Issuu on Google+

20 INTER NATIONAL DESIGN CAMP 13

Design to Play Camp Summary

n ig y es la D oP t to n ay ig Pl es D


International students from all over the world

Content

Page 6

Page 8 Page 13 Page 15 Page 16 Page 18 Page 20 Page 24 Page 26 Page 30

Companies Need Serious Play in order to get Serious Results By Mette Strømgaard Dalby The Campfire Meal Design & Play ARTICLES Play – to Create and to Live By Ann Charlotte Thorsted The iPhone: Anatomy of Play Value in Design By Alexander Manu Designing for Awesome LEGO Play By Anne Flemmert Jensen The Need for Play is Needed Everywhere By Jens Rottbøll Play to Design – Playful Make-Believe By Marieke Amalieh Bülow Exploring and exploiting experimentation for enterprise innovation: A 5X5X5 Approach By Michael Schrage

Page 35

PROJECTS

Page Page Page Page

Teachers and Facilitators Old Dogs – New Tricks LEGO Build the Change Eat & Play By Mette Thrane Frandsen Students Partners

60 62 64 66

Page 69 Page 70

Published by

Austria, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, India, Israel, Japan, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, Sweden, South Africa, South Korea, The Netherlands, USA


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013 DESIGN TO PLAY / PLAY TO DESIGN First edition, first printing 2013 Editor in chief: Mette Strømgaard Dalby Editor: Marianne Baggesen Hilger Editorial staff: Mette Fersløv Schultz Project Manager D2i – Design to innovate: Karsten Bech Project Manager DesignCamp2013: Karen Feder Cover and layout: Oddfischlein Photos: Diana Lovring and Ditte Gjøde Published by Kolding School of Design ISBN: 978-87-90775-46-9 Paper: Amber Graphic, 300/170/80 gr. Printed at: BM Grafisk Copyright: Kolding School of Design Kolding School of Design Aagade 10 DK-6000 Kolding www.dskd.dk

International DesignCamp2013

D2i – Design to innovate www.design2innovate.dk All rights reserved Photographic, mechanical, digital or any other form of reproduction from this book is permitted only in accordance with the agreement between Copy-Dan and the Ministry of Education. Any other usage without the written consent of the publisher is prohibited by applicable Copyright Act. Exceptions to this are extracts for use in reviews and discussions. DesignCamp2013 was organised by Kolding School of Design and D2i – Design to innovate in collaboration with the LEGO Group.

Page 4

Page 5


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Play to Design

Companies Need Serious Play in order to get Serious Results Michael Schrage

By Mette Strømgaard Dalby, Head of Culture and Communication, Kolding School of Design

At last year’s DesignCamp, a representative from one of the major participating organisations stated that ”The DesignCamp is an optimal way of working. It’s not just a conference that you attend and then you go home. Because we work in integrated groups, we get maximum outcome.” To Kolding School of Design this captures the essence of our international DesignCamp. Here, international students learn how to work with each other on the design and innovation process, and they gain important insights from invited companies and organisations, because as we all know, some things are fine in theory but do not necessarily work in practice. Time and again participating companies and organisations are surprised to see what happens when ’business as usual’ is replaced with innovative thinking. And this is essential in a global age when competing on price alone makes a company extremely vulnerable to market fluctuation. LEAN and other cost-reducing processes do not suffice. It takes more. Indeed, the very definition of progress is not to repeat old patterns but to

break these and to advance. In the words of one of the world’s leading innovative thinkers, Edward de Bono: As competition intensifies, the need for creative thinking increases. It is no longer enough to do the same thing better … no longer enough to be efficient and solve problems. Kolding School of Design’s international DesignCamp offers companies and organisations other options than ‘doing the same thing better’. Our objective with the DesignCamp is to train the designers and innovators of tomorrow for a global job market. We achieve this by teaching and applying design methods in multi-cultural teams in close collaboration with companies who help us define real-life challenges to which the design students create possible solutions. We want to produce radical innovation. In other words, we want to produce concepts which allow room for differences and present new paths. We also want to give companies, organisations and students the possibility to tackle concrete challenges as well as meta challenges. Finally,

Kolding School of Design believes that describing the proposed solutions on a piece of paper is not sufficient; instead, we use prototyping as a way of visualising and discovering new solutions. Because we know that a prototype says more than a thousand words and still remains open to new interpretations and adaptations. Words entrench, while a prototype acts as a catalyst for discussion and further development. Prototyping is serious play. Prototyping means to simulate to innovate. And indeed prototyping is one of the designer’s core competences.

YOU’RE NOT BEING SERIOUS UNLESS YOU PLAY

So welcome to the DesignCamp2013 on play and design. What better way to end than with the words of Walt Disney. He created a variety of much loved characters that appeal to young and old both, and this year, his business empire celebrates its 90th anniversary:

(IT’S RISKIER NOT TO PLAY)

Around here, however, we don’t look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors and doing new things, because we’re curious… and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.

Page 6

Page 7


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

The Campfire Meal

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Hot topic Companies and their present challenges Design students from the World’s top universities

International experts

Professional designers

The DesignCamp is internationally recognised for successfully establishing a space for companies, experts and design students to come together and engage in the creation of new concepts. This is our recipe.

New thoughts and ideas

Space for development: Creative knowledge institution Experienced design teachers Danish culture The design process

The DesignCamp revolves around a current topic that relates to design. It brings together international experts, experienced designers, companies and design students from the World’s leading universities to exchange and develop new knowledge around specific challenges.

design methods for gathering and recapitulating knowledge, and methods for ideation and concept development. The international encounter, the unique Danish culture and the creative setting at Kolding School of Design constitute the perfect starting point for innovation.

Different ingredients are mixed together inside an ideal space for creative development where specific challenges that face the partner companies undergo an intense design process facilitated by experienced design teachers. The design process applies methods for collaboration,

The design process is kindled by a two-day conference and workshop after which the professional designers start their further training programme and design students become immersed in their projects. After 11 days of intense work, the results of the Camp are ready to be presented.

And the outcome is multifarious. A number of companies begin working directly with the concepts. New business opportunities appear. Design methods become integrated in the companies. New forms of collaborations emerge. Companies hand-pick students to complete assignments or internships. New knowledge is shared with the rest of the World through articles and via students, and the design profession evolves. Dinner is served!

High intensity

Workshop Conference

Project work Further training

New knowledge

Design concepts

New forms of collaboration

DesignCamp Since 2009, the DesignCamp has evolved into an international development platform creating design concepts for its partner companies and new knowledge for the design profession based on global, societal challenges.

Page 8

Page 9


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Camp Design

Output Day Conference

Student Camp

Exhibition Design Course for Trained Designers

IT'S ONE OF THE MOST FANTASTIC EXPERIENCES I HAVE EVER HAD IN TERMS OF DESIGN, CULTURE AND LIFE Xinyu Zhang, HDK, Sweden

DESIGNCAMP The DesignCamp comprises a number of events carefully planned and coordinated to generate maximum outcome.

Page 10

Page 11


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design The DesignCamp2013 sets out to explore play within the context of design in order to investigate and develop design methods for integrating play in companies, processes, products and services.

8 0

to n ay ig Pl es D

N

O V

28

O

C

T

D to es Pl ign ay

& Play

20 INTER NATIONAL DESIGN CAMP 13

Play makes us happy and it energises us. When children play, it’s not just a game. They create a prototype of the world around them and explore it, socially and with their senses. And they cannot not play. Not because playing is easy but because playing is hard! Playing holds a challenge that children are attracted to and which they cannot ignore; a motivation that springs from the essence of play and ensures that the child will continue to evolve through play. Still, do we bear in mind that grownups can gain from play as well? That indeed we need play to escape reality; to open up and dare do things differently? To be innovative and generate

Page 12

Page 13

new ideas? To trust that when we feel good about playing, something good will come from it – even though we might not know in advance what that is? Whether we are children, grownups, designers, companies, students, or researchers we need play in our lives because essentially, it is in our human nature to be playful – even if we have forgotten. The DesignCamp2013 focuses on why we need play. Not just in our families and in our spare time but also in our work lives, the processes that we contribute to, the products we use, the services we use, and indeed all of the experiences that define everyday life.

Mette Erenskjold Kristensen, Viking Life Saving Equipment

I’VE LEARNED THAT YOU CAN USE PLAY TO TRIGGER CREATIVE THOUGHTS BUT YOU CAN ALSO USE PLAY WHEN MAKING MAJOR AND STRATEGIC DECISIONS


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

Articles Conference speakers share key insights on play and design

Page 14

Page 15

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Play – to Create and to Live By Ann Charlotte Thorsted

Play represents a fundamental link between what we do and who we are as people. Researcher at Aalborg University, Ann Charlotte Thorsted, explains the dichotomy of play as a creative power and a basic human life phenomenon. Play is about learning and human development. At least, this is the short account of the way most people perceive the concept of play. Play as a fun, eventful, imaginative and joyous activity, which helps the child develop and become a valuable asset to the people it interacts with and the surrounding society. Yet, there is more to play. Play is also about being present in life, living life, exploring life and rejoicing in life. So, on the one hand we are able to talk about play as a creative power – play to design – where play serves as the catalyst for our functional world, for creative and innovative designs, and thus as the launching pad for inventiveness and the creation of original solutions. On the other hand, something else happens to us during the act of playing as we experience how play itself can challenge and change us at an existential level. Play as a valuable and universal life phe-

nomenon that is not exclusively linked to childhood but a basic phenomenon in everyone’s life – regardless of age, gender, culture or religion. We do not just play in order to create something; a new product or a new design. During those moments, when we are really captured by play, life itself comes into play. This is why it is important that we not only talk about play to design but also articulate design to play as an indication of the dichotomy of play. Play as a sovereign life-expression which grabs us and makes us experience the essence of life itself through a loving, trusting and self-forgetful relation to the people we play with. An indulgence similar to the one that helps us experience creativity and reach the level of deep commitment in what we do. Hence, play can be characterised as a fundamental link between what we do (play to design) and who we are as people (design to play).

Page 16

PLAY IS ALSO ABOUT BEING PRESENT IN LIFE, LIVING LIFE, EXPLORING LIFE AND REJOICING IN LIFE Ann Charlotte Thorsted

Page 17


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

The iPhone: Anatomy of Play Value in Design By Alexander Manu

Play to Design

Strategic Innovation Practitioner and International Lecturer Alexander Manu proposes that corporations do not design products or services anymore: they design behaviour spaces. A Behaviour Space is a construct that combines the attributes of a compelling experience with the characteristics of play value. It is play value that maintains the engagement in the experience, and it is play that ultimately gives value to the experience itself.

