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August/September 2019

https://forms.gle/CKRtagcu3mhFCuhU8

WELCOME TO

arizona Irish-Hispanic Ancestry How They Met Falling from an Orange Tree

Rose of Tralee’s First Lady

Oonagh O’Gara shares fond childhood

Arizona Diamondbacks

Irish Heritage Day Batter up September 17!

!


SAVE THE OCT DATE OBE R 2019 19

Anam Cara

Emerald Anniversary Gala 20TH ANNIVERSARY CHARITY EVENT

HONOREES: TOMMY MONTGOMERY AND JAN MURPHY

ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY

$125 ICLF members, $150 non-members https://www.azirish.org/anam-cara/

SPONSORSHIP

We have several different sponsorship levels for our Gala event For details: https://www.azirish.org/anam-cara/

AUCTION ITEMS

If you wish to donate an Auction Item and for details please see: https://www.azirish.org/anam-cara

20 YEARS

ENJOY

Delicious Dinner, Live Music and Great Entertainment, Exciting Auction

DRESS

Men: Black-tie optional but bow-tie encouraged/suit/formal kilt Women: Full-length optional/semiformal/cocktail Funds raised will provide and improve access for people of all ages and backgrounds to dynamic arts, educational, and cultural programming in the state of Arizona.

1106 North Central Avenue Phoenix, Arizona 85004

Beginning September 3 Fall/Winter/Spring Season:

Tues, Wed, Thu, Sat 10AM–3PM Friday 3PM–8PM

602.258.0109

azirish.org info@azirish.org The Irish Cultural Center and McClelland Library are divisions of the Irish Cultural & Learning Foundation and are owned and maintained by the City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department.


IRISH HERITAGE DAY

HALFWAY TO ST. PADDY’S DAY! TUESDAY, SEPT 17, 6:40PM AT CHASE FIELD

MIAMI MARLINS vs ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS IRISH HERITAGE DAY

Join the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Celtic Community as we celebrate Irish Heritage Day! Be sure to arrive early and enjoy two hours of entertainment. 4:30-6:15pm Outdoors: Scott Jeffers of Traveler, Phoenix Pipe

Band members, and Phoenix Gaels GAA Club hurling demo

5:45-6:00pm Pre-game field performance (7 minutes sometime

during this quarter-hour) with Arizona Highland Dancing Association and Michael Patrick Gallagher School of Irish Dance

Special discounted seating together in Section 108. Purchase tickets at dbacks.com/celtic (e-tickets) OR save the online fee by purchasing at desertshamrock.com. Bring your family and friends and be sure to wear your green or kilt as the case may be!

ORDER DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

TICKETS: $22, Bullpen Reserve BONUS: Ticket includes ballcap

Arizona’s Scott Jeffers of Traveler

HOSTED BY

AFTER GAME SOCIALIZING: Show your event day D-backs ticket for $5 any Irish draft, $5 Tullamore DEW, $5 RedBush, and ask for Happy Hour D-backs SPECIALS all evening at The Kettle Black Kitchen & Pub and Seamus McCaffrey’s downtown’s late night Irish Pub & Restaurant. FOR GROUPS OF 20 OR MORE, CONTACT JOHANNA IMPERIAL JIMPERIAL@DBACKS.COM OR 602.462.4113 WITH CREDIT CARD If mailing a group order, put Attn: Johanna Imperial; and provide the key contact name, address, email, and phone. Make ONE check payable to Arizona Diamondbacks.


NEWS

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

International Commemoration of the Great Irish Famine in Phoenix, Arizona

J

osepha Madigan T.D., Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht and Chair of the National Famine Commemoration Committee, has announced that the 2019 International Commemoration of the Great Irish Famine will take place in Phoenix, Arizona on Sunday, 3rd November. Confirming the arrangements for this year’s event,

Minister Madigan commented: “As Chair of the National Famine Commemoration Committee, I look forward to the remembrance being held in Phoenix, Arizona. This is the fifth time the commemoration has been held in the U.S. and Phoenix is the westernmost venue to date. Previously it has been held in New York, Boston, New Orleans and Philadelphia. I am particularly pleased that the An Gorta Mor, Hunger Memorial in Phoenix, Arizona Commemoration is being held in Phoenix this year as 2019 marks the 20th anniversary of the dedication of the Great Hunger Memorial commissioned by the Irish Cultural Center there. This year represents an opportunity to not only recognise the work of the Irish Cultural Center and McClelland Library in Phoenix itself but to honour the memory of those who left Ireland during the Famine, the subsequent years of emigration which saw many Famine Irish and their descendants make an enormous contribution in Western U.S., and the ongoing role of the Irish diaspora and Irish-Americans in Arizona and throughout the Western U.S.” There have been ten international commemorations of the Great Irish Famine to date. Since the inaugural tribute in Toronto and Quebec in 2009, events have also been held in Australia, Canada, and the UK.

Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Manx (Isle of Man) Cornwall, Brittany, Galicia, Asturias, Patagonia

Niemann Publishing, Inc. 2320 E. Baseline Rd., #148-300 Phoenix, Arizona 85042 INQUIRIES: info@desertshamrock.com

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Publisher Julie O’Mahar (2003 - 2013) Editor Kathleen Wood (2003 - 2008) Publisher Maureen O’Mahar (1996 - 2002) Founding Publisher Robert E. Graham (1987 - 1996) Former Design & Layout Contributors Jim Burke, Heidi Will, Gena Corcoran MASTHEAD DESIGN 2014

No.21 26,No. Vol.30, rr~~Vol. Newspape IrishNewspape OriginalIrish Arizona’sOriginal 2015~~Arizona’s ril/May 2019 – February March/Ap January

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK 2320 E. Baseline Rd., #148-300 Phoenix, AZ 85042 602-568-3455 info@desertshamrock.com

The Desert Shamrock is published bi-monthly. No part of the publication may be reproduced without the written permission of Niemann Publishing, Inc. (NPI). All rights reserved. Copyright © 2019 by NPI. The opinions expressed herein are the opinions of the writers, and not necessarily those of The Desert Shamrock, the publisher, or the editorial staff. Publication of advertising herein does not necessarily constitute endorsement of a product or service. All unsolicited materials are appreciated and carefully evaluated although publication is not guaranteed.


THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

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TABLE OF

CONTENTS August/September 2019 ~ Arizona’s Original Irish Newspaper

ANCESTRY 10 ROSE OF TRALEE: An Irish-Mexican Connection 11 How They Met Falling from an Orange Tree 27 Elvis is not a Carlow man as once thought

ARTS 13 SCOTS: Life and Love and Godparents

CULTURE 17 Celtic Caterer: True Shepherd’s Pie

EVENTS 2, 26 EVENTS: Irish Cultural Ctr & McClelland Library, Phx

3, 14 EVENT: D-backs Irish Heritage Day, Phx 4 EVENT: Int’l. Comm. Great Irish Famine at ICC, Phx 6 Arizona Highland Celtic Festival, Prescott 7 FUNDRAISER: $10,000 Drawing at ICC, Phx 10, 11 McClelland EXHIBIT: The Irish in Latin America, Phx 13 The Awakened Feminine Retreat, Ireland 15 WORKSHOP by Desert Shamrock: How to be “IN” the News 19 EVENTS: Chandler-Tullamore Sister Cities 19, 26 EVENTS: Irish Network Arizona 26 Arizona Rose LIVE ON IRELAND’S TV - RTE 26 WORKSHOP by Tim H Murphy: Ireland Through my Lens 27 TRAVEL: Scottsdale-Killarney, Ireland Golf Trip 27 CONCERTS: Musical Instrument Museum, Phx

NEWS 4 Int’l. Commemoration of Great Irish Famine, Phx 22 Pumping the breaks on electric vehicle hype

FEATURES

ROSE OF TRALEE 8,9,23 Rose Kayla Gray, A very personal story 23 Oonagh O’Gara shares fond childhood

SPORTS 20 John Ryan Murphy Hosts “Catching up with Murph” 21 ASU Golfer Olivia Mehaffey from Belfast

8

TRAVEL

Rose Kayla Gray A very personal story

9 Welcome to Arizona, our home! 12 SCOTS: Old West’s Tombstone heralds Scottish rose 14,15 The Splendor of County Sligo 16 STUDY ABROAD: Studies in IT… and archaeology? Found at IT Sligo 18 Left Lane Maureen, Part 28: Making Memories that Last

DIRECTORIES 7 Celtic Pubs and Eateries 24,25 Organizations, Sister Cities, Dance, Musicians, Clans

14

The Splendor of County Sligo

21

ASU Golfer Olivia Mehaffey from Belfast

CALENDAR 26 Schedule of Events

HISTORY

FR

EE

6 Arizona: Did you know? 16 Beyond Rome: Fascinating Irish and Peruvian

!

August/September 2019

Archaeology https://forms.gle/CKRtagcu3mhFCuhU8

WELCOME TO

arizona

NEXT ISSUE SNEAK PEEK YEAR 20: Irish Cultural Center & McClelland Library Emerald Anniversary

Arizona: More than the Grand Canyon Explore • Experience • Bring a Camera PHOTO: Ballooning in Sedona’s Red

Rocks

PHOTO BY: TIM H MURPHY PHOTOGRAPHY

COVER:

Irish-Hispanic Ancestry How They Met Falling from an Orange Tree

Rose of Tralee’s First Lady

Oonagh O’Gara shares fond childhood

Arizona Diamondbacks

Irish Heritage Day Batter up September 17!

Ballooning in Sedona’s Red Rocks, AZ TIM H MURPHY PHOTOGRAPHY

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6

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

PHOTO BY ROBERT BODY LICENSED BY CREATIVE COMMONS

HISTORY

PHOTO BY MARTIN ST-AMANT LICENSED BY CREATIVE COMMONS

ARIZONA:

Did you know?

81. The ringtail is the official state mammal. It is a fox-like, nocturnal animal that measures about two-and-a-half feet long. 82. Tubac was the first European Settlement in Arizona (1752). 83. Arizona is the only state in the nation that elects a Mine Inspector.

85. Built in by Del Webb in 1960, Sun City, Arizona was the first 55-plus active adult retirement community in the country.

Of Irish descent and Arizona’s Official State Historian, Marshall Trimble has been called the “Will Rogers of Arizona.” He’s a “cowboy philosopher,” educator, lecturer, author, folk singer and stage performer, and appears frequently on radio and television. He created and taught Arizona history at Scottsdale Community College for forty years where he was also Director of Southwest Studies.

86. Turquoise is the official state gemstone. The bluegreen stone has a somewhat waxy surface and can be found throughout the state

PHOTO BY GARY M. JOHNSON

Read more fun and fascinating facts about Arizona NEXT edition.

