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In SPORTS | pg. 13

Teams finally take the field

Griffins top Keene; Willsboro girls rout Wells

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In OPINION | pg. 6

Guest viewpoint Don’t hate the Donald!

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In ARTS | pg. 9

The band Lucid will perform This weekend at the Strand in Plattsburgh

Program to address root causes of domestic violence Court-mandated program urges offenders to take accountability for their actions By Pete DeMola

pete@suncommunitynews.com

ELIZABETHTOWN — “If my hands could talk,” read the placard, “they would tell you I’m sorry — I’m sorry for the abuse, the aggression, the control, the suffering.” Testimonials from nearly a dozen local residents convicted of domestic abuse-related charges lined the Essex County Board of Supervisors chamber last week.

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The display was part of the Violence Intervention Project (VIP), an educational program designed to address the roots of domestic violence and force offenders to take accountability for their actions. Society is still prone to victim-blaming, said project leaders and victims, including Meredith King, a Westport resident who was nearly killed by her husband in 2011. King’s husband is serving a decade in state prison for felony strangulation. Despite being incarcerated, he hasn’t been held accountable for his brutal attack, King said. While King has an order of protection against him, no such safeguard exists for their children once he is released.

>> See Domestic violence | pg. 10

Preet to press: Keep at it

Federal prosecutor urges newspapers to continue to root out corruption, wrongdoing by public officials

Sun Community News Editor Pete DeMola named NYPA writer of the year

ELIZABETHTOWN — Sun Community News Editor Pete DeMola has been named writer of the year by the New York Press Association at its annual spring conference in Saratoga Springs. The state-wide acknowledgement is John one of the most prestigious awards given Gereau by the association each year and is highly Managing Editor competitive, according to Rich Hotaling, NYPA’s association and creative services manager. DeMola was one of 57 newspaper professionals vying for the honor, which was judged by members of the Washington Newspapers Publishers Association, Hotaling said. The award required submitting five non-related articles written by one author and published in 2015. In their critique, the judges said DeMola did a great job of investigative reporting — best among the 57 entries — and said he did a fine job of storytelling using vivid words to help. “He showed great depth in many stories, too,” the judges went on to say. “All five stories are strong which is rare.” The articles on which DeMola was judged included an indepth investigative piece on former embroiled Essex town clerk William Morgan; an article about a businessman who

Domestic violence touches everyone, said King — including those in the justice system, the healthcare industry, regular taxpayers, school districts — but victim-blaming is still pervasive. Instead of seeking out the root of violence, people tend to ask, “Why didn’t she leave?” King said. “This is a cycle that needs to stop.” As part of the 33-week VIP program, participants are forced to come face-to-face with their actions. A critical component is recognizing the controlling behavior that is often a predecessor to violence, said VIP Program

By Pete DeMola

pete@suncommunitynews.com

Editor Pete DeMola stands in front of the Sun Community News offices on Monday, April 11 after being named writer of the year by the New York Press Association. Photo by John Gereau

conned the community one nickel at a time; a human interest piece about the prison break in Dannemora; a lighthearted feature about the Essex County Fair and a whistleblower article about a plan to pump PCB-laden water from an old missile silo in Lewis, New York. The judges said DeMola’s writing style and attention to detail stole the show. “Pete was easily the winner of the writer of the year competition,” the judges wrote. NYPA President David Tyler, who helped distribute the awards during the conference, said “NYPA represents more than 700 newspapers across the state and this year’s contest included thousands of entries in dozens of categories.” >> Pete DeMola | pg. 10

SARATOGA SPRINGS — Talk about a receptive crowd. The federal prosecutor responsible for the conviction of two of the state’s most powerful officials had sage advice for reporters at a conference last week: Keep digging. “We don’t know where all the bad things are,” Preet Bharara, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, told reporters at a conference in Saratoga Springs last Friday, April 8. “Often it is the case that you folks are better at figuring that out than the feds are.” Bharara said reporters, particularly those working beats at local newspapers, are often more deft at “ferreting out” and exposing malfeasance than the federal government. This is attributed, in part, he said, because local reporters are often more dialed into their local communities than law enforcement officials. Bharara, who assumed office in 2009, has reached nearrock star status in the Empire State for successfully prosecuting a slew of state officials on corruption charges. >> See Preet Bharara | pg. 11


2 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV)

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Essex County OKs consultant to study ambulance district By Pete DeMola

pete@suncommunitynews.com

ELIZABETHTOWN — Essex County will hire a consultant to study the feasibility of a countywide ambulance district. Lawmakers have unanimously authorized county officials to go out for an RFP for a consultant who will assemble a strategic plan. Local ambulance squads and county officials have referred

to a series of issues facing local ambulance squads — including the steep drop-off in volunteer rates that some say is throttling operations — as a “crisis.” “The problem is getting worse by the day,” said Essex County Board of Supervisors Vice Chairman Randy Preston (I-Wilmington), who called the creation of a countywide district the “most sensible way to move forward.” A handful of lawmakers have expressed tentative support for the idea. The consultant, said Preston, will explore all aspects of district creation, including available funding streams and how a hypothetical system would be implemented, as well as take an inventory of current resources, including the number of volunteers and available equipment. Supervisors have created a special committee designed to oversee the issue. And in a departure from the past, lines of communication are now open with the state, officials reported. “They assured us there will be high-level meetings as we move forward with this,” Preston said. Essex County EMS Coordinator Patty Bashaw has spent much of the winter meeting with squads and surveying mem-

bers to gauge their concerns. Twenty-seven percent of those surveyed said the county should consider a countywide district; 12 percent were against, while 61 percent said they needed more information. A lack of volunteers topped the list of concerns, followed by a dearth of appropriate leadership, a lack of support from towns and long travel times. Perhaps surprisingly, 57 percent of those surveyed said the training courses — including the EMT-B, which clocks in at 190 hours — were not unnecessarily long. Topping EMT wish lists were incentives — including tax breaks — group purchasing plans and closer training opportunities. Bashaw said the results indicated squads were keeping an open mind. Preston, urging lawmakers to approve the measure, said the situation was urgent. “We need to move forward and do something about it,” he said. Funding for the consultant would likely come from a state grant, Preston said.

Emergency project will repair crack in ELCS foundation Project comes with $500,000 price tag, says superintendent, with 70 percent of costs reimbursed by state By Pete DeMola

pete@suncommunitynews.com

ELIZABETHTOWN — An architect made a startling discovery as he poked around in the bowels of Elizabethtown-Lewis Central during a recent state-mandated engineering study. The foundation had cracked, exposing corroded rebar. The state education department classified its repair as an emergency project and fast-tracked the approval process. Superintendent Scott Osborne estimated repairs will clock in at $500,000, with up to 70 percent of the costs slated to be reimbursed by the state within the next fiscal year. The school board has already authorized the project. “We’ve hit the go button,” said Osborne. The crack, caused by chemicals used to stabilize the ce-

ment during the pouring process, is behind the school’s electrical mainframe. Repair will require the building to be powered off for three weeks in July. “As luck would have it, we couldn’t have picked a worse spot,” Osborne said. “Not that we picked it.” The district is currently assessing options for a temporary relocation of operations. Negotiations are underway with Westport Central. The Elizabethtown-Lewis Youth Commission is also working to evaluate their summer playground program, Osborne said. The foundation was poured in 1949, and work on the school was completed in 1952. The district is monitoring the crack, which is located beneath the music room, for any changes, said Osborne. At present, the crack remains confined to a single area and the situation poses no immediate danger to faculty and students, Osborne said. Work on the project, which will go out to bid this month, is anticipated to begin on July 5. Osborne said he was confident that work will be completed before faculty are scheduled to return on Sept. 6. “No doubt,” he said.


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The Valley News Sun • April 16, 2016 | 3

Fundraiser planned to aid local man with medical expenses Lewis resident George “Bucky” Sweatt has been diagnosed with lymphoma By Pete DeMola

pete@suncommunitynews.com

LEWIS — Friends and family of a local man are mobilizing to assist him in his fight against cancer. George “Bucky” Sweatt is a good man, says everyone who knows him. “He has a huge, huge heart,” said Cheryl Sweatt, his daughterin-law. “He would do anything for anybody.” Sweatt was diagnosed with lymphoma. He’s currently hospitalized at the University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington. Once he regains some of his strength, he’ll begin chemotherapy treatments, Cheryl said. A fundraiser is planned for April 30 at the Wooden Nickel in Lewis to aid with expenses. Sons Korey and Kenny say their father, a Navy veteran and NYCO employee, is a stand-up guy who instilled the virtues of volunteerism and community engagement in them from a young age. “I don’t know a single person who has met him who has a bad thing to say about him,” Korey said. “He’s just 110 percent sincere.”

A benefit to aid the family of George “Bucky” Sweatt with medical costs has been scheduled for April 30 at the Wooden Nickel in Lewis. Photo provided

Kenny cited his father’s long-standing involvement with the Elks and Elizabethtown-Lewis Ambulance Squad, among other organizations, as a testament to his love for community. Above all, he said, his father is an avid outdoorsman. “About the time we were old enough to carry a fishing pole and gun, we had one,” Kenny recalled. “We’ve always been an outdoor family.” Patience is critical for deer hunting, Corey recalled. And the weather is important for fishing.

Local diner ranks second in ‘Backroads’ mag

PORT HENRY — Backroads USA, a magazine for motorcycle enthusiasts, gave Foote’s Port Henry Diner second place in the diner category for the Best of Backroads 2015. “The food is superb, the staff friendly and accommodating,” said the editors. The editors, who cover the eastern half of the country, also recommended the diner to bikers at Americade, the annual motorcycle rally in Lake George. “This place is also an excellent ride from Lake George, something you Americaders should think about if you have a free day at the rally,” the magazine wrote. Each year, Backroads USA lists the most exciting destinations from the past year’s issues. The diner is popular among motorcyclists and cyclists who enjoy touring the lake and the backroads of the Adirondack Coast. Chef/owner Don Foote, who bought the diner in June 2012,

was thrilled to be chosen among the many diners dotting the eastern half of the country, from North Carolina to the Canadian border. “We see a lot of bikers who love to combine a stop for lunch with their ride around Lake Champlain,” said Foote. “We hope this award brings more bikers to Port Henry.” Pictured above: Foote’s Port Henry Diner was ranked second place in the diner category for the Best of Backroads 2015. Photo provided

Both are lessons from Dad. Kenny recalled tracking a deer with his old man, who eventually caught up to it at the edge of a field. Just as Bucky was getting ready to shoot, a shot rang out from a another direction and the deer dropped. Bucky looked around in surprise — it was one of his buddies. “I didn’t even think the gun went off!” Kenny recalled his father as saying. The illness came quick, Korey recalled. Just six weeks ago, the pair were working on the house Bucky shares with his wife, Karen. Bucky faces a long road to recovery. Each chemo treatment will require a hospital stay. The tentative schedule sees a fourmonth regimen. Once those sessions are completed, Bucky will require an additional round to prevent recurrence. All proceeds from the fundraiser, which includes raffles, auctions and giveaways, will go toward travel and medical expenses. The event, said Cheryl, is also designed for folks to reminisce and share stories about Bucky. “They always say bad things happen to the good ones,” Korey said. Benefit for George “Bucky” Sweatt: Saturday, April 30 at 3 p.m. the Wooden Nickel in Lewis. Donations and volunteers welcome. For more info, call or text Becca at 518-570-5901 or Cheryl at 518-586-6846.


4 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV)

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Benefit to aid local farm scorched by fire Folk bands, fresh-farm dinner on deck at Whallonsburg Grange Hall benefit for Reber Rock Farm By Pete DeMola

pete@suncommunitynews.com

REBER — Six weeks after a fast-burning fire incinerated the barn at Reber Rock Farm, the community has raised $26,000 in reconstruction funds. A weekend benefit at the Whallonsburg Grange Hall aims to further aid those efforts. After chowing down on a dinner prepared with local food, a handful of folk and bluegrass bands have been tapped to perform. Grange Manager Kate Ritter said benefits to

aid folks who have suffered setbacks are “very much in line historically” with the function of grange halls. A homage to Bob Dylan on his 75th birthday had already been in the works, she said. But after the Feb. 27 fire, the event took on a broader dimension. “We thought it was a way to bring some joy into a situation that was very tragic for them,” Ritter said. The blaze killed a newborn calf, hens and injured a livestock guardian dog, according to a GoFundMe page set up to aid with expenses. Reber Rock also lost equipment, hay and grain in the conflagration. Mary-Nell Bockman will perform on Saturday with her band, the Wannabes.

While fundraisers are crucial to aid any community member who has been touched by misfortune, Bockman said, they take on an additional layer of importance in the farming world due to the razor-thin margins and precise agricultural calendar. “The Grange is really a center of responding to that,” Bockman said, citing efforts to aid Tropical Storm Irene victims. “It’s one of the most important aspects of what we do.” In addition to the Wannabes, Ploughman’s Lunch and Alice’s Fault will perform. Dylan’s songs lend themselves well to people singing along, Bockman said. While his music isn’t rooted in the soil, per se, he drew inspiration from Woody Guthrie, who drew from the experiences of poor migrant farmers. Full and By Farm is among those who do-

Westport Drama to present ‘Annie, Jr.’ Musical production returns to WCS stage By Keith Lobdell

keith@suncommunitynews.com

WESTPORT — The musical is back in Westport. Members of the Westport Central School Drama Club will perform “Annie, Jr.,” Friday, April 15 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, April 16 at 2 and 7 p.m. in the Bulles Auditorium. Not only will the school troupe be bringing a musical to the stage, they also opened the formerly grades 7-12 club up to students in fifth and sixth grades. “It has been wonderful,” director Dianna McGuigan. “There is so much talent at this school. It’s lovely to be able to start getting younger kids used to being up on the stage and building a core group for the future.” McGuigan said there were a lot of girls in the senior elementary classes who wanted to participate in the show, which in part led her to the choice of Annie, Jr., along with the chance to bring singing to the stage. “They have not done a musical here in a long time and we wanted to try and get that rolling again,” she said. “This has been a committed, hard-working group who have been great to work with. It has been a lot of fun.”

