and an audiovisual set-up for use by visitors. Underfloor heating and LED lighting have been installed, but the brick archways and plastered walls have been retained. Alpine White and Opal acrylic stone were used to create an innovative design that blends seamlessly with the historical characteristics. The counter winds around the columns in both directions to create areas to serve the public; in this way, visitors can go to any point easily and, in addition, the continuous surface presents different heights to accommodate people standing, seated or in a wheelchair. The material properties mean joints are invisible, and its durability and strength were also major factors for both projects, as well as the non-porous surfaces being hygienic and easy to clean. ¥ LG Hausys United Kingdom � +44 (0)1892 704074 www.himacs.eu


302

Bathrooms and Sanitaryware

2016 ¥ 3   ∂

Comprehensive wall panel and tap ranges

Treading safely

For shower, bath and basin areas, Flight Modular Wall by Mira Showers is a range of waterproof panels designed to achieve a high-quality professional installation that saves time over traditional tiling. Once in place, the wall panels are a realistic alternative to tiles and remove the need for grouting and /or any visible silicone sealant when used with upstand shower trays or baths. A leak-proof corner profile offers complete integrity where panels butt together.

Aiming to support multi-generational living and aid with accessibility, Twyford has extended its Opal bath range to include a tread pattern, adding seven new variations to this range. The tread covers the full length of the base, and the bath comes in the standard 1,700 ≈ 700 mm size shown here and a more compact, space-saving 1,500 ≈ 700 mm model.

Manufactured from acrylic-capped ABS for high impact resistance, the panels incorporate Biocote antimicrobial technology to help keep mould at bay and eliminate the risk of grout discoloration or porosity. The company describes this as a ‘fit and forget’ product, combining low maintenance with a stylish appearance, and making it suitable for applications from social housing to hotels and student accommodation. The 2.01 m high shower panels come in a choice of three notional widths: 760, 800 and 1,200 mm. Actual dimensions are 735, 775 and 1,175 mm – tolerances being provided for by the complementary 25 mm corner profile, inclusive to the panel’s package. The bath splashback is 500 mm high, whilst that for basins is 250 ≈ 600 mm. Also new

from Mira is the Aspects collection of taps comprising seven designs, from the chunky, square-edged Honesty range to the authentic Victorian appearance of the Virtue, to cover every style of bathroom. Three examples are shown here. Fluency, top, offers ease of use with its ‘raceway’ shaped control lever that can be operated with just a finger or the side of the hand. Evolve (bottom, left) is geometrically styled and designed to remove the usual wedge cut-out from the back of the lever and also the bite-out from the spout for the aerator. Below is Revive, offering a contemporary pastiche of Victorian styling with features such as the capstan taps, but designed to complement both period and modern newbuild homes. The handle design has touch points that feel generous between the fingers. Each of the seven designs covers the full range of product types: monobloc, basin and bath pillars, bath filler, and bath/shower mixer. They work on all pressures, have integrated push-button diverters, and flush-fitting aerators for ease of cleaning. ¥ Mira Showers United Kingdom � +44 (0)1242 221221 www.mirashowers.co.uk

The company says the extra choice will provide greater design flexibility for developers and social housing contracts. The tread pattern is also available with the low-volume model, which saves up to 90 litres of water each time, and there is additionally the option of chrome handgrips. The range carries a 25-year guarantee. Made of acrylic, to be warm to the touch and offer good heat-retention properties, the baths can be fitted with the new twinskinned Endurance front and end panels for added robustness. The front panel fits any 1,700 mm bath and the end panel is available in 700 and 750 mm widths. ¥ Twyford Bathrooms United Kingdom � +44 (0)1270 879777 www.twyfordbathrooms.com


