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Ti artists create mural Project involves many community helpers

Saturday, December 14, 2013

CHRISTMAS WISHES

This Week TICONDEROGA

By Fred Herbst fred@denpubs.com TICONDEROGA Ñ A retaining wall on Wicker Street in Ticonderoga is becoming a work of art. Work has started to paint a mural on the concrete structure near Inter-Lakes Health. ItÕ s scheduled to be completed in the spring. Maura Jebb, Maureen Jebb and Joan Pulling are the primary artists working on the mural, although it has been a community project, according to Chattie Van Wert, executive director of the Ticonderoga Revitalization Alliance. ItÕ s TiconderogaÕ s second mural project. Last summer a mural was painted on the wall of the Ti Barbershop on Champlain Avenue. Ò With the assistance of Sharon Reynolds of PRIDE, this mural project started last summer with the receipt of a $550 grant from the Essex County Arts Council awarded to the Ticonderoga Revitalization Alliance with the stipulation it be used this year,Ó Van Wert said. Ò After successful completion of the mural on the side of Ti Barbershop next to JayÕ s Sunoco, the mural team was willing to pursue another. Ò Over the course of a few weeks, several locations for the next mural were considered and at the recommendation of Vincent Smith, the retaining wall on 9N/Wicker Street was selected,Ó she said. The image is an Adirondack lake being fed by a waterfall. It was designed by Maura Jebb, a Ticonderoga High School student, and Pulling, a local artist who is mentoring her. The retaining wall is the property of the state Department of Transportation. Once permission was secure, the Ti highway department cleared brush. CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

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Broadband could stimulate the economy. PAGE 13 SPORTS

Julian Fleury had a chance to visit with Santa Claus at the Mineville-Witherbee Fire Department recently. Santa stopped at the fire station to hear Christmas wishes from local children.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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Lady Panthers eke out a win over Schroon Lake. PAGE 2O

Schroon holiday charity needs assistance Children’s Christmas Express faces shortfall

IN BRIEF

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By Fred Herbst

CROWN POINT

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fred@denpubs.com

SCHROON LAKE

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SCHROON LAKE Ñ ChildrenÕ s Christmas Express, a Schroon Lake holiday charity, is asking for public support. The program, which provides holi-

day gifts to children in need, is experiencing a shortage as Christmas nears. Ò The elves at Christmas Express are extremely concerned about how they will fulfill all those Christmas wishes this year, the wishes that create holiday memories and magic,Ó said Patti Mehm of the Christmas Express. Ò There have been policy changes at some supporters, which has resulted in some delays and limitations on resources this year.Ó Complicating the situation is an increase in the number of families seek-

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ing help this holiday season, Ò The continued economic situation has had a huge impact on the number of families seeking assistance, with the most numbers of families seeking assistance,Ó Mehm said. Ò The wishes are so simple, like warm boots, warm pjs, a baby doll, or a movie on DVD,Ó she said. Ò They touch my heart and help put the season into perspective for me. For numerous years toys, winter clothing and other items have been gathered from within the

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community for approximately 50 local children, ranging from infants to 13 years old, and then those special items are delivered to each household.Ó People who wish to help the ChildrenÕ s Christmas Express have several opportunities to assist. Ò Wish TreesÓ have been erected at Tops Market and The Towne Store in Schroon Lake. Each tree contains a Christmas wish from a local child. Each CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

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December 14, 2013

Ticonderoga High School students, along with the Ticonderoga Kiwanis, collected food and donations to benefit the Ticonderoga Food Pantry Dec. 7 during its “Stuff-A-Bus” effort. Students attempted to fill a school bus with donations. From left are David Bevins, Kasi Wendell, Nick Fitzgerald, teacher Britney Shaw, Dale Quesnel, Katelyn Troche, Nicole Curcio, Abby Young and Delaney Hughes . Photo by Nancy Frasier


December 14, 2013

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Times of Ti - 3

Ti Natural Foods Coop seeking logo Contest to determine group’s symbol By Fred Herbst

fred@denpubs.com TICONDEROGA Ñ The committee working to establish a food cooperative store in Ticonderoga is now seeking a logo. The Ticonderoga Natural Foods Coop committee has announced it will hold a contest to select a logo for the yet-to-becreated store. Ò Ticonderoga Natural Foods Coop is seeking a creative, innovative and professional logo design,Ó said Sharon Reynolds of the food coop committee. Ò The logo should be recognizable and help promote our organizationÕ s mission.Ó Entries must be submitted to Eric Stoddard, a committee member, by Jan. 15. PDF or EPS files with 300 dpi or higher resolution can be Emailed to Stoddard at tifoodcoop@gmail.com The