With the added students to choose from, McGuigan picked fifth-grader Abbey Schwoebel, who has also been part of productions at the Boquet River Theatre Festival, to play the show’s title role. “I have enjoyed practice,” Schwoebel said. “I really like to act — it’s a lot of fun for me to do. I was really happy when I was told I would be playing Annie and it is a rewarding role.” Junior Tommy Maron, who has been in lead roles in several Drama Club productions, will play the role of Daddy Warbucks. Juniors Amanda Hinge (Ms. Hannigan) and Sienna Fleury (maid) are both in their sixth drama club performances. “It is a really different role for me,” said Hinge. “I’ve been playing characters who are more sweet and Ms. Hannigan is really mean. I’ve been enjoying it.” Hinge said it has also been easier to learn the songs she is part of. “There’s a tune, which makes memorizing easier,” Hinge said. “Right now, my focus is on timing and dancing.” “I think it’s neat to see the younger kids and how they react,” Fleury said. “It’s also nice because we get to see how we have grown and changed. It’s great to see how good the younger kids are, as well.” Sophomore Malynda Lobdell, who plays Grace in her

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A Benefit for Reber Rock Farm: Saturday, April 16 at the Whallonsburg Grange Hall. Dinner starts at 5 p.m., with performances beginning at 7 p.m: $10/$5 (adults/12 and under). Donations will be accepted for the concert.

fourth Drama Club production, agreed. “They are great little actresses,” she said. “Having the music and dances is not something we have done for a while and it has been a lot of fun.” Admission for Annie, Jr. is $7 for adults and $5 for seniors and children under 12, with a $20 family maximum. All proceeds go to the Westport Drama Club. Pictured above: The cast of Annie, Jr. which will be performed April 1516 at Westport Central School.

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nated food for the dinner. Co-owner James Graves said he was happy to be a part of such a supportive community. Graves, among others, also aided Reber Rock by helping to build a temporary structure before work begins on a new barn later this month. “It’s a testament to the quality of the community of young farmers we have,” Graves said. “It’s pretty amazing to see how many hands rally when something like this strikes.”

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The Valley News Sun • April 16, 2016 | 5

New book by local authors presents history with a dash of doodling “Essex, New York Architecture: A Doodler’s Field Guide” seeks to provide interactive experience, say authors By Pete DeMola

pete@suncommunitynews.com

ESSEX — A powerhouse in the early 19thcentury, Essex acted as the portal to an untapped area filled with extractable natural resources. A bustling maritime economy emerged around the port, located 17 miles southwest of Burlington. The streets hummed with activity: shipbuilders, blacksmiths, merchants and construction workers all set up shop on the pitstop between Montreal and New York City. With them, buildings sprung up to accommodate the crush. The economy tanked before the Civil War — chalk it up to the birth of railroads and changes in migration trends — but the structures remained. Most towns modified and changed over time. But Essex was preserved by neglect, says George Davis, the co-author of a new book chronicling the town’s history through

the art of doodling. The town’s well-preserved buildings — mostly Georgian, Federal, Greek Revival and Victorian-style architecture — remain a popular drawing point for the community, making it a popular summertime destination. “Essex, New York Architecture: A Doodler’s Field Guide,” co-authored by Katie Shepard, encourages visitors to discover new ways of interacting with these structures, say the authors. The blueprints originated when the authors, operators of popular lifestyle blog Essex on Lake Champlain, learned dispatches on heritage and architecture were among the site’s most popular entries. A year-long series diving into the town’s architectural history acted as the foundation, with the exact buildings selected with help from materials originally produced by the Essex Community Heritage Organization for a self-guided walking tour. The whole idea of the project is that the book is handmade like somebody’s doodling notebook, said Davis. Alongside the 200-plus drawings of some of the town’s most prominent buildings — Greystone Cottage, John Gould House and the Essex Inn — the 168-page version places

the structures into historical context. Take the Billings Cottage, for instance, a small stone house located at the corner of School and Elm Streets. The mid 19th-century equivalent of the working class home was likely constructed with help from the mercantile families who acted as banks, Davis said. Many structures have a distinct blue-gray hue because they were built with locally quarried limestone. Davis and Shepard hope the book will lead visitors and residents into a “more architecturally informed experience” of the town, which now boasts of a year-round population of less than 700. Smartphones can be immersive, said Davis. “But they also have the effect of distancing.” The authors see the book as a communitywide effort. A raft of local residents aided in compiling a beta version, said Davis. The authors are also working with the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism, who will steer visitors to local retail outlets where the book can be purchased. In doing so, the authors hope guests will explore other destinations, including local farms and neighboring communities.

Essex’s architectural legacy is the subject of an interactive new book, “Essex, New York Architecture: A Doodler’s Field Guide.” Readers are encouraged to explore the town’s historical past through doodling. Pictured above is an illustration from the book. Photo provided

The paperback book contains spaces for readers to doodle their own iterations of the town as they explore its hidden treasures. “Everyone can doodle,” Davis said. “Hopefully folks will build a relationship with this place.” “Essex, New York Architecture: A Doodler’s Field Guide” is now available through Essex on Lake Champlain.

SWEET SPOT: Maple Matchup tasting competition official Glen Cameron congratulates Tony Corwin (R), owner of South Meadow Farm Maple Sugarworks, on winning the annual maple syrup tasting competition at Lake Placid’s 3rd Annual Tastes of Maple event on Saturday April 2. Corwin’s syrup won by a fairly large margin this year, organizers said, unseating last year’s winner, Paul Smith’s College.

Grand Knight Thomas McDonald, of Knights of Columbus Council 2301 of Au Sable Forks, presents a check for $200 to Jack Thomas, 9, son of Mike and Monica Thomas of Jay, in recognition of Jack’s achievement and sportsmanship in the recently completed Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship competition. Thomas finished third in the state-level contest at West Point on Sunday, April 10, making 20 of 25 freethrow attempts. The Knights of Columbus award will help Thomas attain his goal of attending basketball camp this summer.

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6 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV)

OPINIONS

Behind the Pressline

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Augmented Reality

ugmented Reality: Now there’s a phrase I never thought would become part of my everyday vocabulary, but for the last few weeks it has perhaps been my most used phrase. If you aren’t familiar with Augmented Reality, or the acronym AR, you will be very soon. When I first heard of it several years ago it sounded like some digital tech guy’s dream and like most of you, I never really gave it a second thought. When it resurfaced recently during a conference call with publishers from around the country, we were all ready to move on to the next subject. But then one publisher got our attention and made us take a closer look. Even within our own company, our very astute publisher in our Syracuse office, who also serves as president of the New York Press Association, told me he never really understood AR, but now can’t stop talking about it. AR allows any visible product in print or on a screen to magically come to life. The process of AR memorizes an image and then digitally allows us to associate that image with eye popping video and graphic movements on a mobile devise, when scanned. Still not impressed? Are you still reading the column? In this week’s paper you’ll begin to see several ads and soon articles with a small box shaped-like a smart cell phone with an AR inside. Download a free App from the Apple Store or Google Play called “Layar” then scan the ad or article. The phone or tablet will briefly go to a ghosting look on the copy and then watch what happens! The newspaper comes to life, transporting you to digital interaction. Still not sold? Not a big smart phone or tablet user? I can appreciate that, but this version of AR is only the beginning. Picture some point in the not so distance future when your everyday eye-wear is digitally enhanced. Images and sounds from all kinds of material will be a tap on the eye-wear away. For a long time, people assumed the internet was the future of newspapers. However, new research finds that over the past eight years the websites of 51 corporately owned newspapers have not seen appreciable readership gains. The average reach of a newspaper website within the newspaper’s market has gone from 9.8 percent in 2007 to 10 percent in 2015, while at the same time, print readership has fallen from 42.4 percent in 2007 to 28.5 percent in 2015. Readers haven’t abandoned print, it’s newspapers that have abandoned readers. AR is the first of many steps to bring hard copy and digital into one platform. Once again our newspaper is proud to be the first newspaper in our region to bring AR to you. Dan Alexander is CEO of Sun Community News.

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Guest viewpoint: A true view of Donald Trump

T

here has been so much hatred directed at Donald Trump lately — a lot of it in this newspaper — by what are obviously coordinated “cut and paste” efforts, taken from internet propaganda sites, to smear him by some of your readers — who are trying to paint him as some kind of xenophobic monster, fascist, sexist, Hitler clone, bigoted, business bankrupter, con man, womanizer — you name it. I feel compelled to counter some of these vicious attacks. It’s very comforting for naive persons led by organized political activists to attack someone by hiding behind perceived shields of Christianity, patriotism and other kinds of political correctness. I want to make clear that this is not an endorsement of Donald Trump in any way. However, there are always two sides to every story. I only want to put things into proper perspective. A lot of people have been conditioned to believe that Donald Trump’s success was primarily owed to his “Daddy’s money.” Nonsense! Anyone who has ever owned a business knows that it takes a lot more than money to run a business. I can assure you that Donald Trump has put in, and still puts in, a lot of sleepless nights worrying about his business ventures. I also guarantee that he has earned every penny of his efforts —just like every other successful businessperson in the world. His father, Fred, started his first business—a very successful market called Trump Market in Woodhaven, Queens—coincidentally my childhood hometown! Fred Trump could easily be the poster person for the American Dream; rightly or wrongly, his son Donald, is now the premier Manhattan real estate developer and a major symbol of elegant American capitalism at its finest. Yes, his father left him a significant inheritance which certainly helped him succeed in his business ventures, but so what? I am also a serial entrepreneur, on a smaller scale of course, and many times I wished that I had a rich father. But, I didn’t; yet I never begrudged anyone’s business successes. Professional political propagandists want naive people to think of Donald Trump as a rude, crude braggart and blowhard. Nothing could be farther from the truth! He may not speak eloquently (of which I am sure that he can when a black tie occasion demands it) but he has a genuinely honest style. He doesn’t need to cover stupidity with polished phoniness. He’s only being a true native New Yorker: sometimes loud, sometimes argumentative, sometimes obnoxious, sometimes aggressive, sometimes polished, but always sincere (unlike longterm permanently ensconced politicians). Owing a lot to their New York values, New Yorkers Generally say what they mean and mean what they say. It’s a characteristic of successful entrepreneurs to take great pride in their accomplishments and they enjoy talking about them. Donald Trump has rightfully earned bragging rights for his achievements. (I, like him, also take pride in my accomplishments and like to talk about my rightfully earned achievements.) Professional political propagandists want naive people to believe that he is racist, sexist and anti-immigration. More nonsense! Business people are too busy to concern themselves with a person’s color, origin, sexual or any other preferences. Donald Trump didn’t build a diversified, multinational world-class organization by excluding from his business ventures blacks, women, Saudis, Israelis, Muslims, Mexicans, Cubans or any other potential customers. Professional political propagandists want naive people to fault him for his personal life and especially his choice of women. He’s a wealthy celebrity who married a woman who in her own right was a celebrity model. What’s the matter with that? Professional political propagandists want naive people to paint him as being a Hitler clone. More nonsense!

Adolf Hitler came from a modest Austrian family and aggressively rose to power through manipulative political maneuvering. Donald Trump became a multinational builder of exclusive tangible properties through his ambition, hard work and determination to further his American Dream. Professional political propagandists want naive people to paint him as some kind of incompetent playboy jerk who has Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore through Creative Commons Licensing. Some rights reserved. bankrupted several businesses. More nonsense! Businesses go bankrupt all the time and for many reasons: major economic recessions, changing fashions and fads, unexpected natural disasters, raw material shortages, political pandering to anti-business activists etc. Think: Super Storm Sandy, Hurricane Katrina, the Northridge Earthquake, the Phuket Tsunami, TWA, United Airlines, GM, Sears, AIG, Lehman Bros, etc. I guarantee that the recent push for a nationwide $15 minimum wage will bankrupt even more businesses—maybe even some of Donald Trump’s! Professional political propagandists want naive people to paint him as a con artist who has been, and is being, sued many times. Again, anyone who has ever been in business, gets sued sooner or later: Someone slips on your sidewalk, you or an employee back a truck into someone’s building, an employee drops hot coffee into a customer’s lap, a disgruntled employee accuses you of unfairly firing him, etc. There is an entire industry of desperate lawyers just stomping at the bit to sue for any of these reasons and plenty more. Look at all the TV ads by these shady law firms. Professional political propagandists urge naive people to poke fun at the time that he served Trump wine and steaks at one of his earlier political events to woo voters. What did his critics expect him to serve: Kentucky Fried chicken and coleslaw, with bottled water—like they do at many small town church picnics? Serving quality food to important guests in a world class Trump venue is an elegant sign of mature etiquette and political savviness. Professional political propagandists want naive people to paint him as an uncaring rich person insensitive to anyone else’s personal feelings. More nonsense! When Ted Cruz stupidly and ignorantly attacked Donald Trump’s “New York values” on national television, he instantly responded without hesitation that he lost several friends in the 9/11 attacks on his beloved Manhattan. This was especially meaningful for me because I, too, happened to be in New York on 9/11. No compassion? Just more BS from Trump haters! I could go on and on, but, lastly, professional political propagandists want naive people to paint him as a political bumpkin who understands business, but doesn’t know how the world of politics works. This is the biggest nonsense of all! I can assure you that Donald Trump learned from his Dad at a very early age how to deal with politicians at all levels—both in the U.S. and internationally. If any readers want to learn about Donald Trump’s world class business empire, unclouded by propaganda, visit the Trump Organization‘s website at trump.com. It’s abundantly clear to anyone that Donald Trump is at least as qualified to be President than all 545 of the U.S.’s current “leaders” put together. David Safrany Lake View Terrace, CA

OPINION POLICY

Sun Community News welcomes letters to the editor • Letters can be sent to its offices, 14 Hand Avenue, PO Box 338, Elizabethtown, 12932 or e-mailed to johng@suncommunitynews.com • Letters can also be submitted online at www.suncommunitynews.com. • Letters should not exceed 400 words and must be signed and include a

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The Valley News Sun • April 16, 2016 | 7