During the Q&A session of the July 2011 Research In Motion (makers of the Blackberry) Shareholders Meeting, one investor commanded everyone’s attention by giving the following declaration: ‘You’re letting Apple and Android eat your lunch, and those are not business devices, those are kids’ games.’ Unwittingly, this investor hit the nail on the head: The iPhone and the Android are kids’ games, they are invitations to behaviour, and this is precisely why they were so immediately successful. These devices are fun to interact with, they are pleasurable and playful; they are no longer just products but play behaviour spaces. The iPhone was a shift in what users find of value in a mobile device, and introduced new sources of value at the level of user experience. This was a shift of value from security as a feature, to fun, pleasure and discovery as an attitude. This is a value metric in which hardware, beauty, functionality, usability and application customization all play equally relevant parts, in creating an experience that has but

Page 18

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Page 19

one headline: Pleasure. The iPhone is pleasure objectified. Where does the pleasure in play come from? It comes from the exercising of our freedom; it comes from the excitement of exploration, and from the thrill of discovery. The iPhone pioneered the transformation of a piece of technology into a behavioural object, something that invites playful use, directs the user and responds to his or hers actions. In the iPhone, play builds a bridge between pleasure and purpose. The iPhone is not a tool, and it is not a toy. The iPhone is an invitation to bring play into 'serious' life, reuniting the accomplishment of goal-­oriented tasks, with the experimentation and self-­expression of play. It is a device for exploration, surprise and delight. Play for purpose. The recognition that there are times in which we need to take everything less seriously, allow ourselves to possibility, and to enjoy the journey. What I am proposing is that corporations do not design products or services anymore: they design behaviour spaces. Behaviour Space is any set of

behavioural characteristics and their required media – products, systems, substances, energy – which form part of a set of actions directed toward a similar goal. Behaviour space is a multidimensional construct that includes time, rhythm, motion, attention, retention, a variety of stimuli and a variety of responses. In a behaviour space Play Value is essential in achieving satisfaction in the engagement between users and products or services. Play value is the relationship between physical and mental features – stimuli – of a product or system, elements that achieve a relationship with the user, a relationship described as fun, challenging, non-frustrating, absorbing and rewarding. The compelling mix of these elements prompts repeat play value. Repeat play value is the reason we keep engaging with YouTube, Facebook, Google, Twitter, iPhones and more. These compelling products and services are all behaviour spaces, providing experiences that are fun, challenging, rewarding, absorbing and non- frustrating. They succeed precisely because they never hide this fact.


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

When Ole Kirk Kristiansen invented the LEGO System Brick in the 1950s, he did not just invent another toy; he invented a ‘system of play’; a system that grew into becoming an icon for contemporary notions of creativity & play.

Designing for Awesome LEGO Play By Anne Flemmert Jensen

The LEGO Group is in the business of inventing play experiences that help children grow, develop and be creative. But play is changeable and dynamic, and has to be re-invented in order to stay awesome and addictive to kids in the future. Anne Flemmert Jensen, Insight Director at Future Lab, addresses how LEGO designs new successful play formulas, and how notions of play are incorporated in the LEGO work culture.

Page 20

Until this day, these notions of what play is and should be are still deeply ingrained in the LEGO Values, Culture and DNA. We are in the business of play. And play is an important pre-requisite for life-long learning & development. It is a state of mind that frees us as human beings and allows us to be creative, open-minded and explorative. Innovation leadership in a company with such a strong heritage is all about designing new recipes for awesome, addictive, and desirable LEGO Play. One crucial key to designing such a successful recipe is to stick with one very clear core or ‘play promise’. The trick is then to unfold the different complexities within that core in exactly the right combinations. Wanting a play experience to do everything at the same time makes it confusing and distasteful. A second crucial key is to make sure that the play experience has sufficient longevity. We aim to design immersive play experiences that have both a creative flow and a play flow. A third crucial key is that the play experience ‘speaks’ to kids across the world. A cool play experience is not the same today as it was just a few years ago. The ‘business of play’ is under transformation. Play is expanding into spheres that were traditionally separate from play. Think about how play is expanding

Page 21

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

onto the digital platforms. Think about how it is expanding across generations and into our education and work spheres. In order to keep being relevant to kids, we need to keep rethinking and reinventing what ‘system of play’ is and can be, and put it into new contexts relevant for kids today and in the future. As mentioned, notions of play are also deeply ingrained in our work culture. In our front-end innovation departments, we subscribe very consciously to elements inherent in play when we design new concept ideas. First of all, play is all about entering a mode where you throw off constraint. This mode opens up for greater freedom, exploration, fluidity, interactivity, and creativity. Such an atmosphere doesn’t just exist but has to be created using various forms of techniques, methods, and environments. The participants must be aware, that they are now entering a mode of thinking and interaction where new ideas are encouraged, supported and built on; that we provide a safe ground to try out new and sometimes risky ideas. Secondly, play usually takes place in the interaction between people. The best and most transformative ideas usually arise from a collective effort. And our innovation processes are always interaction based. Thirdly, a good play experience often provides clear frames for the play. This can be in terms of a particular theme, a set of rules, inherent characteristics of the object, an externally generated flow, etc. Creativity doesn’t just flourish and grow out of nothing; the best creative ideas come out of providing the participants with clear frames within which to generate ideas.


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

OCT THIS 30 CONFERENCE HAS BEEN A SUPER EXPERIENCE AND DAY A BOOST OF INSPIRATION! CONFERENCE IT HAS REMINDED ME THAT I NEED TO DARE LIBERATE MYSELF AND PLAY – THE DESIGN PROCESSES THAT I ENGAGE IN ON A DAILY BASIS WILL BECOME THE BETTER FOR IT.

A DAY OF PLAY AND INSPIRATION Maja Skall, Bestseller

PLAY CAN GENERATE SOLUTIONS THAT YOUR INTELLECT CANNOT BECAUSE WHEN YOU PLAY YOU LET GO OF EVERYTHING ELSE AND IGNORE THE BARRIERS Dorthe T. La Cour, Viking Life Saving Equipment

GRAPHIC RECORDING WE RECENTLY LAUNCHED THE SUB-BRAND B&O PLAY, AND I FEEL WE HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO KEEP EXPLORING WHAT WE MEAN BY PLAY. PLAY SHOULD BE MEANINGFUL. YOU SHOULD USE PLAY TO GET MOVING AND CHALLENGE YOURSELF. THAT’S WHY I’M HERE. Jørgen Daucke, B&O

Page 22

T


N

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

THIS CONFERENCE HAS BEEN A SUPER EXPERIENCE AND A BOOST OF INSPIRATION! IT HAS REMINDED ME THAT I NEED TO DARE LIBERATE MYSELF AND PLAY – THE DESIGN PROCESSES THAT I ENGAGE IN ON A DAILY BASIS WILL BECOME THE BETTER FOR IT.

IT HAS TRULY BEEN AN EYE-OPENING EXPERIENCE. THERE ARE SO MANY THINGS THAT WE ARE GOING TO TAKE AWAY FROM THIS EXPERIENCE AND USE. Torben Rohde, Scandic City Aarhus

Maja Skall, Bestseller

PLAY CAN GENERATE SOLUTIONS THAT YOUR INTELLECT CANNOT BECAUSE WHEN YOU PLAY YOU LET GO OF EVERYTHING ELSE AND IGNORE THE BARRIERS Dorthe T. La Cour, Viking Life Saving Equipment

WE RECENTLY LAUNCHED THE SUB-BRAND B&O PLAY, AND I FEEL WE HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO KEEP EXPLORING WHAT WE MEAN BY PLAY. PLAY SHOULD BE MEANINGFUL. YOU SHOULD USE PLAY TO GET MOVING AND CHALLENGE YOURSELF. THAT’S WHY I’M HERE. Jørgen Daucke, B&O


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Conference Day THIS CONFERENCE HAS BEEN A SUPER EXPERIENCE AND A BOOST OF INSPIRATION! IT HAS REMINDED ME THAT I NEED TO DARE LIBERATE MYSELF AND PLAY – THE DESIGN PROCESSES THAT I ENGAGE IN ON A DAILY BASIS WILL BECOME THE BETTER FOR IT. Maja Skall, Bestseller

PLAY CAN GENERATE SOLUTIONS THAT YOUR INTELLECT CANNOT BECAUSE WHEN YOU PLAY YOU LET GO OF EVERYTHING ELSE AND IGNORE THE BARRIERS

Graphic Recording Conference Day by Christel Maria Jantzen, Visuel Optur

Dorthe T. La Cour, Viking Life Saving Equipment

WE RECENTLY LAUNCHED THE SUB-BRAND B&O PLAY, AND I FEEL WE HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO KEEP EXPLORING WHAT WE MEAN BY PLAY. PLAY SHOULD BE MEANINGFUL. YOU SHOULD USE PLAY TO GET MOVING AND CHALLENGE YOURSELF. THAT’S WHY I’M HERE. Jørgen Daucke, B&O


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

THIS CONFERENCE HAS BEEN A SUPER EXPERIENCE AND A BOOST OF INSPIRATION! IT HAS REMINDED ME THAT I NEED TO DARE LIBERATE MYSELF AND PLAY – THE DESIGN PROCESSES THAT I ENGAGE IN ON A DAILY BASIS WILL BECOME THE BETTER FOR IT. Maja Skall, Bestseller

PLAY CAN GENERATE SOLUTIONS THAT YOUR INTELLECT CANNOT BECAUSE WHEN YOU PLAY YOU LET GO OF EVERYTHING ELSE AND IGNORE THE BARRIERS Dorthe T. La Cour, Viking Life Saving Equipment

WE RECENTLY LAUNCHED THE SUB-BRAND B&O PLAY, AND I FEEL WE HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO KEEP EXPLORING WHAT WE MEAN BY PLAY. PLAY SHOULD BE MEANINGFUL. YOU SHOULD USE PLAY TO GET MOVING AND CHALLENGE YOURSELF. THAT’S WHY I’M HERE. Jørgen Daucke, B&O


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

30 OCT THIS CONFERENCE HAS BEEN A SUPER EXPERIENCE AND ADAY BOOST OF INSPIRATION! CONFERENCE IT HAS REMINDED ME THAT I NEED TO DARE LIBERATE MYSELF AND PLAY – THE DESIGN PROCESSES THAT I ENGAGE IN ON A DAILY BASIS WILL BECOME THE BETTER FOR IT.

