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January MArch-April – February 2016 2015 ~ Arizona’s ~ Arizona’s Original Original Irish Irish Newspaper Newspaper ~ Vol. ~ Vol. 27, No. 26, 2 No. 1

LET THE

GAMES

BEGIN! Scottish Highland games that is… PAGE 17

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

3

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Ann Niemann

W

PHOTO BY MIKE CARRO

McClelland Library, Phoenix

GIVEAWAY!!

tickets to the 28th Annual Win ONE of six pairs of adult (value $48 each pair)! Your Arizona Renaissance Festival 27. choice of date through March and Put “Ren” in the subject line d send your name, address, an k. phone to info@desertshamroc wing. com by March 10 for the dra LOTS of fun! See ad page 4

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Enjoy life and blessings, and a good read in COVER PHOTO BY ANN NIEMANN AT THE IRISH CULTURAL CENTER, PHOENIX

ARIZONA’S ORIGINAL IRISH NEWSPAPER

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hat a fun photo shoot with Scottish Highland athletes, Heather MacDonald and Eddie Brown! The backdrop for the COVER PHOTO is at the Irish Cultural Center/ McClelland Library in downtown Phoenix. Eddie is an Arizona native and ASU graduate. He lives in Mesa, Arizona with his wife and daughter and has been competing in the Scottish heavy events since 2012. He competed in the IHGF All American championship in 2013 where he placed 4th. In 2014, he became the world amateur caber tossing champion in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We’re cheering on the Arizona Diamondbacks. With Major League Baseball’s Spring Training games in March, Eddie is wondering though, “Which one o’ ye fellas was callin’ me kilt a skirt?” Somber thought! Phoenix is hosting the Women’s World Championships (see page 17). Heather was first introduced through Fellow A-Class competitor, Scott Hutchison; they were teammates (Track & Field) in college. She won her very first games in 2006 and ended up falling in love with the sport and the camaraderie. Heather holds various field records at games in New Mexico, Southern California, and Arizona; 2015 Scottish Games League Southwest Champion; 7-year Women’s World Championships competitor 7 -year U.S. National Heavy Events Championships (Pleasanton, CA) competitor; and 5-time Pacific Northwest Scottish Games Championships competitor. “Highland Games has been an important part of my life for a decade, and a source of so many strong friendships, indelible memories, and positive connections. Beyond the feats of strength, we accomplish (particularly the women), we all share a common thread of community and sportsmanship that transcends the field itself.” Heather’s personal records are: 30’ Braemar Stone, 38’ Open Stone, 42’3” Hwavy Weight for Distance, 73’ Light Weight for Distance, 95’2” Light Hammer, 82’ Heavy Hammer, 15’6” Weight for Height, 26’ Sheaf. Biggest caber turned: 17’6”, 75 lbs. She is a Professor of English, Arizona State University Writers Studio; and Adjunct Instructor at Glendale Community College.

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK

Serving the Celtic Community 2320 E. Baseline Rd., #148-623 Phoenix, AZ 85042 • (602) 568-3455 Visit www.DesertShamrock.com • E-mail: info@desertshamrock.com Owner & Editor in Chief • Ann Niemann Publisher • Niemann Publishing, Inc. Art Direction, Design & Layout • Heidi Barry Will, Erin Loukili, Jaclyn Threadgill Masthead Design • Elaine’s Design Emporium Contributing Columnists Janice Bryson • J Carro • Vicki Champion Katie Caufield Ginder • Brian Hanrahan • Ellen Harrington Adrienne Leavy • Carmelita Lee • Iain Lundy Lynn Herdman Mascarelli • Leah Rossow Maureen & Jack Sullivan • Marshall Trimble • Kathleen Walters Liz Warren • Jan Whalen • Caroline Woodiel • Gary Woodside Publisher – Julie O’Mahar (2003 - 2013) Editor - Kathleen Wood (2003 - 2008) Publisher - Maureen O’Mahar (1996 - 2002) Founding Publisher - Robert E. Graham (1987 - 1996) Copyright © 2016 - Niemann Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. The opinions expressed herein are the opinions of the writers, and not necessarily those of ‘The Desert Shamrock,’ the publisher or the editorial staff. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Publication of advertising herein does not necessarily constitute endorsement of a product or service. Unsolicited materials become the property of Niemann Publishing, Inc. All unsolicited materials are greatly appreciated and carefully evaluated although publication is not guaranteed.

2320 E. Baseline Rd., #148-623 Phoenix, AZ 85042

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Irish Colleen Titleholders Guests of the Queen Saturday, March 26


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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

TABLE OF

SPECIAL SECTION TO THE ENTERTAINER! » MARCH 2016

CONTENTS

Mar – Apr 2016 ~ Arizona’s Original Irish Newspaper 39 Pot of Gold Music Festival 43 Kiss Me I’m Irish Run & Walk 44 Book of Kells Seminar 50 and BACK Discovery Series: Explore UK &

ARTS

FEATURES

19 Book Review: “Up Cappanale Way” 37 FREE Online Course: Intro C.S. Lewis 40 Celtic Artisan: Jean Doig, Lace Maker, Spinner, Weaver 41 Spinning Around Ireland

Ireland, OrigiNation 51 San Diego St. Patrick’s Parade & Festival

HISTORY

BUSINESS

6 Irish Tales from Arizona Territory: Ranchers 6 Arizona: Did you know?

30 Irish Network Phx: Maureen and Jack Sullivan

CULTURE

12 Michael Bidwill, Grand Marshal Phoenix St. Patrick’s Parade

SCOTS

8 Maureen O’Hara, 1920-2015 10 Centenary of 1916 Easter Rising 12 Irish Person of Year Paul Ahern 14 Young Irish Titleholders Selected 20 St. Patrick, Moses, and Viracocha 23 Tucson Grand Marshal T.P. Prendiville 34 Keltic Kitchen: Hot Cross Buns 35 Celtic Caterer: Cooking Demos in Phx 42 Anam Cara Honorees, 2015

16 Davy Gowan, Scottish Squatter at Tonto 17 Who’s Ready? Glenmo Games 52 38 Highland Tea with Diana Gabaldon

TRAVEL

28 The Guinness Storehouse, Dublin 29 Left Lane Maureen, Part 13: Galway

WELSH 44 Frongoch and Easter Rising of 1916

EVENTS

24

Leprechauns, Legends and Myths

OUT & ABOUT

4 Arizona Renaissance Festival 11 Events at Irish Cultural Center & Library 13 Phoenix St. Patrick’s Parade & Faire 18 Young Artists & Authors Showcase 18 Phoenix Mayor’s Int’l. Gala 19 Tucson Mayor’s Luncheon 21 Pirate Party 23 Tucson St. Patrick’s Parade & Festival 38 Northern Arizona Happenings 38 Sedona St. Patrick’s Parade & Festival

26-27 Photo Galleries

DIRECTORIES

32 Celtic Pubs and Eateries 46-47 Organizations, Sister Cities, Dance, Clans

CALENDAR 48-49 Full Schedule of Events including live music on March 17

NEXT ISSUE SNEAK PEEK

Special look at doctors and staff of Celtic ancestry

36

The Thistle, the Shamrock and Narnia

Days for Girls in Limpopo, South Africa. Sign up to help at Mad B’s Quilt and Sew workshops in Mesa. paulab@daysforgirls.org

SM

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HISTORY

MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

IRISH TALES

FROM ARIZONA TERRITORY/RANCHERS

By Janice Ryan Bryson Photos by J. Bryson

M ARIZONA:

Did you know?

33. Clark Gable and Carole Lombard, two of the most prominent movie stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age, were married on March 18, 1939, in Kingman, Arizona. 34. Montezuma never visited Montezuma National Monument—he was born 100 years after the prehistoric dwelling was abandoned. The monument was misnamed for the Aztec emperor when it was rediscovered in the 1860s. 35. Sandra Day O’Connor, the first woman appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court, grew up on a large family ranch near Duncan, Arizona. 36. The Arizona Cardinals are the oldest continuous franchise in the National Football League, dating back to 1898. [See story page 12]

PHOTO BY GARY M. JOHNSON

Read more fun and fascinating facts about Arizona NEXT edition.

Arizona’s Official State Historian, Marshall Trimble has been called the “Will Rogers of Arizona.” He’s a “cowboy philosopher,” educator, lecturer, author, folk singer and stage performer, and appears frequently on radio and television. He created and taught Arizona history at Scottsdale Community College for forty years where he was also Director of Southwest Studies.

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any of the Irish heading west into the American frontier traveled to the mining camps to seek their fortunes in striking it rich in gold, silver, or copper. Others decided they could take advantage of the heavily populated camps to seek their fortunes in other ways, providing beef or lamb to hungry miners or owning a prosperous saloon or mercantile business. Arizona had two sets of Ryan brothers who were engaged in the cattle business. There is something about that Ryan name…. When I was at a clan gathering in Ireland I was told, “All Ryans are rogues, but not all rogues are Ryans.” I guess we made our reputation in Ireland on that note. The first set of Ryan brothers were located in Southern Arizona. Their father, Matthew Ryan, was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, and immigrated to America when he was only thirteen. He was an Irish success story with butcher shops, packing houses, and mercantile businesses in Kansas and ranches in Wyoming. In 1894, his sons Matthew Jr. and Jeptha, later joined by their brother Thomas, ventured into cattle ranching in Southern Arizona and New Mexico. By 1896, they were the third largest ranching enterprise in Cochise County; exceeded only by the Chiricahua and Erie Cattle Companies. They began closing their ranches in Arizona by 1901 due to drought and the loss of land with settlers moving into the area. The population growth included men working the mines in Gleeson, Pearce, and Bisbee. By February 1903, 18,000 head of cattle had been shipped to their company feeder lots in Colorado as the Ryan brothers from Kansas severed their ties with Arizona. At that time, my grandfather William Albert Ryan was 17 years old and in time, he and his brothers Neil, Joseph, and Emmet would form another Ryan brothers group with ranches in Gila and Apache Counties. The brothers’ parents, William and Anna

Moloney Ryan, were from Counties Tipperary and Limerick and had settled in Globe during the early 1880s. When the boys were young, the trail herds would stop near Globe on their way to the railroad shipping point in Holbrook. All the cowboys wanted to take advantage of the saloons and dance halls in Globe before tackling the long trail to Holbrook. They would pay the local boys to watch the cattle while they headed to town. The boys would take advantage of the absence of the cowboys and practice their roping and bull dogging skills on the cattle. Will and his brothers leased ranches on the Apache Reservation; both Will and his brother Emmet lived on the Reservation. Will’s wife Edith was a novelty to the Apaches as they had not seen many white women and they would come by the cabin and look at her through the windows. She would fix them lunch and they were always respectful of her. Through the years this set of Ryan brothers also ranched at the Five Slash Ranch in Globe, the Box Bar at Fort McDowell, and Will even ventured into the sheep business. Janice Ryan Bryson descended from Irish Pioneers who arrived in the Arizona Territory in the 1880s. She is co-founder of the Irish Arizona Project and co-author of the book Irish Arizona. Janice was named an Arizona Culture Keeper for her research on the Irish in our state and is a recipient of the 2015 Anam Cara Award.

The first documented herd of cattle to arrive in Arizona was in 1540 as part of Franciso Vazquez de Coronado’s expedition as he searched for the Seven Cities of Cibola on behalf of the King of Spain.


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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

We Say Goodbye to the Pride of Ireland

MAUREEN O’HARA T

By June Parker Beck

1920-2015

here are no finer words to describe legendary Irish actress Maureen O’Hara than those written by Anthony J.F. O’Reilly, Chairman, President and CEO of Heinz Food at their World Headquarters. Mr. O’Reilly composed this letter for the program of the Ireland Fund when they honored Maureen at a gala dinner in 1991: “There is no doubt that Maureen O’Hara is a descendant of one great Celtic queen, and should Ireland have a queen today, surely it would be she. Time and again we have witnessed her standing majestically and resolutely for virtue and justice before the boldest of men, the likes of John Wayne and Errol Flynn. And we have seen them withered by her fiery indignation. And what queen would be more gracious or kind or more beautiful, or inspire us to greater acts of heroism. Maureen, you have captured hearts throughout the world and made each of us from Ireland proud that you are one of our own...” In the bygone days of the silver screen, Maureen O’Hara was quite at home as a swashbuckling heroine fencing her way across the high seas or standing toe-to-toe with the likes of rugged star, John Wayne. Things really hadn’t changed that much in the 1990s when she returned to film at the age of 70 in “Only The Lonely” with John Candy. Getting back into the swing of things, she surged ahead making several made-for-TV movies, “The Christmas Box,” (1995); “Cab to Canada” (1998); and “The Last Dance” (2000). This magnificent lady brought to every role she played, intelligence, strength, and pride in being a woman. To most female fans, Maureen O’Hara seems to represent a womanly pride and elegance that they greatly admire. However, her incredible beauty caused the studio heads to relegate her to more decorative roles. Thankfully, director John Ford came to her rescue periodically and cast her in films like “How Green Was My Valley” and “The Quiet Man.” She is also remembered for such classics as “Miracle on 34th Street,” “The Parent Trap,” and the ever popular “McLintock.”

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

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Maureen completed her autobiography, “Tis Herself, A Memoir.” In 2005, she was honored as “Woman of the Year” by the Irish America Magazine; and went on to receive many other honors in Ireland and the U.S. in subsequent years. On November 8, 2014, Maureen was awarded a long overdue Oscar for Lifetime Achievement by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Governors Board. I was honored to be invited to this celebration and had tears in my eyes as she received a standing ovation followed by presentation speeches by Clint Eastwood and Liam Neeson. In 2012, Maureen began her official retirement by making her home near her beloved grandson, Conor FitzSimons, his wife Elga, and two great grandchildren, Everest and Baylee, in Boise Idaho. Last August 17, 2015 on her 95th birthday, they held a small gathering of family and friends to celebrate. A couple of weeks prior (through the “Maureen O’Hara Magazine on Facebook” extension page), I invited fans to submit a brief birthday video and the response was amazing! We received 63 video clips from all over the world and uploaded them to YouTube! One was from Ralna English of the Lawrence Welk TV show (she sang and played the piano for her birthday greeting.) Elga FitzSimons played the videos for Maureen at that party. We were so happy to be even a small part of this special occasion; which would be Maureen’s last birthday. Over 10,000 people have visited the YouTube Maureen O’Hara Birthday video site. Add to that a 100,000+ Facebook “Likes” and you have one very popular lady with fans from three generations from a worldwide prospective.

As Maureen’s archivist and official website editor, Maureen O’Hara Magazine, for over 20 years, I am humbled by her trust and confidence in me and grateful to have had her friendship. I’ve learned so many things on this adventure. First and foremost, Maureen had tremendous pride in her Irish heritage— born Maureen FitzSimons on August 17, 1920 in Ranelagh, Dublin, Ireland—it was her inspiration from the beginning. Her mother was an accomplished contralto. Her father was part owner of “The Shamrock Rovers,” a renown Irish soccer team, and managed a business in Dublin. Maureen’s athletic skills from an early age undoubtedly enabled her to perform her own stunts, which was rare at the time for any actress. All this coupled with her great love for her family and an impeccable work ethic. She gave 100% to everything she did. One could not ask for a better legacy.

Her life away from films has been an adventure that rivals any make-believe story on the screen. As the wife of famed pilot Brig. General Charles Blair, she experienced what she reflects as the happiest ten years of her life. When Charlie was killed in a tragic plane crash in 1978, Maureen became the first woman to own and manage a scheduled airline. She considered all the rough spots in her life, “another hill to climb.” Maureen O’Hara was a mother, grandmother, sister, and a friend. Her family was the most important thing in her life. To coin a worn-out phrase of this era, “It just doesn’t get any better than that.” We lost Maureen on October 24, 2015. On November 9, she was laid to rest beside her beloved husband at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. May she rest in peace.

Watch film, music, and interview clips In 1991, June Beck decided she’d try her hand at writing and selected Irish actress Maureen O’Hara as her topic. This evolved into even more research on Maureen and her multi-talented family, creating a website (later made Maureen’s “official” site by Maureen and her brother, Charles FitzSimons), a trip to Ireland, new friends, and dozens of other wonderful experiences. June attributes her 24-year association as a blessing. June resides in Tempe, Arizona.