LETTERS

ToÊ presidentialÊ candidates:Ê ChangeÊ yourÊ diapersÊ andÊ growÊ up! To the Editor: Bravo, and thank you to Lt. Col. Joseph Dummoulin, for your timely letter. What, indeed has happened to this country? All the world must be shaking their heads in wonder and disbelief. What has happened to “God, Country, Apple Pie” and the spirit of brotherly love and compassion? I think we should just cancel this election until we get some grown people worth voting for. How can a bunch of silly and jealous children lead our country when they are not able to get out of the sandbox and stop throwing sand at each other. Change your diapers and grow up! When I was young, if I had uttered just one of those statements, I would have been hauled to the woodshed for a few swats to the behind and then had my mouth washed out with soap. What must the children think of those who are supposed to be examples of something special? You and I are all immigrants to this country (except for our Native Americans) and why did they come here? They came to have a new and better life. To have the basic freedoms you seem so eager to throw away, as you throw mud at each other. I can just see how foreign policies are to be handled and people comforted and built up! Please see how very infantile you are and give us people worth voting for. My goodness, who cares why someone went to the rest room, or who has a more beautiful wife. I think all people are beautiful, have worth and are able to be human. Grow up and prove me right. I want someone worth voting for, for I do love America. I want all people to be proud as well. Patty Francisco Tupper Lake

KeepÊ upÊ theÊ goodÊ work! To the Editor: I’d like to take this opportunity to thank the Sun for providing a public forum for the free exchange of ideas on the relevant issues of the day. While I don’t always agree with their positions, I recognize that they are expressing real concern for the people in the area and their future. This past week, I dropped my longtime subscription to the Press Republican. Their editorial “slant” has moved way too far from my comfort zone. I’ll try the Post Star for a while and see how that goes. But increasingly I find the Sun has useful and interesting content. I hope that trend continues. Keep up the good work. Fred V. Provoncha Ticonderoga

TeachÊ yourÊ kidsÊ aboutÊ gunÊ safety To the Editor: Tonight on channel 10 TV was an article on Nicholas’ Law. I believe this is just for Albany County. It is a mandatory firearms storage law in a locked case. Any loss of life is a tragedy, especially if it was preventable. There is no reason the parents can’t instruct their children in firearms safety. You teach them to look both ways before they cross a street, to wear a seat belt, to wear a bike helmet, not to go with strangers and on and on. So why not firearms safety? The NRA has the Eddie Eagle Gun Safety Program, which I might add, many schools refuse to use, even though it is free. Very simple—see a gun, don’t touch, leave the area, tell an adult. “Oh we don’t want to glorify guns.” Come on, get real. My first “instruction” in firearms safety was when I was about four to four-and-a-half years old when I picked up my mother’s Colt 25 auto, unloaded in the chamber, but with a full mag. A one foot wooden ruler was applied across my butt and across my fingers! It was applied hard enough so that it at 75 years old I still remember it. George Phillips Chestertown

US needs a flat tax To the Editor: It seems the older I get, the more I become concerned with the direction our great nation and country is going. Things don’t seem to be getting done in Washington as they might. Though some of the fault may be our own (the voters) due to who we put in office. I believe it is time for term limits—instead of the same old life-timers holding down their precious seats. Maybe we should limit their terms in office to eight or maybe 10 years or less. The great compensation and benefits our representatives receive is more than incentive to try to keep one’s seat. Perhaps, with little interest or concern for those who put them there. This goes for senators as well as our representatives. The so-called power of one rep or senator should be no greater than the man or woman in the next seat before one could run again for that office. There are many out there with good ideas and common sense that need a chance to do the public good. I also believe in a flat tax. The first requirement being to determine the country’s gross national product. That being found—the need to determine what percentage of the gross product would be needed to run the government—the military—social security, etc. The gross product is so large that probably only a small percentage would be needed for taxes. “Possibly” 3 to 5 percent.

Every company—business organization would need to report deductions to complicate things (Sorry!) Instead, everyone would pay his or her 3 or 5 percent. The beggar on the street (sure) the working family—big corporations and the millionaires—their 3 to 5 percent! No one would be pointed out as not paying their fair share. The Bible refers to the promised land—there is nor, has ever been in all the world’s history, a country with more opportunities or freedoms than the United States of America. Lets do our best to insure these freedoms and pass them on to other countries as time passes and they are so motivated. E.C. James Shoreham, Vt

PortÊ HenryÊ dissolutionÊ planÊ isÊ notÊ legallyÊ binding

COMMENTARY

Little Bits A Sunday of Solid Gold Gordie Little

Columnist

T

To the Editor: I keep seeing in your paper letters claiming that Trump and Hitler are one and the same. I guess I read a different history than all the rest of the writers. It’s not Trump followers who are taking to the streets to break up political rallies of their opponents. It’s not Trump followers who have shut down an opponent’s rally. It’s not Trump followers that have claimed their opponents have no right to share their ideas or to gather together. Trump followers do not go to Sanders or Clinton rallies just to disrupt them and try to shut them down. Trump followers do not mass in the streets and try to stop Sanders and Clinton followers from getting into their rallies. All the violence at Trump rallies has been caused by the left. (What little there has been.) They are the real fascists. So I stop here to ask, who are the real bullies here? Or is it okay or the left to do what they please and no one is allowed to defend themselves, except the left? Trump offers to pay for legal help for any of his people that run afoul of the law. So the left cries foul. They have doing the same thing for years. But there is one thing Hitler and Trump do have in common: Charisma. Obama has this too and he also has a fawning group of followers who would do anything for him. Let’s not forget that Obama also has been friendly with a domestic terrorist. No, I still am not going to vote for Trump. But it is past time for the name calling to stop. It is time for Sanders and Clinton to stand up and condemn all violence done by their followers as well as their opponents. Raynard Corrow Indian Lake

he number of those who remember my radio career is dwindling. It was April, 1997 when I left that adventure. The page turned and what followed couldn’t have been more satisfying. While on the radio, I originated a music program titled “A Sunday of Solid Gold.” Using records I collected since childhood, along with some belonging to the station, I was able to feature songs that dated from the beginnings of recorded music right up to the more recent decades. You might recall a song called “With a Little Help From My Friends.” It applied to that Sunday program. On holidays, friends like Don Cassidy would show up with rare songs I didn’t possess. His wife Lillian gave me her collection. The late dentist, Dr. “Ditt” Dittmar, often came in with records and tape cassettes. When he passed away, I learned that he had willed to me his entire music collection, meticulously annotated and labeled. I have never seen its match. Through the years, others left us and I was the recipient of their collections as well. Another friend I simply refer to as “Dickie,” knew my love of old country music and kept me well supplied with cassettes that I shared with my listeners. Then, there was Ron Longto. If you knew him, you need no explanation. If you didn’t, it was your loss. He wrote for a newspaper called “The North Countryman” and loved old music as much as I. While Kaye was cleaning out a bedroom in preparation for guests recently, she stumbled upon a cardboard box jammed full of cassette tapes, each of which had been carefully edited and recorded for me by Ron in his home on equipment that was state of the art at that time. He supplied me with full, numbered lists, replete with all the pertinent information about each song. He made hundreds of those tapes for me and we were fast friends until he also had the bad fortune of passing away. To say that Kaye and I have been enjoying those tapes again is a gross understatement. The music dates back to the teens and twenties and runs the gamut from early jazz and Dixieland to big band, swing and beyond. As I pushed the “Play” button on my cassette player, I offered a silent prayer of gratitude to Ron’s spirit for his indefatigable efforts on my behalf. I often wondered what happened to his record collection when he died. These days, I dare say not one out of a hundred of you even knows what a cassette tape is. I still have many and have the means of converting them to a digital format; but we enjoy listening to them the “old way.” I also have a decent turntable for listening to my many record albums. Yes, I even have an 8-track player. Yup, I’m as old as dirt and darn proud of it.

Submit letters to the editor to John Gereau at Johng@suncommunitynews.com

Columnist Gordie Little may be reached at gordie@suncommunitynews.com.

To the Editor: A headline like “Port Henry board adopts dissolution plan” gives a true fact but does not tell the true story of the Tuesday, April 5 public hearing. Without exploring other tax saving options, several village residents petitioned last June, on the promise of tax relief, to have a vote on dissolution of the Village of Port Henry. In October, by 19 votes, the measure passed. At that point, village and town officials were legally required to draft a plan for dissolving the village. With the help of the LaBerge group of Albany, they did so. Since then, public hearings have been held and villagers were told they will have a chance to vote on the final version of the plan for dissolution. We get our chance only if petitions with 25 percent of the registered voters are presented within 45 days of the last public hearing. Several reports of the April 5 meeting describe it as “contentious” or “hostile.” Well, there’s a good reason for that was not mentioned in any articles I read. The fatal flaw in the plan for dissolution, no matter how well worked out the details sound, is that it is not legally binding. It takes very few words to describe that very big problem. When I first heard this, I really did not believe it. I e-mailed a representative from the LaBerge group asking if the plan was legally binding. Her response: “There is no legal weight of enforcement that the plan carries” and “The dissolution plan represents the recommended implementation strategy from the village to the town.” In other words, the plan is a polite note to the town to please be nice to us. When the town gets into budget trouble, which will happen, any promises made to the village costing the town money will be dropped. At that point, our only recourse will be to pull out our copies of the plan and say “but you said...you promised.” Because of the relative population numbers, after dissolution, voters from Port Henry will have much less effect on town policy. We will have voted away our political voice. In case the reader has not guessed by now, petitions for a referendum on the plan are now circulating. It is my sincere hope that these petitions are filed with a large excess of signers, the plan is rejected by village voters and dissolution is stopped. Kim Gilbertson Port Henry

ViolenceÊ atÊ TrumpÊ ralliesÊ causedÊ byÊ theÊ left


8 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV)

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ANNIE@ WESTPORT CENTRAL SCHOOL. Friday: 7:00 pm Saturday: 2:00 & 7:00 pm

APR.

15 Fri.

AND

APR.

16 Sat.

Westport Drama Club presents Annie! the musical based on Harold Gray’s famous comic strip, Little Orphan Annie. Directed by Diana McGuigan-George. Cast includes students from grades 5-12. Admission: $7 adult, $5 seniors, Children under 12 free. Details: 518-962-8244 86475

PROOF@ WILLSBORO CENTRAL SCHOOL. Fri. & Sat.: 7:00 pm Sunday: 2:00 pm

APR.

15 Fri.

APR.

17 Sun.

On the eve of her 25th birthday, Catherine, a troubled young woman, has spent years caring for her brilliant but unstable father, a famous mathematician. Now, following his death, she must deal with her own volatile emotions. $6 admission. Details: Derrick Hopkins dhopkins@willsborocs.org. 86477

ZEUS ON THE LOOSE@CHAZY CENTRAL RURAL SCHOOL. Saturday: 7:00 pm Sunday: 2:00 pm

APR.

16 Sat.

AND

APR.

17 Sun.

Enjoy “make your own” sundaes with gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus, compliments of Stewarts. Prometheus disappears from his torture rock & Zeus goes missing! Lots of zany Greek fun happens. All proceeds benefit the Senior trip, Class Day & graduation for class of 2016. Cost: $5 each, $15 per family. 86479

APR. BOB DYLAN 75TH 16 Sat. BIRTHDAY BASH@ WHALLONSBURG GRANGE HALL.

Saturday: 5:00 pm

Support Reber Rock Farm who lost the barn, tools, equipment, hat & animals in a February fire. Farm Fresh Dinner (vegetarian option available ) $10, $5 children under 12. Music of Bob Dylan with Alice’s Fault, The Wannabes, and Ploughman’s Lunch. 86484

THE BIG SHORT @ WHALLONSBURG GRANGE HALL.

APR.

23 Sat.

Saturday: 7:30 pm

The Big Short follows four outsiders and their bold move against big banks during the 2008 sub-prime mortgage crisis. Tickets: $6 adults, $3 under 18 Details: 518-963-4170 or www.cvfilms.org 86487


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The Valley News Sun • April 16, 2016 | 9

EYE ON THE ARTS

Progress and Prosperity

“We cannot seek achievement for ourselves and forget about progress and prosperity for our community.” Cesar Chavez said that. Whatever your political leanings, I think this holds true for most of us. Whether permanently or temporarily we have chosen to live in the North Country, and that means something – it means more than just choosing a certain address. It signifies a choice of community. And we’re lucky to have a pretty good one – getting involved is not only easy, but it’s a lot of fun. Check out some of the events happening around the area this week. Get involved, have fun, and participate in the progress and prosperity of upstate New York. SUNY Plattsburgh will open “Fashion,” a play by A.C. Mowatt, on April 20. Published in 1845, Mowatt’s play is a satire of America’s obsession with highbrow taste and cultural distinction. Though written over a century ago, the play’s message continues to carry an uncanny resonance today. The opening performance will begin at 9:30 a.m. Repeat performances will follow on April 21-24 at varying times. For more information, or to reserve a seat, call 518-564 2180. Saranac Lake’s BluSeed Studios will screen a film by Voters for Change on April 20. “Making a Killing: Guns, Greed, and the NRA” tells the stories of how guns - and the billions of dollars made off of them - affect the lives of everyday Americans. It features personal stories from people across the country who have been affected by gun violence, including survivors and victims’ families. The film looks into gun tragedies that include unintentional shootings, domestic violence, suicides, mass shootings and trafficking. The showing will begin at 7 p.m. A donation of $5 at the door is suggested. On April 16, the Whallonsburg Grange Hall will host a benefit dinner and concert for the Reber Rock Farm. The farm, located just outside of Essex, lost its new barn in a fire on Feb. 27. Along with the building itself, Reber Rock lost livestock, tools, equipment, hay, and grain. The benefit will begin with a farm to table dinner from 5 - 6:30 p.m. The dinner will cost $10 for adults and $5 for children under twelve. A concert celebrating Bob Dylan’s 75th birthday will follow. Featured performers include the Wannabes, Alice’s Fault, and Ploughman’s Lunch. For the concert portion of the evening, attendees are encouraged to pay what they can afford for tickets. For more information, visit www.thegrangehall.info Lucid will perform at the Strand Center for the Arts in Plattsburgh on April 16. The Plattsburgh-based band is a local sensation. For over 10 years, Lucid has played their unique blend of blues, rock and funk all over the Northeast – gathering thousands of fans along the way. The band’s performance at the Strand will mark their last live performance for the foreseeable future. “We’re certainly not breaking up — that’s something we

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> Arts Columnist

helps cancer patients and their families with the costs of incidentals during and after cancer treatment. The show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $9.50. Elizabeth Izzo is the arts and entertainment columnist for Sun Community News. Reach her at Elizabeth@suncommunitynews. com.