A DAY OF PLAY AND INSPIRATION Maja Skall, Bestseller

PLAY CAN GENERATE SOLUTIONS THAT YOUR INTELLECT CANNOT BECAUSE WHEN YOU PLAY YOU LET GO OF EVERYTHING ELSE AND IGNORE THE BARRIERS Dorthe T. La Cour, Viking Life Saving Equipment

WEGRAPHIC RECENTLYRECORDING LAUNCHED THE SUB-BRAND B&O PLAY, AND I FEEL WE HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO KEEP EXPLORING WHAT WE MEAN BY PLAY. PLAY SHOULD BE MEANINGFUL. YOU SHOULD USE PLAY TO GET MOVING AND CHALLENGE YOURSELF. THAT’S WHY I’M HERE. Jørgen Daucke, B&O

Page 22

Page 23

T


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

The Need for Play is Needed Everywhere

(Højskoler). Likewise, I have spent more than a decade in corporate business working with B&O, Stadium, Index, DONG Energy, NOVO Nordisk, IC Company, the Danish Defence, and many others And throughout my long work life one pattern emerges: Corporate business tends to be far more open to play than the creative industry! How come?

By Jens Rottbøll

The need for play in business has never been bigger than it is right now in the midst of an economic crisis – not knowing for sure whether it is behind us, or if we still have to experience a larger decrease in our economy. Yet, the need for play in the creative industry is even bigger. I’m still wondering why the creative industry tends to make use of last millennium’s methodologies to develop their businesses – saving their creativity only for product development!

When the creative industry makes business plans they seem to forget the creative processes. Why is corporate business more open to playful processes than the creative industry? asks Jens Rottbøll, Partner in Trivium.

Play to Design

Educated as an artist (guitarist) from the Conservatory of Rhythmic Music in Copenhagen, then working in the music business i.e. as CEO and artistic director of VEGA, the concert venue in Copenhagen awarded as one of top 3 venues in Europe, I know the processes of creating, performing and promoting music. And over the years, I have worked with designers, architects, musicians, painters, music festivals, music organisations and colleges

Page 24

My personal observation is that people from the creative industries tend to seek basic well-known business processes when it comes to developing their business. They are usually not educated in creating a strong business for themselves. Business plans are not a big part of curriculum in the majority of creative schools in Denmark, and therefore they look for classic processes for business improvement, which is much better than not looking at all of course. But in my opinion they neglect a huge potential; a great source of either business development or just any kind of development by playing.

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

that can possibly improve their bottom line, and generally I find, they are more open to “doing things in a new and different way” – provided it creates results. For more than a decade I have used process designs based on the methodology LEGO®SERIOUSPLAY® to create growth in corporate business. The tool was presented in the workshop on the 30th of October at Kolding School of Design. The benefits of using this tool for creating growth are many, and it could be used far more in the creative industries than it is today. The basic principles for the tool are as follows: • No development without involvement. The method ensures a very robust co-creation process that allows far more good ideas to emerge during the development process.

If you want to develop – you must get into a learning mode – and the best way to get into a learning mode is by playing! Play fighting saves a lot of money! This applies in any industry.

• Let your fingers help your brain. Brain Science shows that there are a lot of connections from your fingers to your brain. By using your fingers in an active building process, you access a larger part of your brain and thereby a larger part of your embedded knowledge.

Because of the economic crisis, the private sector has a strong need for business development. So, private companies seek any methodology

• Break you patterns. By building you create new patterns for the neurons in your brain. If you don’t use a tool for this, you limit your brain to

Page 25

repeating old habits (the old neural patterns in our brain that we all create to survive a busy day. It’s the brain’s way to save energy). • Play with the future – no real consequences. This is the core of playing – the play fighting part. The ability to play out an emerging future and examine possibilities, barriers, leadership behaviours, etc. without there being any real consequences. This forms your behaviour towards the future without any risk. • Create a strong and compelling strategic story and tell it. Since ancient times, strong and compelling storytelling has been a major ingredient in most cultures around the world. This has always been the strength of the creative business as many in the corporate business still seem to love “Death by power points”. Why not use this for the money making part of Art’s business? Play and be inspired!


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design – Playful Make-Believe By Marieke Amalieh Bülow

Play to Design

Leaving off old habits and mind-sets and opening up to new ways of thinking. This is the real challenge according to Design Consultant Marieke Bülow. She is part of the D2i – Design to innovate team, which specialises in teaching companies how to apply design methods and elements of play in support of their strategy.

One of our core competences as designers is our ability to visualise futures that do not yet exist. Designers are trained to be ‘in the open’ and are able to give form to the intermediate results that we encounter in the process and present not one but several suggestions for a final solution. This requires certain conditions which very much resemble the framework you create when entering the world of play. You have to be able to be in the moment; sense and collaborate with the people around you. You have to be positive and open in order not to kill the very imagination and energy that enables you to be vigilant for the newly visible. In other words, you have to be prepared to ‘play along’. The ability to play along is not a special talent only bestowed on a few fortunate people; it is a fundamental quality entailed in all people, which we can develop and sophisticate. Yet, the designer is aware of the importance of maintaining this skill because of its vital significance when we set out to create new solutions – when we set out to design.

Page 26

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Page 27

In D2i we specialise in conveying the competences and tools that the designer uses and how these can create value in support of a company strategy. Our design consultants are trained designers who have created competency development tools, typically in the form of workshops, which we offer to companies. This is a practical way for non-designers to test and experience design tools s uch as for instance ideation. Ideation is one of the tools used to generate all new ideas. Therefore, setting the right frame is particularly important when applying this specific tool. Ideation works best when the ideas are born through play. So, you have to add elements of play in order to ’force’ the rational mind to open up and embrace the possibilities rather than set up barriers in defence of that which already exists. And actually, the real challenge is this: to leave off old habits and mind-sets and really be open to new ways of thinking. A good way to open up is by brainstorming on a series of non-related words and then making ‘impossible

combinations’; for instance ‘ballerina shrimp’ or ‘cocktail warrior’. Next, you come up with ideas for these impossibilities, and because our rational mind knows that these are in fact impossibilities, it lets go and we allow ourselves to play. Another approach is ‘trip up’ where you either remove core elements or add new (and perhaps irrelevant) ones; for instance that the Internet was never invented or that the ideas must be directed at a whole new target group. By adding elements of play we help the brain open up and envision ideas that have never been seen before. This is a core component in the designer’s skill set, and one that companies can use to become better at developing new strategies, products and services which are of value to the company, the users and the world at large.


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

IF YOU WANT TO DEVELOP – YOU MUST GET INTO A LEARNING MODE – AND THE BEST WAY TO GET INTO A LEARNING MODE IS BY PLAYING! PLAY FIGHTING SAVES A LOT OF MONEY! THIS APPLIES IN ANY INDUSTRY Jens Rottbøll

TODAY, WHAT IS NEW IS THE ROLE WE APPOINT TO PLAY AND THE DEGREE OF FREEDOM WE DARE TO GIVE IT AS A LIFE PHENOMENON WITHIN A PROFESSIONAL CONTEXT AS AN ORGANISATION Ann Charlotte Thorsted

CREATE A SAFE GROUND FOR EXPERIMENTATION WHERE PEOPLE ARE NOT AFRAID TO COME UP WITH RISKY IDEAS Anne Flemmert

YOU SHOULD ALWAYS FOCUS ON CREATING NEW VALUE. AND IF YOU DEFINE VALUE AS MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN THE WORLD, PROFIT WILL AUTOMATICALLY FOLLOW Alexander Manu

Page 28

Page 29

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Exploring and exploiting experimentation for enterprise innovation: A 5X5X5 Approach By Michael Schrage

The 5X5X5 X-team approach is a rapid innovation methodology emphasizing 'lightweight, high-impact' business experimentation. Research Fellow at MIT and Thought Leader on Innovation Michael Schrage explains the methodology. Increasingly competitive global markets have made innovation a top-management imperative. When cost-cutting efforts hit diminishing returns, investments to add new value enjoy more serious consideration. Consultants, advisors and assorted management gurus are called upon for innovation insights. New tools and technologies are considered to renew or redefine innovation processes. Firms revisit the fundamentals of their innovation culture and practices. While executives declare a greater willingness to innovate, their concerns over costs and risks remain. They're skeptical of 'innovation transformations' that might undermine key customer and partner relationships. They're cynical about 'innovation incrementalism' that promises new value creation on the margins. More firms want to be more innovative about being more innovative. They want to

quickly and cheaply tap their people's collective expertise while preserving top management's strategic innovation prerogatives. In effect, they seek to strike a better balance between bottom-up innovation efforts and topdown strategic imperatives. ‘5X5X5’: RAPID INNOVATION METHODOLOGY THIS DESIRE HAS MADE MANY FIRMS MORE RECEPTIVE TO EXPLORING NOVEL INNOVATION METHODOLOGIES. The 5X5X5 X-team approach is a rapid innovation methodology emphasizing 'lightweight, high-impact' business experimentation. 'Lightweight' means surprisingly inexpensive in terms of organizational time, money and resources; 'high impact' means the proposed experiments test business hypotheses the firm's management deeply cares about. Combining 'lightweight' and 'high impact' inherently commands organizational curiosity,

attention and respect. The lean and agile nature of the experiments assure they generate actionable insights remarkably fast. They're less 'proofs of concept' than invitations to quickly take the next innovation steps. The methodology has been effectively used by global enterprises ranging from European conglomerates to Brazilian media giants to Australian financial services firms to American consumer products companies. What began as a quasi-academic ‘gimmick’ to goad students and companies away from their infatuation with ‘good ideas’ became a distinctive innovation option. The appeal comes not only from the 5X5X5's emphasis on speed and low-cost but its explicit effort to align the firm's improvisational talent with top management's articulated vision. The 5X5X5 is designed to leverage a firm's cultural and organizational diversity to inspire experimental in-

Page 30

Play to Design

genuity. The 5X5X5 methodology has worked well in organizations that love to play with ideas as well as firms that, frankly, would rather draw innovation inspiration from outside consultants. More collaborative firms have welcomed 5X5X5s as a culturally compatible innovation approach while topdown, quasi-autocratic leaderships have cautiously embraced 5X5X5s as a safely cost-effective diversification of their innovation spend. The central purpose of the 5X5X5 is to create vibrant internal markets of business hypotheses and experiments portfolios for the enterprise. Rivalry and competition complement collaborations and cooperation. The goal is to explicitly link lean and agile experimentation to lean and agile innovation. Simple experiments lead to strategic initiatives and impact. Experiments portfolios offer top management options to not only explore disruptive opportunities but also better manage innovation risk. While the experiments and the business hypotheses they test are valuable, the methodology is also a source of human capital formation. To paraphrase the pioneering French industrial sociologist LaPlay, "The most important product of the experiment isn't the data, it's the experimenter." Aligning experimentation with innovation is important. But expanding the boundaries of human capability and creativity around innovation and experimentation is even more important. 5X5X5: DESIGN AND CONSTRAINTS The 5X5X5 design is simple and straightforward. A minimum of 5 teams of 5 people are given no more