The Lavender Pit, an open pit copper mine, Bisbee, Arizona (2006)

Prescott Highland Games and Celtic Faire

SEP. Watson Lake Park AZ 28-29 Prescott, Tickets online or at the Gate 9 1 20 SeamusMcCaffreys.com

24th Annual

(602) 253-6081 SeamusMcCaffreys.com 18 West Monroe Phoenix, Arizona 85003

1 8 We s t M o n r o e WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM

Phoenix, Arizona 85003

Continuous Entertainment Highland Dancing Pipe Bands • Heavy Athletics Whisky Tastings Food Vendors • Merchandise Vendors • and much more.

PET FRIENDLY www.PrescottAreaCelticSociety.com

PHOTO BY CORNELLROCKEY LICENSED BY CREATIVE COMMONS

84. Nearly 5 million people visit Arizona’s Grand Canyon National Park each year.


THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

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Celtic Pubs & Eateries

If you're looking for some Craic, look no further!

Greater Phoenix The Dubliner Irish Pub & Restaurant

O’Connor’s Pub

Fibber Magees Pub Irish Restaurant & Bar

Rosie McCaffrey’s Irish Pub

3841 E. Thunderbird Road, #111, Phoenix, AZ 85032 (east of AZ-51); 602-867-0984; www.dublinerpub.com Arizona’s original Irish pub and very first to serve Guinness on tap, Irish and American fare, games on big-screen TV, live music six nights a week.

1989 W. Elliot Road, Chandler, AZ 85224 (SE corner of Elliot & Dobson Road) 480-722-9434, www.fibbermageespub.com Open 11am-2am, 7 days a week Authentic Pub featuring Irish & American menu favorites. Daily Food and Drink Specials. All Day Happy Hour, 7 Days a week. Pub Quiz, Live Entertainment & 2-time Guinness Perfect Pint Champion!

Gallagher’s Sports Grill

7575 N. 16th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85020 (16th Street & Morten); 602-997-0084 3220 E. Baseline, Phoenix, AZ 85042 (NE corner of 32nd St. & Baseline); 602-437-0981 34406 N. Black Mountain Parkway, Cave Creek, AZ 85331 (Carefree Hwy. & 48th Street); 480-595-8800 751 E Union Hills Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85024 (7th & Union Hills); 602-867-3222 www.gallaghersaz.com Discover a great tasting menu, HD sports, daily and late night specials, weekend breakfast, karaoke, trivia and OTB!

H.B. Hanratty’s Pub

537 E. Camelback Rd Phoenix, AZ 85012 (east of Central Avenue downtown); 602 274-3067 Fri-Sat 3pm-2am, Sun 3pm-Midnight, Mon-Thurs 4pm-Midnight Bar snacks, darts, billiards, pinball. Great neighborhood hang-out.

The Harp Irish Pub

1744 S. Val Vista Drive, Mesa, AZ 85204 (just south of US-60 in Dana Park Village Square) 480-507-7827; www.theharpaz.com An Irish pub from our interior to our menu. We offer a perfect eblend of modern and comfort Irish/American food and drinks in an authentic atmosphere. Daily happy hour from 3-6pm. Experience a piece of the Emerald Isle in the desert!

The Irish Wolfhound Restaurant & Pub

16811 N. Litchfield Road, Surprise, AZ 85374 (just south of Bell Road); 623-214-1004; www.irishwolfhoundpub.com Open 11am-2am, 7 days a week Bringing a little piece of Ireland to the desert. Featured on PBS “Check, Please!” with award-winning Corned Beef & Cabbage and Guinness Battered Atlantic Cod.

2601 W. Dunlap Avenue, #7, Phoenix, AZ 85021 (east of I-17); 602-997-7714; www.oconnorspub.com Where You’re A Stranger Only Once! For some good ol’ Irish hospitality in the Valley of the Sun, drop in the best Irish pub in Phoenix!

906 E. Camelback Road, Phoenix, AZ 85014 (additional parking on 10th Street! 100 feet away!) 602-241-1916; www.rosiemccaffreys.com Irish owned and operated pub in central Phoenix serving good food and drink, the traditional Irish way, showing all Celtic FC matches, daily specials. Sláinte!

Rúla Bula Irish Pub and Restaurant

401 S. Mill Avenue, Tempe, AZ 85281 (between University and Rio Salado Parkway) 480-929-9500; www.rulabula.com Downtown Tempe, old world pub serving traditional and contemporary pub fare. Draft craft beer, premium whiskies and specialty cocktails. Daily Happy Hour. Live Music weekends. See ad page 20

Séamus McCaffrey’s Irish Pub

18 W. Monroe Street, Phoenix, AZ 85003 (adjacent to historic Hotel San Carlos) 602-253-6081; www.seamusmccaffreys.com Downtown Phoenix’ Original Irish Pub & Restaurant. Est.-1991. Corned beef & cabbage, Irish stew, fish & chips, full menu, weekend brunch, AZ’s largest whiskey menu, 10 on tap, open late. See ad page 6

Skeptical Chymist Irish Restaurant & Bar 15689 N. Hayden Road, Scottsdale, AZ 85260 (off AZ-101 and Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd.) 480-609-8677, www.skepticalchymist.com Open 11am-2am, 7 days a week Scottsdale’s only authentic Irish Pub featuring a menu of both classic and modern cuisine, 29 draft beers, 50+ Irish Whiskeys, daily food and drink specials, happy hour 7 days a week, Pub Quiz and live entertainment!

Tim Finnegan’s Irish Restaurant & Bar

NEW LOCATION: 17045 N. 59th Avenue, Glendale, AZ 85308 (north of Bell Road); 602-875-8331; www.timfinnegans.com Open Mon-Wed 11am-Midnight; Thurs-Sun 11am-2am Evokes images of the great old pubs with blend of modern Ireland. Enjoy USDA Prime, Shepherd’s Pie with choice lamb, and mussels fresh from the sea. Live music. See ad page 13

New customers are looking for you!

The $10,000.00 Drawing will return!!! Kick off October 21, 2019 Drawing will be held on February 7, 2020 at the Saint Brigid Feast

T h e 2 0 1 9 Wi n n e r w a s D i x i e M a x w e l l you can be the next Dixie! WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM


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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

a l y a K ray G 2019 ARIZONA ROSE

A very personal story

You choose what defines you.

WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM

PHOTOS BY JESSICA FRIELING PHOTOGRAPHY

I

grew up in a small town in southern Ohio called “Hamilton!”. It is the only city in the world that legally has an exclamation point in its name…but no map recognizes that. Hamilton! is the City of Sculpture and has been named for having the best tap water in the world. My family comprises my parents, my younger sister (who is my junior by seven years) and a wide array of animals that came in and out of our house. We had everything from ducks to lizards. My sister has been happily married for three years and has a beautiful little girl and about to welcome her second child. My mother is a psychiatric nurse for the state of Florida and my father is an environmental services technician in Ohio. Although located across the United States, we talk every day regardless of time zone. For me, I was always the little ginger with freckles and green eyes, but because of my father’s adoption and my mother’s limited family history, I never knew much about my heritage. It wasn’t until my adulthood that 23&Me and AncestryDNA came out that I knew I had the chance to find out more about where I came from. I completed both mouth swabs and waited patiently for a response. In the longest six weeks of my life, I found out that I was 57.1% Irish and 25.2% “Broadly Northwestern European” (which on the map meant, Ireland and Scotland). I was elated to find out that I finally had a history, something I could explore further. Friends and family laughed that they already had the Irish figured out.

Events that rocked my teens

When I was 14 years old, I went to my optometrist who asked me a question that I had never thought of as a problem before, he inquired, “Do you have headaches?” I was baffled because I had had headaches daily for as long as I could remember but never thought of it as abnormal, I figured everyone had headaches and you only took medicine when your head really hurt. I answered and it put my life on a track I never realized possible. The optometrist noted he saw some abnormalities in my eyes and said I needed to see a doctor. Scared and confused, my mother and I started to see doctor after doctor for over a year. In that year, I was diagnosed with things like lupus, vitamin deficiency, and hormones. But we never gave up finding an answer. Then the day I finished 8th grade, I finally had an MRI. After which, we were taken into a small room where I was offered offbrand Sprite and graham crackers as we sat. After an hour, the doctor nonchalantly told us I had some “abnormalities” but it was nothing severe and to go home. Confused, we got in the car to drive home. However, on that drive, my mother got a call saying we needed to come back and that I needed to have surgery. All sounds stopped in that moment. We finished the drive home, packed up a few things, and went back to the hospital where I became a short-term resident and my life went from worrying about high school to brain surgery. The doctors talked quietly to my parents, but I knew the severity of the disease they had diagnosed me with as I had access to the Internet: Chiari Malformation and Hydrocephalus.


THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

Mission crystalized

The fact I had gone undiagnosed for so long, the surgeons were concerned for surgery success. They offered two options, one that was the current standard practice, and one that was more experimental. My parents went with the latter and off to the operating room I went. On the ride in that long white hallway, I had what felt like an eternity to think. As they gave me my anesthesia, I realized how lucky I was to be in this moment. I made a promise to myself that if the surgery was a success, I had to live each day to the fullest and never let a moment pass. I was determined to make the most of my second chance at life. I started to fall asleep and in the last seconds of being awake, I had an epiphany, I was going to make a difference in people’s lives like the people in masks around me were making for me.

9

Welcome to Arizona,

OUR HOME!

Journey after brain surgery

From the second I was discharged, I put all my eggs in the medical research basket. My first job was at a research facility at the closest university and I never looked back. With this new mission in life, I set myself up for success. I graduated from Case Western Reserve University with degrees in Chemical Biology, Chemistry, Biology, and Theatre and a master’s certificate in Applied Anatomy. During my five years there, I worked at a variety of laboratories at medical centers. My research ranged from glioblastomas to sickle cell disease. Upon graduation, I was invited to lead the world’s only ocular biorepository. I found myself relocating across the country from Ohio to Arizona to pursue further opportunities in research. Donor Network of Arizona, the organization responsible for all organ donation in the state, was expanding to include a role responsible for research. I jumped at the opportunity, packed my car, and began the exciting trek.

Arizona Adventures

I relocated to Phoenix for a job opportunity and immediately found life-long chosen family and friends. I became involved with the Arizona Colleen and Rose program and was honored and humbled to be selected with the dual titles as 2019 Arizona Colleen and Arizona Rose. Representing the Phoenix St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Faire Committee, the Irish Community, and its anchor, the Irish Cultural Center & McClelland Library, has been phenomenal already and I haven’t even arrived in Tralee at the time of this printing. CONTINUED ON PAGE 23

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park on the Arizona-Utah border in monsoon season. This red-sand desert region’s formation “Totem Pole” has been the site for Western movies like The Eiger Sanction with Clint Eastwood.

East of Page, Arizona, Antelope Canyon it is a “slot canyon”. To get the effect of flowing sand, the Navajo guide bent down and scooped up several hands full of sand, threw it up on the shelf and yelled to Tim, ”Shoot!”, jumping back behind one of the rock walls. It worked.