A&E A& &E

ELIZABETH IZZO

want to make clear,” Lowell Wurster, vocalist/percussionist for Lucid, told NYS Music. “Everyone is doing great and we’re as close as ever. We’re brothers and our musical flow is undeniable.” The band will take the stage at 7 p.m. Tickets are $17 in advance and $20 at the door. To purchase tickets, or for more information on the show, call the Strand’s box office at 518-5631604. Directly following the band’s performance at the Strand, an after party will be held at the Monopole Bar on Protection Ave. A set by The Blind Owl Band will start at 10 p.m. Tickets are free. On April 17, the Elizabethtown Social Center will host a “Paint Party” event by Creative Bloc Paint & Sip. Attendees will be guided through the process of painting an incredible autumn landscape by talented artist Linda Smyth. The $35 registration cost will cover all art supplies and instruction. Space will be limited; pre-registration required. Contact the Social Center by calling 518-873-6408 or by emailing info@elizabethtownsocialcenter. org for more details. During the month of April, the NorthWind Fine Arts gallery in Saranac will host an exhibit by Montreal-based artist France Jauron. The exhibition, titled “Roots,” features organic creations that mimic nature. The exhibition can be viewed during normal gallery hours; Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Plattsburgh’s Trinity Park will be abuzz with supporters of presidential candidate Bernie Sanders on April 16. The “March for Bernie Sanders” event, sponsored by the ROTA Studio and Gallery, will begin in the park at 2:30 p.m. Following the march there will be brief speeches by campaign staff members and local delegate Maria Dezotell. There will be voter registration tables at the park for people who have yet to register ahead of the primaries on April 19. The Ticonderoga Fire Department will re-open their Hall of Flame Museum on April 22. An Open House at the Ticonderoga Fire Hall of Flame will take place from 5 – 6 p.m. with a ribbon cutting ceremony taking place in front of the museum at 6 p.m. The ribbon cutting ceremony will include speakers, museum tours, and light refreshments. For more information contact the Ticonderoga Fire Department at 518-585-7771 or the Ticonderoga Area Chamber of Commerce at 518-585-6619. The Charles Wood Theater in Glens Falls will host an evening of belly dancing on April 16. The SunDancers Community Belly Dance group offers a beginner and intermediate class weekly at the YMCA, in conjunction with the Charles R. Wood Cancer Center’s Forever Strong program. All profits from the Coalescence show will benefit the Randy’s Patient Assistance Fund at Glens Falls Hospital; a program that

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From Sunrise to Sundown

The rock band Lucid will perform at the Strand this Saturday, April 16.


10 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV)

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Pete DeMola From page 1

“To be singled out as the writer of the year is a tremendous accomplishment and the readers of Sun Community News are lucky to regularly read Pete’s work,” Tyler said. “He is obviously an accomplished journalist and a skilled writer.” Following the conference, which took place April 8-9 at the Gideon Putnam in Saratoga Springs, DeMola said he was honored to be recognized by the New York Press Association. “Sun Community News is a great place to work. Without the support of my colleagues, this wouldn’t have been possible,” DeMola said. Sun Community News Publisher Dan Alexander said DeMola brings a skill set and ethic to the organization that is not easy to find. “We’ve known for some time that we had an extremely talented writer on The Sun team,” Alexander said. “His work ethic, strong personal drive and inquisitive nature are talents that make for an excellent reporter and Pete certainly embodies what every newspaper looks for in a reporter.” “Pete is a rare talent that we are honored to have writing for Sun Community Newspapers,” Alexander said. Sun Community News General Manager DJ Alexander echoed his father’s statements.

Domestic violence From page 1

Director Pat Harford. Those behaviors include manipulation, victim-blaming and tightening access to friends and family. “We don’t recognize behaviors for the dangers that they are,” Harford said. “It’s never a one-time event.” The program, coordinated by Behavioral Health Services North, also steers participants towards developing self-esteem and respect. The “If My Hands Could Talk” exhibit is

“We’re so proud to have Pete recognized as the best writer in the state of New York, and I cannot think of anyone more deserving of such a prestigious award,” DJ Alexander said. “Pete’s name is always spoken with respect among local business people and colleagues. He has such talent and dedication to the job and profession of journalism. We are fortunate to have him writing for our communities,” the younger Alexander said. According to promotional information on the contest, NYPA members have competed in a statewide annual better newspaper contest for nearly a century. The contest is designed to measure papers of similar size

part of coming to terms with past behavior, she said. It’s critical for a constellation of agencies, from health and human service providers to the education system, to climb onboard and create a culture of accountability, said Harford. The director has been involved with the program for 18 years. During her presentation, Harford held up items that tethered the concepts to real people — including items of clothing from deceased victims. Harford’s granddaughter, Chloe Grace, just turned six. Women have a one in three chance of getting assaulted in their lifetimes, she said. The prospects for verbal assault are nearly 100 percent. “She’s not growing up in the world I want for her,” Harford said.

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against one another in categories such as news, photography, and advertising. Approximately 4,000 entries are received each year. NYPA Executive Director Michelle Rea said in a release, “The contest provides an opportunity to display the powerful, impactful work being done by community newspapers.” A Syracuse native, DeMola is now an editor based in Essex County, New York. Following his graduation from Syracuse University in 2005, DeMola traveled to China, where he spent five years living in Beijing honing his craft at a series of new media start-ups and state-run media outlets. Stints in Guilin, Hong Kong and Korea followed. His writings on music, culture and current affairs from across East Asia have appeared in numerous publications while some of his creative campaigns, including the one that brought Record Store Day to Mainland China in April 2013, have received substantial media attention. Since returning to live full-time in the United States in 2013, Pete has been reporting on some of the most critical issues facing the Adirondack Park, including economic development and the effect state policies have on rural, local governments. DeMola joined the editorial team at Sun Community News in December of 2013.

Westport polling place changed WESTPORT — Voting for the New York primary on Tuesday, April 19 will take place at Westport Central School — not the Westport Town Hall.

Keeseville Elementary announces registration KEESEVILLE — Registration and screening for children entering kindergarten at Keeseville Elementary School will be held Wednesday, May 18 and May 19. To be eligible for kindergarten, the child must be five years of age on or before Thursday, Dec. 1. If a child who will be entering kindergarten this fall and someone has not been contacted by the school, call Keeseville Elementary at 834-2839 ext 1 between 7:15 a.m. and 3:15 p.m. This will enable them to put the child’s name on their mailing list.

CORRECTION: WCS drama club presents ‘Proof’ WILLSBORO — The Willsboro Drama Club presents PROOF, a two-act drama by David Auburn at Willsboro Central, Friday, April 15, April 16, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, April 17, at 2 p.m. The cost is $6 for general admission. There is a parent advisory. The show is not intended for children 12 and under.

Library presents ‘Through the Canyon’ WADHMAS — The Wadhams Free Library will present “Through the Canyon: Dennis Kalma, an Illustrated Talk” Wednesday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m. Free.


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Preet Bharara From page 1

The roster includes former state Senate majority leader Dean Skelos, former state Assembly speaker Sheldon Silver, senators Thomas Libous, Carl Kruger, Malcolm Smith and Hiram Monserrate, among others. Hundreds of reporters and media professionals had gathered at the New York Press Association’s annual conference last week at the Gideon Putnam Resort. Among their chief concerns was breathing new life into the print media industry, which has suffered downturns as more readers turn to digital media. Bharara, a former high school and college reporter, said the trend was alarming. “My longest standing lament is sort of a reduction in investigative journalism,” he said. “Every time the press has to downsize, opportunities to ferret out fraud and to find the bad guys are lost, and I don’t like that at all,” Bharara said. The prosecutor cited a New York Times magazine report on Vitaly Borker, a Brooklyn-based online eyewear merchant who threatened customers, and a Daily News report on the CityTime payroll scandal as two investigative pieces that sparked action from his office. Bharara has garnered headlines for the high-profile cases that have cast a chill through Albany, including the one-two punch that took down Skelos and Silver last year. Just this week, CBS2 reported Bharara is probing real estate industry figures about donations solicited by New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s campaign. Despite the high-octane cases, the prosecutor said his office continues to be equally invested in smaller-scale crimes that affect ordinary people, including combating opiate abuse and consumer fraud perpetrated by people who falsely claim to be Internal Revenue Service agents. The trend has reached epidemic proportions in the state. “It’s equally devastating to the individuals who are victim to those kinds of scams,” Bharara said. “No case is too small if it has an impact on ordinary people who are suffering and faced with the consequences of bad behavior,” he added. Bharara deferred when asked by a reporter about the state legislature’s failure to include ethics reform in this year’s budget. He did say, however, organizations riddled by corruption need to police themselves. “The best line of defense against corruption or bad conduct is a change in the culture of the place,” he said, noting the most surprising aspect of last year’s high-profile arrests was how little was done by those who knew it was going on. No institution will be 100 percent pure, he said, comparing the state capital to harboring a virus. “In some ways, the whole place is worthy of maligning.” Looking at how institutions respond after arrest tells you a lot, he said. Many legislators, in days after the Silver complaint was filed, said the Manhattan politician should maintain his powerful position. In no other industry would this happen, he said, which speaks volumes. “The culture of the place matters.” Bharara also sounded off on a number of current events. On his massive Turkish Twitter following stemming from the arrest of Turkish national Reza Zarreb on charges related to evading Iranian sanctions, he said: “There’s a feeling that cor-

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The Valley News Sun • April 16, 2016 | 11

ruption is not being dealt with in that country.” “I’ve been offered all manner of delicious Turkish food, including shish kebab and Turkish delight. There have been a lot of expressions of love towards me and my office. And I guess what I would say is, ‘I’m not sure that a stranger is worthy of another stranger’s love.’ But I do hope that what our office stands for, and what our principles are, are worthy of respect.” On the Panama Papers, he said: “When there is a case to pursue based on things that are in the public record, we will pursue them, and that’s a normal thing that folks do in our office,” Bharara said. On the New York State Joint Commission of Public Ethics decision to force PR firms to register as lobbyists, he said: “I did not appreciate that. I’m going Preet Bharara, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, delivers comments to the to go back to my office that think about New York Press Association’s annual conference in Saratoga Springs on Friday, April 8, 2015. that very deeply while not answering Photo by Pete DeMola your question.” “Often when I’m speaking in front of an audience like this, On the dismantling of the Moreland Commission, he said: made up of press, it means that someone is getting arrested.” “At the end of the day, I think our office took control of [the On his ominous warning to “stay tuned,” he said: seized documents] and we made the most of it.” “My update is ‘stay tuned.’” On the receptive audience, he said:


12 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV)

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Sun Community News introduces ‘augmented reality’ to print

ELIZABETHTOWN — Last week, Sun Community News debuted its newest innovation with augmented reality. Once the Layar app is downloaded, users can use their smartphone or other mobile device to scan a page, picture or advertisement which features the Layar logo. Once recognized, enhanced content will start showing. The application will also store the content to be replayed at a later time. “I have been referring to it as interactive print,” said Dan Alexander, Jr., General Manager at Sun Community News. “It’s something fun and cool. We can bring so much more to a reader than a headshot or a link to a website at the end of the story. It will make the newspaper so much more interesting to read — I can sit there and hold my phone and watch the page come to life. You move the phone and what you are watching stays attached to the page.”

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Alexander said the technology, which runs off an interactive application called Layar (downloaded from the Apple Store or Google Play Store), gives the company the ability to enhance any type of print for their newspapers and North Country Living magazine, along with providing the same feature for advertisers through print ads, business cards, brochures, posters, banners and billboards. “You can have photo carousels or video, which can also be enhanced — the possibilities are kind of endless,” Alexander said. “It allows businesses to have more enhanced pieces printed for them as well as on their print ads.” Sun Community News debuted AR last week in an advertisement and as part of a story on the dissolution plan public hearing in the village of Port Henry. Sun Community News Publisher Dan Alexander, Sr., said augmented reality is a way for Sun Community News introduced their new augmented reality feature through the Layar the business to combine the print and digital application last week with an advertisement campaign and coverage of the Port Henry dissolution plan public hearing. You can scan the advertisement below using the Layar worlds of journalism and advertisement. application to learn more. “Readers haven’t abandoned print, it’s newspapers that have abandoned readers,” Alexansite, you can launch the app, tap the screen and watch the ender, Sr., said. “Augmented reality is the first of many steps to hanced content show up. You can link to a person’s Twitter bring hard copy and digital into one platform. Once again, feed, so when you scan their face their posts come up right our newspaper is proud to be the first newspaper in our re- next to it.” gion to bring AR to you.” During the recent New York Press Association (NYPA) Alexander, Jr., talked about the various ways businesses spring convention, Alexander said the company led the discould use the feature. cussion on AR. “You could have a link to the history of your business that “After going to the NYPA conference, we seem to be the opens when a person scans your business card,” he said. “You only ones really implementing this,” he said. “We knew this can take a virtual tour of a store or a house up for sale. You was really a step up when we talked to Dave Tyler (NYPA can enhance news coverage in the paper by having video of President and Publisher of Sun Community News sister coman interview with an official that comes to life when you scan pany Eagle News) and other publishers who were really imthe page. You can do all of this without having to open a web- pressed with what we were doing with this.”

•MY

Layar app allows readers to scan pages, see video, photos and more

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For more on augmented reality, see Dan Alexander, Sr.Õ s Ò Thoughts from the PresslineÓ column on the editorial page in this weekÕ s edition.


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SPORTS

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The Valley News Sun • April 16, 2016 | 13

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Finally on the field: local teams open in wet conditions Baseball

Griffins 17, Keene 8 WESTPORT — Three pitchers combined to help the Griffins score a victory over the Beavers April 11. Keene struck first with an unearned run in the first while Elizabethtown-Lewis/Westport answered back with an unearned run of their own in the bottom of the frame. The Girffins then put up 13 runs in the next two innings to take a 14-2 lead. Keene scored five in the fourth to cut the lead in half but EL/W answered back with three more runs to win by nine. Colden Blades started for the Griffins and got the win with five strikeouts. Trevor Brooks relieved in the fourth, striking out three, and Schylar Kurth pitched the last two innings. Carter Storey had his first two varsity hits and RBI for the Griffins, while Thomas Mero, Dylan Limlaw and Wyatt Gough all added RBI doubles, with Gough adding a single to his line score. Sam Napper and Briar Christian also added hits for ELW. Defensively, Dylan Limlaw ended the third inning with a fly ball catch and threw out the runner tagging at third in a pretty double play. “Early season errors and wild pitches plagued both teams early,” Griffins coach Don Markwica said. “We took advantage of 11 walks.” Lucas Isham, Kaleb Cook and Damian Brown had Keene’s hits. Brown started for Keene and took the loss with six strikeouts. Haverlick came on in the fourth for Keene and struck out 8.