∂   2016 ¥ 3

313

Product Information Index Building for the Community The architectural realisation of the Paul & Henri Carnal Hall at the Institut Le Rosey in Rolle (Tuchschmid) Light and shade (Levolux)  Improved performance follows theatre refurb (Steven A Hunt)  Resilient flooring (Gerflor)  Flexible design (Style)  Handrail options (SG System)  Colourful cladding lets the light in (Rodeca)  Ducting solution (Kingspan)  Art of waterproofing (Kemper)  Acrylic stone helps blend the old with the new (LG Hausys)  Living roof on eco lodge (Firestone)  Cost-cutting results of streamlined system (Knauf) 

10 years of the DETAIL Prize From 17 May to 30 June 2016, completed projects that are characterised by innovative details within a coherent overall concept can once again be submitted as entries for the DETAIL Prize 2016 competition. For the past ten years the DETAIL Prize has been awarded to future-oriented, innovative and pioneering projects that have outstanding architectural and technical qualities. The prize is awarded every two years by DETAIL in cooperation with BAU 2017 as the premium partner, Gartner as the main sponsor, conceptual partners from the political arena, and industry sponsors. This year for the first time construction software manufacturer Orca is also on board. Over the years, various special prizes have been offered alongside the main prize as a way of reacting to current trends and developments. In 2016, two special prizes, DETAIL inside and DETAIL structure, will be offered for the first time. These two new categories are aimed at the core target group of architects as well as at interior designers, designers, civil engineers and structural engineers. The DETAIL Readers‘ Prize in contrast, the winner of which is voted by the DETAIL readership, has become firmly established. The DETAIL editorial team nominates the most compelling entries for the main and special prizes. The respective winners will ultimately be voted by a jury of renowned experts, which in recent years has included star architects such as Carlo Baumschlager, David Chipperfield and Lord Norman Foster. The winning projects and offices will be announced and awarded at a gala ceremony in Berlin on 11 November 2016, and exhibited in Munich during BAU, the world‘s leading trade fair for architecture, materials and systems. For more information visit: www.detail.de/ detailpreis and www.detail-online.com/detailprize ¥ Entries via: www.detail.de and www.detail-online.com

Facades Colours make connections to the landscape (Tile of Spain)  Height of technology (Casalgrande)  Mountain shelter (Rieder Smart Elements)  Glass and aluminium combine to distinctive effect (Novelis)  Eye-catching screened facades now showing on new retail outlets (Levolux)  Construction first (Yorkon)  Metal mesh offers protection on a sliding scale (GKD)  Bathrooms and Sanitary Ware Flowing design (Keramag)  Slimline porcelain surfaces create overall impact (GranitiFiandre)  Comprehensive wall panel and tap ranges (Mira Showers)  Treading safely (Twyford)  Textured tiling (FAP Ceramiche)  The shape of things (Porcelanosa)  Added dimension (Glass 1989)  The answer could be 42 (Schell)  New bath and basin shapes are in the frame 

286 288 288 290 290 290 291 291 292 292 293 293 294 294 296 296 297 298 298 300 300 302 302 304 304 304 305 305

Landscaping and Outdoor Living Oak appearance (Millboard) Streamlined external storage solution (Sistemi RasoParete) Contemporary seating style moves outside (Ethimo) All angles covered (Firestone) Paving the way to effective water dispersal (Langford) High-tech lighting (Catellani & Smith)

306 306 308 308 309 309

On The Spot SeSa Build 2016 in Istanbul focuses on the sustainable city  10 years of the DETAIL Prize

310 313


322

Cover 3_2016: Visitor Centre in Niederstotzingen Architects: Ritter Jockisch, D –Munich Black-and-white photos introducing main sections: p. 221: “Mahyar Caravansary”, route from ­Isfahan to Shiraz, Iran, 1840 Artist: Eugène Flandin p. 229: Unterlinden Museum in Colmar Architects: Herzog & de Meuron, CH–Basel p. 235: Visitor Centre in Pombal ­Architects: Comoco Arquitectos, P–Coimbra page 259: Giant’s Causeway Visitor Centre Architects: Heneghan Peng Architects, GB –Dublin page 285: Visitor Centre in Niederstotzingen Architects: Ritter Jockisch, D –Munich Photo credits: Photos for which no credit is given were either provided by the respective architects or they are product photos from the DETAIL archives.