BY ANN NIEMANN, EDITOR IN CHIEF PHOTOS BY TIM H MURPHY PHOTOGRAPHY

presentation of the 1916 Rising, concert, or genealogy class. These are just some of the many choices. I highly recommend the Heard Museum with exhibits, performances, and festivals celebrating the arts and cultures of the Native people of the Americas, especially the Southwest. Musical Instrument Museum showcases 7,000 instruments from all over the world with demonstrations and events. Their theatre presents a variety of concerts every week, including performers from Ireland and Scotland, and even the Galician bagpiper Christina Pato, another Celtic cousin. The acoustics are superb and the best I’m aware of in greater Phoenix. And then there’s the spectacular outdoors. If you’re a golfer, there are courses all over the state year-round. Just 1.5 hours north, you arrive in higher elevations for the red rocks of Sedona with pink jeep tours or ballooning (on the cover this edition). Another half-hour north is Flagstaff in high desert that has more forest, snow skiing, and elk. South of Phoenix is Tucson with Old West history as you explore that region, including Tombstone (see its “rose” story on page 12). A highlight for me this year was going birding with my two sisters. We stayed in Sierra Vista and from there hiked and photographed the area. There are thousands of local and migratory birds. Lots to share!

W

e invite you to experience the incredible State of Arizona. Don’t worry, it really is a dry heat. It does get toasty during the summer but that’s when you stay indoors and visit an abundance of museums, music venues, and any foodie locales you may have missed otherwise. Always wear sunscreen every day and drink more water than you usually do. Here, it’s okay to carry a bottle of water everywhere, even into church; the importance of hydration to feel your best. Plus, places like Kartchner Caverns are cool underground and fascinating for all ages.

My Top 7 Picks

As our Arizona Rose Kayla Gray will attest, touring our Irish Cultural Center & McClelland Library may be a hidden gem but can boast the largest number of Irish programs in the country with a Great Hall, replica Bunratty cottage, Hunger Memorial, and 15,000 sf library that has a facsimile of The Book of Kells under glass (one of four and the only one privately owned donated by Sean and Janet Lee). Come by for a monthly Ceili (Irish social dancing), an annual multi-media

Tempe Town Lake where Arizona State University is located. Currach Team Phoenix has events there; there’s no admission fee or cost for spectators to try rowing.

Performing at a Native American Pow Wow ceremony.

WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM


ANCESTRY

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

Welcome toAn Irish-Mexican our fall season CONNECTION 2017 Texas Rose of Tralee BY LYDIAN LAWLER LOPEZ

11TH ANNUAL ANAM CARA AWARDS GALA Saturday, Oct 20, 2018

M

y Irish and Mexican heritage has always been something that is a huge part of my life and has shaped who I am today. Born in Houston, Texas, I was raised to be proud in three ways: intensely proud to be a native Texan, proud to be Irish American, and proud to be of Mexican American descent. My Irish heritage comes from Abbeyleix, County Laois and my Mexican heritage from Mexico City. My mother, the Lawler side of my family, enrolled me in Irish dance lessons at age five and continuously supported my dance career throughout 25 competitive years. My dance journeys led me to competitions in Ireland, numerous places in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

THE ACADEMY OF IRISH & CELTIC STUDIES Classes begin September 10, 2018 EXHIBIT: THE IRISH IN LATIN AMERICA October 2, 2018 through June 30, 2019

GALA Yes, there are Irish dance CURRACH TEAM PHOENIX KICK-OFF Thursday, October 25, 2018 competitions in Mexico! Presented by Ireland’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

and so much more...

Lydian with her parents, Frank and Lori

My father, the Lopez side of my family, always taught me the importance of learning about Mexican and Latin culture, especially the history. He always made sure that I knew the connections between Mexico and Ireland, his favorite being exploits of the San Patricios (St. Patrick) Battalion during the Mexican American War from 1846-1848 [see page 24 to contact Los San Patricios de Arizona]. Since middle school I have been able to work with organizations that provide service to low-income day care centers and schools, as well as work within the volunteer system at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston. However, working with organizations that assist with immigrants traveling to the United States, who are primarily coming from Mexico or Latin

ACADEM Y

See the calendar and directory in this issue for more information about us.

Doors open on THE IRISH INTuesday LATIN AMERICA

ENCLOSED GLASS DISPLAYS AND 23 INFORMATIVE PANELS September 4, 2018 Represents the accomplishments of historical figures of Irish descent in Latin America.

Fall/Winter/Spring Season:

First launched in Mexico City in October of 2016, the traveling exhibit spans the history of10AM Irish immigrants andTues their descendants – 3PM – Sat across Latin America from 1611-1968. Provided by Ireland’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (Tours, Library & Genealogy)

WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM

America, made the biggest impact on me. Learning of the struggles that some people face when coming to a new country and all the things that they need help with, whether it’s legal aid to become a citizen, finding work, housing, clothing, or even care for their children, made me realize that as a community, there is so much more we could be doing to help others. From those experiences, a goal is to become a lawyer and potentially practice immigration law. When I was selected as the Texas Rose of Tralee in 2017, I felt it was a unique culmination of celebrating my Irish heritage as well as my Mexican heritage. For my Rose of Tralee on-stage performance, I chose to sing a Selena song, “Como La Flor” in Spanish. I remember seeing my family and friends singing along with me in the audience and it was such a special moment that I will never forget. The Rose of Tralee International Festival has opened so many doors for me and has allowed me to travel all over the world for events, including Belarus in aid of Chernobyl Children International. It was one of the most eye-opening and fulfilling experiences of my life to be able to work with the children who reside in the Vesnova orphanage and learn more about everything that Adi Roche and her organization do to better the lives of the children affected by the nuclear disaster. While the Festival celebrates women of Irish descent, it also celebrates the diverse communities and cultures where we come from around the globe. This extraordinary and unforgettable experience was made more special because I was able to share both aspects of my heritage. It brings us all together and I will celebrate and cherish that for the rest of my life.

H C A RR

T

CU

Lydian graduated from the University of Houston with a bachelor’s degree in English and Pre-Law in 2015. She is a member of the Texas Rose Center; and completing her TCRG certification to be an Irish dance teacher. Supporting her local GAA team, Lydian is cheering for the Houston Gaels!

1106 North Central Phoenix, Arizona 8 602.258.0109

azirish.org info@azirish.org

The Irish Cultural Center and Library are divisions of the Ir Learning Foundation and are maintained by the City of Ph and Recreation Department


THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

BY CARMELITA LEE

M

y Irish-Scottish descent Mom, Doris Holland Maxwell, and my MexicanJewish Dad couldn’t have been more different. Grandpa Maxwell’s family was austere, with what one might call severe Scottish ways, and my mostly silent Pawpaw loved his haggis. Mom, (number 7 of 13) was very bright with hopes of becoming a nurse, but had to leave school at 14, at the height of the Depression. Still, she bore no resentment. Daddy, on the other hand, was an eager go-getter. He spent two years in school, starting at age 10. His teacher saw that he was bright, so brought him books, books, books, and taught him math on her own time. He kept in touch with her all his life. At 17 he became a Mariachi and traveled all over America with a Mexican circus. He became a famous radio crooner in the 1930s, and appeared in places like the Copa Cabana, state fairs, and tourist spots. His money always went home to his parents. Pearl Harbor changed all that. Already in his 30s,

he enlisted in the Army. They wanted him in the USO, but he refused, volunteering for the infantry. He served in the African, and then Italian campaigns, distinguishing himself in the Battle of Monte Casino, earning two purple hearts and a Silver Star for valor. Stationed in Fort Benning, Georgia to recover, my dad met Carlton Maxwell. Texas was too far for leave at Christmas of 1944. Dad mentioned wanting a normal, quiet holiday to Carlton, who piped up and said, “Sarge, why don’t you come home with me. We ain’t got much, but my Ma’s a good cook, and she won’t mind an extra plate.” Carlton telegrammed my later-to-be Granny. She was beside herself with joy to see her boy again. With her preparations in full swing. Granny worried about when to start her biscuits so they would be hot and ready to go. Granny didn’t have a telephone, so she devised an ingenious method of communications. Her farm was a couple of miles from the bus station, separated by acres of orange groves. Those trees reach 30 feet tall. Granny stationed her kids by “hollerin’ distance” in the tops of the trees so they could see their brother

11TH ANNUAL ANAM CARA AWARDS GALA Saturday, Oct 20, 2018

THE ACADEMY OF IRISH & CELTIC STUDIES Classes begin September 10, 2018 EXHIBIT: THE IRISH IN LATIN AMERICA October 2, 2018 through June 30, 2019 Presented by Ireland’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

walking down the road. As they caught a glimpse of him, they hollered to the next sibling in the treetops. Mom was in the tree nearest the house. You might call it tree-mail. Giddy with excitement to see her brother turn up the dirt road, Doris began to climb down as fast as she could to run to him. In her haste she first lost her shoe, then her footing, and started a flailing, grasping fall from the orange tree. Seeing the danger, my dad ran up under the tree just in time to catch a beautiful Doris Maxwell landing on him. When she met Daddy, she had never seen such an exotic handsome man in her Podunk little town of Plant City, Florida (the strawberry capital of America). It was a whirlwind romance. Dad’s every free moment was spent in Florida. Engaged in March, they married on June 10, 1945. Married 41 years with three children, it was a romance to last.

ANCESTRY

Welcome to How They Met Falling ouran fall seasonTree from Orange

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How does a gal named Carmelita Lee claim to be Irish? Scottish, even? Granny Holland’s family hailed from Ennis, County Clare, and Grandpa Maxwell from the Borderlands, Scotland. Her husband’s mother was a Dowdall, and he had a Grandma O’Higgins…ye can’t be more Irish than that!

GALA

CURRACH TEAM PHOENIX KICK-OFF Thursday, October 25, 2018 and so much more...

H C A RR

M A E T

CU ACADEM Y

Matt’s grandparents, James Joseph Cunningham and Delia McNicholas, each emigrated from Co. Mayo, Ireland, met and married in Chicago

See the calendar and directory in this issue for more information about us.

IN LATIN AMERICA Doors THE openIRISH on Tuesday McClelland Library exhibit September 3 through December 7 September 4, 2018 Irish Cultural Center in downtown Phoenix Tues, Wed, Thurs, Sat • 10am–3pm; Fridays • 3pm–8pm Fall/Winter/Spring Season: (Closed Holidays)

10AMTickets – 3PM Tuesat–the Sat available Library’s reception desk in the main lobby. Admission: $10 Adult, $8 Senior/Student, $5 ICLF Members, (Tours, Library & Genealogy) Children under 6 are free

1106 North Central Avenue Phoenix, Arizona 85004 602.258.0109

azirish.org info@azirish.org The Irish Cultural Center and McClelland Library are divisions of the Irish Cultural & Learning Foundation and are owned and maintained by the City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department.