Softball Willsboro 22, Wells 1 WILLSBORO — Rylee Pierson struck out nine while scattering three hits over seven innings as the Warriors defeated

Wells April 11. Bailee Pulsifer collected five hits in the win, including a double. Darrien Sweatt and Kaitlyn Shaw each connected on home runs, while Shaw added a pair of doubles while Savannah Bronson collected one double in the win.

Peru 22, Saranac Lake 2 PERU — The Lady Indians scored in each of the first four innings, including a nine-run third as they defeated the Lady Red Storm April 5. Jade Ramos took the win in the circle for the Indians, while Kiersten McCarthy relieved her in the fourth. Ramos, Kara Barber and Brittany Miner each had two hits for the Indians, with Miner hitting a double while Miner and Ramos hitting triples. Morgan Farmer had a double for the Red Storm while taking the loss on the mound.

Fort Ann 11, Lake Placid 0 GLENS FALLS — Grace Struges connected on a pair of hits

for the Lady Blue Bombers, who were unable to slow down the Lady Cardinal bats April 5. Pictured above: Griffins pitcher Colden Blades delivers a pitch against Keene batter Damian Brown in the season opener for both teams April 11. The spring sports season should kick into high gear with clearing skies and warming temperatures in the forecast/ Photo by Jill Lobdell


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OBITUARIES

KennethÊ E.Ê Coonrod

WILLSBORO — Kenneth E. Coonrod, 89, of Point Road, Willsboro, passed away Friday, April 8, 2016 at CVPH Medical Center with his wife Ella by his side. He was born on March 18, 1927, son of Frank and Evalina (Blanchard) Coonrod. He was predeceased by his parents as well as a sister Irene Rathbun and her husband Fletcher. Ken is survived by his wife of 66 years, Ella (Doyle), a daughter Cheryl and husband Lawrence Morgan of Concord, NH, a son Keith and wife Joan Coonrod, fulltime RV travelers. He is also survived by five grandchildren Kenneth Morgan of Brentwood TN, Michael Morgan of Santa Monica CA, Heather Coonrod of Lexington KY, Meghan (Coonrod) and husband Brad Carr of Lisbon NY, and Nicole Coonrod of Laconia NH. Ken graduated from Willsboro High School in 1944. He then enrolled in an accelerated course at Coyne Electrical School in Chicago IL. Ken was a veteran of World War II, serving in the South Pacific as a Petty Officer, Electrician’s Mate 3/C 1944-1946. He was awarded medals that included WW II Medal, American Campaign, Asiatic Pacific Campaign, Philippines Liberation, and Japanese Occupation. In 2011, Ken was a member of the Patriot Flight, an organization affiliated with the National Honor Flight Network that brings WWII Veterans to our nation’s capital. Ken is past President Willsboro Chamber of Commerce, past President Willsboro/Essex Kiwanis Club, past Commander American Legion Post 405 with over 60 years of continuous membership, charter member of Willsboro Industries. Over a 30 year span, Ken was an owner of various businesses that included Willsboro Motor Service and Willsboro Furniture & Appliance Store. He subsequently was employed by NYCO as maintenance superintendent until his retirement in 1985. Ken and Ella subsequently embarked on another career as Wagonmasters for Tracks to Adventure Caravans and traveled domestically and internationally for 13 years. Ken also served as the Willsboro Town Judge from 1993 to December 2013. Ken was inducted into the Willsboro Central School “Wall of Distinction” in 2011. Ken was a member and Eucharist Minister at St. Philip’s Church. He was also an avid hunter and fisherman and enjoyed woodworking, golf and gardening. Calling hours will be from 4:00 to 7:00 PM on Monday, April 11, at Marvin-Heald Funeral Home, 7521 Court Street, Elizabethtown. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated

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at 10:00 AM on Tuesday, April 12, at St. Philip of Jesus church in Willsboro. Burial will follow in the Calvary Cemetery with military honors. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Willsboro/Essex EMS (PO Box 55, Essex, NY) in the name of Kenneth Coonrod. To light a memorial candle or leave an online condolence please visit www.healdfuneralhomeinc.com.

AndrewÊ McCabe

MIDDLEBURY — It is with great sadness that Jane, Shaw and Duncan McCabe announce the sudden passing of their father Andrew on April 1, 2016. Andy, 54, died unexpectedly at his home near Annandale-On-Hudson, where he was employed as the Bard Men’s Soccer Coach and an Assistant Athletic Director since the summer of 2013. Andy’s recent success at Bard had been recognized by being named the Liberty League Coach of the year, and the ECAC Div. III Upstate Coach of the Year. McCabe had come to Bard from Middlebury College, where he was an assistant men’s soccer coach for eight seasons. During his tenure there, Middlebury won two New England Small College Athletic Conference Championships, made three NCAA Div. III Elite 8 appearances, and won the NCAA Div. III Men’s National Championship in 2007. In addition to his work at Middlebury College, McCabe was head of the boys’ U17 Team in the Vermont Olympic Development Program, and a coach/ administrator at the Vermont Soccer School. Andy graduated from Middlebury College in 1983 having grown up in nearby Elizabethtown NY. Upon graduation, Andy accepted a position with the Peace Corps water program and spent a number of years in Washington DC as a political consultant, where he had become a senior adviser to Governor of Kentucky’s John Y. Brown in his bid for a return to the State House. A lover of the outdoors and the north country Andy returned to his roots and became a small business owner and entrepreneur, running successful businesses in Westport, NY, Vergennes and Middlebury VT. Many came to know Vergennes Wine, one such venture, widely recognized by connoisseurs as the place to go for top wine selection and advice. In addition to his beloved children, Andrew is survived by Monica Carroll, mother of their children, and his siblings Geoffrey, Matt, John, Meredith and Jacqueline, as well as several nieces and nephews and countless friends. All those who knew Andy were charmed by his candor, intelligence and irrepressible sense of humor. Andy was a lover of arts, culture, politics and sports. He was an avid reader, who delighted in literature and the art of writing, as revealed in his

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The Valley News Sun • April 16, 2016 | 15

many clever and well-loved wine advertisements. Andrew was an unsurpassed conversationalist who welcomed all. A Memorial Service will be held at Middlebury Mead Chapel in Middlebury, Vermont at 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 9, to celebrate his life and the extraordinary impact he had on all he met. Please send condolences and/or memories to Monica@middlebury.edu, jmccabe@middlebury.edu or saward@middlebury.edu. Letters or cards may be sent c/o Monica Carroll at 5102 Buckingham Rd. Boulder, CO 80301

RobertÊ H.Ê Ò BottlesÓ Ê LaVigne

ELIZABETHTOWN — Robert H. “Bottles” LaVigne, 88, of Windy Way in Elizabethtown passed away Wednesday April 6, 2016 at Essex Center with his loving family by his side. He was born on December 19, 1927 son of the late Oliver and Gertrude (Robarge) LaVigne. Robert-also known locally as Bottles is a longtime resident of Elizabethtown. Robert is an army veteran and was stationed in Japan. Once he left the military his years of service continued for 26 years as a New York State Police Officer. In 1980 he was elected Sheriff of Essex County and held that position for the next 18 years until his retirement in 1997. He was a long time member of Kiwanis and the Knights of Columbus. He is  survived by his  wife  of 58  years Shirley  (McLellan), originally from Montreal, Quebec, four daughters, their spouses, and 10 grandchildren. Debbie  (Karl) Brooks,  Shonna and Trevor of Elizabethtown. Lori (Glenn) Abbotts, Dusty and Spencer Mowery of Palm Coast Florida. JoAnn (Tim) Drummond, Megan, Mandy and Matt of Palm Coast Florida. Wendy (Mike) Morris, Carley, Mallory and Logan of Elizabethtown. Two Sisters In Law, Patsy Morris from Pembroke, Ontario, Elsie Hooper from Vancouver, British Columbia and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents Oliver and Gertrude LaVigne and his sister and Brother in Law  Marion (LaVigne) and Bernard Egan, and three Brothers in Law from Canada, Patrick McLellan, Mickey Morris, and Clifford Hooper. Calling hours were Sunday, April 10, 2016 from 3:00 to 7:00 PM at Marvin-Heald Funeral Home, 7521 Court Street, Elizabethtown. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated 10:00 AM Monday April 11, 2016 at St. Elizabeth’s Church in Elizabethtown. Burial was follow in the parish Cemetery with military honors. In lieu of flowers the family requests that donations be made in Bottles name to the Elizabethown-Lewis Ambulance Squad.     To light a memorial candle or leave an online condolence please visit www.healdfuneralhomeinc.com


16 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV)

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ave the date! The Pleasant Valley Chorale will present its spring concerts, “Classic Cole – A Salute to the music of Cole Porter,” on two occaArin Burdo > Columnist sions: info@elizabethtownsocialcenter.org Saturday, May 7, at the Essex Community Church and a special concert for Mother’s Day at 7 p.m., and Sunday, May 8, at the United Church of Christ on Route 9 in Elizabethtown, at 3 p.m. The program features many of the lovely, haunting melodies written by Porter from the early to mid-20th century. The Pleasant Valley Chorale is sponsored by the Social Center, under the direction of Susan Hughes and accompanied by Kerry Mero. Admission to the concerts is free, with a goodwill donation accepted at the door. For more information, please contact the Social Center. A Teen Paint Party will be held Saturday, April 16, at 6 p.m. Contact the Center to register. The next adult Paint Party is Sunday, April 17, at 2 p.m. Creative Bloc Paint & Sip provides all art supplies and the class. Walk-ins are accepted with cash payment of $35 if there is space. On Monday nights, Kye Smith offers Boot Camp at 6 p.m. and pick-up basketball is open for adults at ELCS from 7 until 9 p.m. Kye offers Wednesday night Zumba on April 20, at 5:15 p.m., and Boot Camp immediately after at 6:30 p.m. On Thursday, NCCI offers Medicaid enrollment help from 9 a.m. to noon. Karin DeMuro offers yoga at 4:15 p.m. and Zumba at 5:30 p.m. Teen Rec hours are Tuesday through Thursday, 3 to 6 p.m.; Friday 3 to 9 p.m.; and Saturday 2 until 9 p.m. For more information, visit elizabethtownsocialcenter.org or call 873-6408.

Elizabethtown Social Center

BRASS to host annual meeting ELIZABETHTOWN — The Boquet River Association will hold an annual meeting Monday, May 2, at the Hand House. The meet and greet begins at 6:30 p.m. with refreshments. Danielle Garneau, Ph. D. will give a presentation on microplastics pollution in Lake Champlain at 7 p.m. Garneau will present current research that identifies possible sources and the impacts on the ecosystems in and surrounding the lake. The annual business meeting will follow, chaired by Anita Deming, who will also provide an update on BRASS projects. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, visit boquetriver.org, email ald6@cornell.edu or call 962-4810 ext 409.

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he North Country SPCA would like to remind you that, thanks to Rolling Redemption, you can Kathy Wilcox > Columnist donate your bottles and cans onrollerprincessfrog@yahoo.com site at our shelter at 7700 Route 9N in Elizabethtown in our handy receptacle! While you are there, why not stop inside and meet some of our many adoptable animals? You might just meet your new best friend. Our featured pet this week is Hector, a Domestic Shorthairmix who is truly a one of a kind feline. This huge fellow weighs in at a whooping 18 pounds-and half of that weight come from his humongous head. Hector has a truly comical appearance, with his enormous head, muscular body, and short little stubby legs with an honest- to -goodness thumb on both front feet. Not only is his appearance rather... unique; he also has a terrific purr-sonality and absolutely adores attention. No matter how much you pet and cuddle him, he will never be pampered enough to suit him! If you are looking for a cat to be a true companion, you won’t want to miss out on this terrific guy!

North Country SPCA

AAA seeks volunteers ESSEX — The Adirondack Art Association is currently looking for volunteers to help prepare the gallery for the season opening during the month of May. Volunteers are also needed from Friday, May 27 to Saturday, Oct. 15 to help with a variety of tasks. Shifts and volunteer schedules at the AAA are flexible according to the needs of the organization, the task at hand, and the volunteer’s availability. Those interested in volunteering should email AAA Executive Director Christina Elliott at info@adirondackartassociation.com and plan on attending one of the Volunteer Orientations scheduled for Monday, May 2, from 1 to 3 p.m. or Monday, June 27 from 1 to 3 p.m.


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New trails incorporated into inn-to-inn hike WESTPORT — People taking part in Champlain Area Trails’ (CATS) “Grand Hike to the Essex Inn” on Saturday, May 14 will walk on three new trails. The inn-to-inn hike begins in Wadhams where hikers will set out on the new “Wadhams Lookout Trail” and see a panoramic view of the High Peaks. After a short connection via the existing Field and Forest Trail, hikers will get to the other new trails. The 1.5-mile “Long Valley Trail” goes from upland forest to grassy fields on the south side of Crooked Brook. It leads to Sayre Road and the new “Art Farm Trail.”

Hikers here will see landowner Ted Cornell’s unique outdoor sculptures as they walk uphill through large grassy meadows toward a piney forest and the CATS trails leading to Essex. Hikers arriving in Essex will celebrate at a block party at the Essex Inn featuring live music, food, drinks, kids crafts, restorative yoga and chair massage provided by Lake Champlain Yoga & Wellness, and a photo booth to commemorate the event. Participants are encouraged to park in Essex where free shuttles, starting at 12:15, will take them from the Essex Inn to Wadhams.