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ARTS

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

2016 Marks the International Commemoration of the Centenary of the

1916 EASTER RISING

By Caroline Woodiel

O

ne hundred years ago, the city of Dublin was seized and occupied by the very poets, teachers, labor leaders, and ordinary citizens who walked its streets daily. While outside of Ireland many may not have an instant recollection or idea of what took place in Dublin over those 6 days after Easter, it was much different in 1916. In April of 1916, the world was well aware of the events in Dublin. Newspapers around the globe, including the New York Times and local papers like the Arizona Republican, covered the plight of the men and women of Ireland’s Easter Rising. Now, 100 years later, the world finds itself again reflecting upon the Irish struggle for independence. Just as many Arizonans found themselves first learning about the Irish plight through day after day of front page coverage, in 2016 many Arizonans will learn about the Easter Rising in The Desert Shamrock. Dublin was a drastic example of extremes at the turn of the century.  Severe poverty plagued its citizens, while the landed gentry lived lives of excess and luxury.  The Irish people found their voice in a 19th century cultural and language revival, reinforcing their identity and providing a sounding board for the many issues facing the Irish people.  As the 20th century moved into its second decade, the newly unified voice of the Irish called out to the discontent felt by laborers, suffragettes, poets, academics, and playwrights. The frustrations seemed to

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be about to come to a head in 1914 with the possibility of the long awaited promise of self-governance, or Home Rule. However, any hope for self-governance was short circuited in the British Parliament when WWI broke out. While the horrors of war waged around the many Irish soldiers fighting and dying in British uniforms, many of the men and women back home did not give up hope on Ireland obtaining its own Jim Daugherty, freedom. Arms were presenter of the “1916 smuggled and secret Easter Rebellion groups were reorganized Commemoration” at in hopes of a future the Irish Cultural Center republic. Many of these were headed not March 26. by soldiers, but by the academics, artists, and labor leaders who were at the heart of the cultural revival. Groups like the Irish Republican Brotherhood and Citizen’s Army joined with the Irish Volunteers and together, set an eventual date for what would be later known as the Easter Rising. The Monday after Easter 1916, the Volunteers marched in formation into Dublin on April 24. The citizenry had become accustomed to drilling and was unaware of the six-day siege about to take hold of their city.  With the General Post Office, or GPO, as their headquarters, Pádraig Pearse read aloud the Proclamation declaring the formation of the Irish Republic, and the right of the Irish people to self-governance. Six days of bloody war ensued, and in the end the small number of rebels were forced to surrender to the British Army. Soon afterwards, secret court martials were held for the men deemed responsible for the Easter Rising. One by one the British government condemned them to death and swiftly carried out their executions.  The politicized martyrdom of the Rising’s leaders only added fuel to the fire of their cause. The spark ignited by these men, and the other participants of the Easter Rising, seized on the talk of forced Irish conscription and became the torch that brought about the Irish Free State and the now Republic of Ireland. On the eve of the centenary of their great sacrifice, the world remembers and reflects on the men and women of the Easter Rising and the aftermath of their actions just as they did 100 years ago. To learn more about the 1916 Easter Rising, visit the McClelland Library’s exhibition “Remembering the Easter Rising: Historical Context and Cultural Legacy.” The Irish Cultural Center has its annual multi-media presentation “1916 Easter Rebellion Commemoration” presented by Jim Daugherty on March 26.

Éamon de Valera, prisoner at Richmond Barracks

IMAGE FROM THE 1916 EXHIBIT AT THE MCCLELLAND LIBRARY COURTESY OF KILMAINHAM GAOL; WWW.HERITAGEIRELAND.IE/ EN/KILMAINHAMGAOL.

Resolve for Irish Independence The swift executions in 1916 further fanned the resolve for freedom and independence of the Irish.

May 3

May 8

Pádraig Pearse

Éamonn Ceannt

Thomas Clarke

Seán Heuston

Thomas MacDonagh

Michael Mallin

May 4

May 9

Joseph Mary Plunkett Edward Daly William Pearse Michael O’Hanrahan

May 5 John MacBride

Con Colbert

Thomas Kent (in Cork)

May 12 James Connolly Seán MacDiarmada

August 3 Roger Casement (in England)

The efforts of these men and the many others who joined, culminated in The Republic of Ireland Act 1948 came into force on 18 April 1949, Easter Monday, the 33rd anniversary of the beginning of the Easter Rising. Caroline Woodiel is a hobby photographer, border collie enthusiast, and librarian with ancestors of both Irish and Scottish descent. She holds a Bachelor’s of History from the University of Colorado and a Master’s of Library and Information Science from the University of Arizona. Caroline is the Public Services Coordinator for the McClelland Irish Library in Phoenix.


CULTURE

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

CARDINALS PRESIDENT KICKS OFF ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE

Parade and faire are part of a day-long Irish party on March 12 in downtown Phoenix

T

he 33rd annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade starts at 10 a.m. March 12 at Third and Sheridan Streets and heads south to McDowell Road. The popular parade is the Valley’s only authentic day-long Irish party and is sure to keep the eyes of the Irish (and Irish wannabes, smiling). The parade theme is “2016 - An Irish Centennial,” which ties in with the global commemorations of the Easter Rising of 1916 in Dublin. A Faire featuring a roster of Irish rock and traditional bands, Irish food and fashion also starts at 10 a.m. at Margaret Hance Park off Central Avenue.

in Washington, D.C. where last May he was awarded an honorary doctorate of Humane Letters and delivered the school’s commencement address 25 years after his own graduation. He’s a wee bit Irish himself and is honored to represent the Arizona Irish Community.

IRISH PERSON OF THE YEAR

Paul Ahern, Architect, President of the Irish Cultural and Learning Foundation Board

GRAND MARSHAL

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Michael Bidwill joined the Cardinals in 1996 after six years as a federal prosecutor in Phoenix. Since he took over as team President in 2007, the Cardinal have gone .500 or better in seven of nine seasons (just twice in previous 20 years) and have posted four double-digit win seasons (none in previous 20 years). The 2015 season was a banner one for the organization as the team won the NFC West, set a franchise record for wins in the regular season (13) and earned the first postseason bye in team history. Arizona also played its eighth and ninth postseason games since Bidwill took over as President in 2007. The Cardinals played just seven total playoff games in the previous 73 years between 1933 (when the NFL first instituted a postseason) and 2006. Michael notably spearheaded the effort that led to the creation of University of Phoenix Stadium where the Cardinals have sold out every game played since it opened in 2006. The iconic, award-winning stadium has been a major factor in the transformation of the Cardinals and a catalyst for the team’s success. It also hosted its second Super Bowl in February of 2015 as well as the Pro Bowl a week before. Bidwill was influential in landing both events which combined to deliver an economic impact of $720 million to the region. Michael has taken on an increasing role in the NFL and the greater Phoenix business community. Bidwill earned a B.S. in Finance from St. Louis University and a law degree from Catholic University

PHOTO BY DIANE AHERN

PHOTO BY DARREN URBAN, COURTESY OF ARIZONA CARDINALS

Michael Bidwill – President, Arizona Cardinals Football Club

Paul Ahern was born in Las Vegas, Nevada to John and Martha Ahern. Paul was named after his father, who gave him guidance in everyday things, as well as business, work ethic and even, on occasion, matters of the heart. He is the third of four children. He met and married Diane, while attending ASU. They have three daughters and five grandchildren. Paul’s great grandfather, Patrick, emigrated from County Kerry as a teenager with his brother around 1850. Patrick was denied entry to the U.S. in New York but was accepted in Canada. Eventually his son James, Paul’s grandfather, settled in Nevada. Paul’s father remained in Nevada where he created Ahern Rentals, specializing in construction equipment. Paul earned a Bachelor of Architecture from Arizona State University in 1973. Two years after graduating, Paul became a registered architect and worked for an established firm in Tempe. In 1979 a new firm was created that included Paul as a partner and owner. In 1997, Paul designed An Halla Mor, or the Great Hall, which was the first of three buildings that constitute the Irish Cultural Center in central Phoenix. An Halla Mor opened in 2002. Paul was able to meet the design criteria for the newly started Center by providing a meeting place for a variety of Irish cultural activities, including the Center’s Academy of Irish and Celtic Studies. The Cottage, which opened in 2004, is a replica of an authentic 19th century County Clare stone cottage. Paul’s most recent project, the McClelland Library, opened to the public in October 2012. The library is more than a repository for books: it houses the administrative offices of the Center as well as the Center’s Academy classes; exhibit space; and the Frances McClelland Genealogy Research Center. Paul enjoys leading the newly formed Currach Team Phoenix. There is nothing that makes him happier than to see the Center being filled with people enjoying themselves.


33rd Annual Phoenix

An Irish St. Cen ten nial

Patrick’s Day Parade and Faire

Parade Irish Faire

Begins 10am on 3rd Street & Sheridan; goes south to McDowell

Raffle: Win a Trip To Ireland Irish Cultural & Learning Foundation

Food Drive & $100 Raffle

Friends of Saint Patrick Centre AZ Chapter

Marching Bands Irish Dancers Government Dignitaries Police & Fire Vehicles 2016 Arizona Colleen/Rose & Court Bagpipers Floats

10am to 5pm at the Irish Cultural Center & Margaret Hance Park

Admission $10 Kids 12 & under FREE Senior (55+) & Military $8 CASH ONLY (ATMS available) 3 Stages of Irish Music and Dancers Kids Area Food and Beverages Crafters 1916 Commemorative Exhibit at the McClelland Library

FREE PARKING & SHUTTLE TO FAIRE at 1850 N Central Ave (West side of Central & Palm Ln)

or take the light rail to Roosevelt

Saturday March 12 StPatricksDayPhoenix.org


CULTURE

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

ARIZONA’S

YOUNG IRISH TITLEHOLDERS SELECTED By Sarah Houghtelin Koerner

T

he Little Miss Shamrock and Arizona Irish Lass are Irish heritage programs open to young girls six to seventeen years of age with some Irish ancestry. These encourage pride in one’s culture, as well as involvement in the Irish Community in Phoenix and Arizona. The winners will assist the 2016 Arizona Colleen and Rose as representatives at various events around the state, including the 2016 Phoenix St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Faire on Saturday, March 12. The Shamrock contestants were seven talented and remarkable young ladies: Ada Hamilton (8), Rylee Hankal (11), Lily Wnek (10), Molly Ruley (11), Keira Ruzovich (11), Katie Hannigan (11), and Erin Larson (9). The Irish lasses featured five incredible teens: Marlene Hannigan (13), Anne Gardner-Hajek (13), Sophia Promponas (15), Kaitlynn McAulay (14), and Draevyn Clark (16). The adjudication panels included dancers, artists, and outstanding women in the Irish Community. This year’s judges were Laura Masterson, Jacquilyn Avery, Nicole Lopez; and Cassandra Lopez, 2015 Arizona Colleen and Rose, Mallory Melton, and the representa-

tive from the Arizona Renaissance Festival, Lady Letitia Peighton MacCarthy. Contestants arrived early in the morning to meet each other and rehearse. Check in began at 10:00 am followed by games so the participants could relax and have some fun together. They were able to practice speaking into a microphone, walking up and down the stage stairs, and each girl rehearsed her talent on stage before the judges arrived. After rehearsals, the contestants enjoyed lunch together and then played a few more games before getting dressed for the big event. The Selection began with a meet and greet where the judges could meet each girl and their family in a relaxed atmosphere before the emcee called for everyone to find a seat so the main part of the program could begin. The co-emcees were the 2015 Arizona Irish Lass Ella Sullivan assisted by 2015 Little Miss Shamrocks Ceilli Tobin and Megan Kernaghan. Each young lady began by introducing herself to the audience. These were followed by an on-stage, three-minute individual interview with questions from the panel of judges, including, “Tell us something about your family being Irish.” Once the interview portion was completed, the competitors began their talents. The audience enjoyed singing, dancing, and playing musical instruments. After a short break for refreshments and final tabulation, the outgoing Shamrocks and Lass entertained the audience with their talent performances one last time before crowning their successors. Finally, the moment everyone had waited for arrived as Sullivan, Tobin, and Kernaghan invited all

contestants to join them on stage. Each girl was given flowers and a special award that highlighted each young lady’s contribution to a great performance and a funfilled day. Then, the titleholders were announced and the crowd welcomed the 2016 Little Miss Shamrocks, Rylee Hankal and Molly Ruley, and our 2016 Arizona Irish Lass, Anne Gardner- Hajek. For more information, please email juniorprograms@azcolleen.org. Sarah Houghtelin Koerner was crowned the 2004 Arizona Colleen and currently directs the two junior age group selections for the Arizona Colleen Programs under the auspices of the Phoenix St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Faire Committee.

The earliest recorded evidence of St. Patrick’s Day being celebrated outside of Ireland, other than by Irish soldiers, is provided by Jonathan Swift, the Dublin-born author of Gulliver’s Travels. In his Journal to Stella, he notes that in 1713 the parliament at Westminster was closed because it was St. Patrick’s Day and that the Mall in London was so full of decorations that he thought “all the world was Irish”. WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM » WWW.ENTERTAINERMAG.COM


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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

SCOTS

Tonto Natural Bridge

BE LUNDY

too good to let slip. Originally from the Scottish fishing port of Inverbervie, Gowan arrived in the Arizona Territory in the 1870s. While prospecting along Pine Creek, he came across the amazing travertine arch, believed to be the largest in the world. Indians were a constant danger and on one occasion, Gowan had to hide under the bridge for three days. When he emerged he behaved in true Scottish entrepreneurial style…and claimed squatters’ rights. Gowan insisted he had been the first white man to set eyes on the bridge, a highly unlikely story but one that suited his assertion. More than 20 years later, his nephew, David Goodfellow, arrived with his family in Arizona and set up home with ‘Uncle Davy’. Gowan refused to settle, he continued to mine, and his sense of humor showed through in census documents where he gave as his birthplace ‘Atlantic Ocean’. Old Davy Gowan left home one day in the winter of 1925 and never returned. Weeks later his frozen body was found near Deer Creek. But his discovery— Tonto Natural Bridge—lives on as one of Arizona’s most striking hidden gems.

DAVY GOWAN

The Scottish ‘squatter’ at Tonto

Indians in pursuit? Davy Gowan, an imposing man with long red hair and a thick Scottish accent, was a nomadic character. He had been shipwrecked off the west coast of America and wandered from place to place working as a miner and a gold prospector. But Gowan was also as shrewd as they come and at the Tonto bridge he saw an opportunity that was

By Iain Lundy

T

onto Natural Bridge is one of Arizona’s most stunning natural wonders. Set in the countryside near Payson, it is a magnet for walkers, hikers, outdoor lovers and tourists. But how many realize that this scenic treasure was ‘discovered’ by a rough and ready Scotsman on the run from

Iain Lundy grew up in Ayrshire, Scotland, and has worked as a journalist since the 1970s. He and his wife moved from Scotland to Arizona in March. His paternal grandfather came from Downpatrick, County Down, and moved to the west of Scotland as a young man.

Grandmother is from Tiree, an island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland

Grandmother is from Tiree, an island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

GLENMO GAMES 52! Submitted by J. Carro, Marketing Ideals Company

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oin us for a Scottish weekend celebration! The Glenmorangie Scottish Highland Games is comprised of many things: world-class athletic competitions, Highland dance, reenactment presentations, educational seminars, clans, food, live music, bagpipe & drum bands from all over the globe and lots of fun for the wee lads & lasses. Have you ever seen a big burley man in a kilt toss a telephone-pole-like caber? Did you know that the origination of pipe bands comprised of pipers, side drummers, bass drummers and occasionally a tenor drummer occurred sometime after the battle of Waterloo in 1815? They are Solo Piping, Solo Drumming, Drum Major and Pipe Bands. Or how about, that right along with the ancient stories of daring warriors and master pipers you

will find dance as a crucial part of celebrations and ceremonies of the Highlands? Nothing can compare with the graceful power of a Highland dancer recalling a glorious victory.

You can even research your family roots at the Games and learn about the significance of a family tartan. While you are attending the Glenmorangie Scottish Gathering & Highland Games this year, make it a point to visit the Clan tents. The Wee Ones area this year features junior athletic competitions, bounce houses, games, arts & crafts. In the Ghillie Dhu, Wicked Tinkers and Celtica Pipes Rock will play, with additional performances by Stoneybank, with comedian Patrick Halloran as emcee. The Learners’ Arms will feature music by De Mairt Ceol, Stoneybank, John Allen and Mistress of Ceremonies Sarah Haywood. There will also be a variety of musicians roving the

SCOTS

WHO’S READY?

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grounds and master illusionist Craig Davis perform throughout the weekend. Visit with our friends from the British Car Clubs, reenactment groups and Scottish Country dancers who will demonstrate and perform all weekend through! Come hungry! In the mood for some haggis? Fish & chips? Shepherd’s Pie? Find all of that (and more) in the food court plus ice cold Kiltlifter and other fine beverages! Each year Glenmorangie Single Malt Scotch Whisky provides tastings & educational seminars that are second-to-none. This year they have graciously offered to provide a more upscale experience and will be sampling more complex marks paired with tasty nibbles and for one seminar each day, Glenmo collaborates with Westin Kierland’s The Scotch Library where guests will sample a reserved mark along with epicurean delights prepared by the Westin’s chef.