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

Old West’s Tombstone heralds Scottish rose BY IAIN LUNDY PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ROSE MUSEUM

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ourist attractions come in all forms, shapes and sizes and in Tombstone, Arizona, size matters in the case of one of the state’s bestkept tourist secrets that has even found its way into Ripley’s ‘Believe it or Not’ columns. Tombstone is a byword for cowboys, saloon brawls, and of course the OK Corral. It doesn’t conjure up an image of flower bushes and green-fingered residents, except thanks to the presence of a Scottish newlywed in the town more than 130 years ago. Tombstone can boast the largest rose tree in the world. Cuttings of the Lady Banksia Rose were sent from Scotland in 1885 and thrived in the Arizona desert conditions. Today it is displayed on a trellis system of poles and metal pipes and covers an area of 5,000 square feet. The Rose Tree Museum, once a hotel, is one of the town’s most popular visitor stops.

Mary Gee was the Scottish woman who had just arrived in town with her English-born husband Henry when she received the delivery from her family. Originally Mary Newlands, she had been born in Paisley, Renfrewshire. Henry was her second husband and the couple had been married in Manhattan before embarking on the arduous trip to southern Arizona. The parcel Mary received contained some of her favorite flowers and she gave a cutting to Amelia Adamson, the owner of the boarding house where she was living. Amelia planted it, and the rose tree seemingly never stopped growing. The Guinness Book of Records has acknowledged it as the largest rose tree in the world, and it is a diversion for many visitors exploring Tombstone’s Wild West history. Iain Lundy grew up in Ayrshire, Scotland, and has worked as a journalist since the 1970s. He and his wife moved from Scotland to Arizona in March. His paternal grandfather came from Downpatrick, County Down, and moved to the west of Scotland as a young man.

Tonto Natural Bridge

Another Arizona tourist attraction with a distinctly Scottish flavor is the Tonto Natural Bridge, just north of Payson. The spectacular travertine (unique as quartzite rather than typical sandstone or hard limestone) arch was ‘discovered’ by an enterprising and wily Scottish gold prospector named David Gowan. It’s a passageway at the bottom of the valley, with two springs, one thought to be 40 feet deep, and fertile acres above the formation. David came from Inverbervie, a fishing village on Scotland’s east coast, and first clapped eyes on the stunning natural bridge in 1877. He decided he wanted to make the area his home. Apache tribesmen, however, had different ideas; they were adamant the land belonged to them. Despite the Scotsman having to hide in a deep cave under the bridge for three days until he was satisfied the Apaches weren’t going to kill him (according to his own story), Gowan somehow made a successful claim on the 160 acres of land. He built a home, planted fruit trees, hunted plentiful game, and used it as a base for his prospecting. Years later he contacted a nephew in Scotland and asked if he wanted to settle on the land. The man, John Goodfellow, brought his family, upgraded access roads to the site, and built cabins for visitors who wanted to see the natural wonder. Old Davie Gowan left his home one winter’s day and never returned. Searchers found his frozen remains many months later. The estate was later sold and officially opened in 1991 to be known as Tonto National Bridge State Park. A scenic place to hike and explore.

PHOTO BY CLINTUS LICENSED BY CREATIVE COMMONS

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Love

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Life

THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

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Godparents Give me just a moment And I’ll talk to you of life It’s love between two people A husband and a wife.

Take time to stop and wonder What is this thing we do? Where comes so great a miracle? From God it must be true. So now it’s time to say thanks And bless this little one The start of many good times The days so full of fun. Just a time to make a promise To a life so small and frail A parent hopes that all is well That they will never fail. So God has asked for helpers Two lives to watch along The loveliest of children That nothing will go wrong. The roads will come so quickly The paths will soon divide

Instead of just forgetting You must not run and hide.

The die is cast with prayers now There is a greater plan Today there are two people A woman and a man. When a life begins with loving It follows all your days The love of friends and family Will help you find the way. The start is now with water And a little bit of oil All eyes they fill with tears of joy The fruit of love and toil. So hold the blessed miracle And vow to make things right This child has two Godparents The Keepers of the Light. The time will pass so quickly The days will find their ends But always when you need them They are your special friends.

Dan on the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, Scotland

You parents who were chosen Because you really care Give proof of why they chose you And promise to be there. For life is just beginning Now followed by-the Lord The ways to learn forgiving The love that’s in each word. Take note of what is promised Take care of what you say This child has two Godparents To stand and find the way. © 2012 Daniel Joseph Magee

The Awakened

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A swimming pool contractor in the Phoenix area, Dan Magee is originally from New Jersey, but has lived in Arizona for 43 years. He is married to the first girl he met in kindergarten. He and Anne have three children. They spend part of each year in Scotland. Dan’s paternal ancestors came from Scotland to Ireland during the “Seeding Of Antrim” where crofters were thrown off their land to make more room for sheep. Originally named Mackay, they were put into indentured service and the spelling fell by the wayside. Typically, most were unable to read and write. Hence the many varieties of the spelling of Magee. Denied a visa his father had a plan with his brother. His Dad emigrated to Canada and walked into the USA, only to find that he was a U.S. citizen when he applied. His Grandfather was naturalized in New York in 1895 but had returned to Ireland when his father died. So, my father was born in Ireland, but to a naturalized USA citizen.

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Grandmother is from Tiree, an island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

The Splendor of County

Sligo This is the third in a series chronicling Arizona Photographer Tim H. Murphy’s travels through Ireland and Northern Ireland in the summer of 2018.

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fter our stay in County Donegal, we headed to County Sligo. To be exact, since the 90s, we have been visiting Rosses Point, a charming seaside village outside of Sligo that is home to the venerable County Sligo Golf Club. (Photo 1) For the second year, our home was the Down Yonder Boutique B&B, a posh Rosses Point property run by Eavan O’Hara and Guido DiLucio. With a beautiful classic interior, deluxe furnishings—including king size beds (a rarity in Ireland)—and a sunny breakfast room to enjoy Eavan’s incredible breakfasts. Make it a “must-do” on your travels, too. Check out this outstanding view of Sligo’s iconic Ben Bulben that I captured in the wee hours while hanging off the B&B balcony in my flannel pajamas! (Photo 2) Country Sligo Golf Club annually hosts the West of Ireland Championship, won by Rory McIlroy (twice) and Shane Lowry. Debbie made some news of her own as the first overseas member to achieve a hole in one! This was Debbie’s second ace in Ireland and fourth overall. Festivities included presentation of a trophy by the club’s Lady Captain and a party that started at a 10pm! (Photo 3) County Sligo Golf Club was the site of a couple of photo shoots, yielding some gems including Rosses Point

D-BACKS IRISH HERITAGE DAY

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Group discounted tickets $22 includes green ballcap. Seated together. Wear your green or kilt as the case may be! www.dbacks.com/celtic • See details page 3 • Save online fee at www.desertshamrock.com WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

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I named Golden Hour (Photo 4) and Silhouettes in the Sun (Photo 5). We enjoy making the 30-minute drive north to Mullaghmore, a wee little harbour village. We head right to Eithna’s By the Sea Restaurant, offering incredible fresh seafood and locally sourced produce. Heading back to the town of Sligo, the coast road offers beautiful scenery, including this view of Classiebawn Castle, formerly the home of Lord Mountbatten. (Photo 6) We waited too long to try the seaweed baths offered in the Sligo area. Our first experience was at Kilcullens Seaweed Baths, opened in 1912, in Eniscrone, about an hour’s drive from Sligo. The first step is a quick visit to the “steam box.” Next, you’re immersed in a piping hot bath filled with locally harvested seaweed. The finale is a bracing shower with sea water piped in directly from the Atlantic! The health benefits include nourishing the skin as well as reducing the symptoms of arthritis. It is also an antidote to a cold, damp Irish day. Having enjoyed our first seaweed bath experience, we tried out the more modern Voya Seaweed Baths in nearby Strandhill. Both establishments get a two thumbs up rating! (Photo 7) Sligo has so much to offer with excellent beaches, surfing, world class golf, an incredible abbey, fishing, a vibrant music scene, great restaurants and pubs, as well as beautiful views of Ben Bulben. In close proximity to Sligo are a beautiful waterfall park at Glencar, Mullaghmore Harbour, Classibawn Castle, WB Yeats’ grave in Drumcliffe, and so much more. So, we strongly encourage you to include Sligo in your Irish travel plans. Next, we head to County Clare to our other “home” in Ireland, Lahinch. Join me for the next installment…

How to be IN the News WRITERS’ WORKSHOP Saturday, September 14 | 1:30pm - 4pm | Presented by Ann Niemann, Editor in Chief

For Advertisers, Writers, Photographers of all Skill Levels. Includes “how to” create submissions to The Desert Shamrock. ICC Norton Room | $10 at door; $5 each add’l family member; light refreshments | Register at: info@desertshamrock.com WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM


AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

PHOTO BY BACA12 LICENSED BY CREATIVE COMMONS

HISTORY

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The hill in the background is Queen Maeve’s Cairn (Tomb) in Knocknarea, Ireland. Note the size of people around it.

Beyond Rome: Fascinating Irish and Peruvian Archaeology BY DR. SHARONAH FREDRICK DEPT. OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES, SUNY AT BUFFALO

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hen one plans a vacation to see the ruins of the ancient world, certain nations come to mind: Greece, Rome and Egypt. Without disparaging those marvelous sites, those with a taste for vast stone sanctuaries should consider two places that boast pasts that are far older than Greece, Rome; and,

in some cases, older than Egypt. Why has it taken so long to note that the cultures of Ireland and Peru surpass, in variety, age and construction, Greece, Rome and Egypt? Why were Ireland and Peru considered archeological “periphery”, so-called “outlying areas” of only marginal interest to fans of Celtic, (or Inca) culture? [PULLQUOTE] This question becomes particularly amusing when we remember that the oldest human finds to date in Ireland and Peru predate Celts and Incas by at least three thousand years.