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ALTONA - Ganienkeh Territorial High Stakes Bingo 4 Devil's Den Road 518-236-7099 Wednesdays & Fridays doors open at 5pm Games start at 6:30 pm. KEESEVILLE - Keeseville Fire Dept. North Country AmVets 1309 Rt. 9 South Saturday, 7:30 pm. PLATTSBURGH - Knights of Columbus #255 St. Peter's School 518-561-4501 Mondays, 7pm. PLATTSBURGH - Our Lady of Victory 4919 South Catherine St. Wednesday Nights, Doors open at 6:00 with games starting at 7:10 pm. PLATTSBURGH American Legion Post 20 162 Quarry Rd. 518-5631692 Sundays, 7pm. PORT HENRY Port Henry Knights of Columbus, bingo, 7 p.m. Every Monday TICONDEROGA - Bingo, Ticonderoga fire house, 6:45 p.m. Doors 5 p.m. Every Thursday. CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS LAKE PLACID – Monthly Saturday Play for Pre-K thru Grade 5 kids & families at the Lake Placid Public Library 10am to 11am. Indoor games, activities and children's classic books. For more info 518523-3200. CLASSES & WORKSHOPS MORIAH - Adult Beginning Swimming Workshop at the Moriah Central Pool on April 16, 10-noon. $15/person, ages 18-118 years of age. Want to swim for fun or fitness? Bridget Simpson will introduce skills, instill confidence, refine skills you have, and get you going. Give it a try! bmmsimpson@mac.com MORIAH - Take 5! For Fitness at 176 The Portage (Command Performance). Classes held April 7, 14, 21, May 5 & 12. $10 per meeting. A reality based approach to fitness & weight management goals that fit your busy life. We are seeing results and having a blast! Personal Trainer Bridget Simpson leads meetings. bmmsimpson@mac.com WILMINGTON - Yoga for the Community Every Sun., 5:30-6:30pm @ Riverstone Wellness, Wilmington, NY. For more info send email to: riverstonewellness@yahoo.com

People on CATS’ Grand Hike will walk through grassy fields at the ‘Art Farm Trail’ after passing by Ted Cornell’s unique outdoor sculptures.

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS

COMMUNITY OUTREACH

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PUBLIC MEETINGS

SARANAC - Chair Yoga Classes to be held at Will Rogers. Amy Kohanski will hold a series of chair yoga classes at Saranac Village at Will Rogers on Thursdays from 3:30 4:30 p.m., beginning January 14th through June 23rd. Pre-registration is not required. No experience is necessary. For more information, please call Amy Kohanski at 518-524-6888 or email her at akohanski@roadrunner.com.

ELIZABETHTOWN – 2015-2016 WIC Schedule at the Public Health Building December 3, January 7, Feb 4, March 3, April 7, May 5, June 2, July 7, August 4, September 1, October 6, November 3, December 1, 8:00 - 3:30 PM November 19, December 17, January 21, Feb 18, March 16, April 21, May 19, June 16, July 21, August 18, September 15, October 20, November 17, December 15, 11:30 am - 6:30 PM Call us to schedule an appointment or find out more information at 518-873-3560 or 518- 569-3296

SARANAC LAKE - On Thursday, May 5th at 7:30 p.m., at Saranac Village at Will Rogers, Dr. Karen Kan, will introduce the benefits of acupuncture, how it works and who it works best for, as part of the Adirondack Wellness Series. This program is free and open to the public. For more information call Debbie Kanze at (518) 8917117 or visit www.saranacvillage.com. TICONDEROGA - Essex County Lethernecks, Marine Corps League, Det 791, Ticonderoga American Legion Post. 6 p.m. Active Marines and Marine Veterans invited. First Thursday of every month.

PLATTSBURGH - BREASTFEEDING - LA LECHE LEAGUE Do you have questions about breastfeeding? Do you have support you can offer to others? Do you need information about returning to work and nursing? Please join us for mother-to-mother sharing. All mothers, mothers-to-be, and children are welcome. Meetings are twice monthly: the first Monday at 7 P.M and the third Friday at 10:00 A.M at the Family Connections, 194 U.S Oval, Plattsburgh. Info: 518-643-9436.

SARANAC LAKE - As part of the Saranac Village at Will Rogers Road to Retirement Series, on Wednesday, May 4th at 2:00 p.m., at Saranac Village at Will Rogers, Photographer John Eldridge will talk about the art of photography and how to improve your skills. This program is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information, please contact Debbie Kanze at 518-891-7117 or visit www.saranacvillage.com. COMMUNITY OUTREACH

BINGO

People can hike the whole route or join at designated “oases,” staffed with volunteers to provide refreshments. The block party begins at 4 p.m., so hikers should estimate their walking times and plan to arrive in Essex accordingly. People parking in Wadhams are to arrange their own transportation back from Essex. Check-in is from 12:15 – 1:30 p.m. across from Dogwood Bakery in Wadhams. Everyone is welcome for the hike and block party, which non-hikers can also attend. To preregister go to the CATS website www. ChamplainAreaTrails.com or call 962-2287.

AUSABLE FORKS – 2015-2016 WIC schedule at the Ambulance Building-Ausable Forks December 2, January 6, Feb, 3, March 2, April 6, May 4, June 1, July 6, August 3, September 7, October 5, November 2, December 7, at 9:30 am - 2:15 PM Call us to schedule an appointment or find out more information at 518-873-3560 or 518- 569-3296 BEEKMANTOWN- The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Monday, April 18th, Beekmantown High School, 9am to 2pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406 BLACK BROOK - The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Thursday, April 21st, Black Brook Town Hall, 3pm to 7pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406 CLINTONVILLE – Chesterfield Fish & Game Club, Green St., Clintonville, NY has indoor Archery, Pistol & Small Caliber Rifle Shooting. January–April. Tuesdays Archery 7pm–9pm. Thursday is Pistol & Small Rifle Shooting 7pm9pm. Please note that Pistol Permits are required before shooting is allowed. Cost is $5 Non-Member & $3 for members. For further details please call John Stranahan 518-534-9716.

ESSEX - The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Monday, April 25, Essex Fire Department, co-sponsor Masonic Lodge, 4pm to 7 pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406 KEESEVILLE – 2015-2016 WIC schedule at the United Methodist Church November 25, December 30, January 13, Feb 25, March 24, April 28, May 26, June 23, July 28,August 25, September 22, October 27, November 23, December 22, 9:30 am - 2:15 PM Call us to schedule an appointment or find out more information at 518-873-3560 or 518- 569-3296 LAKE PLACID – 2015-2016 WIC schedule at the Thomas Shipman Youth Center December 1, January 5, Feb 2, March 1, April 5, May 3, June 7, July 5, August 2, September 6, October 4, November 1, December 6 , 9:30 am - 2:15 PM November 24, December 22, January 26, Feb 23, March 22, April 26, May 24, June 28, July 26, August 23, September 27, October 25, November 22, December 27 1:30 PM - 6:00 PM Call us to schedule an appointment or find out more information at 518-873-3560 or 518- 569-3296 PLATTSBURGH - The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Friday, April 22, Clinton Community College, 11amto 2:30pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406. PLATTSBURGH - The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Friday, April 29th, Jeffords Steel, 11am to 2pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406

ELIZABETHTOWN - Al-Anon Family Group, family, friends of problem drinkers. Elizabethtown Community Hospital Board Room. 4 to 5 p.m. Anonymous, confidential, free. Details: 518-962-2351, 518873-2652. Every Sunday.

PLATTSBURGH - The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Friday, April 15th, CV TEC Plattsburgh, 9am to 2pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406

ELIZABETHTOWN - The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Thursday, April 14th, Essex County Department of Social Services, 10am to 2pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406

ROUSES POINT - The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Tuesday, April 19th, Rouses Point Fire Department, 3pm to 7pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406

ELLENBURG - The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Monday, April 25th, Ellenburg Knights of Columbus, 4pm to 7 pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406

SARANAC LAKE - The North Country Regional Blood Donor Center, with help from a number local businesses and community groups, is conducting A community blood drive. Wednesday, April 20th, North Country Community College, 11am to 3pm. For more info call (518) 562-7406

DINNERS & SUCH WESTPORT - Roast Turkey Dinner, Thursday, April 21, 2016 at the Westport Federated Church, 6486 Main St., Westport, NY. Serving starts 4:30pm with take-outs available. $10.00 Adults, $5.00 Children 12 & under, pre-school free. Donations of non-perishable food items for the Westport Food Pantry are appreciated. LECTURES & SEMINARS PLATTSBURGH - twice-monthly Public Science Forums on interesting topics in science and the social sciences at The Champlain Wine Company, 30 City Hall Place, Plattsburgh NY 12901. First and third Mondays of each month at 5:30 pm. Beginning Monday Feb. 1st. Local Scientists and Social Scientists present provocative public forums free to the public. For more information, please call 518564-0064. PUBLIC MEETINGS CADYVILLE – Al-Anon Adult Children Meeting every Monday at Cadyville Wesleyan Church, use rear entrance, 2083 Route 3, Cadyville at 7pm-8pm. For more information call 1-888-425-2666 or 518-561-0838. CADYVILLE – Al-Anon Family Group Meeting every Sunday at Cadyville Wesleyan Church, use rear entrance, 2083 Route 3, Cadyville at 7pm-8pm. For more information call 1-888-425-2666 or 518-561-0838. CHAZY – Al-Anon Family Group Meeting every Friday at Sacred Heart Church, 8 Hall Street, Chazy 7:30pm-8:30pm. For more information call 1-888-425-2666 or 518-561-0838. CHAZY – Chazy Public Library Meetings: January 20, 2016, February 24,2016, March 30, 2016, April 27, 2016. Organizational Meeting May 18, 2016. ELIZABETHTOWN - The Town of Elizabethtown will hold their April 19, 2016 monthly board meeting 7:00 PM at Cobble Hill Golf Course due to the presidential primary voting occurring at the Town Hall. ELIZABETHTOWN – Al-Anon Family Group Meeting every Sunday at Elizabethtown Community Hospital Board Room, 75 Park St., Elizabethtown, 4pm-5pm. For more information call 1-888-425-2666 or 518-561-0838. ELIZABETHTOWN – Elizabethtown Thrift Shop will have it's Monthly Meeting Second Monday of Every Month at 7pm @ The Episcopal Parish Hall. LAKE PLACID – Al-Anon Adult Children Meeting every Monday at St. Agnes Church Basement, 169 Hillcrest Avenue, Lake Placid 8pm9pm. For more information call 1888-425-2666 or 518-561-0838.

PLATTSBURGH – Al-Anon Family Group Meeting every Tuesday at United Methodist Church, 127 Beekman Street, Plattsburgh Noon-1pm. For more information call 1-888-425-2666 or 518-5610838. PLATTSBURGH – Al-Anon Family Group Meeting every Thursday at United Methodist Church, 127 Beedman Street, Plattsburgh 7:30pm-8:30pm. For more information call 1-888-425-2666 or 518-561-0838. PLATTSBURGH – ALATEEN Meeting every Thursday at United Methodist Church, 127 Beedman Street, Plattsburgh 7:30pm8:30pm. For more information call 1-888-425-2666 or 518-561-0838. SARNAC LAKE – Al-Anon Family Group Meeting every Wednesday at Baldwin House, 94 Church Street, Saranac Lake 7pm-8pm. For more information call 1-888425-2666 or 518-561-0838. SENIORS SARANAC LAKE - The Saranac Village at Will Rogers Senior Outing Clubs April event will be on Tuesday, April 26th featuring a visit to the Earthwood Building School, an off-the-grid, 5-acre campus, in West Chazy. This program is open to the public. There is a $10 fee, per person, to visit the school. Lunch will be at a The Laughing Hen in Saranac ($4.95 and up). Please wear good walking shoes and clothing for potentially cool or inclement weather. Departure will be from Will Rogers at 9:00 a.m. Please call 518-891-7117 to RSVP. SPORTS & RECREATION MINEVILLE – Open Bowling Fridays at the VFW. For more info call 518-942-6514 VENDORS FOOD AND CRAFT/FLEA MARKET VENDORS WANTED for a two day set-up Memorial Day Weekend at Veterans Park, Crown Point, NY. Call 518-216-4024.

TO ADVERTISE IN THE SUN COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD PLEASE CALL SHANNON AT 518-873-6368 EXT. 201 OR EMAIL shannonc@suncommunitynews.com


18 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV)

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Published by Denton Publications, Inc.


Published by Denton Publications, Inc.

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(CV)

The Valley News Sun • April 16, 2016 | 19

BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT! 518-873-6368 Ext. 201 “We’re more than a newspaper, we’re a community service.”


20 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV)

www.suncommunitynews.com CARS

2009 TOYOTA COROLLA, low miles, very good condition, Asking $6,900.00. 518-5769519 CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! All Make/Models 2000-2015! Any Condition. Running or Not. Competitive Offer! Free Towing! Were Nationwide! Call Now: 1-888-4162330. Donate Your Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast - FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1-800-245-0398

MOTORCYCLES

HELP WANTED

WANTED OLD JAPANESE MOTORCYCLES KAWASAKI Z1-900 (1972-75), KZ900, KZ1000 (19761982), Z1R, KZ 1000MK2 (1979,80), W1-650, H1-500 (1969-72), H2-750 (1972-1975), S1-250, S2-350, S3-400, KH250, KH400, SUZUKI-GS400, GT380, HONDA-CB750K (1969-1976), CBX1000 (1979,80) CASH!! 1800-772-1142 1-310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com

SEARCHING FOR EMPLOYEES BEYOND YOUR LOCAL MARKET? ADVERTISE WITH US! We can help with our low cost-high impact package of print and online classified ads placed statewide, or in regional zones throughout New York State. Reach as many as 3.3 million consumers! Place your ad online at AdNetworkNY.com or call 315-437-6173

ACCESSORIES J&J Auto Repair 9409 State Route 9 Chazy, NY 518-846-3110 GARAGE SALE

LEGAL NOTICES FOR THIS NEWSPAPER AND NEWSPAPERS AROUND THE STATE MAY BE FOUND ONLINE AT http://newyorkpu blicnotices.com

THE ARC OF DELAWARE COUNTY seeks dynamic professionals to lead our nationally recognized organization in supporting people with I/DD in living personally fulfilling lives. Positions include: Chief Services Officer, Speech Pathologist, Supervisor, Life Coach, Assistant Director of Residential Services, House Manager. Apply www.delarc.org. US Postal Service Now Hiring. 1800-269-9731 $21/hr avg. w/ Fed. Ben. incl. to start. FT/PT. Not affiliated w/ USPS.

HUGE MOVING SALE April 15th & 16th (Friday & Saturday) 8-4 RAIN OR SHINE 2 Miles North of Lewis on Route 9 House full of Old and New Items .... Furniture, Linens, Dishes, Collectibles & So Much More. Too much to list!!! Prices are Cheap!!! Watch for the Signs and Balloons!!