Page 31

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

than 5 days to come up with a portfolio of 5 ‘business experiments’ that should take no longer than 5 weeks to run and cost no more than 5000 euro to conduct. Each experiment should have a ‘business case’ attached explaining how running that experiment gives tremendous insight into a possible 5 million euro savings or 5 million euro growth opportunity for the firm. There's nothing magical about the number ‘5’. The point is insisting upon experimental ingenuity within defined constraints. The purpose of these constraints is obvious: individuals and organizations should come up with experiments offering high-impact potential at great speed and low cost. The constraints are less important than the ingenuity they inspire. The issue isn’t whether the euro (or dollar) budget for a proposed experiment exceed 5,000 or if runtime could be done over two weekends instead of 35 days, it’s pushing a small group of people to think 'inside the box.' But the 5X5X5 is an unusual and very special box – one that’s provocatively shaped and made from innovative materials. This box is designed to make disruptive innovation not just possible but probable. Should the 5X5X5 teams do suitably clever jobs of thinking inside this box, they’ll come up with portfolios of experiments with the potential and power to transform their organization's innovation culture - if that is what the organization wants. In larger firms, some twenty-five to thirtyfive ‘high-potential’ managers and workersfrom across the organization have identified that ‘top man-

agement’ wants participating in the X-teams exercise. This ordinarily gives 5 to 7 X-teams. They're briefed – with examples, a framework and suggested process options – on what their deliverables should look like. As a rule, participants get no special compensation – although travel expenses, etc. and appropriate time allowances help assure adequate collaboration with colleagues. The big motivational and organizational lure is that each X-team will present its portfolio to top management. Ideally, this means the CEO, a C-suite colleague or three and, perhaps, a non-executive director and ‘prestige’ outsider. These X-teams are fully aware that they are ‘competing’ with their colleagues to come up with the best possible portfolios to present before their bosses. Rivalry has proven an effective mechanism for focusing team attention, energy and ingenuity on experimental designs most likely to impress their superiors. Occasionally, presentations are made before top P&L executives of business groups – the de facto CEOs of the key business units. The 5X5X5 doesn’t work unless participants are confident their work is being taken seriously by people with the power to either fund the experiments or advance the presenters’ careers. 5X5X5 PORTFOLIOS: WINDOWS INTO ENTERPRISE CULTURE Simple statistics assure the odds are in favor of truly impressive experiments. Five teams times five portfolios equals 25 experiments - six teams times five portfolios equals 30 experiments - and those numbers help guarantee affirmative outcomes.


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

While half the proposed experiments with redundancy and overlap - will be below the median, the structure of the 5X5X5 human capital marketplace means that 10% to 20% of the experimental ideas will be first-rate. There are always – without exception – at least three to four experiments that make top management sit up straight, eyes widen (or narrow, depending on temperament) and incredulously ask, “We can do that!?” Mais, oui - for roughly 5,000 euro 5 weeks and a willingness to proceed. Every firm should hope – and reasonably expect – that 25 or more of its most talented people in collaboratively creative competition with each other should be able to come up with at least three or four truly startling concepts. If they can't, that's important information for top management to know. The absence of innovative experimental proposals is as important for the C-suite to understand as their presence. More often than not, however, portfolio presentations produce a top-tier of world-class experiments. Just below the elite creme de la creme is a layer of another three or four business hypotheses that either individual team members love and seek to champion and/or hold unexpected appeal for a particular business unit that can’t wait to try them out. (An ‘ugly duckling’ experiment that captures the fancy of a well-regarded enterprise intrapreneur is not uncommon. They see – or think they see – something that elevates the merely ‘decent’ experiment into a ‘this could be the start of something big.’)

Design to Play

The beauty of well-designed 5X5X5s is that organizations can’t help but learn from them. Portfolios become lenses and windows into enterprise culture and priorities. For example, if 22 of 25 experiments focus on customers or clients, then why aren’t participants proposing innovative experiments with key suppliers and partners? If portfolio focus emphasizes diversification opportunities, are the 5X5X5 people paying enough attention to organic growth with existing customers? The experiments that aren’t being proposed may be as useful and revealing to top management – and the 5X5X5 participants – as the ones that are. This is a major reason why portfolios concepts are so valuable. It’s not enough to come up with 5 individually impressive experiments. How X-teams think through and articulate their focus and philosophy of experimentation is equally significant. Why these experiments? What does this portfolio say about which innovation opportunities should be identified and explored inside the firm? The willingness to ask simple questions is essential. The 5X5X5 offers a fast, cheap and ingenious method for innovators to safely revisit – and test - business fundamentals. Simple questions about customer segmentation, sales, pricing, design, performance and language successfully inspire high-impact hypotheses. Simplicity invites ingenuity. Getting talented and ambitious people to take disciplined approaches

to these issues is valuable. X-teams pushed to rigorously think beyond ‘business plans’ and ‘proposals’ into portfolio rationales of experiments makes people rethink the relationship between words and deeds. By making rapidly 'business hypotheses' the 'schwerpunkt' of innovation design, firms can create a better balance between action and analysis. This frequently represents an important cultural value for business innovators. After all, no one can get an MBA from an elite school without performing reams of analysis. But remarkably few world-class business schools make rapid experimentation and test a curricular requirement.

Play to Design

TOMORROW’S DESIGN RESEARCH AGENDA IS METAPLAY: HOW DO WE PLAY WITH PLAY? Michael Schrage

Of course, this broad overview minimizes many of the organizational elements that give richness and flavor to the enterprise experience. For example, many firms put zero constraints on the portfolios they’re asking from their people. X-teams are encouraged to create ‘portfolios-without-boundaries’ – that is, hypotheses and experiments addressing any issue they deem important. Nothing – price, new media, new materials, new customers, new technologies, new sales tactics – is off limits. Anything goes. Other firms want to place further constraints on the 5X5X5 constraints. Their experiments portfolios need to address particular business concerns. For example, the future role of customers, suppliers or Web 2.0 or emerging markets. In other words, top management wants experimentation that aligns with innovation along particular dimensions. Their X-teams have explicit missions or briefs. Their 5X5X5

Page 32

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Page 33


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

focus is producing portfolios around specific challenges or themes: • How should we use new media better? • How can we better collaborate with key suppliers? • What experiments should we be doing with our best customers? • How can we better segment our customers and clients? • Can we wrap new services around our products? • How can we make customer support centers innovation platforms? RISING TO THE INNOVATION CHALLENGE Anecdotally, the creative differences between 'open' 5X5X5 X-team briefs and targeted themes appear minimal. Both offer the capacity for disruptive surprise. Both require teams to display a chemistry or esprit in order to succeed. Both develop a collaborate prowess for hypothesizing and experimental design. Both demand the ability to fluently and persuasively present before top management. Arguably the most significant difference I've observed is that 'open' briefs give top management a broader view into how their most talented people view innovation opportunities and risk. What thematic briefs gain in specificity, they lose in strategic scope and sweep. Thematic X-teams are beholden to management priorities in a way that 'open' teams are not.

Design to Play

capability, that shouldn’t overshadow its power to influence the firm's sense of its innovation cultures and processes. Virtually no participants – and certainly no top managements – considered the exercise to be a poor or mediocre use of time. To the contrary, the overwhelming majority of participants observe that it yields disproportionate value for time. The professional development aspect is a key ingredient but the reality is that the methodology gives top management a relatively inexpensive way to see how ‘innovative’ and ‘creative’ its people can be. Devising business experiments portfolios and presentations on demand lets the C-suite see how its people rise - or fail to rise - to the innovation challenge. Instead of being an intellectual or academic exercise, the 5X5s turn out to be ‘reality checks’ for organizations that say they want to be more innovative. For many

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

organizations, it's painfully clear that the conservatism and risk-aversion of top management - not the lowcost with and high-speed ingenuity of their most talented people - is the real innovation constraint. Successful 5X5s make people more effective innovators. More effective innovators mean more effective innovations. Even moderately successful 5X5 experiences attract broader attention. The 5X5 is a viral innovation methodology. It’s infectiously innovative X-teams and top managements that see 5X5 presentations as the start of healthier and more agile innovation cultures behave differently. Successful innovation requires a commitment to action. As Schumpter remarked, “Innovation is less an act of intellect than an act of will.” Wanting it – wanting to turn hypotheses into experiments into innovation – is an act of will.

Projects Student solutions to the challenges set by the participating companies and organisations in the DesignCamp2013

Michael Schrage

SIMPLE EXPERIMENTS LEAD TO STRATEGIC INITIATIVES AND IMPACT

While the 5X5X5’s professional development value may have the most important impact on enterprise

Page 34

Page 35


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

PARTNER: Kolding Spildevand / Kolding Waste Water GROUP: Beayue Louie, Emily Carr University, Canada Birkir Gudmundsson, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Manabu Ariyoshi, Tama Art University, Japan Thomas Helmer, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

THEIR FILMS SHOW THAT IT'S POSSIBLE TO COMMUNICATE WHAT IT IS WE DO IN AN EXCELLENT WAY. WE INTEND TO STICK WITH THE CHARACTERS FROM THE FILM AND MAKE THEM A CENTRAL PART OF OUR COMMUNICATION.

Kolding Ecosystems A new corporate identity for Kolding Waste Water

THE CHALLENGE How might we change the public identity of Kolding Waste Water? THE CONCEPT Kolding Ecosystems aims to communicate the value and importance of the service that Kolding Waste Water (KWW) provides the citizens of Kolding Municipility. KWW is a key figure in keeping the municipality clean but the services it provides remain invisible to its customers: the citizens and companies of Kolding Municipality, who are not confronted with the consequences of creating waste and waste water. In short: Out of sight, out of mind. Yet, it is important that they recognise and understand how their actions affect the ecosystem they live in, as it is vital and needs to be handled with care. To get this message across, the group has suggested changing KWW’s identity to Kolding Ecosystems, to reflect the fact that KWW is in the business of living systems: recycling water and organic materials to safeguard public health and the environment. Waste water is the material they work with,

not what they do. To further implement this identity change – and educate the citizens of Kolding Municipality – the group has made a humorous animated film which tells people about KWW and the importance and weightiness of their work. In addition to the animated film, the group has also designed a new logo for Kolding Ecosystems. THE OUTCOME The challenge that KWW’s director, Per Holm, set the students on the first day of the DesignCamp was this: How can we convey what it is we do to the citizens and companies in Kolding Municipality? He left the camp with a unique animated film and a workable suggestion regarding a new identity for KWW.