subject line should read Ò Logo Submission.Ó The winner will be announced on the TNFC Facebook page and blog. The winner will also be contacted by Email or phone. The prize is a $100 gift certificate. Reynolds said entries should reflect the Ticonderoga Natural Foods CoopÕ s mission, which is Ò To create and support a community-owned co-op that believes in the importance of healthy living, sustainability and offering locally produced products. We are committed to providing high quality goods and services at affordable prices through member-participation and employment opportunities.Ó Entries must also be original. They can be in color or back and white. Ò This logo may be featured on our website, our social media platforms and other mediums Ñ signage, bags, labels, newsletters, t-shirts, etc.,Ó Reynolds said. Ò As a result, while we want the logo to be eye-catching, it must still be legible. There are no limi-

tations and any colors may be used. However, logo must look good in color or black and white. Ò Logos cannot contain copyrighted material,Ó she said. Ò Logos must have been created and edited by the contestant. Logos may not include images or licensed images that have been previously published. They must be easily reproducible and scalable for large and small formatting.Ó The winner will be selected by the Ticonderoga Natural Foods Coop steering committee. The winner must agree that Ticonderoga Natural Food Coop may publish their logo and name in advertising campaigns and/ or marketing materials in the future. Contestants must assign all ownership rights, including all intellectual property rights to the logo, to Ticonderoga Natural Foods Coop. Ticonderoga Natural Food Coop also reserves the right to alter, modify or revise the logo as it sees necessary and also reserves the right to not select a winner if no suitable entries are received.

Ticonderoga’s Legacy Park gains an addition By Fred Herbst

fred@denpubs.com TICONDEROGA Ñ Champlain Legacy Park has a new addition. A park bench has been placed in direct view of the LaChute River Falls by the Ticonderoga Historical Society. The Champlain Legacy Park is located adjacent to TiconderogaÕ s Bicentennial Park. Ò To serve the people is a primary objective of the Once Upon a Park Bench project,Ó June Curtis, historical society grant coordinator, said. “Reflecting on the definition that parks are for rest and recreation, a need was identified for resting areas. The latest enhancement to Champlain Legacy Park is this park bench, situated steps from the parking area where it is wheelchair accessible and strategically placed for enjoying the view of the LaChute River Falls.Ó The projectÕ s goal is to enrich the quality of life for local people and visitors. Ò Judging from the number of individuals who have commented on the park bench in the few short weeks it has been in place, Once Upon a Park Bench is deemed a great success,Ó , Bill

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Dolback, town historian and historical society president, said. Ò The bench will be dedicated in the spring as part of our annual Memorial Day ceremony.Ó The bench project was coordinated by the Ticonderoga Historical Society and made possible by a grant award from the South Lake Champlain Fund administered through the Vermont Community Foundation. Curtis said the park bench is another community-friendly enhancement to an historic area of Ticonderoga and plays a part in the commemorations of the 250th anniversary of the settlement of Ticonderoga. Ti will mark its 250th anniversary in 2014. Ò As most people know, Ticonderoga, Ô the place between the watersÕ Ñ a name given by Native Americans Ñ is situated between two magnificent lakes,” Curtis said. “The cool, pure waters of Lake George flow north into the LaChute River, passing through the town over a series of waterfalls and eventually emptying into the larger Lake Champlain. Ò As the gateway to Lake Champlain, the LaChute River with its picturesque falls has gained much attention in recent years and has

Champlain Legacy Park has a new addition. A park bench has been placed in direct view of the LaChute River Falls by the Ticonderoga Historical Society. The Champlain Legacy Park is located adjacent to Ticonderoga’s Bicentennial Park. been the inspiration behind many projects such as the growth in Bicentennial Park, the LaChute River Walking Trail, the historic preservation of the Frazier Bridge and the development of

Champlain Legacy Park. The emphasis continues to be to serve the people while respecting the natural environment,Ó she said.


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December 14, 2013

Broadway comes to Ticonderoga schools

Diane Legro performs for Ticonderoga Middle School students. Legro is a member of The Learning Arts, which presented “Broadway and Carnegie Hall” to students recently.

Steven Herring performs for Ticonderoga Middle School students. Herring is a member of The Learning Arts, which presented “Broadway and Carnegie Hall” to students recently.

Photo by Nancy Frasier

Photo by Nancy Frasier

The Learning Arts performs, teaches By Fred Herbst

fred@denpubs.com TICONDEROGA Ñ Ticonderoga students got a taste of Broadway recently. The Learning Arts, a collaboration of music and education professionals, recently presented Ò Broadway and Carnegie HallÓ to students. ItÕ s the second year The Learning Arts has visited TiconderogaÕ s middle and high schools. Ò Most of the performers have changed, but the quality remains the same,Ó John Donohue, middle school principal, said. Ò The performers have played in venues like Carnegie Hall, Broadway and PROMS. They really are some of the best of the best.