The Incas, whose dynasty met its end with the arrival of the Spanish Conquistadors in 1532-4, were the last of a long series of Native American civilizations that had dominated the Andean area. Those civilizations stretched back to one of the world’s oldest cities, Caral, which is nearer Peru’s coastline than its more famous mountains. The Incan dynasty, at most, reached back to the mid-12th century. But Caral, as archaeologist Ruth Shady has proven, is over 4,000 years old. Popular imagination sees everything Irish as having purely Celtic roots. But one of Erin’s most prominent archaeologists, Stephen Berg of Ireland’s National University at Galway, reminds us that 7,000 years ago, the pre-Celtic cultures of the Isle were building monumental tomb structures that rival royal tombs of Roman Caesars. Visitors to Ireland’s County Sligo are well aware of Sligo’s connection to the poet William Butler Yeats, but they often miss the magnificent structures of Carrowmore. Carrowmore is a megalithic cemetery whose imposing structures, similar to the Nazca lines of the southern Peruvian desert, were designed to be seen from a great distance. Many readers of Yeats’ sublime poetry have heard of Queen Maeve and her connection to Irish mythology and

literature, but many have not yet visited the majestic Tomb of Queen Maeve, also in Sligo, whose power and visual impact in the Irish landscape can hold its own with any Egyptian pyramid. New World scholars are aware of the immense pyramids of Native civilizations in Peru. The brilliantly painted interiors of the coastal Moche peoples (1st-7th century, roughly) have scenes as vivid as the murals that decorated the resting places for Egyptian Pharaohs. The monument of Listoghil, part of County Sligo’s Carrowmore complex, was raised to mark the pre-Celtic afterlife a full two thousand years before Egyptian written history began. Sadly, errors of past scholarship stated that Ireland was the last part of Europe to be inhabited; that Peru first had human settlement long after settlers from Central Asia had made their way into North America. We now know that there were complex cultures in Ireland at least two millennium before any existed in the Mediterranean; and that human beings lived in Latin America’s Southern Cone (Chile, Peru, Argentina, etc.) over 14,500 years ago, predating the supposed “most ancient” Clovis site in North America. Stones speak. Archaeologists are hearing some of the older stories now, and Ireland and Peru have fascinating histories, and artifacts, to share.

Studies in IT…and archaeology? Found at IT Sligo BY MICHAEL TAPIA

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he opportunity to study abroad was one I would never second guess. Studying archaeology in Ireland provided many opportunities I was unable to find anywhere near me. Choosing the possible place was determined by college’s academics and location. Sligo city in County Sligo, Ireland is a great location for studying and taking in the Irish culture. Institute of Technology Sligo provides many science degrees, including those in archaeology. Obtaining a Bachelor’s degree in Applied Archaeology is a unique major to study, and is not provided in the States. The ‘applied’ suggests study in technology on computers and in the labs. Learning applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS), and Polymerase Chain Reaction, which is used to determine the gender of an animal by using a blood sample, these are courses that I have not been able to locate in a school that provided the other classes I needed. Most colleges provide degrees in Anthropology, where archaeology is a main focus. At IT Sligo, I was also able to participate in end-of- year excavation at a megalithic tomb called Carrowmore. This two- week excavation gives a real hands-on experience of working on an archaeological site.

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Studying in a different country across the world also provided me the opportunity to acclimate to the culture in Sligo. Having courses such as Iron Age in Europe and Archaeology of Buildings really provided insight and information on the Enjoying dessert at Hooked, country, and on the a favorite restaurant city of Sligo. There are many aspects of the Irish culture that relate to course studies. The professors 2018 Archaeological discoveries at Newgrange within the World Heritage Site of Brú na Bóinne. Technology to see the stone formations under the field. at the Institute of Technology Sligo take pride in their courses in providing vital information. Joining a society such as Stones & Bones provided many opportunities to weekend trips provided opportunities see Michael Tapia recently received his Bachelor of meet people and take trips around the the landscape of the country. Science degree in Applied Archaeology in Ireland from Institute of Technology Sligo. He currently country to visit archaeological and heriSligo is a great place to visit, or volunteers at the Arizona Museum of Natural tage sites. Conversing with people from even relocate. Studying in Sligo was a History cataloguing artifact inventory and different countries such as Germany, great experience that provided one-ofpreparing artifacts for display. Next is earning a France, Italy, and Mexico was a great a-kind knowledge. In a country like Master’s in Archaeology to work academically. experience, learning about different culIreland, archaeology and conservation His mom’s maiden name is Mulheron from tures. By living in Sligo, there are many are important. Studying archaeology in Co. Donegal, with James Mitchell her great opportunities for hiking, sightseeing, such a country with pride in its history grandfather born in Old Castle, Co. Meath, and her great grandmother Bridget Garvey from surfing, and a fun night life. As a member is beneficial and provides great insight I Co. Mayo. My family’s gift shop, Mully’s Celtic of the IT Sligo basketball team, I was wouldn’t have had otherwise. For more Cottage, is in Prescott. able to create many friendships there too. information, visit www.itsligo.ie/studyTraveling across the country and having at-it-sligo/international-students


THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

True Shepherd’s Pie

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o essentially be called a Shepherd’s Pie, the dish needs to be made with AT LEAST 50% lamb. Because, you can’t shepherd cows, so you cannot call an all-beef dish, a shepherd’s pie. In fact, that has its own name, that is a “Cottage Pie.” Strange I know, but there are a few people who come up to me saying that they don’t like the taste of lamb. And for this I blame whoever cooked their lamb first. After inquiring why, I find that 90% of these people’s experiences has been with lamb that was overcooked. You see, people who have never cooked with lamb see it as a red meat and thus, will cook it like beef; wrong. A beef roast, one normally cooks it at roughly 325 F, for 20 minutes per pound. With a lamb roast, you want to cook at 275 F, for 30 minutes for every pound. Lower the temperatures when baking for longer periods of time, reaching a center temperature of 145 F to 155 F. That is medium rare to medium. Even if you like your red meat on the well done side, you cannot do that with lamb. It does not have all the nice slivers of fat that allows beef to stay juicy even at

medium well. For lamb, once you go over the medium temperature 155 F, then the flavor of the meat becomes gamey. The best temperature for any roasted lamb dish is 145 F or medium rare. HOWEVER, when cooking lamb mixed in a stew or a pie, the lean flavor of lamb can enhance a dish far more than beef ever could. It can also be less expensive than beef in many cities today. Now all eight Celtic Nations have their own traditional version of Shepherd’s Pie. This primarily applies to the vegetables used in the dish. These variations are listed below. Note: when making these traditional dishes, the method was not to peel the vegetables but wash them very well. This too, adds to the flavor. Eric McBride is an award-winning Historical Chef, specializing in Celtic Cuisine. He is the Author of 6 Celtic Cookbooks and has designed a large array of mixed spices from Traditional Celtic recipes. You can order any of these online at www.celticcaterer.com.

Serves 4-6 2 lbs. Ground Lamb (or 50% with Ground Beef) 2 large Onions, chopped 2 Carrots, diced 1 cup Peas 1 cup Chicken Stock 2 Tbs. Oil 2 cloves Garlic, pressed and chopped 2 Tbs. Flour 2 tsp. Tomato Puree 2 tsp. Kosher Salt ½ tsp. Black Pepper, freshly ground 2 tsp. Dried Rosemary 2 tsp. Dried Thyme 1 tsp. Worcestershire Sauce Optional 1 cup Peas (Wales and Cornwall) 1 cup of wild Mushrooms (Asturias and Breton) 1 cup of Green Beans, chopped (Galicia) 50% Haggis mixed with the lamb or beef (Scotland) Substitute Colcannon Potatoes for the Mashed top layer (Ireland)) POTATO TOPPING 1 ½ lbs. Yellow Potatoes ¼ cup Half-and-Half 2 oz. Butter 2 oz. Sour Cream ¾ tsp Kosher Salt ¼ tsp White Pepper 1 Egg Yolk 1. Cut up potatoes for easier cooking and place them in a large pot filled with water. Cover and bring to a boil. Allow to simmer for 20 minutes. Drain and set aside. 2. Replace pot on burner and combine butter and half-and-half. Stir in potatoes and mash. Add seasoning and sour cream, continuing to stir. When smooth, fold in egg yolk, mix thoroughly, and then set aside. 3. In a stock pot, sauté the onions and carrots with the oil. Cook for 5 minutes or until onions begin to change color. Add in garlic and stir. 4. Add in lamb and seasonings; brown the meat. 5. Drain any excess fat. Add all additional vegetables. Cover meat with flour. Add tomato paste, chicken stock, peas, rosemary, thyme and Worcestershire. Stir and allow meat to simmer for 10 minutes to thicken. 6. Place meat evenly in an 8x11” casserole dish or individual ramekins (adjust cooking time for the latter). Top meat with whipped mashed potatoes, smoothing it out with a rubber spatula. Bake at 400 ºF for 25 minutes or until potatoes begin to brown. Allow to cool some and serve. An additional version in Scotland is to crumple Haggis Potato Crisps on top of the mashed potatoes just prior to serving. WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM

CULTURE

CELTIC CATERER

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

DRIVING TIPS FROM LEFT LANE MAUREEN

PART 28: Making

Memories that Last

BY MAUREEN SULLIVAN, CTC

Here are some photos I thought you would enjoy taken by our clients as they traveled through Ireland. We customize each itinerary to meet your personal schedule, whether for individuals or groups. It comes co mplete with driving instructions, bus and train schedules as needed, photo of booked lodging destinations, and lots of tips to see and do while there. Maybe your photo will be here next time!

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1. Jeff traveled with his wife Jan, his mother and daughter, Gloria and Erin. The lady in white is Beatrice Leahy, hostess of Ladyswell Guesthouse in Cashel. Jeff says, “The Guinness is much better in Ireland.” 2. Laurie is riding a horse on the beach in the Dingle Peninsula. 3. Meghan, Morghan, and Madelyn standing at the top of the Cliffs of Moher before the renovations and safety wall. A great family adventure and a first legal pint in Ireland! 4. For Anthony and Nancy, Cliffs of Moher sailing and gazing up at 670 feet of rock along the bottom of the cliffs was amazing! Cruises along the bottom of the cliffs are a recent addition. A lot of clients say this was the highlight of their trip, listening to the ocean crashing into the cliffs.   5. Hugh and Winnie stop by a large Standing Stone in front of the 5,200-year-old Newgrange passage tomb located in the Boyne Valley.   6. Keith and Laurie went to Ireland for a month and stayed one week at the Loop Head lightkeeper’s house in County Clare. And, stayed one week at the Galley Head lightkeeper’s house in County Cork. The greatest experience was lying in bed listening to the ocean waves pounding against the rocks.

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7. Craig and Bobbie enjoying an Irish breakfast at Tower View B&B in Dingle. A hearty breakfast is an integral start to your day! 8. Kevin and Lynne relaxing at the Library Bar in Kinnitty Castle. Sitting in the cozy library bar with the collection of antique books and journals, one can feel the history of the castle. If the walls could only talk. 9. With Brian taking the photo of Denise and Beth, they couldn’t believe the view of Ladies View in the Killarney National Park. It was named after Queen Victoria’s Ladies-in-waiting visit there during the royal visit in 1861. Maureen and John (“Jack”) are the owners of Sullivan’s Travels, Inc. Maureen has been a travel professional for 25 years, moving their business to Phoenix four years ago. www.sullivanstravels.com

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

IRISH NETWORK ARIZONA

Mother is Mary Patricia Doyle of the Doyle clan from County Galway, Ireland

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

John Ryan Murphy Hosts “Catching up with Murph”

PHOTOS BY MONICA BRADBURN/ ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS

D

-backs catcher John Ryan Murphy hosted kids from Gigi’s Playhouse for a special batting practice experience, in connection with IamMore Foundation. It provides fun experiences meeting John Ryan Murphy and the Arizona Diamondbacks (Major League Baseball Club). Murphy, along with close friend Catherine “Kat” Leibbrandt, her mother, Leslie, and sister, Gabby, started the IamMore® Foundation. Their inspiration is to enhance the lives of children faced with difficult development and medical circumstances. “Catching Up with Murph” has become a staple of the IamMore Foundation, headquartered in Bradenton, FL, which allows children and individuals to pursue their love of sports including baseball, helping them to be identified by their passions rather than their affliction. Kat shares, “Our mission at the IamMore Foundation is to reinvent the self-image of children who have been diagnosed with a debilitating physical ailment or chronic illness, whether diagnosed at birth or incurred through disease, and to empower their identity to be immeasurably more than their diagnoses. We wish to be the architects of their ideal image, facilitating experiences that allow them to identify with their passion, instead of being restricted within the boundaries of medical terminology. They should not be defined by their medical circumstances, but valued for their courage and strength. They should not live by what the doctors tell them, but should see the hope they offer others and the seeds of inspiration they can plant in this wonderful world.” This was the first event in May 2019, to be held each D-backs homestand at Chase Stadium. With the D-backs, IamMore has had the opportunity to partner with both Banner Children’s and Gigi’s Playhouse Phoenix.