Viagra!! 52 Pills for Only $99.00! Your #1 trusted provider for 10 years. Insured and Guaranteed Delivery. Call today 1-888-796-8878 VINEYARD ASSISTANT: Full time, Benefits, Must enjoy working outside in all weather conditions, Located near Watkins Glen, Contact: David Hobbs @ 1-585-330-5390, dhobbs@paulhobbs.com HELP WANTED LOCAL

Win a $2,000 grand prize! Take our survey at www.pulsepoll.com and tell us about your media usage and shopping plans. Your input will help this paper help local businesses. Thank you! BOATS 94 Bassboat 18' 150HP Yamah motor, Tandem trailer, new trolling motor, new batteries, $7000 OBO. 518-561-2586. AUTOS WANTED A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR FOR BREAST CANCER! Help United Breast Foundation education, prevention, & support programs. FAST FREE PICKUP - 24 HR RESPONSE - TAX DEDUCTION 855403-0213 CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! We buy 2000-2015 Cars/Trucks, Running or Not! Nationwide Free Pickup! Call 1-888-416-2208

YOU CAN YELL “SOLD!” WITH A SMILE when you have enough bidders at your next auction. We can help! ADVERTISE WITH US -reach as many as 3.3 million consumers with our low cost-high impact package of print and online classified ads placed statewide, or in regional zones throughout New York State. Place your ad online at AdNetworkNY.com or call 315-437-6173. HELP WANTED Help Wanted Free room and board live in assistance needed for disabled man. Valid drivers license a plus. Small stipend for work 518-293-7303 Make $1,000 Weekly! Paid in Advance! Mailing Brochures at Home. Easy Pleasant work. Begin Immediately. Age Unimportant. www.MyHomeIncomeNow55.com Many RN positions available in your area. Hospitals, correctional facilities, and home health assessments. Great Pay & Benefits. Call: 1-718-387-8181 #202 or email: recruit@whiteglovecare.net U.S. POSTAL SERVICE Now Hiring 1-800-311-6617 $21/hr avg. w/ Federal Benefits included to start. FT/PT. Not affiliated w/ USPS

HELP WANTED LOCAL

CAREER TRAINING THE OCEAN CORP. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a New Career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid available for those who qualify. 1-800-321-0298.

THE CLINTON, ESSEX,WARREN, WASHINGTON BOCES Is Currently Accepting Applications For The Following Anticipated Positions: Anticipated Full-time tenuretrack vacancies for the 2016-17 school year, starting September 1, 2016:

*New Visions Medical Instruc-

tor for an Elizabethtown based program with secondary grades science certification, biology preferred.

WORK WANTED EXPERIENCED TEACHER will supervise the Calvert School Home study program(grades 4-8) in JayLake Placid region. Cost is dependent on services required. Course cost about $1800/year plus supervision charges .ekverner@gmail. com. After May 8th phone 518 647 2150. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

*College & Career Transition

Experience teacher, NYS secondary grades certification with dual ELA/mathematics certification preferred.

*Secondary grades classroom special education teacher with secondary grades special education certification.

*Elementary grades special education teacher with special education certification.

LOOK FOR NORTH COUNTRY LIVING MAGAZINE AVAILABLE AT STORES THROUGHOUT NORTHERN NEW YORK AND VERMONT PUBLISHED BY: DENTON PUBLICATIONS INC.

*Security &Law enforcement ADON ASSISTANT Director of Nursing Minimum 3 yrs. Long Term Care exp. Required

AUCTIONS Parker Chevrolet 622 State Route 11 Champlain, NY 12919 (866) 944-3628

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Contact Michelle: (518) -802-7677 mamato@essexrehab.net

RN Nurse Educator Essex Center Elizabethtown, NY 5 years LTC exp. reqd. Prior Clinical Training exp. reqd. Must be NYS licensed RN

teacher at CVES Mineville Campus, with five years of successful law enforcement experience and appropriate teacher certification.

Competitive salary as per contract. Cover letter, resume, three reference letters and a completed CVES application due May 12, 2016 to applicants@cves.org or to : A. Paul Scott, Interim Assistant Superintendent of Management Services, Champlain Valley Educational Services, PO BOX 455, Plattsburgh, NY 12901. CVES application available on employment page via www.cves.org. EOE/AAE. Questions? 518-536-7316 The Bistro in Westport is looking for Waitstaff and Bartender for the summer season. Call Fabienne at 518-524-1119. CAREER TRAINING

Contact Michelle: (518)-802-7677 mamato@essexrehab.net

25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a driver for Stevens Transport! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! New drivers earn $800+ per week! PAID CDL TRAINING! Stevens covers all costs! 1-888734-6714 drive4stevens.com ACCOUNTING & PAYROLL TRAINING PROGRAM! Online career training can get you job ready now! TRAIN AT HOME NOW! Financial aid if qualified! HS Diploma/GED required. 1-877-253-6495 AIRLINE CAREERS. Get FAA approved maintenance training at campuses coast to coast. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid for qualifying students. Military friendly. Call AIM 888-686-1704 AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, Boeing, Delta and othersstart here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1-866-296-7093 MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Begin training at home for a career working with Medical Billing & Insurance! Online training with the right College can get you ready! HS Diploma/GED & Computer/Internet needed. 1-888-7346711

MISCELLANEOUS !!OLD GUITARS WANTED!! Gibson,Martin,Fender,Gretsch. 19301980. Top Dollar paid!! Call Toll Free 1-866-433-8277 A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation's largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-553-4101 ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement Systems Inc. Call us for all of your basement needs! Waterproofing, Finishing, Structural Repairs, Humidity and Mold Control FREE ESTIMATES! Call 1-800-957-4881 AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, Boeing, Delta and othersstart here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-453-6204 CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! 1 DAY PAYMENT & PREPAID shipping. HIGHEST PRICES! Call 1-888-7767771. www.Cash4DiabeticSupplies.com DISH TV 190 channels Highspeed Internet Only $49.95/mo! Ask about a 3 year price guarantee & get Netflix included for 1 year! Call Today 1-800-826-4464 DIVORCE $390* Covers Children, etc. *Excludes govt. fees*. LOCALLY COVERING ALL COUNTIES IN THE STATE. CALL 1-888-498-7075, EXT. 700 (Weekdays: 8AM-7PM). BAYCOR & ASSOCIATES. Dr. Richard Foreman 78 Champlain St, Rouses Point, NY 518-297-8110 KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Harris Bed Bug Killers/KIT Complete Treatment System Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com


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MISCELLANEOUS

MISCELLANEOUS

Lower Your TV, Internet & Phone Bill!!! Fast Internet from $15/mo qualifying service. Limited Time Offer. Plus, FREE $300 Gift Card. Call 855-693-1333.

WE BUY USED/DAMAGED TRUCKS! Chevy, Toyota, Ford and More. 2000-2015. America's Top Truck Buyer. Free Nationwide Towing! Call Now: 1-800-536-4708

Make a Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now! Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call NOW: 1-888-909-9905 18+.

XARELTO USERS have you had complications due to internal bleeding (after January 2012)? If so, you MAY be due financial compensation. If you don't have an attorney, CALL Injuryfone today! 1-800-340-6821

Plattsburgh House of Prayer 63 Broad St. Plattsburgh, NY 518-314-1333 REPLACEMENT WINDOWS $199.00 Installed. Double Hung Tilt-ins, Lifetime Warranty. BBB A+ rating, serving NYS over 40 years. Call Rich 1-866-272-7533. uscustomwindowsdoors.com REVERSE MORTGAGES - Draw all eligible cash out of your home & eliminate mortgage payments FOREVER! For Seniors 62+! Serving NY, NJ, Florida. FHA Government insured. Purchase, refinance & VA loans also. In home personal service. Free 28 page catalog. 1-888-660-3033. All Island Mortgage. www.allislandmortgage.com

ADOPTIONS PREGNANT? Happy, loving couple wishes to raise your newborn with care, warmth, love. Liz, Dominick 1877-274-4824 text 1-740-5524384 PROFESSIONAL AFRICAN American couple truly want to adopt. Great relatives, active lifestyle, huge hearts, adventerous, loving. Confidential, allowed expenses paid. Kecia and Devon, 1-866-9325603. ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES Apr 30th & May 1st at the Washington County Fairgrounds, Rte. 29, Greenwich NY. $4 admission. (Sat. 8a-5p, Sun 9a-4p) Featuring over 225 dealers. GREAT FOOD. Early-Bird Friday (4/29 - 7a-4p - $10). RAIN or SHINE. Call (518) 331-5004 WHIRLPOOL UPRIGHT FREEZER, a year old, Asking $200 OBO. Call 518-963-8930 or 518-962-2376. FARM LIVESTOCK

Sun Community News & New Market Press

PIGS FOR SALE $200 ea. Firm. Live weight approx. 200 lbs. Located in Essex. Call 518-224-0251.

Weekly News Publications

FINANCIAL SERVICES

REACHING MORE THAN

57,832 HOMES USPS MAILED TO

Northern New York and Vermont

CASH IN ONE CLICK Short Term Lender Matching Service www.CashinOneClick.com Apply in Minutes and Get Approved. Desktop or Mobile Peru Federal Credit Union 700 Bear Swamp Rd. Peru, NY 518-643-9915 FOR SALE

SUPPORT our service members, veterans and their families in their time of need. For more information visit the Fisher House website at www.fisherhouse.org SUPPORT OUR SERVICE MEMBERS, veterans and their families in their time of need. For more information visit the Fisher House website at www.fisherhouse.org SWITCH TO DIRECTV and get a $100 Gift Card. FREE Whole-Home Genie HD/DVR upgrade. Starting at $19.99/mo. New Customers Only. Don't settle for cable. Call NOW 1-800-931-4807 TOP CASH PAID FOR OLD GUITARS! 1920's thru 1980's. Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prairie State, D'Angelico, Stromberg. And Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1-800-401-0440

GENERAL

2-55 Gallon Fresh Water Aquariums, Best Equipment, $200 Each. 518-708-0678 For Sale, King Koil Alyssa Plush Mattress, King size. Great condition $50. Whirlpool Cabrio Washer, works $Free. Call 518-6439391 Hand Gun Ruger Vaquero 44 Magnum Stainless Steel, Single Action, Wood Grips, Fires 44 Mag. And 44 Special, Like New fire only once $550 OBO, or trade for a 45 Auto Handgun. 518-354-8654

MINATURE TRAINS-LIONEL, American Flyer and HO scale, Vintage collection, perfect working condition, all electric, tracks, transformers, switches, display boards & buildings-negotiable 518-834-7929

SAWMILLS from only $4397.00 MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Win a $2,000 grand prize! Enter to win. Take our survey at www.pulsepoll.com and tell us about your household shopping plans and media usage. Your input will help us improve the paper and get the advertising specials you want. Thank you! FURNITURE America's Mattress 23 Weed St. Plattsburgh, NY 518-348-8705 GENERAL CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2000 and Newer. Nations Top Car Buyer! Free Towing From Anywhere! Call Now: 1-800-864-5960. Make a Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now! Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call NOW: Call 1-877-737-9447 18+

SEGUIN DENTURE CLINIC 368 Rt. 219 Hemmingford, Canada 2 miles North of Mooers) Call: 1-450-247-2077

FOR ALL YOUR DENTURE NEEDS!

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killers/KIT. Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com KILL ROACHES - GUARANTEED! Harris Roach Tablets with Lure. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com New Anderson 36” Storm Door. Paid $291, Sell for $190. 518-5612175.

The Valley News Sun • April 16, 2016 | 21

LOGGING

LAVALLEE LOGGING

NORTH COUNTRY LIVING MAGAZINE ASK YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION OR CONTACT ASHLEY ALEXANDER 518-873-6368 EXT 105 OR EMAIL

ashley@suncommunitynews.com

SUNCOMMUNITYNEWS.COM FOR ALL YOUR COMMUNITY NEWS, SPORTS, EVENTS AND INFORMATION

is looking to harvest and purchase standing timber, All Species. Willing to pay New York State stumpage prices on all species. $ or % paid. References available. Matt Lavallee 518-645-6351 A CUT ABOVE THE REST!

PRECISION TREE SERVICE 518-942-6545 LOST & FOUND

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PETS & ANIMALS KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS. Buy Harris Bed Bug Killers/Kit Complete Treatment System. Available Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com OTHER PETS

NORTHERN TIMBER We are looking to purchase all species of standing timber top dollar paid for all types log,pulp,chips etc call 518-5349739

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ANTIQUE FAIR AND FLEA MARKET

APPLIANCES

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FOR SALE

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Lost Dog Last seen March 19th near Lincoln Pond. 3 year old Bulldog/Pit mix named Diesel. Very Friendly and missed dearly. White and brown/brindle and wearing a Large Red Collar without tags.Please call 518-339-2501 if you have seen him. Thank You. WANTED TO BUY CAPITAL CLASSIC CARS Buying All European & Classic Cars. Any Condition. Any Location.Porsche, Mercedes, Jaguar & More! Top Dollar Paid.CapitalClassicCars.com Steve Nicholas 571-282-5153 CASH FOR DIABETIC TEST STRIPS Up to $35/Box! Sealed & Unexpired. Payment Made SAME DAY. Highest Prices Paid!! Call Juley Today! 800-413-3479 www.CashForYourTestStrips.com CASH PAID- up to $25/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. 1-DAYPAYMENT.1-800371-1136 TOP CA$H PAID FOR OLD ROLEX, PATEK PHILIPPE & CARTIER WATCHES! DAYTONA, SUBMARINER, GMT-MASTER, EXPLORER, MILGAUSS, MOONPHASE, DAY DATE, etc.1-800-4010440 Wanted to Buy used 3 point hitch sickle bar mower, in good condition. 518-524-1972. WANTS TO PURCHASE minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201 Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

FREE PRINTING ESTIMATES @ suncommunityprinting.com

APARTMENT RENTALS Rouses Point – 2 bdrm, 2nd floor. Quiet neighborhood, large lot, space for a garden, 2 car parking and garage space avail. $570/mo. + electric. Call Evenings 450-2464320. VACATION PROPERTY RENTALS OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Resort Services. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com. REAL ESTATE SALES REAL ESTATE WILLSBORO, NY 1.06 acre lot w/water/sewer/power ($26,000) or Above lot with 1998 2bd/2bath mobile home ($49,000) 518-963-7320

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22 | April 16, 2016 • The Valley News Sun (CV) COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

VISIT THE REGION'S PREMIER LIFESTYLE PUBLICATION NORTH COUNTRY LIVING MAGAZINE NCLMAGAZINE.COM PUBLISHED BY: DENTON PUBLICATIONS INC.