2016 ¥ 3   ∂

p. 234 top right: Courtesy Fondazione MAXXI pp. 236 –241 bottom: Jill Tate, GB–Newcastle upon Tyne p. 241 top: Filip Dujardin, B –Gent pp. 246 –248: The Greypixel Workshop, H–Pécs pp. 253 top, 254, 255 top, 255 bottom: Adam Mørk, DK–Kopenhagen pp. 253 bottom, 255 middle: Helene Høyer Mikkelsen, DK–Aarhus pp. 249 –252: José Campos, P–Porto pp. 256–258: Jan Bitter, D–Berlin pp. 259, 261, 264/265, 266 top, 268 bottom, 271, 272 top, 273: ®Hufton+Crow p. 263 top: Sabine Drey, D–Munich pp. 266 bottom, 267, 269 bottom, 270, 272 bottom: Marie-Louise Halpenny, GB –Dun Laoghaire pp. 275, 277–282, 283 bottom, 284 bottom, 285: Brigida González, D–Stuttgart

pp. 220, 242, 243: Brian Zhang Li, CHN-Bejing

pp. 276, 284 top left: Keller Damm Roser Landschaftsarchitekten, D–Munich

pp. 221, 222 bottom: from: Eugène Napoléon Flandin: Voyage en Perse, Boston 2002

p. 283 top: Ritter Jokisch, D–Munich

p. 223 top: Curator’s Office, Yellowstone National Park, WY/from: Michael Gross & Ronald Zimmermann: Interpretative centres. Stevens Point 2002 p. 223 bottom: from: Heinrich Klotz: Von der Urhütte zum Wolkenkratzer. Munich 1991 p. 224 top: Milla & Partner with Sasha Waltz p. 222 top: NPS Historic Photograph Collection/ www.nps.gov pp. 224 bottom, 235, 244, 245: FG + SG fotografia de arquitectura, P–Lissabon p. 225 top: Heinrich Helfenstein, CH-Zurich p. 225 bottom: Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter, N–Oslo p. 226 top: Gettysburg National Military Park p. 226 bottom: Wikipedia/Scott Basford p. 227 top: Hans Schlupp, AUS –Neutral Bay p. 227 bottom: Frank Kaltenbach, D–Munich p. 228 top: Wikipedia/Acroterion p. 228 bottom: Jürgen Mayer H., D–Berlin p. 229: Herzog & de Meuron, CH–Basle pp. 230 top, 232 bottom: Jakob Schoof, D–Munich pp. 230 bottom, 231, 232 top: Ruedi Walti, CH–Basel p. 234 bottom: © Robert Baudin for Hornibrook Ltd. Courtesy Australian Air Photos

p. 283 middle: Lutzenberger + Lutzenberger, D–Bad Wörishofen p. 284 top right: Roland Pawlitschko, D–Munich p. 286: Tuchschmid AG, Hans Ege, www.artege.de p. 291 top right, bottom right: Mark Park, University of Hull p. 292 top centre, top right: Horizon Photoworks Rotterdam p. 292 bottom centre, bottom right: Jesús Granada p. 294 top centre: David Frutos p. 294 bottom left, bottom centre: Mariela Pollonio p. 296 top left, bottom left: Anze Cokl p. 296 top centre: Peter Usbeck p. 296 top right: Jens Schlüter p. 296 bottom centre, bottom right: Desmoulins p.305 top left, bottom left: Schell GmbH & Co KG p. 310 top: Osman Emiroglu, Istanbul p. 310 bottom: Heike Kappelt, D –Munich p. 319 left: Heneghan Peng Architects, GB–Dublin p. 319 right: Myrzik und Jarisch, D–Munich

CAD drawings All CAD drawings contained in the “Documentation” section of the journal were ­produced with VectorWorks®.