Thomas P. Murphy, CPA 21639 N. 12th AveNue, Suite 203 • PhoeNix, ArizoNA 85027 (623) 581-0375 • FAx (623) 581-9242 Grandfather Murphy born in County Westmeath and Grandmother in County Longford, Ireland

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

21

Olivia Mehaffey from Belfast

INTERVIEW WITH JIM CULLETON

have made Arizona feel like home.

rom Banbridge town in the County Down comes Olivia Mehaffey. The two-time Curtis Cup player and Irish international completed a stunning junior year at Arizona State University. Currently she’s recovering from a fractured wrist, which occurred hiking in the Mourne Mountains in late May. Olivia took some time to answer a few questions for me. This year’s honors include: • Currently ranked #13 in the World • Pac-12 Champion • Regional Co-Medalist • 3 Individual Victories • @TheAnnikaaward Finalist • Pac-12 All American Team • Competed in the Inaugural women’s amateur at Augusta national finishing 23rd overall

You listen to music a lot whilst warming up. What are you listening to mostly? I normally listen to upbeat

F

What age did you start playing and why golf? I started playing when I was 6, mainly because my dad and brother played. I would go to join them. You’re the first Irish golfer ever to play for ASU; correct? Yes A big step away from home many Irish kids have struggled with homesickness moving so far away from home; not you though? I don’t feel I get home sick because I

am so busy. My schedule gets a bit crazy and I sometimes don’t have time to think about home. Also, I

music, normally some rap or club music. Something to get me pumped up.

Is it true you beat Phil Mickelson in a chipping challenge at Papago? (You can exaggerate a bit it’s an Irish paper. LOL) I did have a chipping competition with Phil, it

US Open. Is this a similar path you would like to follow heading into your senior year at ASU?  I have a similar plan. Obviously with this injury, my priority is getting back to full health. But all being well, that would be the plan.

If and when you join the LPGA tour, will you be staying here in Arizona? It seems to be a very popular base for many tour players. I plan on staying in Arizona. It feels

likes home away from home. The weather is perfect for golf and there are so many golf courses.

took me a couple of shots to get inside Phil.

Best golf course you have played in Arizona? My favorite is The Rim Golf Club in Payson.

How many Hole in ones have you had? 4 You made the first ever birdie Olivia Mehaffey at inaugural Augusta National Women’s Amateur. How amazing was that whole experience, that week? ANWA was amazing. It was a magical week and one I will remember forever. It was amazing to be part of history and this event has had a huge impact on female golf.

You partnered #1 amateur and eventual winner, Jennifer Kupcho, in the first two rounds there. She earned her LPGA tour card in 2018 but deferred turning pro until the 2019

Favorite Irish place to hang out in the Valley? (You better say TKB. Irish owner Jimmy is cool. LOL) Favorite Irish

place is The Kettle Black. Good vibe and feels like home.

Big thank you Olivia for your time. It’s just great to have one of our own flying the flag here in the desert and good luck in your senior year and beyond. The Irish Community here in Arizona is very proud of you. Jimmy Culleton comes from Donabate in north County Dublin, the youngest sibling in a family of five. Original founder of Tim Finnegan’s Irish Pub; stepped aside in 2018 after a very successful ten years. He is very proud of the success of his current restaurant The Kettle Black in downtown Phoenix. Working full-time in real estate for Vylla home group out of Scottsdale, Jimmy specialises working with first-time buyers and sellers. There is nothing more satisfying than seeing the joy in the faces of his clients when finding their perfect home. In his spare time, he golfs and loves hiking most mornings with his Labradors, Arthur and Guinness.

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

NEWS

22

Pumping the breaks on electric vehicle hype Andrew Grafton (full three-fourths Scottish descent) from Keybridge Communications shares research for energy consumers. BY PETER ROFF

G

erman auto giant Volkswagen announced plans to produce 50 million electric cars in the coming years. The news comes as more and more evidence suggests that across the globe, consumers are embracing electric vehicles. Already, 1 million EVs have sold in the United States. One estimate concludes that U.S. roads will carry over 18 million EVs by 2030.   The future, it seems, has arrived. While EVs were once a quaint curiosity, they’re now a viable mass-market product -- and could drive down global carbon emissions. Or so the thinking goes. The problem is, though, that EVs have plenty of dirty secrets. Mass adoption would not do nearly as much as good as the public thinks, because these vehicles pose many unique environmental threats. Take the batteries running these vehicles. The nickel and graphite that goes into them comes primarily from mines in Australia, Canada, Indonesia, Russia, and the Philippines.  This process produces huge volumes of noxious chemicals, including sulphur dioxide, which has been linked to severe public health problems in nearby populations, including genetic deformities and fatal lung conditions. 

Harvesting these engine components also generates substantial carbon emissions. A study published in the journal PLOS One calculated the global warming impact of over sixty frequently mined metals and ranked them by severity. Nickel was in the top ten. So, yes, while an electric car’s engine may burn clean, the process that produced that engine is anything but. Also consider where the electricity that powers these vehicles comes from. Many power plants still run on coal, one of the most carbon-intensive fuels in the world. For electric cars that get their power from such sources, the electricity required to travel a thousand miles equates to about 290 pounds of burned coal, releasing about 310 kilograms of CO2. That figure is only about 40 kilograms less than emissions released from a regular, gas-guzzling vehicle. The sad truth about electric vehicles is that they do not substantially cut emissions. They simply switch the source, moving it from the car engine to the production plant. That’s rendered the net benefits of these vehicles negligible, at best. According to the Manhattan Institute, electric vehicles will account for just one half of one percent of total domestic energy emissions reductions over the next four decades. That’s a rounding error. If Americans are serious about reducing carbon

emissions, they need to look past the hype. There is a real opportunity to dramatically decrease energy-related carbon emissions, but it’s not in the car -- it’s in the power plant. Over the last decade or so, domestic gas production has rapidly expanded. Developers have invented powerful new drilling technologies like fracking to drive domestic gas production to unprecedented heights. Natural gas is a cheap substitute for coal in electricity production. It also burns much cleaner, producing about half the emissions. Power plants have already started to switch over. And the United States is now world leader in emissions reductions. Electric vehicles are a classic case of hype outpacing reality. There may be good reasons to find ways to capture carbon and commoditize it outside the policy proscriptions being offered up by global warming hysterics. And it’s reasonable to be engaged in a search for cheaper ways to produce the energy that powers our vehicles and heats and cools our homes. Policymakers should be looking for ways to accelerate this transformation. Peter Roff is a Senior Fellow at Frontiers of Freedom. This piece originally ran in the Orange County Register.

Every day, with our team of members, readers, and Irish Heritage Partners, The Wild Geese explores, promotes, preserves, and celebrates the epic heritage of the Irish around the world -- through compelling content, evolving technologies, a dynamic community, and collaborative marketing connections. WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM

.Irish


THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

I am the proud mother of an elderly parrot (somewhere between 60-80 years old) named Sami and a ten-month-old puppy named Falkor. I love to find ways to incorporate my pets into my ventures. I frequently visit the Hance Dog Park -- it is amazing, and Falkor has made the best of friends there. I also enjoy taking Falkor and Sami to the pet-friendly, bird-themed restaurant The Perch Brewery in Chandler. Falkor and I also find ourselves taking hikes on many of the 595-miles of trails in Maricopa County. Our favorite is the Gateway Loop! When I am not with my pets, I love being a part of the amazing culture that Arizona has to offer. There are so many festivals and events that happen every weekend. From Adult Prom at the Children’s Museum of Phoenix, where my friends and I were able to let our inner children roam free; to Salt River Tubing, where you can see the beautiful Arizona landscape and wildlife while floating in a tire tube!

23

Rose of Tralee’s First Lady

Oonagh O’Gara shares fond childhood

Mantras

With everything I have experienced, I have chosen to focus on two main mantras for my life: optimism and perseverance. I strive to put good vibes into the world and to focus on the can-do attitude. I always joke that I will try anything three times, because statistically it is more sound and it gives me an opportunity to really experience it. I think these two together really work well as values because when you are being optimistic you have to continue to work through issues and ideas that may not be the easiest, but you need to “keep on keeping on” (i.e., perseverance), to make the world that much brighter. I put out the positive and try to be the best I can be in that moment. The one thing I want more than anything is to become someone who is remembered for the impact I make on individuals, for my kindness, and energy. Most importantly, for leaving the world a little better place than when I came to it. I plan on doing this through my philanthropic, scientific, and artistic endeavors, whether I leave someone with a laugh through a theatre role I play, or I make someone’s day a little easier by volunteering, or…by finding a cure.

PHOTO BY DOMNICK WALSH PHOTOGRAPHY I enjoyed this Facebook post so much that I asked Oonagh for permission to share it with all our readers. It originated from Athlone in County Westmeath as she recalls. It was “Copy & Paste just change where you were brought up” with it fanning out from there. She is the wife and right hand of Anthony O’Gara, the Executive Chairman of the Rose of Tralee International Festival. It’s a reminder for those of us who shared a similar growing up this way, wherever in the world we live then or now, how lucky we are. Maybe this will help our children understand us a bit better too! PS My ancestors hail from County Longford too. Ann Niemann, Editor in Chief

I

grew up in a place called Longford. Everybody knew everybody and at a time when everyone treated each other like family. Never knew the Christian name of our elders. We went outside to play in fields & ditches, built dens/forts and jumped in puddles to get mud off our shoes. We went out early morning and had to be home when it got as we didn’t have mobiles.   We got dirty dusky and had to climbing trees, and had wash nights share lol. We didn’t eat fast food …We ate soda with sugar & jam sandwiches, homemade bread food and chips cooked in a chip pan with eggs, we were lucky if we got ice cream in a wafer. We played Hide and Seek , cowboys & Indians , we built

tree houses . There was no bottled water . If we had a bottled drink, we shared the same bottle after giving it a wipe with our mucky sleeves. We had kids tv on a Sat morning. Anything Goes, Looney Tunes, Lassie,   we rode our bikes  for hours  (if we had one) with no helmets and came off and got gravel rash. We turned them into motorbikes  with a piece of cardboard. We made Go carts or bogies from pram wheels and wood.  There was no such thing as a mobile phone or any other electronic device . We weren’t AFRAID OF ANYTHING. If someone had a fight, that’s what it was...a fight. Kids didn’t have guns  or knives  . When I grew up, they had an older brother/sister or friend and they dealt with the bullies. The sky was our clock for curfew or until someone got hurt or the shout echoed across the fields “you’re wanted”. School was mandatory, We watched our mouths around our because we knew we’d get a telling off, elders sent to bed after tea. They were the happiest days of my life!   People say today’s kids have everything!!  Well that’s not strictly true .  We had Everything   and appreciated it !!! Re-post if you’re proud  that you came from that time  and will never forget where you came from! [Originally posted July 13, 2018]

Re-post we did. Enjoy!