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VACATION PROPERTY PROMOTE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY STATEWIDE! Homes, camps, land for sale? ADVERTISE WITH US! Selling or renting, we connect you with nearly 3.3 million consumers (plus more online!) with a statewide classified ad. Advertise your property for just $489 for a 25-word ad, LESS for regional coverage areas. Visit AdNetworkNY.com or call 315-437-6173 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GET FUNDING NOW for your small business, up to $2 million in as little as 2 days. Minimum 2 years in business. Call BFS Capital: 888732-6298 or apply online www.bfscapital.com/nyp. CONSTRUCTION Coldspring Granite 13791 NYS Route 9N AuSable Forks, NY 518-647-8192 CRUISE & TRAVEL

HOMES ADIRONDACK “BY OWNER” AdkByOwner.com 1000+ photo listings of local real estate for sale, vacation rentals & timeshares. Owners: List with us for only $299 per year. Visit on-line or call 518-891-9919 LAND CATSKILLS BARGAIN ACREAGE 31 acres - $89,900; 39 acres $99,900. By BOTH for just $185,000. 3 hrs NY City, mtn views, woods, fields! Twn Rd, utils. Terms avail! 1-888-701-1864 NewYorkLandandLakes.com CATSKILLS BARGAIN ACREAGE, 31 acres - $89,900. 39 acres $99,900. Buy both for just $185,000. 3 hours NY City. Mountain views, woods, fields. Town road, utilities. Terms available! Call 888-905-8847. NewYorkLandandLakes.com. NATURAL UNSPOILED COASTAL property. There is a place just hours away where you can find abundant natural beauty, clean air and space. Located in Virginia 90 miles south of Ocean City. Lots are 3 to 22 acres and priced $60,000 to $98,000. All are near the shoreline, some with excellent water views. Amenities include community dock and sandy beach. Low taxes and a mild climate. Call (757) 442-2171 or email: oceanlandtrust@yahoo.com, website http://waverlylots.com.

LEGALS AU SABLE RIVER LODGE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3/15/2016. Office in Essex Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Law Office Steven Kaiser, 134 Hawthorne Ave., Floral Park, NY 11001. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. VN-03/26-04/30/20166TC-112780

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MAGDI LAKE DRIVE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/24/16. Office location: Essex County. Princ. office of LLC: 821 Mirror Lake Dr., Lake Placid, NY 12946. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Paolo Magro, 12 David Dr., Saranac Lake, NY 12983. Purpose: Any lawful activity. VN-04/09-05/14/2016-

ALL INCLUSIVE CRUISE package on the Norwegian Sky out of Miami to the Bahamas. Pricing as low as $299 pp for 3 Day or $349 pp for 4 Day (double occupancy) ALL beverages included! For more info. call 877-270-7260 or go to NCPtravel.com EUROPEAN RIVER CRUISES - the ultimate vacation! See Europe from the comfort of a Viking or Avalon luxury cruise ship. For the experience of a lifetime, call 877-2707260 or go to NCPtravel.com for more information

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DATE 3/31/16 3/31/16 4/1/16 4/1/16 4/1/16 4/1/16 4/4/16 4/4/16 4/4/16 4/4/16 4/4/16 4/5/16 4/5/16 4/5/16 4/5/16 4/6/16

GRANTOR GRANTEE Donald and Beverly Duffina Bryon and Victoria Colby Joni Moschelle Marianna Worczak Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation Andrew Gonyo Federal National Mortgage Association Robert Roberts Laurie King Kondaur Capital Corporation Mary West and Ronald Peltier Kevin Ohara Carol Jackstadt Raymond and Rebecca Hewson Nichole Strong Morgan Kowalowski US Bank Trust Robin Bechard James Diskin William and Bonita St. Dennis Elizabeth Sumner Michael Beebe Clinton County NYSEG Karl Hill et al Barbara Provost et al Ronald and Angel Duchene Ricky Duprey Michael and Ramona Curry Patrick and Donna Curry Marie Benway Joseph Rohlfing

DATE 3/31/16 3/31/16 3/31/16 3/31/16 4/1/16 4/4/16 4/4/16 4/5/16 4/5/16 4/5/16 4/5/16 4/5/16 4/5/16 4/5/16 4/6/16

GRANTOR Thomas and Priscilla Fox Daniel Fields Thomas Benway Dand and Erica Dangelo Blum Rose Corp Surv and Decd Gregsonanne Martin and Sari Stout Laura Antonelli and Keitha Freeman Richard and Susan Vanwormer James Doyle and Todd Dematteo Gerald and Maxine Brow Helen Prouty Arlene Baker Gerald Smith et al Robert Garrow

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REPLACEMENT WINDOWS $199.00 Installed. Double Hung Tilt-ins, Lifetime Warranty. BBB A+ rating, serving NYS over 40 years. Call Rich 1-866-272-7533. uscustomwindowsdoors.com Young Lyon Hardware and Flooring 1923 Saranac Ave. Lake Placid, NY 518-523-9855 INSURANCE Booth Insurance Agency 20 Brinkeroff St. Plattsburgh, NY 518-561-3290 Chauvin Agency Champlain 518-298-2000 Rouses Point- 518-297-6602 Plattsburgh- 518-562-9336 Northern Adjustment Bureau NY State Licensed & Bonded General Adjuster/ Public Adjuster 518-563-4701

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license, number (pending license number) for beer and wine has been applied for by the undersigned to sell beer and wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1711 Front St. Keeseville, NY 12944 Essex County for on-premises consumption. VN-04/09-04/16/20162TC-114306 NOTICE OF LEWIS CEMETERY CORPORATION Notice is hereby given that the Lewis Cemetery Corporation will hold its Annual Meeting at the Lewis Congregational Church Parish Hall, Rt. 9, Lewis, NY on April 18, 2015 at 6 pm. Public is welcome. VN-04/16/2016-1TC115004

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLACID BOAT RENTALS, LLC a domestic limited liability company. Art. of Org. filed with Sec'y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/15/16. Office location: Essex County. SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of such process served upon it to Placid Boat Rentals, LLC, 204 Mirror Lake Drive, Lake Placid, NY 12946. Purpose of LLC: To engage in any lawful activity. VN-03/26-04/30/20166TC-112431

REBER CEMETERY ASSOCIATION MEETING The Reber Cemetery Association will be holding their annual meeting on Sunday evening, April 24th, at 7:00 p.m. In the Reber Church annex. At this time all business will be conducted related to same. All interested parties are cordially invited to attend. /s/ Alan H. Hutchins Association Pres. VN-04/16/2016-1TC-

REBER CEMETERY ASSOCIATION MEETING The Reber Cemetery Association will be holding their annual meeting on Sunday evening, April 24th, at 7:00 p.m. In the Reber Church annex. At this time all business will be conducted related to same. All interested parties are cordially invited to attend. /s/ Alan H. Hutchins Association Pres. VN-04/16/2016-1TC114725 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN; that the Undersigned, on behalf of the Westport Town Board, will accept sealed proposals at the Westport Town Clerks office until April 26th at 3 P.M. for Forestry Management Services. Specifications are available by contacting the Town of Westport 22 Champlain Ave Westport, New York 12993 or by calling 518-9624419. All proposals submitted in response to this notice shall be marked SEALED PROPOSAL FORESTRY MANAGEMENT SERVICES clearly on the outside of the envelope. In addition to the proposal, the proposer shall submit executed noncollusion bid certificates signed by the proposer or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103d. The successful proposer

LOCATION Mooers Beekmantown Beekmantown Champlain Ausable Plattsburgh Plattsburgh Plattsburgh Plattsburgh Ausable Beekmantown Plattsburgh Champlain Champlain Ellenburg Clinton

GRANTEE LOCATION 1812 Homestead Educational Foundation Willsboro Kurt Delong Elizabethtown William Amadon Essex Dora Constance North Elba Rose Development WFC LLC North Elba Tina Campala Schroon Bruce and Roxanne Burns Crown Point Timothy and Carol Donovan North Elba Brian and Melissa Lavallee Jay REQUEST FOR US Bank Trust Schroon PROPOSALS Nayden and Katiaa Mintchev Jay NOTICE IS HEREBY David and Paula McDonough Keene GIVSarah Pastore Elizabethtown EN; that the UnderTyler and Michelle Collins signed, on behalf Schroon of the Andrew and Maureen Ottati Westport Town North Elba Board,

CENTRAL BOILER CERTIFIED Classic Edge OUTDOOR FURNACES. Exceptional performance and value. Adirondack Hardware Call Dennis Today 518-834-4600 Ext. 6

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MAGDI LAKE DRIVE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/24/16. Office location: Essex County. Princ. office of LLC: 821 Mirror Lake Dr., Lake Placid, NY 12946. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Paolo Magro, 12 David Dr., Saranac Lake, NY 12983. Purpose: Any lawful activity. VN-04/09-05/14/20166TC-114152

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REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN; that the Undersigned, on behalf of the Westport Town Board, will accept sealed proposals at the Westport Town Clerks office until April 26th at 3 P.M. for Forestry Management Services. Specifications are available by contacting the Town of Westport 22 Champlain Ave Westport, New York 12993 or by calling 518-9624419. All proposals submitted in response to this notice shall be marked SEALED PROPOSAL FORESTRY MANAGEMENT SERVICES clearly on the outside of the envelope. In addition to the proposal, the proposer shall submit executed noncollusion bid certificates signed by the proposer or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103d. The successful proposer will be notified promptly by letter and must be prepared to enter into a contract to furnish the materials or services. The Town of Westport reserves the right to reject any and all proposals not considered to be in the best interest of the Town of Westport, and to waive any technical or formal defect in the proposals which is considered by the Town Of Westport to be merely irregular, immaterial, or unsubstantial. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that Town of Westport affirmatively states that in regard to any contract entered into pursuant to this notice, without regard to race, color, sex, religion, age, national origin, disability, sexual preference or Vietnam Era veteran status, disadvantaged and minority or womenowned business enterprises will be afforded equal opportunity to submit bids in response hereto. Dated: April 8, 2016 Julie Schreiber Westport Town Clerk

will accept sealed proposals at the Westport Town Clerks office until April 26th at 3 P.M. for Forestry Management Services. Specifications are available by contacting the Town of Westport 22 Champlain Ave Westport, New York 12993 or by calling 518-9624419. All proposals submitted in response to this notice shall be marked SEALED PROPOSAL FORESTRY MANAGEMENT SERVICES clearly on the outside of the envelope. In addition to the proposal, the proposer shall submit executed noncollusion bid certificates signed by the proposer or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103d. The successful proposer will be notified promptly by letter and must be prepared to enter into a contract to furnish the materials or services. The Town of Westport reserves the right to reject any and all proposals not considered to be in the best interest of the Town of Westport, and to waive any technical or formal defect in the proposals which is considered by the Town Of Westport to be merely irregular, immaterial, or unsubstantial. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that Town of Westport affirmatively states that in regard to any contract entered into pursuant to this notice, without regard to race, color, sex, religion, age, national origin, disability, sexual preference or Vietnam Era veteran status, disadvantaged and minority or womenowned business enterprises will be afforded equal opportunity to submit bids in response hereto. Dated: April 8, 2016 Julie Schreiber Westport Town Clerk PO Box 465 22 Champlain Ave. Westport, New York 12993 VN-04/16/2016-1TC115053

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) Name: Solitude Catering LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on January 26, 2016 Office Location: Essex County. The SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at: Forever Native, 3320 Knight Station Rd., Lakeland, FL 33810. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. VN-04/02-05/07/20166TC-113537

PRICE $155,000 $232,000 $23,000 $33,000 $105,787 $12,000 $137,800 $106,000 $96,000 $180,000 $129,000 $50 $5,000 $4,000 $40,000 $17,500

PRICE $100,000 $25,000 $12,000 $680,000 $196,000 $141,000 $60,000 $6,800 $369,000 $63,000 $98,000 $250 $55,000 $150,000 $6,000

WESTPORT CEMETERY ASSOCIATION NOTICE TO: The last known owner or owners of the following burial lots in the Hillside Cemetery, Main St., Westport, NY 12993: Almira N.Greeley, David Clark, Mack, Gibbs, Barber, Holcom, McIntire, Angiers, Reynolds, Bennett, Rogers, Hinkley, Braman, Pierce, Smith, Frisbie, Eastman, Henry, Mitchell, Neddie, Price, Russell, Mother, Ingalls, Bernesand, and Howard; PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that (1) the monuments or markers located at said burial lots are so badly out of repair or dilapidated as to create a dangerous condition, (2) the persons to whom this notice is addressed must repair or remove said monument or marker within 60 days of the date of the third publication of this notice, (3) if the persons to whom this notice is addressed fail to repair or remove said monument or marker within the 60 day time period, the Westport Cemetery Association may remove or repair said monument or marker without further notice to the persons to whom

WESTPORT CEMETERY ASSOCIATION NOTICE TO: The last known owner or owners of the following burial lots in the Hillside Cemetery, Main St., Westport, NY 12993: Almira N.Greeley, David Clark, Mack, Gibbs, Barber, Holcom, McIntire, Angiers, Reynolds, Bennett, Rogers, Hinkley, Braman, Pierce, Smith, Frisbie, Eastman, Henry, Mitchell, Neddie, Price, Russell, Mother, Ingalls, Bernesand, and Howard; PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that (1) the monuments or markers located at said burial lots are so badly out of repair or dilapidated as to create a dangerous condition, (2) the persons to whom this notice is addressed must repair or remove said monument or marker within 60 days of the date of the third publication of this notice, (3) if the persons to whom this notice is addressed fail to repair or remove said monument or marker within the 60 day time period, the Westport Cemetery Association may remove or repair said monument or marker without further notice to the persons to whom this notice is addressed, (4) Westport Cemetery Association must be notified and give permission for any removal or repair done to said monument or maker and (5) notice must be given to the Westport Cemetery Association as to the time of such removal or repair in order to allow a member of the Westport Cemetery Association to supervise such removal or repair. Westport Cemetery Association, P.O. Box 535, Westport, NY 12993 Juanita Napper, President 518-962-8975 or 518-569-7116. VN-04/16-04/30/20163TC-114783


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