Play to Design

Per Holm, Director of Kolding Waste Water

“We have been working for some time on rethinking our internal and external communications. In this context, the students’ input has been heaven sent. Their films show that it's possible to communicate what it is we do in an excellent way. We intend to stick with the characters from the film and make them a central part of our communication,” explains Holm. He hopes to be able to continue working with the students and also sees KWW as a possible participant for next year’s DesignCamp: “Definitely. It has been an extremely positive experience.”

“The students quickly grasped the essence of our challenge. They’ve put together a fantastic project that we can and will use. We’re thrilled!” KWW has already started working with the students to develop the concept.

Page 36

Page 37

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

PARTNER: Oplevelsesparken Universe/Universe science theme park GROUP: Jared Gower, Greenside Design Center, South Africa Nadine Foik, Pratt Institute, USA Niels Rasmussen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Noemie Thomas, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Sara Pignatelli, London College of Fashion, United Kingdom

Knowledge is Power (KiP) A playful and interactive quest for knowledge

THE CHALLENGE How might we bridge the “Wow!” and the “Aha!” factors, while adapting the information provided to individual visitors? THE CONCEPT Knowledge is Power (KiP) is an interactive edutainment system which binds the experience at the Universe science theme park with play and learning. KiP consists of three elements: • An RFID (radio frequency identification) Power Band, which is handed to visitors when they enter Universe. • Info Globes at the park’s experience stations, which visitors activate with their Power Band to gain knowledge, to explore and to interact with the stations and acquire “Super

Powers”. When visitors have acquired all the “Super Powers”, they get the final “Brain Power”, which they can use to activate: • Power Wall, a digital, interactive wall which rounds off the KiP experience with play and games. Here, visitors can show the "Super Powers" they have acquired on their quest for knowledge and use them to play on their own or with friends and family. KiP is designed to connect the entire park experience, to intensify the “Wow!” factor of the activities, to capture the users’ attention and curiosity – the “Aha!” factor – and to encourage independent and interactive learning. KiP turns learning into play.

THE OUTCOME “Absolutely fantastic!” This was the immediate response of Pia Bech Mathiesen, CEO of Universe, when presented with KiP at DesignCamp’s Output Day. She is very impressed with the concept that the students have designed for the theme park. “It’s a really well thought-through concept that the design students have come up with. From the idea to the graphics. The level of detail in the work they have done is amazing. And this has confirmed for me that, here in Denmark and internationally, we have some talented design students who understand complex issues and possess the ability to develop good, creative solutions,” says Pia Bech Mathiesen.

The technological solution that the students have chosen is not yet at a sufficiently stable stage for Universe to implement KiP at this time.

THIS HAS CONFIRMED TO ME THAT HERE IN DENMARK AND INTERNATIONALLY, WE HAVE SOME TALENTED DESIGN STUDENTS WHO UNDERSTAND COMPLEX ISSUES AND POSSESS THE ABILITY TO DEVELOP GOOD, CREATIVE SOLUTIONS Pia Bech Mathiesen, CEO of Universe

“But the idea and intention of KiP has certainly inspired us to look at our challenge in a new way. It is always inspiring to have someone to look at us with new eyes – and challenge our way of doing things,” says Pia Bech Mathiesen.

fo Globe!

Find an In

hand Place your l! mbo on the sy

?!

t the Learn abou e! Experienc Super Earn your Powers! Save the Universe!

Page 38

Page 39


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

PARTNER: B&O Play GROUP: Inês Roque, IADE - Institute of Art, Design and Enterprise, Portugal Jacob Theodore Horowitz, Case Western University, USA Melana Bogdan, Kolding School of Design, Denmark René Petersen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Tanya Smit, Greenside Design Center, South Africa

Vuuz Future of Audio

THE CHALLENGE How might we focus the brand towards the lifestyle of young people through narratives, and design an ultra-domesticated product that makes for a playful experience? THE CONCEPT Vuuz is an elegant, domestic audio product – designed by young people, for young people. Vuuz integrates itself into the lifestyle of its users through its playfulness and adaptability. Young people today listen to music in an entirely different way compared to older generations, i.e. they share their music and listen to it on the go. That is why Vuuz is closely linked to a mobile app and contains a portable speaker; to suit the behaviour and needs of young people. Vuuz consists of three main features: • A minimalistic, elegant bass tower that provides the famous B&O sound quality. • An LCD glass equalizer display that transmits coloured light on demand. • A portable speaker which allows you to take your favourite music with you anywhere in your home.

Your speaker welcomes you with your favorite playlist as you walk through the door, detecting your phone's WI-FI connection.

Aside from the integrated control panel, Vuuz can be controlled via the appurtenant mobile app. The app allows you to decide what you want to listen to and when you want to listen to it. In addition, Vuuz offers you a personal greeting by playing your favourite song when you walk in the door to your home. This is done using the mobile app that activates Vuuz when your phone links up to your wireless home network.

Vuuz will not be featured in B&O’s product catalogue in the near future. But perhaps it will still get a foot in the door at B&O:

I LIKE THAT THEY HAVE BEEN FOCUSING ON THE USER AND THE USAGE SITUATION IN THEIR DEVELOPMENT AND NARRATIVE ABOUT VUUZ. THAT’S WHAT SEPARATES THE DESIGNERS FROM THE ENGINEERS.

“One of the students is applying for a job with us. We are delighted that the student has had a positive impression of our company and wishes to be part of the B&O team,” says Daucke, who also wishes to participate at DesignCamp2014.

THE OUTCOME “This has confirmed for us that the thoughts we are already having with regard to our products and target market are right,” says Jørgen Daucke, Concept Manager at B&O.

Jørgen Daucke, Concept Manager at B&O

“The students have achieved a lot in the short time they had available to them. I like that they have been focusing on the user and the usage situation in their development and narrative about Vuuz. That’s what separates the designers from the engineers. Designers think lifestyle and narrative – the emotion-based – into their development process. And that is important to get users to potentially fall in love with a product.”

CATEGORIES CHOOSE MUSIC

Working

MUSIC

CATEGORY NAME:

Now playing

EQUALIZER

ALARM

Working

TIME:

Coming home CATEGORIES Waking up Party EQUALIZER

Working Cooking Dinner

ALARM

Breakfast ...

Page 40

THE BEO PLAY VUUZ IS FUTURE OF AUDIO. IT GREETING YOU Page 41 AS YOU WALK IN THE DOOR WITH YOUR FAVORITE TUNES. IT ALSO WAKE YOU UP IN THE MORNING WITH YOUR

ON OFF

7

15

pm Search for song

EQUALIZER MODE:

The Lumineers - Elouise

Our song The XX

Working

The Naked and famous - Young Blood

Working, Cooking

Party, Working

The Lumineers - Elouise

Saturday, Sunday

ON OFF

Choose one, two or three colours for equalizer by changing location of a circle.

Alarm, Working

The XX - Our song

REPEAT: TIME:

Avolnation - Kill Your Heros Search for song

7

15

am

Search for song

La Roux - Tigerlily

ABBA - Fernando Alarm, Dinner

The Naked and famous - Young Blood Pixies - Where Is My Mind The Naked and famous - I Kill Giants

Party

The XX - Intro

Party, Working

La Roux - Tigerlily

2:45 / 3:55

The Lumineers - Elouise

La Roux - Tigerlily

The Naked and famous - I Kill Giants

Niva - The Boy From The Sun

The XX - Intro

Working

A core competency of our product is the unique interaction with its phone application. Upon first use, the user enters their Pandora, Spotify, and other music listening methods. The phone then prompts the user to specify when they would like to listen to music throughout the day. Options like wake up, and

ABBA - Fernando

are synced to clocks set by the user, with the exception of the getting home category. This category is activated when users phone connects to your home Wi-Fi network. When the connection is detecteced the speaker starts to play, greeting you as you walk in the door with your favorite tunes. User can also


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

PARTNER: Billund Lufthavn / Billund Airport GROUP: Anne Dieste, Hochschule Pforzheim University, Germany Anne-Marie Gundelwein, University of Applied Science Würzburg, Germany Kristoffer Markussen Johannessen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Mariana Negreiros, London College of Fashion, United Kingdom Yu Xia, Tongji University, China

Kiss & Fly Less stress and more fun for passengers at Billund Airport THE CHALLENGE How might we create an atmosphere that is playful rather than stressful for passengers passing through security? THE CONCEPT By creating a playful environment and an informal, flirtatious mood, Kiss & Fly will make it easier and more enjoyable for passengers to be at Billund airport and passing through security. Kiss & Fly consists of three main elements: • A short, humorous film entitled “Don’t forget to wear your good socks”, which passengers receive a couple of days before they fly. The film acts as a teaser and sets the mood for passengers, while telling them what to expect at the security checkpoints. • A bag for personal items (mobile phone, keys, wallet, etc.), which passengers will be handed at checkin/baggage drop, allowing them to empty their pockets before hitting security. This way, they will be better prepared when asked at security

to put their personal belongings in a tray that is run through a scanner. A small but important thing that can help reduce the usual stressful queues at security. • Playful communication with the passengers at the airport itself in the form of humorous signs and pictograms that send passengers on their way with a smile.

“We have been given a very strong concept which we can easily pitch on in the organisation and which is easy to implement.”

THE OUTCOME For Billund Airport, it has been a positive and rewarding experience to be part of DesignCamp2013.

“We are really excited to see whether this little extra service can help de-stress security and prevent bottlenecks.”

Part of the Kiss & Fly concept is a bag for personal items for use in security, which passengers are given at checkin. A very specific idea which Billund Airport will start testing immediately.

“We have benefitted greatly from working with the students. We have been given a fresh, new perspective on the airport experience and a workable "twist" to our way of communicating. The students have really challenged us and the way we do things. It has been an eye-opener,” says Mette Frøkjær, Experience Designer at Billund Airport.

WE HAVE BENEFITTED GREATLY FROM WORKING WITH THE STUDENTS. WE HAVE BEEN GIVEN A FRESH, NEW PERSPECTIVE ON THE AIRPORT EXPERIENCE AND A WORKABLE "TWIST" TO OUR WAY OF COMMUNICATING. Mette Frøkjær, Experience Designer at Billund Airport

She also emphasises that the students have been very realistic in their approach and it has paid off.

Page 42

Page 43

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

PARTNER: University of Southern Denmark GROUP: Dana Ben Shalom, Bezalel Academy, Israel Kirstine Mackeprang, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Martina Hajny, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Natalie Morcinek, Hochschule Pforzheim University, Germany

Innovation by Networking

THE WORK WITH THE STUDENTS HAS RAISED A LOT OF GOOD POINTS. IT HAS MADE ME WANT TO EXPLORE THESE FURTHER Henrik Sproedt, Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Denmark

Playful networking for students

THE CHALLENGE How might we prepare students for a complex, uncertain and highly dynamic reality... in a playful way? THE CONCEPT Innovation by networking is a pop-up experience which enables students to connect with one another across the board. Innovation by networking has emerged from a need for more networking between educational institutions. A wider network – not to mention the ability to network – can ease the transition from student life to professional life, as you are in touch with people who can promote, encourage and support you, now and in the future. Innovation by networking is an annual pop-up event consisting of four elements: • Tracking: Students are enticed to the pop-up event by text messages and markings on the floor. Creates a mysterious mood and arouses students’ curiosity.