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

Chandler-Tullamore Sister Cities PRESENTS

2016 YOUNG ARTISTS & AUTHORS INTERNATIONAL SHOWCASE RECEPTION “Peace through People” Reception: Friday, April 15 3rd Friday Artwalk • 6:00 to 10:00pm Date: Thursday, April 7, 2016 You are invited to join You are invited to join Mayor Greg Stanton Mayor Greg Stanton Where: Sheraton Grand Phoenix and Phoenix Sister Cities for Valley an amazing evening of the Sun Ballroom and Phoenix 340 N. 3rd Street, international cuisine and entertainment Sisterof Cities for an Phoenix, AZ 85004 fromevening aroundofthe world. amazing Time: Reception 6:00-7:00 p.m. international cuisine Dinner 7:00-9:00 p.m. Date: Thursday, April 7, 2016 ............................................................. and entertainment $130 per; $1,300 for Where: Sheraton Cost: Grand Phoenix from around the world. sponsored table of ten

INVITAT ION

in Historic Downtown Chandler • Exhibit will feature poetry, essays and artworks submitted by Chandler students for our 2016 Art and Author Showcase.

• Chandler-Tullamore Sister Cities was chosen to host the 2015 Sister Cities International Showcase, featuring Young Authors and Artists from around the world! The pieces are included in the Exhibit for the month of April. • Beibhinn Cullen, student from Sacred Heart School, Tullamore, Ireland, was the 2015 Sister Cities International Grand Prize Essay Winner, and is represented in the Exhibit.

For information and to view our winners and Reception photos, please see our website, www.chandlerirish.org; or contact chan.to.tull@gmail.com.

Hosting of the 2016 Art & Author Showcase is made possible by a grant from Chandler Special Events Sponsorship Funding and the Chandler Cultural Foundation, and through the generous support of Downtown Chandler Community Partnership.

Valley of the Sun Ballroom 340 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004 To register: www.phoenixsistercities.org ............................................................. or call 602-534-3751 Time: Reception 6:00-7:00 p.m. Seating is Limited. RSVP Dinner  7:00-9:00 p.m.by March 18 ............................................................. Cost: $130 per; $1,300 for sponsored table of ten ............................................................. To register: www.phoenixsistercities.org or call 602-534-3751 Seating is Limited. RSVP by March 18th GRAND PRIZE: ............................................................. $3000 cash + 2 round trip airfare Attire: Business or traditional international . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tickets . . . . . . . .to . . .any . . . . one . . . . . of . . .our . . . . ten . . . . (10) ..

Win an international experience!

Phoenix Sister Cities

Win an international experience!

A Wine & Design Evening at A Burst of Butterflies

Thursday, April 21, 2016 6:30 - 8:30pm

The Sheraton is offering a discounted self-parking rate of $5 and valet-parking rate of $10.

Bonnie Lou Coleman, MultiMedia Artist and Board Member, Chandler Arts Commission, will lead us in painting The Blarney Castle!

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

By Brian Hanrahan

Up Cappanale Way BY JACK DROUGHT BLACK BRIDGE PRESS, 2012

M

aps depict the site of Cappanale resting a stone’s throw from Birr, a former UK Parliamentary constituency in County Uí Failghe, modern day County Offaly. Both burghs lie almost dead-center in the modern-day Republic of Ireland. Jack Drought’s charming Cappanale of the 1950s seemingly lies with one foot steeped in modernization and one foot steeped in the old ways, a dichotomy not unheard of in Ireland even today. Cappanale is where readers are introduced to Betty Kirwan, née Betty Kelly, a pillar of Irish Catholic guilt, grit and resolve, the family matriarch who we barely meet before she gashes a shin with an ax while chopping wood. “Ya bloody eejit, ya,” Betty curses herself, with no thought of going to a doctor unless her leg had been hacked off. Betty is wife to self-important Val, a dandy who struts about all knotted down and spit-shined on the warmest of days, even while mucking out sewers as Birr Sanitary Inspector, a career he inherited from his father after Val failed at other pursuits. In Vals’ opinion it’s a man’s duty not to tell his wife how much money he makes, nor should any Irishman ever wash dishes or clean up after meals. Unsurprisingly, Val Kirwan is rather fond of the drink, a pursuit hushhushed when it comes to how much he spends on it. The Kirwans birthed sixteen children, twelve of whom still live with Ma and Da in a house only

Personal Note: Recall that twenty years ago Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes taught readers “that a happy childhood is hardly worth your while.” You’ll find none of McCourt’s maudlin sentiment in Jack Drought’s puckish charmer, which reminds me more of my own father’s free-spirited childhood growing up in a rural Erin. He then settled in a Wisconsin farming township replete even today with Irish surnames, although today the farmers’ ghosts lie under Erin Hills Golf Course (PGA men’s championship in 2017).

Recommended!

I really enjoyed the book; the writer captured a wealth of small details that really built a true picture of life in Birr and brought me straight home. The flat accent came out in his accurate spelling of the Offaly brogue. He paints a great picture of what people did just a few decades ago, the simple enjoyment and pride in gardening, fly fishing, and hunting with a good dog.  He also describes the beauty of the town of Birr with its wonderful Georgian Malls; and the influence Lord Rosse and the castle has had on this town over the years making great efforts to support the community which was unique at that time. Also how the town transformed on Mart days, Monday and Thursdays, as it got invaded by farmers with cattle and sheep. The complexity of family, street community and the greater town community, and where folks felt they fit. I think he gets the balance Irish people had at that time being religious, very family centric, but yet not taking life too seriously and the wit and appreciation they had for different characters.

SISTER CITIES

BOOK REVIEW

recently introduced to running sink water and electricity that illuminates a lightbulb or two. The Kirwans lost three children to untimely deaths and one son, Billy, lives in an asylum in Queens County, a fact that troubles the parents deeply. Val and Betty pray and plan that someday Billy might be able to return home, but it seems unlikely. Meanwhile all they can do is travel a far distance to visit him. The author’s richly appointed text captures the inflection of speech patterns underlying prayerful intonations to various patron saints to intercede for Cappanale’s denizens, amid all manner of trials and tribulations. Readers are also treated to samples of typically Irish puck and grit in response to repeated challenges, which remain constant but are met with undeniable resolve. Only if Jack Drought had paraded out an occasional leprechaun or two would he have charmed readers with more old-world schtick in Up Cappanale Way. Tinkers, priests, nuns not sparing the rod with recalcitrant students, a chapter dedicated only to favored dogs living on equal footing with human owners—to say nothing of the real-life Lord and Lady Rosse of Castle Birr with its renowned telescope— they’re all part of Drought’s enticing tale.

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-Tom Nallen Tom and Caroline emigrated from Birr, County Offaly to Arizona

SAVE THE DATE!

Annual Mayor’s Luncheon Friday, March 11 11:30am – 1:30pm 3025 N. Campbell Ave.

Lunch for Members ......................$25 Lunch for Non-Members ..............$30 RSVP: Colleen Beaman 520-743-7979

Hope to see you there! WWW.ENTERTAINERMAG.COM « WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM


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HISTORY

MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

ST. PATRICK, MOSES, AND VIRACOCHA

The Foreign Roots of Great Leaders By Sharonah Fredrick, PhD

F

rom ancient Israel to 5th century Ireland, to the pre-Hispanic Andes mountains, great leaders— in fact, those that each culture considers its greatest leaders—were believed to have foreign roots. Moses had an ostensibly “foreign” (i.e., Egyptian) upbringing. Contrary to what one might suppose, having been brought up in another area, or in the specific case of St. Patrick, another religion, does not exclude one from being adopted as the culture hero by a different group of people. Culture is not genetic. It is learned. A Chinese baby, brought up by Finnish parents, will speak Finnish and not show any innate tendency for the Chinese language. What is it in St. Patrick’s character that marks that saint as specifically Irish when he was of British/Roman descent? Could it be the same extraordinary qualities that made Moses the greatest Jewish prophet, even if as Sigmund Freud surmised, Moses was an Egyptian prince who defected politically to the Israelite side? Did Patrick share a similar life experience with Viracocha, the great shaman wrongly described as a “god” in 16th and 17th century Spanish colonial chronicles. For Peru’s Quechua-speaking Indians, Viracocha brought civilization to the Western Andes. His origin is attributed to Lake Titicaca, far to the east of Peru, where he is venerated. What does St. Patrick, emblem of Irish faith, share with Moses and Viracocha? Patrick’s death date, marked throughout the Irish diaspora, is, according to the old Julian calendar, March 17. His birth year is generally given as around the year 387, near Dumbarton, Scotland, to wealthy parents connected with the Roman legions then occupying Britain. Kidnapped by Irish pirates as a 16-year-old youth, he spent six years in Erin. There, he mastered the Irish language, and vowed to return at a later age. After many years’ monastic training in France, Patrick reappeared in Ireland at the age of 46, devoting himself for the next thirty years to the peaceful evangelization of the island. This is in fact the only case of an entirely peaceful evangelization of an entire nation to Christianity, which renders Patrick a unique figure in the history of world religion. Moses was prophet and author, in Jewish tradition of the first five books of the Bible, the Torah, (the

word means “of the light” in Hebrew; orah being the root for “illumination”). He undertook the liberation of the Israelites from slavery at a mature age: that of 80 years! While some of the Biblical accounts have, as the Spanish-Jewish sage Maimonides (1135-1204) wrote, more of an allegorical meaning, the first forty years of Moses’ life are clearly delineated. Exodus tells us: Moses was a prince in Egypt. That means, for all intents, an Egyptian. The fact of his Jewish birth, as Freud says, is secondary to his greatness as protector and liberator of the Jewish people. Similarly, some 1,700 years later, Patrick’s non-Irish origin was no impediment to him becoming the best-known symbol of Irish learning and erudition during the rest of Europe’s Dark Ages. Like Moses, Patrick was profoundly opposed to slavery. Patrick’s politics may have contributed to the fact that he was never officially canonized as a saint by the Vatican, despite his widespread veneration. Viracocha, the teacher from the eastern Andes mountains, is believed by Aymara and Quechua Indians to have taught their ancestors many millennia ago how to cultivate corn and how to organize themselves peacefully in different societies. Later according to the Huarochiri Manuscript (late 16th century, Peru), Viracocha populated the sea with the fish which humanity needs for sustenance. Seen by Peruvian Andeans as a benevolent protector, his worship outlasted the Incas’ imperial sun-god, Inti. Patrick, Moses and Viracocha are today beloved by the Irish, the Jews and the native Peruvians. None was raised in the cultures in which they are revered. Integrity, not ethnicity, creates heroes, and Patrick is a truly multicultural hero. Sharonah Fredrick is Assistant Director of the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (ACMRS) at ASU. She has a PhD in Latin American Colonial Literature; MA in Renaissance History; and BA in Cultural Anthropology. She’s multi-lingual; attended Yeats Summer School and Merryman Literature Summer School in Ireland, as well as doing independent study in the Donegal Gaeltacht, and summer courses at Trinity College, Dublin.

Mary Kallemeyn Independent Sr. Sales Director 602-978-0598 - Home 623-986-4708 - Cell mkallemeyn@cox.net www.marykay.com/mkallemeyn Discover What You Love TM Grandmother Anna Kerr missed the Titanic because of family illness but emigrated later in 1912 from Belfast

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5628 E. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85018 Bus.: (480) 990-1900 Fax: (480) 481-9551 E-Mail: daveb@isugsw.com http://www.isugsw.com

Dave Binsfeld, CIC, ARM

Vice President

Mother is Mary Patricia Doyle of the Doyle clan from County Galway, Ireland


THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

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Storytelling, Music, & Pirate Legends: A Springtime Celebration for the Family! Sunday, April 17, 2016 ~ 1:30-5:30pm Irish Cultural Center, Phoenix ~ Adults $5 - kids under 12 free

Pirate Lore, Legends & Myth Family Story Time & Crafts St. Patrick Exhibit Music & Ceilidh Food and cash bar Costumes welcome: Dress like a pirate!

Thomas P. Murphy, CPA 21639 N. 12th AveNue, Suite 203 • PhoeNix, ArizoNA 85027 (623) 581-0375 • FAx (623) 581-9242 Grandfather Murphy born in County Westmeath and Grandmother in County Longford, Ireland

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

ARIZONA’S ORIGINAL

NEW from

St. Patrick’s Day

Mike McCormack

March 17th, 2016

Ancient Order of Hibernians National Historian

Irish Step Dancers Bag Pipers Irish Fiddlers Duo

A 116-page illustrated work explaining the reasons for the Easter Rising of 1916, with an account of the most significant six days in Irish history and an appendix of photographs and biographies of each of the leaders who were executed for their dream of independence for their native land. Complete with footnotes and index.

6646 Superstition Springs, Mesa

“A well-constructed account of the events leading to and including the Easter Rising; this is a book every Irish family should have as a reference guide to this important period of our history.”

Available for only $12 plus $3 postage from:

Mike McCormack 37 Harrison Ave. Centereach, NY 11720

BUY ONE FOR YOUR LOCAL LIBRARY

5

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(US 60 & Superstition)

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COVER! MONSTER DRAFTS GREEN BEERS

AUTHENTIC IRISH CUISINE

Pearse Lawlor, Belfast author of The Burnings & Lisburn

Corned Beef & Cabbage • Shepherd’s Pie • Ruebens • Fish & Chips • & Much More!

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HAPPY ST. PATRICK’S DAY

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Expanding in East Mesa!

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

TIMOTHY PATRICK PRENDIVILLE By John Murphy, President

T

arade & P y Fe a D s of Tucson al tiv

St. Patri e ck Th ’s

he 2016 Tucson St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Festival will be held in downtown Tucson on Sunday, March 13, 2016. The Festival will be at Armory Park from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. The Parade winds through downtown Tucson, ending at Armory Park, 6th Avenue and 12th Street. This year’s festivities celebrate the centennial of the 1916 Easter Rising in Ireland, the most significant political, social and economic movement in Ireland during the 20th century - a revolution which eventually established the current Republic of Ireland and borders between the Republic and Northern Ireland. We are especially proud to have Timothy Patrick Prendiville as our Grand Marshal for 2016 to celebrate such a significant turning toward liberty and justice. Tim personifies the spiritual center of the Tucson Irish Community. There isn’t an Irishman in Tucson who hasn’t felt Tim’s compelling influence. Tim has lent his talents to many an Irish organization: the St. Patrick’s

Fr

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TRAVEL

Tucson Grand Marshal

Parade & Festival Committee, the Irish Heritage Foundation, the Emerald Isle Society, the Liturgy & a Meal Program, chaplain to the Green A Brigade. His long-held value of community service is slowly touching us all. The Parade has always enjoyed great crowd appreciation and will feature plenty of bagpipes, bands, floats, and marching entries with keen competition for the Best Entry award. The Festival is downtown Tucson’s hottest and longest running party. 2016 will be the 30th year in a row and will feature music and dance from Tucson’s two award-winning Irish dance schools, Maguire Academy of Irish Dance and Tir Connail Academy Dance. There will be plenty of Irish food and drink. Get your jig on with Irish rock ‘n roll from The Sea Merchants. For more information about participating in the Parade and Festival, directions and schedule of events, log onto www.tucsonstpatricksday.com.