∂ Review of Architecture + Construction Detail

DETAIL English appears in 2016 on 16 January, 1 March, 2 May, 1 July, 1 September, 2 November.

Published by: Institut für internationale ArchitekturDokumentation GmbH & Co. KG, Hackerbrücke 6, 80335 Munich, Germany Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-0 www.detail.de

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PO Box: Postfach 20 10 54, 80010 Munich, Germany Limited partner: ATEC Business Information GmbH General partner: Institut für interna­tionale ArchitekturDokumentation Verwaltungs-GmbH, a 100 per cent subsidiary of ATEC Business Information GmbH. Managing director: Karin Lang Publishing director: Claudia Langert Editorial team: (address as above) Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-57 E-mail: redaktion@detail.de Christian Schittich (editor-in-chief, (V. i. S. d. P.), Sabine Drey, Andreas Gabriel, Frank Kaltenbach, Julia Liese, Thomas ­Madlener, Emilia Margaretha, Peter Popp, Maria Remter, Jakob Schoof, Edith Walter, Heide Wessely Dejanira Ornelas Bitterer, Marion ­Griese, ­Emese M. Köszegi, Simon Kramer ­(drawings) Editorial team DETAIL product ­information: Tim Westphal (manager), Hildegard Wänger, Jenny Clay Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-0 English translations: Elise Feiersinger (pp. 220 –234, 250 –284); Peter Green (pp. 236 –249); Marc Selway (pp. 286 – 313) Production /DTP: Peter Gensmantel (manager), Cornelia Kohn, Andrea Linke, Roswitha Siegler, Simone Soesters Distribution & Marketing: Kristina Weiss (manager). Irene Schweiger (address as above) Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-25 Advertising: Annett Köberlein (manager), Claudia Wach (sales administrator) Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-24 Advertisement Sales Representative Cézanne Sales Services Denise Cézanne-Güttich Rotdornstr. 2 D–41352 Korschenbroich T: +49 (0)2182 578 39 73 F: +49 (0)2182 578 39 75 M: +49 (0)172 821 0095 E: dcg_detail@cezannesales.com

Subscription: 8 issues per year (incl. 2 DETAIL Green issues in April and November) € 131.– for students € 82,– £ 92.–, for students £ 58.50 US$ 179.–, for students US$ 109.50 (Proof of student status must be ­provided to obtain student rates.) All prices include postage/packing (surface mail). Single issues: DETAIL English: € 18.90, £ 13.–, US$ 24.50 DETAIL Green: € 18.90, £ 113.60, US$ 24.50 plus postage /packing All rights reserved. Distributed by IMX. Subscription contact: mail@detail.de Subscription service (subscriptions and changes of address): Vertriebsunion Meynen, Grosse Hub 10, 65344 Eltville, Germany Tel.: +49 (0)61 23-92 38-211, Fax: -212 E-mail: mail@detail.de The publishers bear no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts and ­photos. No part of DETAIL may be reprinted without permission from the publishers. No guarantee can be given for the ­completeness or correctness of the ­published contributions. Reprographics: Martin Härtl OHG Kistlerhofstrasse 70 81379 Munich, Germany Printers: W. Kohlhammer Druckerei GmbH + Co.KG Augsburger Straße 722, 70329 Stuttgart, Germany No claims can be accepted for non-­delivery resulting from industrial disputes or where not caused by an omission on the part of the publishers. This journal is printed on chlorine-free bleached paper. The entire contents of DETAIL are ­protected by copyright. Any use of contributions in whole or in part (including drawings) is per­mitted solely within the terms of relevant copyright law and is subject to fee payment. Any contravention of these conditions will be subject to penalty as defined by copyright law.


DETAIL English 3/2016 - Concept: Visitor and Community Centres  

A typical visitor centre must fulfil a variety of functions: it receives visitors, provides information about the specific place, serves as...

DETAIL English 3/2016 - Concept: Visitor and Community Centres  

A typical visitor centre must fulfil a variety of functions: it receives visitors, provides information about the specific place, serves as...