• Finding: When arriving at the event, students are guided through a narrow corridor full of impressions based on the theme of the year. • Experiencing: The event venue is built like a dome, where the outer area is characterised by challenges that will push the students to the edge of their comfort zone, while the inner area is a dome for opening minds, focusing on opportunities. • Networking: In the inner dome, the students sit on seats that are constantly moving around in all directions and "forcing" students to talk to each other. After this playful networking session, there is space for relaxation and socialising. THE OUTCOME For Henrik Sproedt, Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Denmark, it is both an academic area of interest and a challenge to integrate playful learning in the education of adults. His participation at DesignCamp and work with the students has confirmed for him that the way they do things at SPIRE, Centre for Participatory

Research at University of Southern Denmark, is on the right track. “With the concept they have developed, the design students have taken a step in the right direction,” says Sproedt. The students point out that the current one-way communication lecture form is uninteresting and uninspiring, and not conducive to innovation or interaction between lecturers and students or between the students themselves.

Tracking

Finding

Experiencing

Networking

“The work with the students has raised a lot of good points. It has made me want to explore these further – and perhaps with the students because we have started a good process,” says Sproedt.

Page 44

Page 45


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Grow Up An interactive playground for children

THE CHALLENGE How might we make something familiar unfamiliar? THE CONCEPT Grow Up is an interactive playground that stimulates children’s senses in new ways and creates a space for active, exploratory play and learning. Grow Up makes use of the existing technology of PlayAlive, the satellite, which interacts with users by means of sound, touch and motion sensors. Grow Up focuses on the body. Firstly, because the playground encourages active play, whereby children move about and have their senses stimulated by hearing, seeing and feeling the variety of sounds, sights and surfaces offered by Grow Up. And secondly, because the inside of Grow Up represents the inside of a body where children can play with bodily sounds and thus learn about the body. The Grow Up game involves hunting for colours and sounds: When a child touches a satellite on top of the playground, it plays a sound, e.g. the beating of a heart, or the rumble of a hungry stomach. The child must then

find and touch the satellite of the organ inside the playground which is making the same sound. The satellite then will light up in a particular colour, which the child must find on the top of the playground. A new satellite lights up, plays a sound when touched and so the game continues… THE OUTCOME For PlayAlive, it has been a positive surprise. The four design students have come up with a solution that way surpasses expectations. “It’s a really nice piece of research work that the students have done,” says Lau Kofoed Kierstein, Research, Development & Quality Manager at PlayAlive. “They have thought all the right thoughts. Now it's our job to transform the concept into a commercial product that we can market.” Lau Kofoed Kierstein also explains that PlayAlive plans to test the game of hunting for sounds and colours that the students have developed for Grow Up on a group of children in the near future.  

UNFAMILIAR PLAYGROUND

PARTNER: PlayAlive GROUP: Alice Forestan, Kingston University, United Kingdom Amanda Hoffner, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Xinyu Zhang, University of Gothenburg, School of Design, Sweden Yarden Deddi, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Page 46

THEY HAVE THOUGHT ALL THE RIGHT THOUGHTS. NOW IT'S OUR JOB TO TRANSFORM THE CONCEPT INTO A COMMERCIAL PRODUCT THAT WE CAN MARKET. Lau Kofoed Kierstein, Research, Development & Quality Manager at PlayAlive

Page 47


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

PARTNER: Koldinghus GROUP: Abir Malik, Aalto University, Finland Megan Czaja, Pratt Institute, USA Ruchika Nambiar, Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology, India

History Now

Talking Walls

Projection Mapping

Removable Bricks

Unlocking history by means of storytelling

THE CHALLENGE How might we fill the narrative gap between what the museum says and what the visitor hears? THE CONCEPT History Now aims to make visits to Koldinghus museum interactive and engaging. It is a playful navigation experience that turns the castle into a magical, mysterious place where visitors can experience and explore the 700-year-old history of Koldinghus. History Now unveils the rich history of Koldinghus and highlights the magnificent architecture of the castle to visitors by means of four storytelling features: • Talking walls, which tell stories about the castle and its architecture • Projection mapping, which shows how the castle would have looked over time • Removable bricks, which reveal secret passages, corridors and the like

• A keystone, given to all visitors at the beginning of their visit. The keystone is the key to the castle: Visitors use it to "unlock" and activate different parts of the castle, e.g. the talking walls. History Now is not only an exciting, interactive experience and a new way of communicating with visitors to Koldinghus, it is also a reinvention of the identity of Koldinghus – an identity that will make the castle’s history the museum’s main attraction and unifying starting point. THE OUTCOME “It’s been a really good experience to take part in DesignCamp and work with the students. We are impressed by how talented they are, both the students we have worked with on our project and the other students at the camp. They have designed some excellent solutions,” says Nanna Ebert, Communications Manager at Koldinghus.

I LIKE THE RANDOM ELEMENT OF IT, IN THAT VISITORS GO OFF IN SEARCH OF THEIR OWN EXPERIENCE

Ebert explains that at Koldinghus they have had some of the same thoughts that the students have had in the development of History Now. “We want to strengthen our core narrative, but how we do it? This has provided us with an excellent suggestion, which we hadn’t come up with ourselves. We’ve been given a fresh perspective on our challenge and a workable concept, which we would like to continue working on.”

Nanna Ebert, Communications Manager at Koldinghus

She emphasises that the History Now concept has many good aspects, both in terms of its technology and its content. “I like the random element of it, in that visitors go off in search of their own experience; that it is individual and never the same, giving them a reason to come back. And the technical part of the concept is simple and feasible.”

Page 48

Page 49


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

PARTNER: Kolding Cityforening/Kolding City Association – in collaboration with Kolding Municipality GROUP: Ana Filipa Pardal, IADE – Institute of Art, Design and Enterprise, Portugal Anne Grove, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Nina Delanovic, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Seshmitha Vedachalam, Case Western Reserve University, USA Zhuoyun Qian, Tongji University, China

Kolding Lazermaze Urban light and lazer games for tweens and teens

THE CONCEPT Kolding Lazermaze is a lazer and light-based game installation for the tweens and teens of Kolding. Kolding City Association wishes to encourage this target group to engage in play in the inner city of Kolding. The Lazermaze concept gives the youth of Kolding a reason to use and experience their city in a new and playful way – creating a sense of community. Kolding Lazermaze is set up in vacant shops and spaces in the commercial shopping district. The Lazermaze installations are frequently moved, providing a dynamic gameplay experience that will intrigue the audience and keep them coming back for more. Lazermaze games are physical, challenge-based games. An example of a game – or a challenge – might be a spy mission, where you have to go through a network of lazer beams to reach the end. The camera follows

you on your way through the network. If you hit a lazer beam, an alarm sounds and you are caught on camera. You can see the photo and share it with your friends at a stand just outside the play area.

“It’s a simple project, in the sense that it is easily transferrable to other target groups. It’s flexible and adaptable. And what’s more, it’s easy to "export". We could, for example, implement it in the other towns in the Triangle Region.”

THE OUTCOME “The challenge we set the students at the beginning of DesignCamp was extremely open: How do we motivate kids and tweens to engage in play in the inner city? Kids and tweens is the “traditional” target group – the one we usually think of when discussing how to generate more play in the city centre. So it was a positive surprise for us when the students chose to focus on a different target group, i.e. older children and adolescents. It was great input,” explains Mette Schumacher, city centre manager of Kolding City Association.

IT’S A SIMPLE PROJECT, IN THE SENSE THAT IT IS EASILY TRANSFERRABLE TO OTHER TARGET GROUPS. IT’S FLEXIBLE AND ADAPTABLE. Alexander Priesemann, Landscape Architect at the Urban and Development Administration of Kolding Municipality

The City Association set the challenge together with Kolding Municipality, which was represented by Landscape Architect Alexander Priesemann of the Urban and Development Administration. He points out that the students have developed a concept with many applications.

Page 50

Page 51

LAZER

THE CHALLENGE How might we create a behaviour space – free of inhibitions – that engages and challenges the youth of Kolding?


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

PARTNER: Terrariet Vissenbjerg/Terrarium Vissenbjerg GROUP: Bob Werner, Emily Carr University, Canada Lars Majlund Mørk, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Lukáš Uliarczyk, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic Tatyana Chuzhanova, Aalto University, Finland

FROM EARLY ON IN THE PROCESS, THE STUDENTS CAME UP WITH SOME GREAT IDEAS, SO I KNEW THE RESULT WOULD BE GOOD

TerraViss

Morten Jørgensen, Director of Terrarium Vissenbjerg

Learning through play. Can you jump like a frog?

THE CHALLENGE How might we incorporate a playground into the entire exhibit exhibit at Terrarium Vissenbjerg?

THE OUTCOME Morten Jørgensen, Director of Terrarium Vissenbjerg, was pleased to have taken part in DesignCamp:

THE CONCEPT TerraViss aims to teach visitors about reptiles and amphibians by applying play in a dynamic, personal and interactive way. At TerraViss, the exhibition is a playground in itself. The concept is learning through play – in an active and interactive way.

“We have gotten a lot out of working with the students. They quickly grasped our core issue and, from early on in the process, came up with some great ideas, so I knew the result would be good.”

At TerraViss, each animal exhibit is accompanied by a game that compares human capabilities to those of the various animals. For example, games encourage children to jump like a frog, compare their speed to the speed of a rattle snake or see like a chameleon. All of the games aim to enhance the children’s interest in the animals, whilst allowing them to test their skills and activate their senses. The interactive and physical games at the terrarium activate the children’s interest in the world of reptiles and amphibians. The goal is to promote learning and comprehension through a physical experience.

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

“I look forward to the things to come. I have high expectations for the project,” he concludes.

As part of TerraViss, the students have come up with a lot of games that can be implemented in the terrarium's exhibition area. “I see great potential in the concept the students have designed for us. I have therefore chosen to continue to work on it, in the sense that it becomes a part of a larger project we plan to implement. A major process is already under way, in which we are rethinking and developing the terrarium, and the concept fits in really well with it,” says Jørgensen.

LEARNING THROUGH PLAY

He will continue to work with the students, who will come up with ideas and input for further development work and act as sparring partners.