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

DIRECTORIES

NEW MEMBERS WELCOME! IRISH CULTURAL CENTER & McCLELLAND LIBRARY

IRISH NETWORK ARIZONA (INAZ)

Our mission is to provide a link between the people of Arizona and the people of Ireland and other Celtic cultures. The Irish Cultural Center serves as a central meeting place for cultural groups, affiliate groups and people looking to celebrate their Irish/Celtic heritage. The McClelland Library is a three-story building resembling a traditional 12th century Norman castle from the Emerald Isle. The Library houses 8,000 books from Irish authors, poets, and genealogical sources, a permanent exhibit on The Book of Kells, several reading rooms, and computer access to various disciplines of Irish and Celtic studies including genealogy. The mission of The Academy of Irish & Celtic Studies is to spread the knowledge and wisdom of the Celtic nations through music, dance, art, literature and language. We do this by providing many musical and Arts programs, open to young and old alike. The Center is also available for private rentals, being a beautiful venue for all occasions! www.azirish.org, 602-258-0109

Irish Network Arizona is part of IrishNetwork USA organization. Members connect with their peers and develop relationships that foster success in their business, cultural, and social interests. Come to a monthly breakfast or event to explore membership benefits. Facebook.com/IrishNetworkArizona, info@irishnetworkarizona.com, 623-986-4708 67%

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JIM THOMSON U.S. SCHOOL OF PIPING & DRUMMING 25%

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This bagpipe and drum school is dedicated to excellence in bagpiping as well as camaraderie and fun. All levels of students are welcome! Instructors are brought from Scotland, Ireland, Canada and the U.S. Contact: Eric Poleski, Administrator, ericpoleski@cox.net, 702-270-8974 home, 702340-8859 cell, 928-556-3161, www.nachs.info

LAS VEGAS CELTIC GATHERING & HIGHLAND GAMES LAS VEGAS CELTIC SOCIETY

ARIZONA COLLEEN PROGRAMS

ARIZONA

CENTER

On April 13th and 14th, 2019 in Floyd Lamb Park, the non-profit Las Vegas Celtic Society hosts the Las Vegas Highland Games, a massive festival featuring Celtic music, dancing, food and retail vendors. Enjoy Scottish heavy Athletic events, as well as sanctioned Highland Dance and Bagpipe & Drum Competitions. LasVegasCelticSociety.org

The Arizona Colleen and Rose of Tralee Selection, Arizona Irish Lass and Little Miss Shamrock programs select young ladies of Irish descent to participate as spokespersons at area events. Prize packages for each competition. The Colleen wins a trip to Ireland and $1,000 scholarship. For details, visit www.azcolleen.org or contact Ciara Archer, Chair, 480-358-7504, info@azcolleen.org.

LOS SAN PATRICIOS DE ARIZONA (ST. PATRICK’S BATTALION)

ARIZONA LAW ENFORCEMENT EMERALD SOCIETY (ALEES)

The organization honors the 150-year-old bond of friendship existing today between Mexico and Ireland. Los San Patricios de Arizona was founded by Wm. “Bill” Howard O’Brien; Hector Corona, El Teniente; and Ernie Patino, El Teniente. For information, please call 480-951-1152 or email whoco@cox.net.

ALEES was incorporated in 2004 to promote and celebrate accomplishments of Irish-Americans in law enforcement. Its members, families and friends support ALEES Foundation, a non-profit 501(c)(3) created in 2012 to provide financial assistance to the families of injured and fallen brothers and sisters in Arizona law enforcement. If interested in becoming a member or volunteering, contact us at azemeraldsociety.org.

NORTHERN ARIZONA CELTIC HERITAGE SOCIETY The nonprofit organization is dedicated to presenting, promoting, and preserving Celtic culture. Each year we host the Arizona Highland Celtic Festival (July 20 & 21, 2019 in the NEW location at Fort Tuthill County Park), the Jim Thomson U.S. School of Piping & Drumming, and the Grand Canyon Celtic Arts Academy. Contact Jude McKenzie, information@ nachs.info, 928-556-3161, www.nachs.info.

THE CALEDONIAN SOCIETY OF ARIZONA Our mission is to promote Scottish culture through art, education, and athletics. Each year we grant scholarships to aspiring and professional Highland athletes, musicians, dancers and/or any other individuals or organizations whose mission, project or program promotes Scottish heritage. We meet the 2nd Thursday of each month for drinks, entertainment and Scottish fun! Everyone welcome! ArizonaScots.com.

PHOENIX ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE & FAIRE COMMITTEE Formed in 1983, the Committee has the responsibility for organizing the annual Phoenix St. Patrick’s Day Parade and the Faire that follows, which are held on Saturday (the closest before or falling on March 17); and the Arizona Colleen Programs throughout the year. It is entirely volunteers and meets the second Tuesday of each month at 7 pm at the ICC. Contact: Harry Sexton, President, 602-863-9198. www.stpatricksdayphoenix.org

DAUGHTERS OF SCOTIA DESERT THISTLE LODGE #260 Formed in 2005 to promote Scottish heritage. Ladies of ancestry, married to a Scot or born in Scotland may join. We hold monthly meetings, tea socials, a teahouse at the AZ Highland Games and attend Scottish events. We support Highland dance competition and other charities. Contact: Tammy Gonzales at dos260recsec@gmail.com, 623-707-5032.

RIORDAN MANSION STATE HISTORIC PARK

FRIENDS OF SAINT PATRICK CENTRE – AZ CHAPTER

Built in 1904 for two Irish brothers, Riordan Mansion is an architectural treasure offering a glimpse into the lives of Flagstaff’s early Irish settlers. The “fairy ring” seen on the outdoor self-guided tour hints at the Irish tradition of providing fairies an outdoor dancing space, preventing mischief inside. For admission rates and hours call 928-779-4395.

The nonprofit organization was formed in 2011 to promote positive relationships between Arizona and Northern Ireland. Through education, cultural exchanges and charitable events, the Chapter nurtures St. Patrick’s legacy. Meetings held quarterly at the ICC. Contact: Kelsey.Kelleher@ AZIrishLibrary.org, 602-301-1083.

GRAND CANYON CELTIC ARTS ACADEMY Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy - It offers classes for Youth and Adults in: fiddle, whistle, dance, guitar, and more! Scholarships Available through Northern Arizona Celtic Heritage Society. Contact: Kari@GrandCanyonCelticArts. org, 928-600-1365. www.grandcanyoncelticarts.org

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THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

Chartered on April 21, 1981 in North Carolina, membership is open to all Active Duty and Veterans of the USA and the British Commonwealth who are of Scot or Scot-Irish lineage. For more information, contact SAMS Flagstaff Post 2000, George G. Shoemaker, 928-607-1600, gduffer@suddenlink.net.

TUCSON ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE AND FESTIVAL Celebrating our 32nd year on March 17, 2019! The parade starts at 11am and winds through downtown Tucson ending up with a great festival at Armory Park from 10am until 6pm. Serving Guinness and Harp! Great food, Irish music and dance, a Kids’ Corner, face painting and much more! Established 1987. www.tucsonstpatricksday.com

WELSH LEAGUE OF ARIZONA Our mission is to promote Welsh language and culture with performing arts and literary events, classes, and participating in Celtic festivals and other community events. We endeavor to enhance relations between the U.S. and Wales by being a point of contact for visitors, businesses, and expatriates. We warmly welcome travelers, offering assistance and networking. Contact: John Good, potelobop@hotmail.com. www.welshleagueofarizona.org

SCOTTSDALE SISTER CITIES ASSOCIATION Lisa White, President; JoAnn Garner and Craig Miller, Killarney Committee Chairs 7525 Camelback #102, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 480-945-0384; info@scottsdalesistercities.com

TUCSON-ROSCOMMON, IRELAND SISTER CITIES Colleen Kelly Beaman, Chair 520-743-7979, Ckbeaman@hotmail.com 1670 N Country Club, Tucson, AZ 85716; and Facebook

CELTIC DANCE SCHOOLS

BRACKEN SCHOOL OF IRISH DANCE Classes in Chandler, 480-699-2455 Thomas Bracken, ADCRG | Kieran Noe, TCRG thomas.bracken@brackenirishdance.com kieran.noe@brackenirishdance.com www.brackenirishdance.com

CELTIC STEPS ARIZONA/NEW MEXICO Christopher McGrory, ADCRG Rosemary Browne-McGrory, TCRG Classes in Tempe, Tucson and Albuquerque 520-991-3605; christopher.mcgrory@gmail.com www.tucsonirishdance.com

MAGUIRE ACADEMY OF IRISH DANCE

CLANS

CLAN MACCALLUM-MALCOLM SOCIETY, N.A. Arizona Convenor: Ashleen O’Gaea Ashleen@Comcast.net w/MacCallum in subject line www.Clan-MacCallum-Malcolm.org

CELTIC SISTER CITIES

CHANDLER-TULLAMORE, IRELAND SISTER CITIES Ellen Harrington, Chair, P.O. Box 1474​, Chandler, AZ 85244-1474, 480-600-8509, chan.to.tull@gmail.com, www.chandlerirish.org

PHOENIX-ENNIS, IRELAND SISTER CITIES

Classes in Phoenix, Tucson, Dallas, and Houston Info@maguireacademy.com (520) 319-0204. Darren Maguire, TCRG, ADCRG www.maguireacademy.com

MASCHINO SCHOOL OF HIGHLAND DANCE Kari Maschino, 480-242-7760, Kari@maschinodance.com Gilbert, Tempe, Peoria www.maschinodance.com

MICHAEL PATRICK GALLAGHER SCHOOL OF IRISH DANCE MPGirishdance@yahoo.com Michael Patrick, TCRG, ADCRG, Ann Paitel, TCRG www.mpgirishdance.com