Sunday, March 13, 2016 Festival

10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m., Armory Park

Parade

11:00 a.m., Downtown Tucson

Theme:

“Freedom Rising” celebrating the centennial of the 1916 Easter Rising

Grand Marshal: Timothy Patrick Prendiville

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CULTURE

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

LEPRECHAUNS, LEGENDS AND MYTHS

By Carmelita Lee

I

n the 1959 Disney film, Darby O’Gill and the Little People, Darby, trapped by leprechauns, is shown a harp, a sword, jewels, a stone throne and pots of gold. Those mythical treasures form the basis of a shaky but romantic folktale about Irish royalty, hinted at by the scriptwriter. Over centuries, sloppy scholarship has perpetuated, but not authenticated, the story. Real facts are thin, but you have the stuff of legend. Extracting truth from the fog of millennia becomes an adventure itself. The story goes that the Biblical prophet Jeremiah, circa 585 BC, was charged with saving King Zedekiah’s daughters from certain death or slavery at the hands of Nebuchadnezzar. According to both Egyptian and Hebrew texts and oral history, at least one daughter fled from Israel to Egypt with Jeremiah and his scribe, Baruch. From Egypt they went to Saragossa, Spain, a long-established Jewish city-state. This red-haired beauty, Teia-Tephi, won the heart of a prince, they married and had children, preserving the royal lineage of King David. After a brief stay in Spain, one might say they moved on to greener pastures, settling in Munster in one account, and Leinster in another. It’s a stretch, but the heraldry of Ulster (red hand inside a Star of David, and until 1970, including a crown) is perhaps suggestive of bloodlines, as heraldry often is. But then there’s Leinster’s heraldry depicting a harp, actually a “lap harp” similar to the “kineret” played by that brave shepherd boy in ancient Israel. It has been oft repeated that this small harp, when hung in a tree during a wind, will sing all by itself. Legend says, and tour guides repeat, that Jeremiah was actually Ollamh Fodhla, or the “Wise Sage” of County Meath. Baruch becomes Brek, Brogue, or Brak, depending on who’s telling the story. When they left the old country they were entrusted with not only the king’s daughters, but certain of Israel’s national treasures – a harp, jewels and gold encrusted artifacts, (hinted at being the Arc of the Covenant itself ) and the Coronation Stone, also known as the Pillar of Jacob. This ordinary chunk of red sandstone sits on a shelf under the throne. It has two iron rings from which it was suspended when carried. What’s the big fuss? If legend proved true, the stone would have been a “witness” to the crowning of all the kings of Israel, Ireland, Scotland, and about half the kings and queens of England, from Elizabeth I to the current monarch. Reliable history of the Coronation Stone begins in 1296, when it was taken captive from Scotland by King Edward I, and held in Westminster Abbey until November of 1996, when it was returned to Scotland in a symbolic gesture of

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peace. If the legend is truth, then all kings of Israel, Ireland, Scotland and England were crowned upon it. It’s trustworthy to note that there are actually four coronation stones in the region, each bearing its own folklore. Was the first queen of Ireland really Israel’s own Jewish Princess Teia Tephi, who lived near Cnoc na Teamhrach, or Tara Hill? Was Jeremiah really Ollamh Fodhla, buried in Loughcrew in Cairn T, a magnificent mound passageway near Oldcastle, County Meath? On the side of credibility, Ancestry.com lists her and her husband Heremon as real persons… If all this is truth, is there legitimacy in the current grass-roots movement to find the Lost Tribes of Israel? Are they lost? Or did they just lose their identity? Will there really be a regathering so huge that it will cause the Exodus, or first regathering, to pale in comparison, as suggested by Jeremiah 23:7-8?

I want to believe that a royal princess traveled in Phoenician ships to marry her Eochaid, later called Heremon – but see, there you go. All these names, all these dates…and frankly, I realize that Indiana Jones didn’t look for the Lost Arc in Ireland, which pretty much cinches it for me. Next time, Tuatha Dé Danann….[continued in the May-June edition] Carmelita Lee How does a gal named Carmelita claim to be Irish? Scottish, even? Granny Holland’s family hailed from Ennis, County Clare, and Grandpa Maxwell from the Borderlands, Scotland. Her husband’s mother was a Dowdall, and he had a Grandma O’Higgins...ye can’t be more Irish than that!


OUT & ABOUT

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RIVERDANCE AT THE MESA CENTER FOR THE ARTS Cast members graciously signed autographs for Irish dancers: (l to r) MacKenzie Moore-Kosslow, Colleen Kelahan-Pierson, Anne Gardner-Hajek, and Kassidi Jensen

TV-12 Arizona Midday co-host Jan D’Atri and her daughter, Julia Reeves in the audience

PHOTOS BY MISSY WILSON PHOTOGRAPHY

CELTIC NIGHTS AT THE SCOTTSDALE CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS

Desert Shamrock ticket winners, Joseph and Joyce Lavin, greeted by some of the cast at private pre-show reception Mary and Greg Kallemeyn at Cliffs of Moher, Ireland

Holly Nordquist, 2013 Arizona Colleen and Rose, and Aaron Smith were married at the Irish Cultural Center on November 22, 2015.

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

OUT & ABOUT

SOUPER BOWL KICKOFF LUNCHEON BENEFITTING ST. VINCENT DE PAUL Mrs. Nancy Splain, Interfaith Outreach Coordinator with Kwami Lassiter, former AZ Cardinal AllStar Defensive Back

Silent Auction for tacklehunger.org

ROBERT BURNS DINNER HOSTED BY CALEDONIANS OF ARIZONA (AWARDS IN MAY-JUNE EDITION)

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Emcee Pat McMahon, Arizona radio and TV legend

“FIRST FRIDAY” WITH TIM MURPHY PHOTOGRAPHY ON DISPLAY AT ICC

Judith Bishop and C.M. Novess III

President Don and Pearl Finch

Tim and Debbie Murphy

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

TRAVEL

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THE GUINNESS

STOREHOUSE

Europe’s Leading Tourist Attraction

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t takes adventurous spirit and irrepressible ingenuity to do things the Guinness way. A young Arthur Guinness leaves home and heads to Dublin in 1759, where he signs a 9000-year lease on a dilapidated brewery at St. James’s Gate. Here’s to bold beginnings. From their humble beginnings to the present day, they’ve gone to extraordinary lengths to deliver exceptional beer. GUINNESS® is synonymous with Ireland and no visit to Dublin is complete without a trip to

The Guinness Storehouse will hold its 10th annual St. Patrick’s Festival from 16th–20th March 2016. the Guinness Storehouse—the Home of Guinness. The physical building dates back to 1904 and is built in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture. It was once the fermentation plant of the brewery and is now a multi-story visitor interactive experience dedicated to the history of the making of this world famous beer. Visitors discover what goes into the making of each and every pint, and learn about the incredible brand history, stretching over 250 years. Ireland’s number one attraction unfolds its tale across seven floors shaped around a giant pint, which, if filled would contain 14.3 million pints of Guinness. The Guinness Storehouse® was recently voted Europe’s Leading Tourist Attraction at the World Travel Awards 2015. Paul Carty, Managing Director of the Guinness Storehouse shares, “We welcome our visitors on an unforgettable journey to the heart of Guinness. Here, WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM » WWW.ENTERTAINERMAG.COM

you can experience Guinness like nowhere else: to discover the age-old art of brewing that makes Guinness so distinctive; to learn how to pour the perfect pint in the Guinness Academy; to step into the wonderful world of Guinness Advertising at our new Advertising Exhibit, and to enjoy the best in Irish cuisine at our wonderful restaurants. The highlight for many visitors is the GRAVITY® Bar, where visitors can enjoy unparalleled panoramic views of Dublin city—views that are all the better with a complimentary pint in hand!” Steeped in history and tradition and located in the heart of St. James’s Gate Brewery, the Guinness Storehouse is a must-see for anyone visiting Dublin. The world is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day and where better to celebrate than here?! With live music, entertainment, and of course, a pint of the black stuff, the Guinness Storehouse is the perfect place to experience Ireland’s national holiday. It’s open from 9.30am-6pm on Festival dates. With the successful launch of three new brews, namely Dublin Porter, West Indies Porter, and Guinness Golden Ale, behind them, their innovative

brewers continue to brew up anything they can dream up, proudly pushing brewing boundaries. Fusing over two centuries of brewing heritage and innovation, Nitro IPA was born. Everything you’d want from an IPA blended with everything you’d expect from Guinness, it features a unique blend of carbon dioxide and nitrogen to balance out the profusion of hops flavors. But, while many milestones mark the way on their long and illustrious path, they’re not ones to rest on one’s laurels. As they like to put it: the greatest work is yet to come. For more information and tickets, see www.guinness-storehouse.com.

• The Guinness Storehouse® is open 7 days a week 9:30am7pm (last admission is at 5pm; July and August until 6pm) • Closed on Good Friday, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and St. Stephen’s Day (Dec. 26) • Gravity Bar is the highest bar in Dublin city located 44 metres (144 feet) off the ground

• Over 14 million visitors to date since opening its doors in 2000 • Adult admission is €20 (exchange about $22), which includes a complimentary pint of Guinness in Gravity® Bar, 5th floor restaurants, or the Guinness Academy • Book in advance for up to 10% discount • Book online at www. guinness-storehouse.com


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Galway Cathedral By Maureen Sullivan CTC County Cork, Ireland

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ay the road rise to greet you, as you enjoy the delights of Galway City and the Aran Islands! Galway is one of my favorite Irish cities! There is a grand Saint Patrick’s Day parade in Galway. If you happen to be visiting in the west of Ireland, this year will be their 113th anniversary. The parade will start on Dominick Street, winding through Bridge Street, Eyre Square, and finish at Prospect Hill. There is always a joyful, carnival atmosphere during this time. So if you miss it in 2016, plan ahead to be in Ireland for the 2017 Saint Patrick’s Day celebration!! 2016 will also be the 100th anniversary of the Rising in Dublin on the General Post Office steps. The B&B’s owners in Galway City that we use for our clients are delightful, while the nightly music in and around Eyre Square is truly lively. We found “Tigh Fox,” a local pub with great music and craic. Craic is great fun in the Irish. Galway City “the City of Tribes” is over 800 years old. It’s charming with its narrow streets and shop fronts made of wood and stone. Galway is a great walking city, so park your car by the Cathedral and stroll the streets. The creation of pedestrian streets emphasizes the medieval nature of the city centre

and makes it easier in the exploration of ancient landmarks. St Nicholas Church, founded in 1320 is worth the stop. It is actually Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas called Galway Cathedral. The Spanish Arch, built in the 18th century, shows the trade link to Spain at that time. “Browne Doorway” features a statue of Liam Mellows, who took part in the 1916 Easter Rising. One of the best ways to get an overview of Galway city is the hop-on-hop-off bus, which gives you a good overview of the city. Not to be missed are the Galway shops which feature the marble from Connemara, as well as the lovely Claddagh rings created in this area. The Aran Islands are a highlight of any Irish journey! The ferry takes you to Inis Mor and its main town Kilronan. The ferries leave and return each day from the port of Rossaveal, an hour from Galway. Kilronan is a busy, enjoyable town with its horse carts and rental bicycles greeting you as you arrive on the island. The best way to experience the island is by the minibuses awaiting at the pier. The rugged men who have fished and the women who have created the famous Aran sweaters are the mainstay of this island community. The Aran Islands are part of the Gaeltacht, areas in which the Irish is mainly signposted and spoken by the locals. The islands of Inis Mor, Inishmaan and Inisheer have

BY DONNA KILLOUGHEY BIRD

BY JACK SULLIVAN BY JACK SULLIVAN

PHOTO BY MIGUEL MENDEZ FROM MALAHIDE, IRELAND (GALWAY CATHEDRAL, UPLOADED BY RUSSAVIA) [CC BY 2.0 (HTTP://CREATIVECOMMONS.ORG/LICENSES/BY/2.0)], VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

PART 13: GALWAY

TRAVEL

Driving Tips from Left Lane Maureen

JFK mosaic stained glass

some of the most ancient pre-Christian and Christian remains in Ireland. Using one of the many forms of transportation, you are able to travel to Dun Aengus, an ancient Iron Age stone fort. Many great monks, including St Enda, (500 AD) studied, prayed, and taught in the Aran Islands. He received the island from Aengus, the King of Cashel and went on to teach many scholars such as St. Brendan, Finan and Jarlath. His teaching led many men and women to found great learning centers in Ireland, as well as Europe. For lunch try the seafood fresh from the boats that morning. Stop by the heritage center, IIonad Arainn. See if you are able to take in one of the music, song and dance shows late in the afternoon before your departure. Depending on the time of travel, that experience is at Halla Ronain at around 3:00 pm. Don’t miss the ferry—otherwise you will be spending a night on the island! In Ireland the road less traveled isn’t always a road. Enjoy Ireland! Maureen and John (“Jack”) are the owners of Sullivan’s Travels, Inc. Maureen has been a travel professional for 25 years, moving their business to Phoenix four years ago. www.sullivanstravels.com

SALEM, NH 603-898-5130 FAX 603-898-5113

PHOENIX 602-944-5400 FAX 602-944-3154

MANUFACTURERS REPRESENTATIVES

Jack’s parents were born in County Cork, Ireland, settling in Chicago in the 1920s.

Phone: 480-671-0207 • Cell: 847-481-9149 Fax: 480-617-5961 maureen@sullivanstravels.com • www.sullivanstravels.com Travel Europe, Mexico, Cruises & South Pacific

P.O. Box 1768 Salem, NH 03079

JOE LEWIS

10611 N. 11th St. Phoenix, AZ 85020 jhlreps@aol.com

Electrical, Mechanical, Plastics, Metals, and Contract Mfg. Joe Lewis Cell 617-510-9260 Joe Jr. 603-365-1301 WWW.ENTERTAINERMAG.COM « WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM


IRISH NETWORK PHONIX

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

MAUREEN AND JACK SULLIVAN

by Jan Whalen

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ospitality extraordinaire best describes Maureen and John (“Jack”) Sullivan’s business, Sullivans Travels. This couple goes beyond the extra mile when it comes to planning dream vacations for their clients. They specialize in travel to Ireland and also plan trips to Europe, Australia, China, and the Caribbean. Their seven adult children and eleven grandchildren are their best referral agents. Maureen’s grandparents were Frances and Bernard McNally, onion farmers whose antecedents immigrated from County Clare to Connecticut during the Great Hunger. Her English birth father, Charles Maurice Howes, was killed on a return flight from fighting the Germans in August 1944 before she was born. She explains, “My adopted name was Larson, so technically I am Maureen Frances Rosemary Howes Larson Sullivan.” After her first trip to Ireland, Maureen became fascinated with travel and the incredible warmth of the Irish people. She left her catering business to pursue her new passion. She worked at three travel agencies, earned the CTC designation, then realized that a more tailored service was necessary for clients. Consequently, when Jack retired as an electrician in 1999, they opened their own travel business in Chicago. Jack is the perfect complement to a business specializing in Irish travel. He’s the son of Margaret (Peg) Leap,

Jack and Maureen and children

West Cork; and father, Richard, from Beara Peninsula north of Bantry. Peg lived in America from 1929 to 1979, but after her husband’s death, she returned to Ireland and built a cottage on the family farm, which has remained in the family—a cherished destination for the Sullivans. Six years ago they moved to Phoenix, where they immersed themselves in many activities at the Irish Cultural Center. Once a month, Maureen and Jack prepare an authentic Irish breakfast for the Irish Network Phoenix’s (INPHX) monthly meeting. Guests are welcome; it’s complimentary the first time. Upcoming breakfast at the Irish Cultural Center is 7-8am on April 8 (RSVP to maryhannon@cox.net). In this age of global communication, why use Sullivans Travels? Jack answers without hesitation. “First of all, you can’t believe everything you read on the Internet. There’s so much misleading information out there you could get yourself into a bad situation that ruins your trip.” Maureen agrees. “Many Americans don’t have the time for research. They feel safer speaking with a real person at a time that’s convenient for them. When they hear our voices, they know we care about their vacation as much as they do.” Clients answer three questions during their initial meeting: When do you want to travel? What do you want to see? How much do you have to spend? Armed with this information, Maureen and Jack blend their

“Tig Peig Cottage” in County Cork

experience, knowledge, and connections to map out the details of a dream trip. Happy client, Mary Kallemeyn, says, “Maureen and Jack gave us the confidence in traveling on our own, with a feeling of comfort at each B&B, including specific details of each village, roads to travel, and what to see.” Ellen Harrington, board president for the Chandler-Tullamore (County Offaly) Sister Cities, recently led a trip to Ireland. “Maureen and Jack were the true organizers of the trip. We were following a detailed, bound itinerary. Everyone said it was fantastic!” Mary and Ellen both referred to the written itinerary presentation each client receives. “Our itinerary built our business,” Jack says with a smile. This document is actually a book—a keepsake—forty to eighty pages in length. Besides listing where you’ll visit, it includes colored photos of attractions, reserved B&Bs, maps, and cultural information. Jack is proud of these publications. “Their anticipation bubbles up and our clients arrive in Ireland with this vision and enthusiasm.” The Sullivans have a trunkful of grateful stories. One family discovered that Ireland is family friendly when their B&B hosted a birthday party for their oneyear-old daughter. Another family requested being on a group tour, but longed to visit her grandfather’s home for a day. Maureen made one call and arrangements were made to make this happen. With each story, Maureen and Jack fulfill their own dream of providing one-of-a-kind travel services for their clients. After all, they don’t sell travel, they sell dreams. [The Sullivans write a regular column, “Driving Tips from Left-Lane Maureen;” see page 29.] Jan M. Whalen, MASL, is an award winning author who creates books, workbooks and blogs about self-trust, confidence and telling your story. www.whalenvoices. com; jan@whalenvoices.com

Elaine, Danny and Mary have stories to tell.