Page 52

Page 53


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

PARTNER: LEGO System GROUP: Daniel Glazman, Bezalel Academy, Israel Jake Rich, Kingston University, United Kingdom Rasmus N. N. Buhl, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Peiyu Luo, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Saskia J. Schoonebeek, Utrecht School of the Arts, The Netherlands

Making user involvement fun and fruitful

THE CONCEPT LEGO Day moves the development process out into the real world. Every month, designers from LEGO drive out into the country, park the specially-designed LEGO van and invite children in to play, have fun and interact in order to gain new knowledge and new ideas, look into new forms of play and test concepts and products. LEGO Day came about as a result of the LEGO designers’ need for more real-world insight for their product development process. Currently, the end users, i.e. the children, are not involved in the first part of the development process. They are mainly involved in and used for A or B testing and final product validation. The designers’ development process could be defined as inside-out: Designers use their existing knowledge to implement new concepts and to design new products,

rather than focus exclusively on the needs and wishes of the consumers. The aim of LEGO Day is thus to improve the designers’ development process in order to make LEGO’s products better, smarter, playful and even more certain of being a hit. LEGO Day makes user involvement and testing child’s play for all concerned! THE OUTCOME DesignCamp was a positive experience for Søren Lethin, Senior Concept Manager at LEGO System. “Both the set-up and the idea behind the Camp are really good, and the result that the students have designed for us is great.”

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

LOOK FOR THE LEGO VAN!

LEGO Day THE CHALLENGE How might we encourage LEGO’s designers to want to go out and interact with the people of Billund to gain insights?

Play to Design

ideas that the students had come up with. And most importantly: we put together a "road map" for the project. That was really great, because a good idea is worthless without a plan to back it,” says Lethin. “You have to be ready to deal with what happens when the idea meets the harsh reality, otherwise you will not succeed.” Now LEGO will continue to develop the project on their own, but Søren Lethin is planning to get one of the group members, a student at Kolding School of Design, to present the project to LEGO’s designers in order to equip them to take over the work on LEGO Day.

BOTH THE SET-UP AND THE IDEA BEHIND THE CAMP ARE REALLY GOOD, AND THE RESULT THAT THE STUDENTS HAVE DESIGNED FOR US IS GREAT

Søren Lethin works every day with designers and development processes. He explains that he was especially pleased with the workshop section of the DesignCamp Output Day:

Søren Lethin, Senior Concept Manager at LEGO System

“This was a chance for us to develop the project together and to discuss the process and the thoughts and

Page 54

Page 55


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

PARTNER: Billund Kommune/Billund Municipality GROUP: Denise Dyrvig Clemente Jørgensen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Ellen Rykkelid, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Pramod Pai, Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology, India Ruth Fogel, Design Management, Bezalel Academy, Israel

Make & Mark Giving Billund back to its children

THE CHALLENGE How might we engage the children of Billund in taking ownership of their town? THE CONCEPT Make & Mark enables the children of Billund to make their mark on the town. With the help of the municipality, children have the opportunity to make their mark on selected spaces in the town, creatively and playfully. Make & Mark promotes the development of the town through open innovation, creativity, play and dialogue – and most importantly, through its children. Make & Mark consists of four phases: • Mark: Children select and mark spaces with the Make & Mark ribbon. Provide material that the children can use to make their mark. Help facilitate the process.

• Create: Children get wild and creative! This can be done in several ways: as a community event, as a school or daycare activity, or on the children’s own initiative, using a special Make & Mark kit provided by the municipality. • Engage: The marked spaces become centres of attention, generate pride in the community and interest in Make & Mark. • Transform: Use the increased attention and let the children make their mark on the whole of Billund with Make & Mark. THE OUTCOME “Billund has a vision of becoming the Capital of Children. As part of this, the municipality is working on urban planning aimed at developing Billund into a town for children. Make & Mark is an excellent example of how we can involve the children in urban development and get them to take ownership of their town,” says Heidi Willisie Sønderby, Town Planner in Billund Municipality.

She explains that Billund Municipality has extended its cooperation with the two students from Kolding School of Design. Since the Camp ended, they have worked on the further development of the concept. “After Output Day, we were left with certain questions that we needed answers to. For example, how do we implement the concept so that it is easy for children to understand and use? What are the "rules of the game"? Should it be autonomous or managed by the municipality? These are just some of the questions that the students will be taking a closer look at, among other things by holding workshops and conducting pilot tests with local children. We’re really looking forward to seeing the result,” says Heidi Willisie Sønderby.

Page 56

MAKE & MARK IS AN EXCELLENT EXAMPLE OF HOW WE CAN INVOLVE THE CHILDREN IN URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND GET THEM TO TAKE OWNERSHIP OF THEIR TOWN Heidi Willisie Sønderby, Town Planner in Billund Municipality

Page 57

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

PARTNER: LEGO Digital Solutions GROUP: Chie Miyajima, Tama Art University, Japan MinJi Kim, Rhode Island School of Design, USA Sjoerd Mulder, Utrecht School of the Arts, Netherlands Sylvester Agerbæk Hansen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark Tamás Boldizsár, Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

DIGITAL GAMES ARE DEFINITELY THE FUTURE, SO THE QUESTION IS NOT WHETHER WE ARE GOING TO USE IT, BUT WHEN

Teleport A digital, physical and social gaming platform

THE CHALLENGE How might we create a platform that offers the same play experience, digitally as well as physically? THE CONCEPT LEGO Teleport is a new gaming platform for children which transforms physical LEGO creations into digital game tools by means of a motion-sensing camera.

LEGO Teleport allows children to build game characters and universes, both physically and digitally. Children can get together and build together – a game in itself – and then transfer what they have built to the Teleport universe and play with each other. They can also meet in the digital world and build characters. Here, there is the opportunity to meet players from all over the world and play across cultures and national borders.

Matias Billeschou, Designer at LEGO

“It’s much faster and easier to change the characters when building them by hand. The Teleport concept offers a good interaction between digital and physical play. Digital games are definitely the future, so the question is not whether we are going to use it, but when,” concludes Billeschou.

The concept is simple: • Scan yourself and become your own unique mini avatar in the digital LEGO game world. • Build your own game characters and tools with physical LEGO bricks and transfer them to the digital world using a motion-sensing camera. • Play with friends and players from around the world. In the Teleport universe, the physical LEGO creations become tools for creating and joining in with numerous games: races, competitions, problem solving games and various role-playing games.

THE OUTCOME “It’s a really good project that we can certainly be inspired by,” says Matias Billeschou, Designer at LEGO. He explains why it is good to work with design students. “It’s nice to get new input to our challenges. The students look at us and our challenges with fresh eyes and an open mind. They are not limited by "We usually" That’s a major advantage,” he explains. Talking about LEGO Teleport, he stresses that the idea of building by hand rather than solely on the computer is a good feature.

Page 58

Page 59


DesignCamp2013 Teachers and Facilitators

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

The challenge this year was probably the greatest we have ever faced because working with play as a developmental parameter forced us as teachers well out of our own secure role. Because there is so much pressure to produce something relevant within an extremely tight time frame it very definitely quickened the mind and stiffened the sinews. But just as we might say to the students when they are facing difficulties "trust the methodology" we had to do the same. And because of that we all went on an amazing journey that showed us bodily and mentally what power there is in living up to our own, inner playful instinct. Barnabas Wetton Head of International Innovation, Kolding School of Design

In our planning of the DesignCamp, we focused sharply on creating a learning environment where the students were obliged to engage playfully with the subjects they were working with. No matter if it was waste water or toys, the students were asked to be significantly more playful and physical in their design work than normally. This was not a risk-free challenge to give to groups consisting of people with very different cultural and professional backgrounds. We deliberately pushed the students out of their comfort zones of well-known design methods and asked them to invent new ones with the volume knob for PLAY turned up to max, and of course we were slightly worried that it would not work. But the students grabbed the challenge with both hands and threw themselves fearlessly into a great number of playful activities, exploring design possibilities through play on a scale I have never experienced before. And produced powerful insights and a range of fine, coherent design projects with a playful edge as a result. Michael Frederiksen Designer

Play to Design

DesignCamp 2013 was an energetic multiplayer experience, played by highly skilled students from all over the world. The theme 'Play' gave us as teachers and the students an almost unlimited amount of possibilities to solve these 12 design challenges. Effectively the students had one week for output, and within that week they transformed into strategic communicative partners, and used design as a playful and meaningful tool to solve several difficult design tasks. They operated as 12 small design agencies, and that was not only due to the fact that they were high level students, but also because of the 'fantastisk' organisation done by the University. As a visiting lecturer who visits the school on a regular basis, it was impressing to see that the University literally transformed into a playground where design flourished. It was an honour to be part of this DesignCamp, nobody used the Comic Sans thank God, and above all it was great Fun! León Kranenburg Designer

Page 60

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Page 61

WHAT I LEARNED IN DESIGNCAMP THIS YEAR Play is about empathy with people – all of whom were once children. Play is about striking a balance between:

I was invited to present to the Kolding School of Design's DesignCamp2013. In my 43 years of teaching college students and adults this group of young designers was the greatest concentration of bright, creative people I have experienced in one place at one time. They were extremely intelligent zippy people. It was a delight to be with them and see their work as it grew. I found the school to be a wonderfully nurturing place with superior instructors. Stephen Jepson Motivator & Inspirator

· · · · ·

Doing and Being Structure and Chaos Learning and Mastery Concentration and Laughter _______ and _________ (fill in your own)

The best way to complain is to make something. Play is a seriously effective response to a world filled with too much seriousness. Play will help anyone solve any problem presented by the status quo. Cordy Swope Design Strategist


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Old Dogs – New Tricks It’s never too late to teach an old dog new tricks. As part of the DesignCamp programme, professionally trained designers could sign up for a three-day Design Course in play and design to improve their skills for integrating play in companies, processes, products and services. Taking the Camp conference on 30 October as its starting point, the course was followed by two intense days organised by the Future Lab, LEGO Group and Play Researcher Ann Charlotte Thorsted.

Design to Play

FROM PLAY INSIGHTS TO CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT What does it take to create a great play experience and how do you make playful innovation? These questions and many more were addressed during the Future Lab, LEGO Group course organised by Mette Pernille Larsen, Senior Insight Researcher at Future Lab, LEGO, and Carol Tang, Intern. They introduced the participants to different ways of conducting user experience studies in order to create play and consumer insights and next, they focused on how to get from insights to creation of design tools that can be used for concept development. Designer Karen Feder, who is also DesignCamp Manager: “There is so much leading up to the phase of actual ideation and designers need to know how to legitimise and apply these initial phases in order for a process to be successful.”

Play to Design

FUN AND INSPIRATIONAL WORKSHOPS AND KILLER TALKS BY ALEXANDER MANU AND MICHAEL SCHRAGE AT THE CONFERENCE. VERY IMPRESSIVE AND VERY INTENSE.