Mary Hill-Connor, Committee Chairperson 602-635-9760, mary.hillconnor@gmail.com www.phoenixsistercities.org

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SCOTTISH-AMERICAN MILITARY SOCIETY (SAMS), FLAGSTAFF

25


AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 THE DESERT SHAMROCK

PHOTO BY MICHAEL BAXTER

CALENDAR

26

“IRISH CELEBRATION OF TEA”

Saturday, Sept 21 • 1:30pm–3pm Learn history and how to make a perfect pot of tea! Advance Reservations Only Members $22.50, Non-Members $25 per person Register: www.azirish.org/project/irish-tea-ceremony

BREAKFAST & SPEAKER IRISH NETWORK ARIZONA (INAZ)

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 2019 [All events are in Arizona USA unless otherwise noted]

IRISH CULTURAL CENTER (ICC) & McCLELLAND LIBRARY

PUBLIC WALK-IN HOURS (TOURS, LIBRARY & GENEALOGY) Fall/Winter/Spring starting September 2: Tues, Wed, Thurs, Saturday • 10am–3pm; Fridays • 3pm–8pm Closed major holidays & all of August Frances McClelland Genealogy Research Centre available these hours Open Other Hours for Scheduled Classes, Meetings & Events 1106 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix 85004 602-258-0109, www.azirish.org

WORKSHOP: HOW TO BE “IN” THE NEWS THE DESERT SHAMROCK Saturday, September 21 • 10am–12:30pm Writers, Photographers, Advertisers Presented by Ann Niemann, Editor in Chief ICC Norton Room

See ad page 14

Register: info@desertshamrock.com

Second Friday of the Month • 7am–8:30am Doors open 6:30 am for networking; breakfast promptly 7am ICC Great Hall See ad page 19 August 9 Wendy Johnson, Director, Justa Center Our NEW charity serves homeless elders. Your Golden Years should not be on the streets. Friday, September 13 Fall Membership Kick-Off Includes Tour of the Irish Cultural Center & McClelland Library Be our Guest! RSVP info@irishnetworkarizona.com

ROSE OF TRALEE INT’L FESTIVAL

August 23-27 LIVE STREAM Finals 26-27 Noon–2pm Arizona time Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland Support our 2019 Arizona Rose Kayla Gray! Go to www.roseoftralee.ie and download the app!

See Kayla’s very personal story page 8 Arizona Rose Kayla Gray

BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP

Saturday, Sept 28 • 10:30am–12:30pm McClelland Library - Norton Room; FREE Opportunity to read Irish works and discuss in a group. www.azirish.org/iclf-programs/book-discussions

AN INTIMATE IRISH SESSIUN

Connect to your Irish roots! Saturday, Sept 28 • 7pm–10pm Chandler-Tullamore Sister Cities ICC Great Hall “An Halla More” Drop in to Listen, Play and/or Sing with our special guests from Tullamore, Ireland: Saidhbhe Cullen & Sarah Mahon Suggested Donation $10 to support CTSC and ICLF Info: Ellen Harrington, chan.to.tull@gmail.com, www.chandlerirish.org

ANNUAL PRESCOTT HIGHLAND GAMES & CELTIC FAIRE Saturday & Sunday, Sept 28 & 29 Watson Lake, Prescott

See ad page 6

Tickets online or at the gate www.prescotthighlandgames.com

SAVE THE DATE: INT’L MIXED GOLF TOURNAMENT TWIN TOWNS/ SISTER CITIES

Wednesday and Thursday, October 2 & 3 Killarney Golf & Fishing Club, Ireland, Hosted in part by Scottsdale-Killarney Sister Cities AZ Contact: JoAnn Garner, joanngarner038@gmail.com Info: CounihanSean@gmail.com

See ad page 27

ANAM CARA EMERALD ANNIVERSARY GALA

Saturday October 19, 2019 FUNDRAISER Dinner, Live Music, Entertainment, Silent Auction Honoring of awardees who have exhibited exemplary individual or community service and leadership to the Irish community and Celtic culture. Proceeds help to support the current services and new initiatives of the Irish Cultural Center and McClelland Library. ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY www.azirish.org/anam-cara

See details page 2 LIBRARY EXHIBIT: THE IRISH IN LATIN AMERICA

September 3 through December 7 Presented by Ireland’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Admission: $10 adults; $8 seniors/students; $5 ICC Members; $5 children (12 yrs. and under) www.azirish.org/irish-in-latin-america

See stories and ads pages 10-11 THIRD FRIDAY CEILI

Fridays, Aug 16, Sept 20 • 7:30pm Beginners’ Lesson 6:30pm Family oriented Irish social dances. Taught by Jim & Anne Daugherty with live music in the Great Hall! Cash bar Admission: $6 each; one child under 12 free with each paid adult www.azirish.org/iclf-programs/ceili-dancing

THE ACADEMY OF IRISH AND CELTIC STUDIES

Term is Mon-Sat for 10 weeks Fall term September 9 - November 16 IRISH MUSIC • IRISH LANGUAGE IRISH & SCOTTISH DANCE www.azirish.org/education-and-classes/academy-classes

WWW.DESERTSHAMROCK.COM

FIRST FRIDAY

Friday, Sept 6 • 7pm–10pm FREE Join us for fun, themed entertainment. ICC Great Hall, Cash bar www.azirish.org/firstfridays

FAMILY STORY HOUR

Saturday, September 7 • 10:30am–12:30pm McClelland Library - Castle Keep; FREE Join us for Irish Stories and a craft. Books: “Let’s See Ireland” and “On the Luck of an Irish Sailor” www.azirish.org/iclf-programs/story-time

GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

Saturday, September 7, 2019 from 10:30am–1:00pm McClelland Library - Norton Room Getting Started with Irish Genealogy Research $15 members, $20 non-members www.azirish.org/education-and-classes/genealogy-classes

D-BACKS IRISH HERITAGE DAY HALFWAY TO ST. PADDY’S DAY

Tuesday, Sept 17 • Game 6:40pm vs. Marlins 4:30pm pre-game local entertainment Group discounted tickets $22 includes green ballcap Seated together. Wear your green! www.dbacks.com/celtic See details page 3 Save online fee at www.desertshamrock.com

$10,000 DRAWING FUNDRAISER

Starts Monday, October 21 Drawing Friday, Feb 7 Benefits the Irish Cultural Center & McClelland Library

See ad page 7

ANNUAL SOUTHWEST TEA Saturday, Nov 2 FUNDRAISER Chandler-Tullamore Sister Cities

See contact info page 19

PHOTO WORKSHOP: IRELAND THROUGH MY LENS PRESENTED BY TIM H. MURPHY

Hosted by The Desert Shamrock and Irish Network Arizona Thursday, Jan 16, 2020 • 6:30pm–8:30pm ICC Great Hall, $10 info@desertshamrock.com


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THE DESERT SHAMROCK AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019

CONCERTS AND EVENTS AT MIM

Tralee, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

MUSICAL ICON: ELVIS™ Sat. & Sun., Aug. 10 & 11 | All Day Kick off Elvis Week with a sing-andplay-along of famous Elvis tunes, documentary screenings and talks about the King of Rock and Roll, and more!

Stay in the heart of the Kingdom when touring Kerry’s Wild Atlantic Way

Sponsored by Judy Pelham Elvis Presley™; Rights of Publicity and Persona Rights: ABG EPE IP LLC

Photo courtesy of Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc. “Graceland”

JIGJAM

Sun., Sep. 1 | 7 p.m. Blending the best of traditional Irish music with bluegrass and Americana in a new genre which KILLARNE has been branded as “I-Grass” TWINN (Irish-influenced bluegrass)

Book online www.therosehotel.com or call + 353 66 7199100

ASSOCI

The Rose Hotel, Dan Spring Road, Tralee, Co. Kerry. V92 HKA4. I N T E Email: reservations@therosehotel.com

R N A T I ROCK O N A L CELEBRATE AND ROLL T O U R N A M E N T T Sat. & Sun., Sep. 14 & 15 | All Day S I S T E R

Killarney Town Twinning Association

Don’t miss the closing weekend of The Electric Guitar and MIM’s new Signature Event celebrating the musical genre that shaped popular culture around the world.

INTERNATIONAL MIXED GOLF TOURNAMENT TWIN TOWNS & SISTER CITIES

LÚNASA

O#ional

October 2nd & 3rd, 2019 KILLARNEY GOLF & FISHING CLUB Optional add-on in Dooks & Ballyunion Golf Courses arizona contact:

OCTOBER 2ND Sat., Sep. 14 | 7:30 p.m. K I L L R N E Y LúnasaA is internationally F acknowledged I S I N G as theH finest traditional Irish instrumental outfit of recent KILLARNE add on in Dooks & times, renowned for their stunning TWINN shows and superb musicianship. ASSOCI

I N T E R N A I C O N S T P E I A LA RL A TICKETS AND LINEUP AT MIM.ORG T U H E I L L A R E N E YT P L A T O RK N A M N T & S I S T E R

THE KILLARNEY TOW Special rates at the FOR ACCOMODATION CALL LE 2019 Concert Series sponsored by Killarney Plaza Hotel & F O R T O U R N A M E N T I N F Spa and The Killarney E M A I L : C O U N I H A N S Towers Hotel & Spa

For accomodation call Leonie on +355 (0)64 662 1111. For tournament information please e-mail: counihansean@gmail.com

Craig Miller, Camiller@cox.net

O#ional

OCTOBER 2ND KMIM.org I |L L A R E Y 480.478.6000 | 4725 E. Mayo Blvd., Phoenix,N AZ F I S H I N G

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There are legal documents showing that Elvis Presley’s 4th great Enjoy Musical People might know Elvis grandfather, a farmer near Shillelagh, County Wicklow, reported an Instrument Museum’s S P E C A L R A was of Irish descent, but unprovoked beating in Hacketstown, County Carlow, naming each of Elvis Week, I and T H E I A Y P L A his assailants.K That same year,L WilliamL Presley and his son,R Andrew, N E Rock Roll, and Irish bands! he’s not a Carlow man as emigrated to New Orleans for a “quieter life” in 1775 (as we now & know the American Revolution was intensifying). Later they moved to THE KILLARNEY TOW See details this page. once FOR thought… Tennessee and settled there. ACCOMODATION CALL LE F

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Arizona: More than the Grand Canyon Explore • Experience • Bring a Camera PHOTO: Ballooning in Sedona’s Red Rocks PHOTO BY: TIM H MURPHY PHOTOGRAPHY

Profile for The Desert Shamrock

The Desert Shamrock August-September 2019  

Includes Rose of Tralee Int'l Festival FEATURES with a "Very Personal Story" by 2019 AZ Rose and brain surgery; First Lady Oonagh O'Gara's...

The Desert Shamrock August-September 2019  

Includes Rose of Tralee Int'l Festival FEATURES with a "Very Personal Story" by 2019 AZ Rose and brain surgery; First Lady Oonagh O'Gara's...