One Life, Many Lessons makes it easy.

Contact Jan Whalen today: 623.466.5067 Jan@WhalenVoices.com

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

The McGurk Law Firm, P.L.L.C.

Irish Network Phoenix

An Arizona Professional Limited Liability Company Joseph P. McGurk, Esq., Principal

Irish Network Phoenix is part of the national organization, IN USA, which celebrates Irish Culture and helps Irish and Irish-American professionals across the United States to connect with their peers and to develop relationships that will foster success in their business, economic and social ventures.

A boutique law practice focused upon civil litigation and business counseling

Join us today and be ‘in’ with the IN crowd!

Working collaboratively with clients to tailor legal solutions that fit their specific needs. Leveraging relationships, knowledge and expertise developed over the course of founder Joseph P. McGurk’s 15 years of practice in both New York and Arizona to provide the very best in creative, cost effective solutions and legal representation.

Corporate governance and Business Organizations Law Commercial Transactions and Contract law Real Estate Law • Civil Litigation and Trials Employment Law • Alternative Dispute Resolution Phoenix: 40 N. Central Ave. Ste. 1400, Phoenix, AZ 85004 • (602) 283-1039 Cave Creek: 37617 N. Cave Creek Rd. Ste. 102 Cave Creek, AZ 85331 • (480) 503-8651 F: (602)-343-1801 • jmcgurk@themcgurklawfirm.com

www.themcgurklawfirm.com

623 565 9077 www.irishnetworkphoenix.com theboard@irishnetworkphoenix.com www. facebook.com/irishnetworkphoenix www.meetup.com/irishnetworkphoenix P.O. Box 7116, Phoenix, AZ, 85011 USA

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Grandparents: John O’Dowd emigrated 1929 to NY from Castlebaldwin, Co. Sligo and Ellen Greevy from Roscommon 1938.

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Celtic Pubs & Eateries

If you're looking for some Craic, look no further! The Kettle Black Kitchen & Pub

Flagstaff

1 N. First Street, #201, Phoenix, AZ 85004 (between Washington and Adams) 602-651-1185 www.thekettleblackpub.com Late night restaurant, bar and grill. Jimmy Culleton and Tom Montgomery bring you another great gastrobpub menu and Irish atmosphere. Grand opening was packed! See ad page 47

Greater Phoenix The Dubliner Irish Pub & Restaurant

3841 E. Thunderbird Road, #111, Phoenix, AZ 85032 (east of AZ-51); 602-867-0984 www.dublinerpub.com Arizona’s original Irish pub and very first to serve Guinness on tap, Irish and American fare, games on big-screen TV, live music six nights a week.

O’Connor’s Pub

2601 W. Dunlap Avenue, #7, Phoenix, AZ 85021 (east of I-17) 602-997-7714 www.oconnorspub.com Where You’re A Stranger Only Once! For some good ol’ Irish hospitality in the Valley of the Sun, drop in the best Irish pub in Phoenix! See ad page 21

Gallagher’s Sports Grill

7575 N. 16th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85020 (16th Street & Morten); 602-997-0084

Rúla Bula Irish Pub and Restaurant

3220 E. Baseline, Phoenix, AZ 85042 (NE corner of 32nd St. & Baseline); 602-437-0981

401 S. Mill Avenue, Tempe, AZ 85281 (between University and Rio Salado Parkway) 480-929-9500 www.rulabula.com Downtown Tempe, old world pub serving traditional and contemporary pub fare. Draft craft beer, premium whiskies and specialty cocktails. Daily Happy Hour. Live Music weekends. See ad page 50

34406 N. Black Mountain Parkway, Cave Creek, AZ 85331 (Carefree Hwy. & 48th Street); 480-595-8800 751 E Union Hills Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85024 (7th & Union Hills); 602-867-3222 6750 W. Peoria, Peoria, AZ 85345 (north side of Peoria at 67th Avenue); 623-486-2118 www.gallaghersaz.com Discover a great tasting menu, HD sports, daily and late night specials, weekend breakfast, karaoke, trivia and OTB!

Séamus McCaffrey’s Irish Pub & Restaurant

18 W. Monroe Street, Phoenix, AZ 85003 (adjacent to historic Hotel San Carlos) 602-253-6081 www.seamusmccaffreys.com Downtown Phoenix’ Original Irish Pub & Restaurant. Est.-1991. Corned beef & cabbage, Irish stew, fish & chips, full menu, weekend brunch, AZ’s largest whiskey menu, 10 on tap, open late. See ad page 43

The Harp Irish Pub

1744 S. Val Vista Drive, Mesa, AZ 85204 (just south of US-60 in Dana Park Village Square) 480-507-7827 www.theharpaz.com An Irish pub from our interior to our menu. We offer a perfect blend of modern and comfort Irish/American food and drinks in an authentic atmosphere. Dueling pianos Fridays 9pm; live music Saturdays 8pm.

Tim Finnegan’s Irish Restaurant & Bar

The Irish Wolfhound Restaurant & Pub

9201 N. 29th Avenue, #52, Phoenix, AZ 85051 (west of I-17 and just north of Dunlap Ave.) 602-997-2323 www.timfinnegans.com Evokes images of the great old pubs of Ireland with blend of modern Ireland’s music, food, beverages. Featured on PBS “Check, Please!” Arizona #404 | Chapter 2 of 3. See ad page 47

16811 N. Litchfield Road, Surprise, AZ 85374 (just south of Bell Road) 623-214-1004 www.irishwolfhoundpub.com Indoor/Outdoor St. Patrick’s Day Celebration food booths, giveaways, live music (Spirited Lads, Kilted Spirited, Cheek Tones, Trip Wire). Pub opens at 11am. $5 cover charge. Cash only EVENT.

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CULTURE

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

HOT CROSS BUNS

By Katie Caufield Ginder

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ia daoibh a chaired! (Hello friends!) For many people in Scotland and Wales, the end of the Lenten season is celebrated with the Hot Cross Bun. These slightly spiced sweet rolls typically include raisins or currants and are marked with an icing cross atop of each bun. Christians believe the cross represents the crucifixion of Christ and the spiced dough is a reminder of the spices placed on Jesus’ body pre-resurrection. The recipe below will produce a delicious addition to your Easter celebration but can be savored anytime of the year. Enjoy! Katie Caufield Ginder lives in Gilbert with her husband and son. Her background is in higher education program management, instruction and faculty recruitment. She enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, cooking, yoga, volunteering with Big Brothers Big Sisters and learning about her Irish heritage. Katie’s great, great paternal grandfather was from Galway and immigrated to Pennsylvania in the 1860s.

Serves 24 DOUGH: 1 cup milk (scalded to 180°F) 1 cup cool water 1 package yeast 4 Tbsp. sugar 1 Tbsp. salt 1 cup flour 6 Tbsp. melted butter 2 eggs 5 cups flour (more or less) SUGAR MIXTURE: ¼ cup sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg ½ cup currants or raisins GLAZE: 1 egg white 1 Tbsp. milk ICING: 1 cup powdered sugar 2 Tbsp. milk

DIRECTIONS: Place sugar, salt, flour, and yeast in mixing bowl. Add scalded milk and water at same time. Mix thoroughly and let sit for 10-15 minutes to proof yeast. Add butter, eggs, and flour to yeast mixture, alternating liquid and dry until soft dough forms (will be slightly sticky). Place dough on lightly floured surface and flatten with hands into a rectangle. Sprinkle with tablespoon of sugar mixture and 1/3 raisins or currants. Fold rectangle in half and flatten out into another rectangle. Sprinkle with tablespoon of sugar mixture and 1/3 raisins. Repeat process once more with remaining sugar and raisins. Pinch off dough into golf-ball sized rounds and roll into smooth balls. Place balls on greased cookie sheet about 2 inches apart. Allow to rise in a warm place for one hour.

Preheat oven to 400°F. Brush each roll with glaze and cook in oven for about 20 minutes or until tops are golden brown. Remove from oven and cool completely before adding an icing cross on top of each bun. NOTES: If you don’t have any raisins or currants, try using dried cranberries instead. The sugar mixture can be revised to include spices such as all spice or cardamom as well. Place icing in small Ziploc bag and snip off one corner to create an easy tool for making each cross.

Maternal side “Murphy” came from County Cork and father’s side “Morrison” arrived from County Waterford

Desert Fare Cookbook

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

Cooking Demos in Phoenix By Chef Eric W. McBride

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eltic Cuisine? The mainstream culinary world does not believe and has never explored historically, the connections among the remnants of the last 8 Celtic Nations. That is what I do; I show you the influences between some of the most beloved Celtic dishes. Some that you had no idea were actually from one of the 8 Celtic nations: Scotland, Ireland, Manx, Wales, Cornwall; Brittany, France; Galicia and Asturias, Spain.

Please join me March 19-20 at the Arizona Scottish Gathering and Highland Games in Phoenix and on April 3 at the Discovery: UK and Ireland event at the Scottsdale Center for Performing Arts.

Robert Mulvin, owner, is of Irish and Scottish ancestry

In my live cooking demonstrations, I make various traditional Celtic with a modern flair right in front of a seated audience. They get to see real time camera images from an overhead camera onto a large color screen. All with a storyline explanation of how that particular dish evolved and what aspects in history influenced the creation of that favorite Celtic food, its flavorings, and variations. The guests get to taste what was cooked on stage. Expect a “wow” sampling these Celtic culinary delights. I’ve joined The Desert Shamrock as a regular columnist. Hence, a short treatise on the most wellknown dish identified with Scotland: haggis. It’s not just Scottish but there was a time when eaten all across Europe in every household. I found recipes in Norway, Greece, and the Isle of Man; each had their own version of haggis. It was a way a poor family could survive. They might have some sheep, probably two lambs, and it was a way to maximize them to last all winter long. You had to use everything, so that’s when they started using the offal, lungs, and heart. We can’t import British or Scottish-made haggis because of diseases we can get, similar to mad cow disease because of the lungs. When I make haggis, even though I have

found most countries have no problems with lungs, there is a similar flavor if you use beef tongue. That substituted, along with the sheep heart and liver create a great haggis “flavor.” People ask me about haggis all the time who have never tried it. I ask them, “Do you like bratwurst?” They usually answer, “I love bratwurst!” Well it’s the same thing, made with lamb instead of pork. It’s all in the flavoring, the spices, and the fat that you put into it. One is with pork; one is lamb. What the comedians all hold against it is because they used to use stomach lining the same way that we use the sausage intestine linings. Ninety percent of people who eat sausages don’t realize they are wrapped in pig intestines. The difference with haggis is putting the stomach lining in a salt solution, a brine, for about 24 hours. When you do that, you can scrape it all down and you are just left with a membrane. Then you can put the meat in that way and boil it. When I make it I, sort of construct it: boil things separately, grind it, and then put it all together. The water it has been boiled in can be either used to make a gravy for it, or you can mix the water with some of the fat, mix it in and let it re-saturate the meat. Chef McBride is an award-winning chef and author of four Celtic cookbooks (Scotland, Ireland, Wales & Manx, and Celtic-style vegetarian), and has a line of traditional Celtic Seasoning mixes. You can get his books via his website www.celticcaterer.com or on his Facebook page “the Celtic Caterer & Chef Eric W. McBride, or on YouTube.

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK Dunluce Castle

C.S. LEWIS The Thistle, the Shamrock and Narnia By Alexander Smith Belfast, Northern Ireland

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.S. Lewis is known all over the world as the creator of Narnia. The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe is probably the most widely recognised title of all of the Narnia books. The seven books that comprise The Chronicles of Narnia continue to be read by millions of children in over 42 languages in successive generation after generation representing a truly international and intergenerational readership. It is not exclusively children who enjoy these books; many adults, whether they read the books as children or not, discover them at a different level in later years. The books are read by parents to their children and grandparents to their grandchildren. C.S. Lewis once said that a children’s book that is read only by children is not a good children’s book. By this definition, the Narnia books qualify for inclusion in the category of good. Much of Lewis’s adult life was spent at Oxford University where he

contributed to The Oxford History of English Literature and became a prolific author and poet. He concluded his truly remarkable academic career as Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English at Magdalene College Cambridge. However, it still comes as a surprise, even to some of his admirers, that C.S. Lewis was born in, and grew up in Belfast. His strong Irish roots and background are slightly veiled by the many years he spent as a Don in two of the most prestigious Universities in England but the plain fact is that he was born in Ireland. SURPRISED BY BELFAST His father and mother were both born in Cork in southern Ireland and both families, by different and circuitous routes, arrived in Belfast in the 1860s where C.S. Lewis was born in 1898. The Lewis family has its origins in Wales but his mother’s background is Scottish. Her family were

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Free Online Course An Introduction to C.S. Lewis: Writings and Significance

ALEXANDER SMITH

Myself in C.S. Lewis Study at the Kilns in Oxford

The Searcher, Memorial Sculpture celebrating Lewis’ birth in Belfast

Hamiltons with roots stretching back to Scotland and to Scottish Royalty. Lewis never wrote an autobiography but parts of the story of his early life are told in his book Surprised by Joy. To stand at the birth place of C.S. Lewis will require a visit to Belfast, Northern Ireland. Every year many groups of visitors to Belfast join the C.S. Lewis Tour and come to the site at Dundela where he was born. Lewis recorded for us the detail of an event that happened in the garden of the house where he was born. Of this event he says that the rest of his life was about nothing else. So what was the story about which he makes such a momentous claim? SIGNIFICANT LOCATIONS The Shape of my Early Life is the sub-title to Lewis’s book Surprised by Joy. In it he details many of the locations in Belfast that helped to shape his boyhood. Among these was Little Lea, the new house to which his family moved when he was a child in 1905. He described Little Lea as a major character in his story. It was here that the most earth shattering episode in Lewis’s early life occurred. Other locations in Belfast that are significant in his story include Campbell College; the School he attended in 1910; and the nearby St. Mark’s Church where Lewis and his brother were christened by

their grandfather who was Rector of the Church from 1874-1900. There are many locations in Northern Ireland that captured the affection and imagination of C.S. Lewis. From the windows of the house in which he was born he could see the hills of County Down. One of his early poems is called the “Hills of Down” and it was the view of these hills that first created in Lewis a sense of longing which he retained for the rest of his live. Visitors to Northern Ireland who wish to take the full C.S. Lewis Tour, need to have 4- 5 days to take in the Belfast locations, County Down, the Mourne Mountains, the Antrim Coast with the Castle at Dunluce and the famous Giants Causeway to which Lewis refers in his book, Voyage to Venus. THE C.S. LEWIS FESTIVAL IN BELFAST C.S. Lewis was born on 29 November 1898 and died on 22 November 1963 on the same evening that former U.S. President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas. In November 2013, a memorial stone was dedicated to Lewis’s memory in Poet’s Corner at Westminster Abbey and every November since then, Belfast has celebrated his life and work with a weeklong Festival of events. The events include lectures, talks, theatrical productions, tours, films, and

displays of artwork. For November 2016, the festival programme will feature a new installation of public art in the recently created Lewis Square in Belfast. The new public artwork is a series of life-size sculptures based on The Chronicles of Narnia. Other details of the 2016 festival programme will be available toward the end of the summer. TOUR OPPORTUNITY Heritage Experience, a not for profit, social enterprise company specialising in cultural tourism under the brand name Authentic Ulster, is offering the opportunity for Lewis enthusiasts to visit Ireland for the week of the festival. This is a unique opportunity which is detailed on our website at www.authenticulster. com. The other, easy to remember shared websites are cslewisbelfast.com and cslewisni.com. We welcome you to join us for the festival this year! Alexander “Sandy” Smith is author of “C.S. Lewis and the Island of his Birth,” and a director of Heritage Experience, touring company.

Hillsdale, MI –Hillsdale College launched a new, not-for-credit online course, “An Introduction to C.S. Lewis: Writings and Significance.” The free, nine-week course examines Lewis’s philosophical and literary writings and their significance today. Registration is available online at http://hillsdale.edu/cslewis. “C.S. Lewis was one of the most gifted and influential thinkers of the 20th century,” said Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College. “His extensive contributions to fiction, philosophy, and the study of medieval literature were worthy of serious consideration and discussion for his contemporaries, and perhaps contain even more relevance for those of us fortunate enough to encounter them 53 years after his death. Rarely has a mind like Lewis’ touched on such a wide variety of subjects with such startling interconnectedness.” Instructors for the online course include Dr. Arnn; Michael Ward, author of several books about Lewis; and David Whalen, Hillsdale College provost and professor of English. Each of the nine lessons includes a 30-minute video lecture, a pre-recorded Q&A session, a discussion board, and a quiz. They are available on demand; however, students are encouraged to watch one lecture per week. Those who complete all nine lessons and pass a final quiz have the opportunity to receive a free “Certificate of Completion” for their participation in the course. Hillsdale College offers an entire catalog of free online courses taught by its faculty in subjects including the Constitution, history, k-12 education, great books, and free market economics. More than 900,000 students have generated more than 1.4 million course enrollments since the program launched in fall 2011. To view the full course catalog, visit online. hillsdale.edu.