THE CAMP DESIGN COURSE HAS BEEN A GREAT INSPIRATION TO ME. I HAVE LEARNED A GREAT DEAL ABOUT PLAY AND NOW I WANT TO LEARN MORE.

Martin Stoltze, MA Engineering, Isabella

Vibeke Nødskov, Designer, Nutwood Nest

PLAY FOR LIFE Ann Charlotte Thorsted, Assistant Professor at Aalborg University and Founder of the Danish Play Institute, revisited the DesignCamp after her conference talk to inspire and educate the course participants on play as a key phenomenon for the continued personal and professional growth of organisations and employees and to explain the significance of play in creative processes. Ann Charlotte Thorsted: “When we play we train ourselves to be open and to be in this space of unpredictability which is a fact of life within today’s organisations. Play is important because it teaches us how to be in an organisation based on the demands of society at large. And in a new way, which we still don’t know too much about, it is interesting to determine whether play can become a factor in relation to the good work-life. How can play, also at an existential level, help us be open to how we perceive our work-life and our colleagues?” As one of the recurring issues for designers is how to convey the value of design, Ann Charlotte Thorsted introduced social technology; a new form of process for generating ideas and for helping the participants articulate tacit knowledge about the act of creating.

Page 62

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Page 63


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Play to Design

1 million LEGO® bricks, 1300 people, and an entire weekend to build

On the weekend following the DesignCamp2013, Kolding School of Design hosted the LEGO Build the Change event inviting children and grown-ups to ‘play and design’ using 1 million LEGO bricks. The turn-out was fantastic: 1300 visitors!

FUN FACTS OVER THE YEARS, APPROXIMATELY 560 BILLION LEGO ELEMENTS HAVE BEEN MANUFACTURED LAID END TO END, THE NUMBER OF LEGO BRICKS SOLD WOULD REACH MORE THAN 12 TIMES AROUND THE WORLD

The LEGO Group brought an amazing 1 million LEGO bricks to the event where families and friends enjoyed each other’s company and the chance to build bigger, better and differently than they do at home: Huge towers, special brick objects, robots, rockets, animals, people, picnics and funfairs which were admired by fellow LEGO enthusiasts. Parents with children, grandparents with grandchildren, grown-ups who had ‘borrowed’ nieces and nephews or their children’s friends. The Kolding School of Design lobby was packed but yet the atmosphere was pleasant and friendly and the main sounds you would hear were those of deep concentration and hands going through stacks of LEGO bricks. With no manuals and no fixed outcome it was all about innovation and the challenge and gratification of creating something entirely new – a reflection of the design process and indeed the challenge of innovation. While building and playing the many visitors had plenty of time to explore the exhibition of play concepts which design students and companies had spent the last two weeks producing. Everyone was asked to write a description of their creation, and besides the chance to win great LEGO prizes, all visitors received a diploma and a small LEGO present to take home.

Camilla Torpe, Event Manager, LEGO: LEGO strongly believes in LEARNING by DOING. With LEGO Build the Change we want to challenge children to use their imagination, to be creative and to come up with new and sometimes daring ideas. We also want to challenge them to collaborate, communicate and build things together, and thus give them the experience of what cooperation with others can foster. On these issues we feel very connected to Kolding School of Design and the objective of the DesignCamp. Our vision is to inspire and develop the builders of tomorrow by empowering children to build what they want to see in their future.

ON AVERAGE EVERY PERSON ON EARTH OWNS 75 LEGO BRICKS

Page 64

Page 65

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

AMAZING EXCITING HARD INTERNATIONAL PLAYFUL Anne Dieste, Pforzheim University

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Eat & Play Colourful Bean Hummus By Mette Thrane Frandsen Food Designer and Canteen Manager, Kolding School of Design

BASIC HUMMUS 400 grams of white beans 5 bay leaves 1 tablespoon of tahini 1 chili 2 garlic cloves salt

Play with the hummus by adding different colours. 1: add 4 beetroots during cooking 2: add parsley, spinach and basil during blending 3: add 2 tablespoons of turmeric to the hummus when it is ready

Soak the beans overnight. Bring the beans to a boil and skim the foam off. Add the bay leaves, 1 tablespoon of salt, 1 chili, and perhaps some herbs and let the beans simmer for 1 hour. When the beans are tender and creamy throughout, remove them from the stove and cool them. Be sure to save the water. Blend the beans with the tahini, chili and garlic and add some of the boiled water that you saved until you get the texture you want. Season with salt and chili.

Page 66

Page 67

Bake a delicious white bread and play with the colours of the bread. Divide the dough into portions and add e.g. spinach, beetroots, squid ink and corn flour. Play with the dough by braiding it, twisting it, cutting it into shapes, or whatever your imagination tells you. Enjoy!


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

TWO INTENSE WEEKS OF DESIGNING WITH PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD. A CLOSED AND FOCUSED COCOON WHERE YOU CAN ‘TURN FROM A CATERPILLAR INTO A BUTTERFLY’. AND NEXT TO THAT A LOT OF FUN WITHIN OUR INTERNATIONAL ‘VILLAGE OF NATIONALITIES’!

Play to Design

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Students

Saskia Juliette Schoonebeek, Utrecht School of the Arts, The Netherlands

Page 68

Beayue Louie, Emily Carr University, Canada

Yarden Deddi, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem, Israel

Robert Werner, Emily Carr University, Canada

Luo Peiyu, Tongji University, Shanghai, China

Megan Czaja, Pratt Institute, USA

Martina Hajny, Universität für angewandte Kunst Wien, Austria

Nadine Foik, Pratt Institute, USA

Ellen Rykkelid, AHO, Oslo, Norway

Jacob Theodore Horowitz, Case Western University, USA

Tamás Boldizsár, Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design Budapest, Hungaria

Seshmitha Vedachalam, Case Western University, USA

Lukas Uliarczyk, Tomas Bata University, Czech Republic

Jared Gower, Greenside Design Center, South Africa

Thomas Helmer, Hochschule für Gestaltung Schwäbisch-Gmünd, Germany

Tanya Smit, Greenside Design Center, South Africa

Nina Delanovic, NFT, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Daniel Glazman, Bezalel Academy of Art & Design, Israel

Anne-Marie Gundelwein, Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaften

Dana Ben Shalom, Bezalel Academy of Art & Design, Israel

Würzburg, Germany

Ruth Fogel, Bezalel Academy of Art & Design, Israel

Amanda Hoffner, HDK, Gothenburg, Sweden

Ruchika Vakkiyl Nambiar, Sristhi School of Art, Design and Technology, India

MinJi Kim, Rhode Island School of Design, USA/South Korea

Pramod Mangalore Pai, Sristhi School of Art, Design and Technology, India

Melana Bogdan, NFT, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Zhuoyan Qian, Tongji University, China

Kamilla Falkenberg-Knudsen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Yu Xia, Tongji University, China

Nanna Rosenfeldt-Olsen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Miyajima Chie, Tama Art University, Japan

Linnea Lykkegaard Laursen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Manabu Ariyoshi, Tama Art University, Japan

Niels Sylvester Rasmussen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Saskia Schoonebeek, Utrecht School of the Arts, The Netherlands

René Petersen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Sjoerd Mulder, Utrecht School of the Arts, The Netherlands

Lars Majlund Mørk, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Anne Dieste, Pforzheim University, Germany

Rune Magelund Alexandersen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Natalie Morcinek, Pforzheim University, Germany

Rasmus Niklas Nørgaard Buhl, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Jake Rich, Kingston University, Great Britain

Sylvester Agerbæk Hansen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Alice Forestan, Kingston University, Great Britain

Olav Kristoffer Markussen Johannessen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Mariana Negreiros, London College of Fashion, Great Britain

Denise Dyrvig Clemente Jørgensen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Sara Pignatelli, London College of Fashion, Great Britain

Bo Frøsig, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Abir Iqbal Malik, Aalto University, Finland

Kasper Lundsfryd Pedersen, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Tatyana Chuzhanova, Aalto University, Finland

Noémie Thomas, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Xinyu Zhang, HDK, Sverige

Birkir Gudmundsson, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Ana Filipa Gouveira Pardal, IADE, Portugal

Kirstine Gjerstad Mackeprang, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Ines Catarina Teixeira Roque, IADE, Portugal

Anne Serup Grove, Kolding School of Design, Denmark

Page 69


INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013

Design to Play

Partners

Local partners from all over the Region of Southern Denmark – and more

#01 Terrariet Vissenbjerg/ Terrarium Vissenbjerg Kirkehelle 5 5492 Vissenbjerg Fyn Morten Jørgensen

#05 Kolding Spildevand/ Kolding Waste Water Kolding Åpark 1, st. tv 6000 Kolding Per Holm

#09 Oplevelsesparken Universe/ Science Theme Park Universe Mads Patent Vej 1 6430 Nordborg Pia Bech Mathiesen

#02 Billund Kommune/ Billund Municipality Jorden Rundt 1 7200 Grindsted Heidi Sønderby

#06 LEGO Play Aastvej 1 7190 Billund Caroline S Hansen

#10 B&O Play Peter Bangs Vej 15 7600 Struer Jørgen Daucke

#03 Koldinghus Markdanersgade 11 6000 Kolding Nanna Ebert #04 Syddansk Universitet/ University of Southern Denmark Alsion 2 6400 Sønderborg Henrik Sproedt

#07 PLAYALIVE Platzvej 2 7100 Vejle Lau Kofoed Kierstein #08 LEGO Digital Solutions Havremarken 1 7190 Billund Eik Brandsgaard

#11 Kolding Cityforening/ Kolding City Association Helligkorsgade 5,2 6000 Kolding Mette Schumacher #12 Billund Lufthavn/ Billund Airport Passagerterminalen 10 7190 Billund Mette Frøkjær Hansen

Page 70

10

12 2

8

7

6

11 3

5 1

9 4


Play to Design Articles, Projects, Insights, and Inspiration

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNCAMP2013 International experts, hand-picked international design students, companies and experienced designers gathered at the International DesignCamp2013 ‘Play to Design / Design to Play’ to explore play within the context of design in order to investigate and develop design methods for integrating play in companies, processes, products and services.

The International DesignCamp2013 took place from 28 October – 8 November 2013 and was organised by Kolding School of Design and D2i – Design to innovate in collaboration with the LEGO Group.

Read more on designcamp2013.dskd.dk

Inspired by international speakers and focusing on why people need to play and how we motivate them and improve their terms for doing so, students and industry teamed up to work on specific challenges relating to ten Danish companies.

THE EUROPEAN UNION The European Social Fund

Investing in your future


Dc13 camp summary digital 01