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NORTHERN ARIZONA

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

IN NORTHERN ARIZONA

for a month! By Kathleen Walters

Jamie and Claire in STARZ TV Outlander series

Southwest Skye Pipes & Drums

Old Blind Dogs

March is an exciting month in Northern Arizona. The “Day of the Irish” is celebrated all month long! SEDONA Folks from all over the world will gather in Sedona for their 46th Annual St. Patrick’s Parade and Festival on Saturday, March 12.  Leading the parade will be Northern Arizona’s own pipe band—Southwest Skye Pipes and Drums, and this year’s Grand Marshals will be the Sedona Volunteer Parks Rangers Program.  The parade steps off at 10:30 a.m. at Jordan Park in Uptown Sedona, followed by the Festival. PRESCOTT On Thursday, March 17, Rosslyn Chapel Chapter of the Daughters of the British Empire will host a St. Patrick’s Day Meeting and Lunch at Willow Creek Restaurant, 2516 Willow Creek Road in Prescott.  RSVP to Roslyn at 928-237-1113.

Even though March is for celebrating the Irish, we in Northern Arizona do not forget the Scots. One of Scotland’s favorite folk music groups—The Old Blind Dogs—will perform at Light and Life Free Methodist Church, 2797 Willow Creek Road in Prescott at 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 24. Call Dave at (928) 771-1218 for tickets and information. FLAGSTAFF On Sunday, March 13, from noon to 3 p.m., Riordan Mansion State Park, 409 West Riordan Road in Flagstaff, will celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in true Irish style with music, games, whiskey tasting, and other activities that honor one of Flagstaff’s pioneer Irish families. For more information, call 928-779-4395. Then the Scottish music group The Old Blind Dogs will perform at the Coconino Center for the Arts, 2300 North Fort Valley Road in Flagstaff at 7:00 p.m., on Friday, March 25. For more information, call  928-779-2300. The Northern Arizona Celtic Heritage Society

will present their annual Highland Tea with Diana Gabaldon, author of the “Outlander” series, on Saturday, March 26, from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. at The Kilted Cat, 2600 West Kiltie Lane in Flagstaff.  For ticket information, call 928-606-6327.

It’s great to be Irish any time, any place, but there is nothing better than celebrating St. Patrick’s Day and Month in Arizona! Kathleen Walters lives in a log cabin in the woods near Flagstaff. For several years she taught English on the Navajo Reservation and for 30 years owned and operated Aradia, an independent bookstore in Flagstaff. A strong advocate for Adoptee Rights, she wrote Coming Together: An Adoptee’s Story and the fictional Caitlin: Priestess of the Goddess (under the author name Martha Shideler). Kathleen is fascinated by all things Celtic, travels to Ireland and Scotland as often as possible, and edits and publishes the monthly “Independent Celt Newsletter.” In her spare time, she plays the bagpipes.

SEDONA VOLUNTEER PARK RANGERS

Grand Marshals of the 46th Annual Sedona St. Patrick’s Parade future residents with a spirit of fellowship.” While our first priority is to provide support to the City’s Park & Recreation programs, the majority of our time is spent providing roving informational services and assistance to visitors in “Uptown” Sedona. Uniformed Rangers serve as a primary contact point for visitors in Uptown. They answer questions, provide directions, serve as “City Ambassadors,” pose for pictures, provide first aid, serve as first responders to emergencies, report violations/hazards, pick up litter, check public restrooms, and serve as an immediate City contact for merchants and residents. The Rangers also assist with community events providing crowd control, traffic and parking assistance, gate security, and serving as a roving contact.

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he City of Sedona Volunteer Park Ranger (SVPR) program was created in 2007 based on the City’s Vision Statement goals of preserving Sedona’s “natural beauty, scenic vistas, pristine environmental and cultural heritage nurtured in a spirit of volunteer is—that welcomes and accommodates all of its visitors and

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BENEFIT TO THE CITY During the 2015 calendar year, the Sedona Volunteer Park Rangers provided 1,619 hours of community service, totaling 25,860 volunteer hours since the program began. Based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2014) who sets the monetary value of volunteers for city, state and federal agencies, the Sedona Volunteer Park

Rangers contributed $37,350 in services to the City in 2015. This brings the total to $383,156 since the program began while costing the city less than $24,000 during that same period. But the real value may be found in the intangible benefits of having “City Ambassadors” greeting and assisting visitors on the street, making them feel welcome and creating an atmosphere that encourages them to return to Sedona. SEDONA’S PARADE AND FESTIVAL Saturday, March 12 marks the 46th Annual Sedona St. Patrick’s Parade and Festival. The festivities are presented by Sedona Main Street Program, NAU Parks and Recreation Management Program, and the Sedona Green Team. The parade starts at 10:30 am from Jordan Historical Park and proceeds south on Jordan Road to Mesquite Avenue. Parade entrants include dignitaries and civic, social, cultural, and religious organizations, with area businesses. The Festival begins immediately following the parade, featuring free children’s and family activities, food vendors, and nonstop music until 3pm.


MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

ARTS

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CELTIC ARTISAN:

JEAN DOIG

Knitted Lace

LACE MAKER, SPINNER, WEAVER

By Lynn Herdman Mascarelli

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ighly skilled artisan, Jean Doig, is truly a Celt, hailing from many generations of Cohens. Her mother’s surname was MacGillaverey; her father, a descendant of the Scottish Stewart clan. A versatile woman, Jean, from a young age, assisted her mother in teaching aquatics that she would continue at the YMCA until a back injury forced her into retirement. She pursued studies in library management at Mesa Community College and for several years has coordinated on a part-time basis the technical process for the McClelland Library at the Irish Cultural Center in Phoenix. She is also a library substitute for Mesa Public Schools. Today and for years, she has been a devoted member of CROFT, a research and re-enactment group who claim Scots, Irish and Welsh descent and emulate the lifestyles, trades, and artistry of Celts from 400 BC until 1746 AD. Growing up in Los Angeles, Jean’s crafting began at the wonderful age of five with knitting and crocheting and by nine had progressed to embroidery and needlepoint, then to weaving on the rigid heddle loom and card weaving by age ten. Her teen years only engaged her more, with tatting, spinning, dyeing, and needle lace. It was she who would be asked to assist the substitute when her fiber arts teacher was absent and perhaps here, she discovered her love for teaching. At age twenty-one she turned to her great love... lace making and especially bobbin lace which she claims is the easiest of all to create. “It is like glorified hair braiding,” she said, by which one can produce exquisite collars, edgings, and lace motifs. She would pursue the making of netted lace mesh. All lace making would become her passion, her life work. Jean stated as far back as 1740 in Jefferson’s times, there has been a documented American lace industry and the trading of laces, patterns, and silk. Lacemaking was and still is the work of nuns who embroider and

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beautify church linens. Recently, she said, the oldest maker of bobbin lace died in a convent in Bruge, Belgium. She was a teacher of some of the most advanced forms of bobbin lace. She also remarked how highly praised are the lace designs found in the Vatican linens. An authority in the field of lace making, Jean has been called upon to give lectures and demonstrate her craft to the Mormon Relief Society. As an expert in the design and repair of lace, she was asked by Saint Mark’s Episcopal Church Altar Guild to monogram their altar linens. She stated that lace conservation is of great concern for such groups but it is an arduous task to match size, texture and color of fibers. Fortunately I had “captured” Jean on a day when she was demonstrating her craft to tour groups visiting the Irish Cultural Center. Among her pieces was a stunning collar of Irish lace she had discovered in a trunk that had been made by her paternal great-grandmother. Its large flowers, she pointed out, are no longer made in Ireland; the cost to make them exceeding the time consumed in producing them. Jean’s goal is to design samples of Irish laces...the embroidered net laces of Limerick, Carrickmacross, and Tambour; the needle laces of Youghal and Kenmare from which one can make coasters, sun catchers, ornaments and medallions for clothing. She especially loves Irish crochet and its motifs; there is also the beautiful Mountmellick embroidery with fringed, knitted edge and the unique designs she hopes to replicate soon in a tea cozy. I ask all my artisans this...what do you consider your pièce de résistance? Inspired by Barbara Underwood’s writings on Bedfordshire bobbin lace, Jean created for her sister a wedding headpiece of lace. It consumed two years of her life (1990-1992), 326 pairs of bobbins and 3,800 hours of handwork. It is now on display in her sister’s home. With its letter of authenticity, it is valued at $25,000. Do you have an unhappy memory in your years of art making? Tragically, Jean stated her dog literally ate a stunning knitted lace blouse she had created with


THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

by Kristie Stevenson

ARTS

SPINNING AROUND IRELAND

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imported yarn from Israel and no longer made. And what lies ahead for you? Jean didn’t hesitate...she will continue to teach and make lace, still weave and spin. One could not find a more serious and well-versed teacher in such matters. And with all you have told me, what might you say to our readers in closing? Jean smiled. “Lace is not hard to do but very addicting.” READ MORE: Decorative Arts and History Museum, Dublin http://www.museum.ie/Decorative-Arts-History http://www.irishlacemuseum.com And there are other wonderful sites: http://www.mountmellickdevelopment.com/ museum.htm http://www.carrickmacrosslace.ie http://www.kenmarelace.ie Lynn is a former high school teacher of art, history, and political science. She is a potter, illustrator, muralist in public venues and private homes, and wordsmith. Frequently a featured artist at the Irish Cultural Center, Celtic landscapes intrigue her. Her mom, a Williams, is totally Welsh with ancestry as far back as 1700s and the Isle of Anglesley.

Ann Hines, Jean Doig (center), and Wendy Beaver presenting demonstrations at The Cottage, ICC

n today’s Ireland, an advertisement for “spinning” means a workout on a stationary bike, not using a spinning wheel. But... Two images come to mind when spinning thread is mentioned. One, an old woman holding a stick and twisting it; the other, an equally old woman turning a wheel on a frame. Back through history spinning was done on a weighted stick called a spindle. Women and young girls spent much of their time spinning so the thread could be woven into cloth for the family. The spinning wheel was invented in Asia and made it into Europe by the 13th century. This kind of wheel is called the Great or Walking Wheel. A large wheel turned by hand turns a spindle as the spinner walks away from it which spins the thread. Sleeping Beauty pricked her finger on one. This was the first kind of wheel to make it into Ireland. Improvements were made, including a treadle which turns the wheel by foot allowing the user to sit while working, leaving both hands free to spin better thread. This is what we think of as a spinning wheel. Treadle spinning wheels were brought into Ireland by Sir Thomas Wentworth, Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. He brought craftsmen from Holland to teach Irish carpenters how to build wheels for spinning flax. So in Ireland this wheel is known as the Dutch wheel. Flax was grown and spun in Ireland for use in making the world’s best linen. A hank of spun flax yarn was 3,600 yards long and could weigh as little as an ounce. Irish women were given wheels by weaving mills to spin flax and used their machines for spinning wool as well. Today, around the world, descendants of those spinners spin for the pleasure it brings. Kristie Stevenson, a fourth generation Arizonan, traces her Celtic ancestry back to Ireland, Scotland and Wales. A CROFT member, she enjoys spinning, felting and quilting. She with her husband, Chris, spend summers in their home in Banbridge, County Down, and winter in Glendale, Arizona. PHOTO SHOWN ABOVE BY DETROIT PUBLISHING CO., LIBRARY OF CONGRESS REPRODUCTION NUMBER LLC-DIGPPMSC-09892. LICENSED UNDER PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA COMMONS - HTTPSCOMMONS.WIKIMEDIA.ORGWIKIFILEE

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

ANAM CARA HONOREES T By John Keating, Fund Development Manager, ICLF with Iain Lundy

Photos by Bob Rink Photography

he 8th Annual Anam Cara Awards Gala was a terrific success. More than 175 guests attended at the Irish Cultural Center and McClelland Library in October 2015, for an enjoyable outdoor evening of great food, entertainment, and fun. Among the special visitors was Irish Consul General to the Western U.S., Philip Grant; and Councillor Mary Howard of the EnnisPhoenix Twinning Board (Sister Cities in County Clare, Ireland). The event net proceeds reached close to $20,000. The monies raised from table sales, silent and live auctions, and general donations go directly toward supporting the programs and events offered through the nonprofit parent organization, the Irish Cultural and Learning Foundation (ICLF). The wonderful evening was capped off with awards for the Anam Cara (Irish pronounced “ah-nahm khara” means “soul friend”). The honorees giving touching and emotional speeches about their positive involvement in the Irish/Celtic community. Instead of individuals, this year three outstanding couples were recognized with the annual Anam Cara awards in recognition of their generous contribution of time and leadership in the Community. The three sets of recipients are:

PATRICIA AND SEAN PRIOR The Priors are among the Founders of the ICLF and have been involved with the Center since its conception. Patricia previously served as a volunteer in many positions from Secretary of the ICLF Board of Trustees, President of WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM » WWW.ENTERTAINERMAG.COM

the Board, Executive Director; and as one of the founding members of the Celtic Crafters. The ICC’s Annual Fall Tea is one of the events she hosts and is enjoyed by many each year. Sean is forever proud of his contribution to the Winter Solstice celebration each December and served as a docent for many years. His help with creating the Famine Memorial is also very special to him. Although now “somewhat retired” from their previous involvement with the Irish Cultural Center, but were both delighted at being Honorees for the Anam Cara Award this year, an award that Patricia was quite involved with originally establishing.

ANNA AND MICHAEL O’HARA Michael, who is originally from Ajo, Arizona, and Anna, from Washington DC, were married in 1972 in Phoenix and blessed with three children: Tara Leigh (Soucy), Patrick Michael, and Arick Ray, and their grandson, Brendan. Since Anna retired from teaching middle school in the Kyrene School District in 2006, she has volunteered as Lead Docent at the Irish Cultural Center. She is a former Affiliate Irish Cultural and Learning Foundation Board member. Currently, Anna is President of the Irish Foundation of Arizona; Michael serves as Vice-President and interim Secretary. She and Michael are both founding directors for the Friends of St. Patrick Centre, Arizona Chapter; Anna was the former Secretary. Together, they are members of the Irish Currach Team of Phoenix rowers.

DELIA AND KELLY STOKES Baby Nicholas Stokes was born more than three months early on July 12, 2006, in one of the most breathtakingly beautiful places on earth, the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare, Ireland. Sadly, he lived only an hour and died en route to the hospital. Moved by the compassion and kindness the Irish people showed them, Delia Garcia Stokes Director of Communications for Walmart; and Kelly Stokes, Market Director of Health & Wellness for Walmart, pledged to turn their tragedy into something good. With the help of the Phoenix-Ennis Sister Cities and the county’s leadership, Kelly and Delia’s vision of a fully equipped first aid facility at the soon-to-be completed state-of-the-art Cliffs of Moher Visitor Experience was approved by Clare County Council. In 2007, the Cliffs of Moher Visitor Experience was inaugurated and the first aid facility, named for Baby Nicholas, was opened. Nicholas’ Room is designed to be “an ambulance without wheels,” where trained staff can triage and support visitors who need medical attention. Parents Kelly and Delia, from Phoenix, shared, “Though the circumstances of his premature arrival have been described as sad and tragic, the legacy of Nicholas’ short life is anything but that. There is great joy, peace, hope, and a renewed faith in God’s plan for each of us.” Through the care and assistance provided in Nicholas’ Room, Baby Nicholas will continue to touch the lives of people from Ireland and around the world who visit the Cliffs of Moher.


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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

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WELSH

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

Wales...Cymru

FRONGOCH AND THE EASTER RISING OF 1916

The Irish would be inspired at the Welsh’s dogged retention of their native tongue despite their English neighbors. By Lynn Herdman Mascarelli

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hree miles from Bala in North Wales, there is little evidence of the site of a 1916 internment compound, where the Welsh played a major role in a well-documented turbulent time in Irish and British history. There is talk of ceremonies and the laying of wreaths of remembrance during this centenary year of 2016. With the government of Ireland Act 1914 and continued oppression of Home Rule Bills, Ireland was weary; insurrection imminent. A rebellion aimed at establishing an Irish Republic arose on Easter Monday 1916 but was swiftly crushed by British military forces. Fifteen leaders of the Easter Rising were executed. The rest, more than 1800 Irishmen, among them Michael Collins and Arthur Griffith, were transported with prisoner of war status to Merionethshire in Wales and the tiny village of Fron Goch. Because many charged were wrongly arrested, the prisoner population was sorted out and gradually reduced to five or six hundred. The internment site had been a German prisoner of war camp during World War I. They were displaced and sent elsewhere to make room for the Irish insurgents. It was divided into a North and South Camp. The South Camp based in an old whisky distillery fallen into disrepair when the owners suffered bankruptcy in 1910. The North Camp was close to a road leading to the location of another tragic event years later in Welsh history in the town of Capel Celyn, lying peacefully in a valley. It would be literally submerged under water after the people were forced out; their life work gone to allow a reservoir by the river Tryweryn to flow into the lowlands in1965. The North Camp was designated a place to discipline unruly prisoners. One can only imagine the conflict existing between the camp authorities and imprisoned insurrectionists, the living conditions, and not knowing what lay ahead. Most interesting was the relationship that devel-

Prisoners held Gaelic lessons and were allowed to have musical instruments. oped between prisoners and Welshmen who worked at the camp. The Irish would be inspired at the Welsh’s dogged retention of their native tongue despite their English neighbors. The Irish prisoners were, for the most part, educated men, who chose to use their prison time well by learning their own Gaelic; Welsh, Spanish, and French. Prisoners themselves organized classes in subjects like bookkeeping, mathematics, and shorthand. Paul Dickens in his writings (2016) maintains it was “the learning of Gaelic that had been inspired by the Welsh’s own love for their language.” But Michael Collins would teach other things, train the detainees in military strategy and guerrilla warfare. Frongoch would earn the name: ollscoil na réabhlóide, the university of revolution. The planning of the fight for freedom continued and the name Irish Republican Army was first used instead of the Irish Volunteers or Irish Citizen Army. Public outcry and reports of abuse and poor diet caused a doctor to declare most would not survive their internment and, on 23 December 1916, Britain’s first and only Welsh-speaking Prime Minister, David

Kells and Irish Literature: Working the Dream-Space Irish Monasticism’s Contribution to Europe Interactive Workshop and Film: The Work of Angels “The Book of Kells” Saturday, April 23, 2016 1:00-4:00pm Irish Cultural Center 1106 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 $15 per person / $25 for two Reservations Required Purchase Tickets at the Door

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Lloyd George, signed the release of the Irish detainees who returned home for Christmas. Inwardly they came back to Ireland fired up even more to rebel. There were no remembrances for a very long time at Frongoch due to the ongoing Troubles in Northern Ireland and fear of possible controversy that might ensue if they did. But, initiated by the Liverpool branch of Conradh na Gaeilge/The Gaelic League and Cymdeithas yr Iaith Gymraeg/The Welsh language Society, a memorial plaque in Irish, Welsh, and English was unveiled at the internment site in the summer of 2002. A local school Ysgol Bro Tryweryn now stands on the site of the former camp. For author’s bio and photo, go to page 41.

Fascinating documentary in English and Welsh with subtitles

Legends of Celtic Exploration in the Ancient Americas: Saints, Princes, & Red-Haired Gods Presented by Dr. Sharonah Fredrick Assistant Director, ACMRS

Saturday, May 7, 2016 7:00-9:00pm Irish Cultural Center 1106 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 Tickets $10 at the door Open to the public


45

THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

Matt’s grandparents, James Joseph Cunningham and Delia McNicholas, each emigrated from Co. Mayo, Ireland, met and married in Chicago

The Poisoned Pen Bookstore

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DIRECTORIES

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK IRISH CULTURAL CENTER & McCLELLAND LIBRARY Our mission is to provide a link between the people of Arizona and the people of Ireland and other Celtic cultures. The Irish Cultural Center serves as a central meeting place for cultural groups, affiliate groups and people looking to celebrate their Irish/Celtic heritage. The McClelland Library is a three-story building resembling a traditional 12th century Norman castle from the Emerald Isle. The Library houses 8,000 books from Irish authors, poets, and genealogical sources, a permanent exhibit on The Book of Kells, several reading rooms, and computer access to various disciplines of Irish and Celtic studies including genealogy. Their current exhibition is on the Historical Context and Cultural Legacy of the 1916 Easter Rising. The mission of The Academy of Irish & Celtic Studies is to spread the knowledge and wisdom of the Celtic nations through music, dance, art, literature and language. We do this by providing many musical and Arts programs, open to young and old alike. The Center is also available for private rentals, being a beautiful venue for all occasions! www.azirish.org, 602-258-0109

ARIZONA COLLEEN PROGRAMS The Arizona Colleen and Rose of Tralee Selection, Arizona Irish Lass and Little Miss Shamrock programs select young ladies of Irish descent to participate as spokespersons at area events. Prize packages for each competition. The Colleen wins a trip to Ireland and $1,000 scholarship. For details, visit www.azcolleen.org or contact Erin Sweeney-Morgan, Chair, 602-373-7931, info@azcolleen.org.

ARIZONA LAW ENFORCEMENT EMERALD SOCIETY (ALEES) ALEES was incorporated in 2004 to promote and celebrate accomplishments of Irish-Americans in law enforcement. Its members, families and friends support ALEES Foundation, a non-profit 501(c) (3) created in 2012 to provide financial assistance to the families of injured and fallen brothers and sisters in Arizona law enforcement. If interested in becoming a member or volunteering, contact us at azemeraldsociety.org.

THE CALEDONIAN SOCIETY OF ARIZONA Our mission is to promote Scottish culture through art, education, and athletics. Each year we grant scholarships to aspiring and professional Highland athletes, musicians, dancers and/or any other individuals or organizations whose mission, project or program promotes Scottish heritage. We meet the 2nd Thursday of each month for drinks, entertainment and Scottish fun! Everyone welcome! ArizonaScots.com.

CELTIC HARVEST FESTIVAL SEDONA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 AT VERDE VALLEY SCHOOL Enjoy the sounds of Celtic music and dance, storytelling, and poetry, wares for sale, workshops by artisans, sheepherding demos, art of falconry, Fairy Village children’s activities, lots of food and drink! New this year Scottish heavy athletics! Adults $15; Teens $5; under 11 yrs. old free. www.celticharvestfestival.com

DAUGHTERS OF SCOTIA DESERT THISTLE LODGE #260 Formed in 2005 to promote Scottish heritage. Ladies of ancestry, married to a Scot or born in Scotland may join. We hold monthly meetings, tea socials, a teahouse at the AZ Highland Games and attend Scottish events. We support Highland dance competition and other charities. Contact: Bethany Tso at 602-770-7565 or clanwoman924@yahoo.com

DESERT IRISH WOLFHOUND ASSOCIATION (DIWA) A non-profit corporation, DIWA is committed to improving the health and welfare of Irish Wolfhounds throughout Arizona; encouraging responsible ownership through mentoring and education of its members; and maintaining a source of Irish Wolfhound specific rescue/rehoming contacts statewide. Dues are $20 for a single and $30 for a family membership. For information, contact Christine Davis, President, 602-439-1783; or Pam Clark, Rehoming Coordinator, 928-821-6009; www.desertirishwolfhounds.org.

FRIENDS OF SAINT PATRICK CENTRE – AZ CHAPTER The nonprofit organization was formed in 2011 to promote positive relationships between Arizona and Northern Ireland. Through education, cultural exchanges and charitable events, the Chapter nurtures St. Patrick’s legacy. Meetings held quarterly at the ICC. Contact: Glenda Walker at 602-277-1376, www.saintpatrickcentre.com

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GRAND CANYON CELTIC ARTS ACADEMY It offers classes in Irish music, dance, and language to children ages 7+ (July 14-18, 2014) and adults (July 15-17, 2014). Come learn something new or improve your current skills with members of Runa and Zac Legér. Classes in fiddle, whistle, guitar, bodhrán, Irish language, dance, and more! Contact: Kari Barton, 928-600-1365, kari@grandcanyoncelticarts.org

IRISH AMERICAN CLUB WEST VALLEY Our purpose is to bring together individual of Irish descent and others interested in Irish culture through our monthly socials. Everyone is welcome; it is part of our Irish hospitality. The Club meets monthly October through May for dinner and dancing at the Sun City Country Club. Dues are $10 per year. For information or a complementary newsletter, contact Maura McConnell, Secretary, 623-933-3698, hummel4fun@aol.com.

IRISH FOUNDATION OF ARIZONA Formed in the 1970s to bring together people of Irish heritage in Arizona, the group sponsors social events throughout the year. Meetings are held on the first Wednesday of each month at 7pm at the ICC. Contact: Anna O’Hara, President, 480-345-9517

IRISH NETWORK PHOENIX (IN PHX) Irish Network Phoenix is under the umbrella of the national IrishNetwork USA organization integrating the IrishNetworks that exist in various cities across the United States. It allows members of the networks to connectwith their peers and to develop relationships that will foster success in their business, economic, cultural andsports ventures. Come to a monthly breakfast or lunch to explore membership benefits.www.meetup.com/INPhoenix; www.facebook. com/IrishNetworkPhoenix; www.IrishNetworkPhoenix.com

JIM THOMSON U.S. SCHOOL OF PIPING & DRUMMING This bagpipe and drum school is dedicated to excellence in bagpiping as well as camaraderie and fun. All levels of students are welcome! Instructors are brought from Scotland, Ireland, Canada and the U.S. Contact: Eric Poleski, Administrator, ericpoleski@cox.net, 702-270-8974 home, 702-340-8859 cell, 928-556-3161, www.nachs.info

LOS SAN PATRICIOS DE ARIZONA (ST. PATRICK’S BATTALION) The organization honors the 150-year-old bond of friendship existing today between Mexico and Ireland. Los San Patricios de Arizona was founded by Wm. “Bill” Howard O'Brien; Hector Corona, El Teniente; and Ernie Patino, El Teniente. For information, please call 480-951-1152 or email whoco@cox.net.

NORTHERN ARIZONA CELTIC HERITAGE SOCIETY The nonprofit organization is dedicated to presenting, promoting, and preserving Celtic culture. Each year we host the Arizona Highland Celtic Festival (July 19-20, 2014), the Jim Thomson U.S. School of Piping & Drumming (July 11-18, 2014), and the Grand Canyon Celtic Arts Academy (July 15-18, 2014). Contact Jude McKenzie, information@nachs.info, 928-556-3161, ww.nachs.info.

PHOENIX ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE & FAIRE COMMITTEE Formed in 1983, the Committee has the responsibility for organizing the annual Phoenix St. Patrick’s Day Parade and the Faire that follows, which are held on Saturday (the closest before or falling on March 17); and the Arizona Colleen Programs throughout the year. It is entirely volunteers and meets the second Tuesday of each month at 7 pm at the ICC. Contact: Harry Sexton, President, 602-863-9198.

PHOENIX ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE It is one of the largest parades in Arizona! Celebrate being Irish with the entire Valley. Coming up Saturday, March 14, 2015, 10am; route is Third Street south from Sheridan to Moreland, FREE. Contact: John Corcoran, Chair, 623-939-1183, www.stpatricksdayphoenix.org.

PHOENIX ST. PATRICK’S DAY FAIRE Fun for the entire family, it showcases Irish music, step dancing, Irish and Celtic arts and crafts, plus traditional Irish foods and beverages. Coming up Saturday, March 14, 2015, 10am-5pm at the Irish Cultural Center and Margaret Hance Park grounds. Contact: Mary Moriarty, Chair, 602-258-0109, www.stpatricksdayphoenix.org.


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THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016 TUCSON-ROSCOMMON, IRELAND SISTER CITIES

Our organization, a 501(c)(3), exists in order to promote cultural pride in Celtic heritage through education, scholarships, activities, special events and the annual Prescott Highland Games. It is a love of all things Celtic which drives our association. Dues are $10 for single and $15 per couple per year. For information, call Andy Hamilton 928642-0020 or Jill Nelson 928-443-1422, regjill@q.com; P.O. Box 12912, Prescott, AZ 86304-2912; www.prescotthighlandgames.com.

Colleen Kelly Beaman, Chair 520-743-7979, Ckbeaman@hotmail.com 1670 N Country Club, Tucson, AZ 85716; and Facebook

RIORDAN MANSION STATE HISTORIC PARK

Classes in Chandler, 480-699-2455, www.brackenirishdance.com Thomas Bracken, ADCRG. | Alexis Hodel, TCRG thomas.bracken@brackenirishdance.com, alexis.hodel@brackenirishdance.com

Built in 1904 for two Irish brothers, Riordan Mansion is an architectural treasure offering a glimpse into the lives of Flagstaff’s early Irish settlers. The “fairy ring” seen on the outdoor self-guided tour hints at the Irish tradition of providing fairies an outdoor dancing space, preventing mischief inside. For admission rates and hours call 928-779-4395.

SCOTTISH-AMERICAN MILITARY SOCIETY (SAMS), FLAGSTAFF Chartered on April 21, 1981 in North Carolina, membership is open to all Active Duty and Veterans of the USA and the British Commonwealth who are of Scot or Scot-Irish lineage. For more information, contact SAMS Flagstaff Post 2000, George G. Shoemaker, 928-607-1600, gduffer@suddenlink.net.

SCOTTISH-AMERICAN MILITARY SOCIETY (SAMS), PRESCOTT Membership is open to honorably discharged veterans or active duty or reserve military persons who have served or are serving with any branch of the United States or Commonwealth Armed Forces, of Scottish ancestry. We welcome your membership. Currently there are 39 Posts within the United States. Contact: Reg Nelson, 928-443-1422; SAMS Prescott Post 1297, “The Arizona Highlanders,” P.O. Box 2245, Prescott, AZ 86302-2245; sams.commander.post1297@gmail.com.

CELTIC SISTER CITIES CHANDLER-TULLAMORE, IRELAND SISTER CITIES

CELTIC DANCE SCHOOLS BRACKEN SCHOOL OF IRISH DANCE

MAGUIRE ACADEMY OF IRISH DANCE Classes in Phoenix, Tucson, Dallas, and Houston Info@maguireacademy.com (520) 319-0204. Darren Maguire, TCRG, ADCRG www.maguireacademy.com

MASCHINO SCHOOL OF HIGHLAND DANCE Kari Maschino, 480-242-7760, Kari@maschinodance.com Gilbert, Tempe, Peoria www.maschinodance.com

MICHAEL PATRICK GALLAGHER SCHOOL OF IRISH DANCE

DIRECTORIES

PRESCOTT AREA CELTICS SOCIETY (PACS)

MPGirishdance@yahoo.com Michael Patrick, TCRG, ADCRG, Ann Paitel, TCRG www.mpgirishdance.com

CLANS CLAN MACINNES INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION Arizona Convenor: Steve McKinnis 11505 E. Calle Javelina, Tucson, AZ 85748 macinnes@macinnes.org • 520-290-1268 • www.macinnes.org

Ellen Harrington, President. P.O. Box 4174, Chandler, AZ 85244-4174 480-600-8509, chan.to.tull@gmail.com, www.chandlerirish.org

PHOENIX-ENNIS, IRELAND SISTER CITIES Mary Hill-Connor, Committee Chairperson 602-635-9760, mary.hillconnor@gmail.com www.phoenixsistercities.org

NEW MEMBERS WELCOME! Come explore Ireland with us

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

June 15 – June 27, 2016

8am Open

$1995

9am Rick Calderone Noon Trotters Wake 4pm Carl O’Callaghan 7pm Cockswain

9201 N. 29th Ave., #52

based on double occupancy

Phoenix

TIMFINNEGANS.COM SPECIAL MENU ALL DAY OPEN 8 am 11 am Frank Mackay 3 pm The Spirited Lads 7 pm Carl O’Callaghan Meet the Guinness Girls

SPECIAL MENU ALL DAY 1 North 1st Street, Suite 201, PHOENIX

WWW.THEKETTLEBLACKPUB.COM

Includes all tour guides, all buses, all entrance fees, four-star hotels, all breakfasts, a cabaret show and dinner, a lunch and show at a working farm, a traditional dinner in a castle of Ireland, medical insurance coverage while you are on the trip and all tips except for Bus Driver/Guide at end of trip. Visits to: Dublin: Trinity College, The Book of Kells, St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Phoenix Park, Cabaret Show and Dinner; Belfast: Titanic Quarters, Queens University, Falls Road, Falls Road Murals, History of Northern Ireland Conflict, Walk the Walls of Derry, Visit to the Giant’s Causeway, Derry; Galway: The Burren, Cliffs of Moher, Traditional Irish Dinner and Show at Castle, Rathbun Farm, Marble Factory, Thatched Houses of Ennis; Killarney: The Ring of Kerry, Muckross House, Dingle Peninsula, best Irish Coffee in Ireland, Gap of Dunloe, Blarney: Blarney Castle. Waterford: Waterford Factory Tour.

www.gonzalotours.com Contact Bobby: gonzalotours@yahoo.com | 623-934-2871 | 602-695-5336 (cell)

DEADLINE March 31 for Inquiries

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CALENDAR

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

MARCH-APRIL 2016 [All events are in Arizona USA unless otherwise noted]

IRISH CULTURAL CENTER (ICC)/ MCCLELLAND LIBRARY

PUBLIC WALK-IN HOURS (TOURS, LIBRARY & GENEALOGY) Tuesday-Saturday • 10am – 3pm Wednesday Evenings (Library only) • 3pm – 8pm Frances McClelland Genealogy Centre available these hours; Open Other Hours for Scheduled Classes, Meetings & Events 1106 N. Central Ave., Phoenix 85004 602-258-0109, www.azirish.org See ad page 11

DEIREADH SEACHTAINE – IRISH LANGUAGE WEEKEND

5TH ANNUAL EXPERIENCE IRELAND

Thursday, March 17 • 7:30pm Tickets: start $29 Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts See ad on back page

CELTIC WEEKEND

Thursday March 17 • 10am – 10pm Tickets: $5 - $15 at the gate. Children under 12 free! azirish.org, 602-258-0109

Arizona Renaissance Festival Saturday, March 12 Sunday, March 13 See ad page 4

ST. PATRICK’S EVENTS

February 26-28 • 10am – 4pm $50 per day or $125 for all Instructor is native Irish speaker commissioned by the Ireland-United States (Fulbright) Commission for Educational Exchange. Info: Vicki Champion, AZRangGaeilge@gmail.com, 623680-1711 ICC, azirish.org, Elaine at 602-864-2357

REMEMBERING THE EASTER RISING: HISTORICAL CONTEXT AND CULTURAL LEGACY

Now through June An Interactive Museum EXHIBIT | McClelland Library Co-Sponsored by Ireland’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade through the Consulate Office of San Francisco. Cost: $10 adults, $8 seniors and students, $5 members, and $5 kids ages 5-17. Contact/Info: 602-864-2351; www.azirishlibrary.org

FAMILY STORY HOUR

Saturday, March 5 • 10:30am to Noon Stories and crafts for entire family. Irish Cultural Center; FREE. Contact: 602-864-2351; info@azirishlibrary.org

TÉADA ORCHESTRA PRESENTS “REAWAKENING”

Thursday, March 10 • 7pm Friday, March 11 • 7pm Téada (Irish for “string”) Orchestra is a group of 20 string musicians who form Dublin’s newest orchestral collective. Tickets: $38.50 - $43.50 MIM.org or 480.478.6000

TUCSON MAYOR’S LUNCHEON

Friday, March 11 • 11:30am – 1:30pm Pastiche, 3025 N. Campbell, Tucson Hosted by Tucson-Roscommon Sister Cities RSVP: Colleen Beaman, 520-743-7979 See ad page 19

KISS ME I’M IRISH RUN & WALK

Saturday, March 12 • 7:17am start Live Music, Fun for the Entire Family IrishRunAZ.org; 480609-3978 See ad page 43

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POT OF GOLD MUSIC FESTIVAL

Thursday, March 17 Saturday, March 19 Rawhide in Chandler, AZ potofgoldaz.com See ad on page 39

Friday, March 18 • 7pm – 9pm Westin Kierland, Scottsdale Saturday, March 19 9am – 7pm Sunday March 20 9am – 4pm Steele Indian School Park, Phoenix See ad page 17

February 26 through March 13 By Conor McPherson Directed by Carol MacLeod Theatre Artist Studio Discount for ICC/McClelland Library members See ad page 50

THIRD FRIDAY CEILI

ST. PATRICK’S DAY AT THE IRISH CULTURAL CENTER & MCCLELLAND LIBRARY!

SCOTTISH GATHERING AND HIGHLAND GAMES

“THE WEIR”

(IRISH SOCIAL DANCING) March 18, April 15 • 7pm – 10pm • The Great Hall $6; under 12 FREE (2 with each paid admission)

CONCERT: CHERISH THE LADIES

Saturday, March 12 • 9 am - 5 pm Sunday, March 13 • 9 am - 5 pm Music, crafts, Irish dancing, storytelling and more; celebrate St. Patrick’s Day! Tickets: Activities and performances included with paid museum admission MIM.org or 480.478.6000

THE OLD BLIND DOGS FROM SCOTLAND

PARADES AND FAIRES

Saturday, March 12 Phoenix Parade • 10am; Irish Faire • 10am – 5pm See ad page 13 San Diego, CA Parade • 10:30am; Irish Festival • 9am – 6pm See ad page 51 Sedona Parade • 10:30am; Irish Festival • follows to 3pm See info page 38 Sunday, March 13 Tucson Parade • 11am; Irish Festival • 10am – 6pm See ad page 23

LIVE MUSIC AT IRISH PUBS

Thursday, March 17 Directory page 32; See ads below O’Connor’s page 21 R.T. O’Sullivan’s page 22 Rula Bula page 50 Seamus McCaffrey’s page 43 The Kettle Black page 47 Tim Finnegan’s page 47

ST. PATRICK'S DAY FUN AT RIORDAN MANSION!

Sunday, March 13 • Noon to 3:00pm State Historic Park 409 West Riordan Road, Flagstaff Celebrate the Irish heritage of the Riordan family. Music, raffles, refreshments, crafts for kids, and other magical surprises! Irish-themed tours (regular admission fee applies); whiskey tasting ($15 per person) Hosted by Northern Arizona Celtic Heritage Society and the Riordan Action Network Need not be Irish to attend - kilt not required Info: 928-853-7792

LÚNASA WITH TIM O’BRIEN

Tuesday, March 15 • 7pm Tickets: $38.50 - $48.50 Irish music dream team and Grammy-winning musician explore common roots and mutual influences at the heart of American and Irish music. MIM.org or 480.478.6000

Thursday, March 24 • 7 pm Light & Life Free Methodist Church 2797 Willow Creek Rd., Prescott Tickets at door only: $25; $12 college students; under 19 - FREE, Info: 928-771-1218 Friday, March 25 • 7pm Coconino Center for the Arts, Flagstaff Info: 928-779-2300 www.oldblinddogs.co.uk See info page 38

MULTI-MEDIA EVENT: 100TH ANNIVERSARY 1916 EASTER RISING

Presented by Jim Daugherty Saturday, March 26 • 9am – 1pm The Great Hall, ICC Co-Sponsored by Ireland's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade through the Consulate Office of San Francisco FREE, donations accepted; cash bar azirish.org, 602-258-0109

BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP

Saturday, March 26 • 10:30am – 12:30pm • FREE Co-Sponsored by Ireland’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade through the Consulate Office of San Francisco This month discussing Liam O'Flaherty, “The Informer” (novel) ICC/McClelland Library, 602-864-2351; azirishlibrary.org

ANNUAL HIGHLAND TEA WITH DIANA GABALDON

Saturday, March 26 • 2pm – 5pm The Kilted Cat 2600 West Kiltie Lane, Flagstaff Author of the “Outlander” book and TV series Hosted by Northern AZ Celtic Heritage Society Ticket info: 928-606-6327

MULTI-MEDIA EVENT: 100TH ANNIVERSARY 1916 EASTER RISING

Presented by Jim Daugherty Monday, March 28 • 6:30pm FREE Scottsdale Civic Center Library See ad on back page


THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

FAMILY STORY HOUR

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BOOK OF KELLS SEMINAR

Saturday, April 2 • 10:30am to Noon Stories and crafts for entire family. Irish Cultural Center; FREE. Contact: 602-864-2351; info@azirishlibrary.org

Saturday April 23 • 1pm – 4pm Norton Room, McClelland Library Presented by Sean Lee, ICC Co-Founder and Dr. Sharonah Fredrick, ASU Tickets: $15 per person, $25 for two people at the gate. Reservations required. azirish.org, 602-258-0109 See ad page 44

ORIGINATION/DISCOVERY: UK AND IRELAND

Sunday, April 3 • Noon – 4pm FREE Scottsdale Center for the Arts Concerts, vendors, workshops, dance, cooking show, theatre, and more! Celtic Tea Party 2:30-3:30pm (requires ticket $10; online or call box office) See ad page 50

DAUGHTERS OF SCOTIA SPRING TEA

PIRATE PARTY! FOR ALL AGES

Sunday, April 17 • 1:30pm – 5:30pm ICC/McClelland Library Pirate lore and storytelling, music and dance, kids’ craft, food and cash bar. Welcome to come as a pirate! Tickets: $5 at the gate; kids under 12 FREE azirish.org, 602-258-0109 See ad page 21

MAYOR’S INTERNATIONAL GALA

Thursday, April 7 6pm – 9pm Sheraton Grand Phoenix Tickets by March 18 PhoenixSisterCities.org See ad page 18

“THE STRANGE UNDOING OF PRUDENCIA HART”

GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

National Theatre of Scotland April 19-24, Tickets: $39 plus $10 food and beverage minimum Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts See ad on back page

“PEACE THROUGH PEOPLE”

Thursday, April 21 • 6:30pm – 8:30pm Burst of Butterflies Pottery & Art Studio 141 W. Boston Street, Downtown Chandler Painting the Blarney Castle Hosted by Chandler-Tullamore Sister Cities See ad page 18

Saturday, April 9 • 10:30am to 12:30 pm Cost: $15 members/$20 nonmembers ICC/McClelland Library, 602-864-2351; azirishlibrary.org 2016 Young Artists & Authors Int’l. Showcase Reception Friday, April 15 • 6pm – 10pm 3rd Friday Artwalk, Downtown Chandler Hosted by Chandler-Tullamore Sister Cities Chandlerirish.org See ad page 18

A WINE & DESIGN EVENING

Sunday, April 24 • 2pm – 4pm Great Hall, ICC Tickets: $10 Adults; $5 Children Contacts: Janet Grant, tisdalejanet@gmail.com, 602-509-1182; Bethany Tso, autumnphyre@cox.net, 602-770-7565

BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP

Saturday, April 30 • 10:30am – 12:30pm • FREE Co-Sponsored by Ireland's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade through the Consulate Office of San Francisco This month discussing Frank O'Connor, "Guests of the Nation" (short story) ICC/McClelland Library, 602-864-2351; azirishlibrary.org

SAVE THE DATE: LEGENDS OF CELTIC EXPLORATION IN THE ANCIENT AMERICAS: SAINTS, PRINCES, & RED-HAIRED GODS Saturday, May 7 • 7pm – 9pm Presented by Dr. Sharonah Fredrick ICC, $10 at door See ad page 44

IRISH LANGUAGE INTENSIVE May 17-22 (All levels) Info: Vicki Champion, 623-680-1711

Saturday, March 5 · 7:30pm

March 8 - 13 Foyer

Ticket Includes Dinner! Discounts for Tables of 8

Friday, March 4, 2016 · 7:30pm

Friday, March 18 · 7:30pm

Saturday, March 25 · 7:30pm

480.782.2680 · www.ChandlerCenter.org

Friday, April 1 · 7:30pm /ChandlerCenterfortheArts @ChandlerArts

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MARCH/APRIL 2016 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

OrigiNation A Festival of Native Cultures celebrating the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Arizona

Sunday

April 3, 2016 12 – 4 p.m.

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts 7380 E. Second Street Scottsdale 85251

Free

Admission!

An afternoon of free entertainment and interactive experiences OPEN-AIR MUSIC PERFORMANCES BY

The Rave British Invasion, Tramor, and The Big Fellahs Seating on lawn; welcome to bring a blanket or portable chairs

COMMUNITY PARTNERS including the Irish Cultural Center/McClelland Library, Living Traditions Dance Troupe, Arizona DeLorean Club, Welsh musician John Good, Maschino Highland Dancers, Desert Irish Wolfhound Association, Irish Currach Rowing Team, Scottish Highland Games Athletes, Celtic Re-enactment Organization for Fellowship and Trades (CROFT), Arizona Curriculum Theater presents Peter Pan for children and more!

Sunday A’Fair Presenting Sponsors: Nationwide Supporting Sponsor: Courtyard Scottsdale Salt River

WORKSHOPS FEATURE

The Celtic Caterer live cooking demonstration, period costume making by Arizona Renaissance Festival, Scotch Tasting*, and teaching Irish social dancing (ceili)

CELTIC TEA PARTY*

LIMITED SEATING, WEAR A HAT! Tea Etiquette speaker, light fare and entertainment

Hosted by Phoenix-Ennis and Chandler-Tullamore Sister Cities, Daughters of Scotia, and The Desert Shamrock magazine *Only two of the events require a fee. Purchase tickets online or in person at the box office ($10 per person)

CALL FOR DISCOUNT PRICE!

This year’s must-read Sonoran Mystery

15

$

FOOD TRUCKS ON SITE AND CASH BAR, ARTS-AND-CRAFTS BY LOCAL ARTISTS, DISPLAYS

www.ScottsdalePerformingArts.org

llyndragonpublishing.com

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ICC/McClelland Library members and guests Contains mature language and themes

8/5/15 11:04 AM


THE DESERT SHAMROCK MARCH/APRIL 2016

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We’re on the lookout for the one million of Irish, Scottish, and Welsh descent. The more successful the campaign, the more philanthropic we can be to support Arizona’s Celtic nonprofits, going national and international. Hey, we could even help restore a castle!

The Count Continues! Go to desertshamrock.com Click link on home page

$1 Count Me In

Register as “I’m 1 in a Million!” We’re counting on our website’s homepage! Once you select this perk, you can increase your contribution to include each person in your family at $1 each. So, a family of five would be $5. Receive a beautifully designed Certificate.

$15 T-Shirt

$25 Subscription & Luggage Tag

Receive one-year print subscription mailed to your home or office and stay connected! And, pack your bags for your next adventure with our luggage tag. Get going! Plus, receive Certificate.

$50 Your Name in Print

See your name in a special section of an upcoming edition of The Desert Shamrock! Plus, receive Certificate.

Receive a commemorative T-shirt and Certificate!

Online eMagazine editions at www.issuu.com/desertshamrock “Like” us at www.facebook.com/desertshamrock READ MORE expanded articles at www.desertshamrock.com PHOTO: IRISH CULTURAL CENTER, PHOENIX, AZ; CREDIT: BOB RINK

SAN DIEGO

St.Patrick’s PARADE AND IRISH FESTIVAL

Day

Saturday, March 12, 2016 parade:

10:30 am, Fifth and Laurel irish festival: Balboa Park, 9 am to 6 pm JOIN THE FESTIVITIES! Authentic Celtic Food Village • Beer Garden Craft Booths • Kids’ Zone with Rides and Bungee T-Shirts, Jewelry and More • History Booth

The Parade and Festival are funded solely by event income and the donations and sponsorships provided by individuals and businesses. Guinness is the presenting sponsor and grants have been provided by the Republic of Ireland, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the City of San Diego, Commission on Arts and Culture.

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Explore U.K. + Ireland The 2015-16 Discovery Series offers an authentic exploration of the United Kingdom and Ireland, including performances, talks, films and more. Celebrate with the Ladies!

Cherish the Ladies: Irish Homecoming Thursday, March 17, 7:30 p.m. A St. Patrick’s Day concert with the all-women traditional Irish band blending virtuoso instrumentals, beautiful vocals, captivating arrangements and stunning step dancing. Also in Tucson: Friday, March 18, 7:30 p.m. Fox Tucson Theatre, FoxTucson.com or call 530-547-3040.

National Theater of Scotland’s

The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart

Created by David Greig, Writer, and Wils Wilson, Director

April 19–24 An incredibly inventive and entertaining piece of anarchic theater, live music and strange goings-on. This event is an interactive theater experience with limited seating onstage in a pub setting.

Arts-Connect

Learn more about United Kingdom and Ireland through free lectures and other special events.

100th Anniversary The 1916 Easter Rising Monday, March 28, 6:30 p.m. Scottsdale Civic Center Library

OrigiNation

A Festival of Native Cultures From the United Kingdom, Ireland and Arizona

Sunday, April 3, Noon – 4 p.m. Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts and Scottsdale Civic Center Park

Click ScottsdalePerformingArts.org Call 480-499-TKTS (8587) Visit 7380 E. Second St.

Season Sponsor

Desert Shamrock March-April 2016 e-Magazine  

Packed with EVENTS, tribute to Maureen O'Hara, CS Lewis born in Belfast, and more! The voice of the Arizona Celtic Community, The Desert Sha...

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