Ò The performing and teaching artists of The Learning Arts are here in our school district through the generosity of an anonymous donor family from the region,Ó he said. Ò They will be performing concerts and leading thematic workshops linked to life skills, the academic curriculum and the arts. They are leaders in their field and come highly recommended.” Dianne Legro, a stage actress and singer, Tom McCoy a pianist and composer, Steven Herring, an opera and stage performer, and Jim Benoit, a percussionist, made the trip to Ticonderoga. Ò TheyÕ re phenomenal,Ó Donohue said. Ò ItÕ s a great opportunity for our kids to enjoy these professional artists. ItÕ s a wonderful learning experience.Ó Besides performing, members of The Learning Arts did workshops with students that incorporated science, English, math, history and art. Ò Music touches all of us,Ó Legro said, Ò and it

touches so many aspects of our lives. We want children to see music everywhere they look.Ó Besides Ò Broadway and Carnegie Hall,Ó the troupe presented programs on Ò Music as StoryÓ and Ò Exploring American Poetry and Literature through Music.Ó The Learning Arts visit to Ticonderoga was free to the school. The cost of the three-day program was covered by an anonymous donor, Donohue said. Legro said the anonymous donor has deep roots in the Adirondacks and a desire to share love of the arts with local students. Thanks to the donation, Legro said The Learning Arts will visit all 62 schools in the Adirondack Park this academic year. Ò We have been committed to education and life long learning for more than 30 years,Ó John Cimino, president of The Learning Arts, said. Ò Education is the centerpiece of our mission.

Our work with educators and students in more than 30 states has won us national recognition and our unique innovations in arts-based teaching and learning, linked to our signature approaches to interdisciplinary thinking, creativity, and knowledge integration place us at the cutting edge of educational research, theory and practice. We work with students of all ages and all abilities. Ò Our programs are interactive learning experiences designed to spark studentsÕ thinking, curiosity and the desire to learn more,Ó he said. Ò From one-hour workshops exploring the inner life of music and art to music-centered programs illuminating the inner workings of science and the humanities, our programs support and extend academic curriculum standards while building important connections between ideas. Our programs are at once playful, serious, creative and fun.Ó

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December 14, 2013

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Times of Ti - 5

Ti car show results released By Fred Herbst

fred@denpubs.com TICONDEROGA Ñ The Ticonderoga Area Chamber of Commerce has closed the books on its 21st annual Ticonderoga Area Car Show. Ò On behalf of the chamber and the car show committee I would like to thank our sponsors and volunteers for their support in making the car show and the efforts of the chamber possible,Ó said Matthew Courtright, chamber executive director. Ò Without all of you the show would not be happening each and every year. I would also like to thank all of the local and state agencies.Ó The car show, held Aug. 4, featured 28 classes with awards in each class. The show was a judged show and a Ò SuperWheels ShowdownÓ qualifier. During the event there were a variety of food, vendors, a 50/50 raffle, silent auction raffle tent, car show raffle and music by Jerry’s Juke Box along with a piston toss, muffler wrap, hoola hoop contest and a New York State Police seat belt demonstration. As part of the show, the Kiwanis Club of Ticonderoga duck race was held on the LaChute River. There was a Community Cruise starting at the Best Western Plus Ticonderoga Inn & Suites the day before teh show and a Downtown Cruise In was held with music in front of the chamber office. Awards were given at the Cruise In. The Downtown Cruise In was open to the public with an opportunity to view cars, listen to music and visit local businesses. The Chamber also worked with area businesses to offer specials and promotions during the car show weekend. Sponsors of the 21st annual car show were, at the $500 level, Denton Publications/Times of Ti, Dunkin Donuts of Ticonderoga McDonaldÕ s/ Hearburg Enterprises and TonyÕ s Ticonderoga Sports; at the $250 level, A&S Customs, Best Western Plus Ticonderoga Inn & Suites, Christopher Chevrolet, Inter-Lakes Health and the Wagon Wheel Restaurant; at the $100 level, Affordable Workplave Safety LLC, Avery Energy, Bangma Signs, Bridge Point Communication, Carney & Breitenbach,

Crab Shack Snack Bar, Champlain Valley Heating& Plumbing LLC, CSEA Local 816, DulacÕ s Bookkeeping & Tax Preparation/Reynolds Logging, Egglefield Bros. Inc., Glens Falls National Bank, Hong Kong Jade, International Paper Co., LockrowÕ s, LormanÕ s Embroidery, Engraving & Screenprinting, Moriah Shock-NYSCOPBA, Napa Auto Parts, Port Henry Service Center, Rathbun Jewelers, Snug Harbor Marina, The Wind Chill Factory, Ticoneroga Federal Credit Union, Ticonderoga Kiwanis Club and Village Auto; at the $60 level, D.L. Paige Building & Excavating, Hot Biscuit Diner, H&R Block, JayÕ s Sunoco, JimÕ s Body Shop, R. Patnode Plumbking, Heating & Wiring, The Old Mine and Wilcox & Regan Funeral Home. Additional sponsors were Adirondack Outhouses by Tyler, Classic Industries, Fort Ticondeorga, Hagerty Insurance, Jegs, Kneucraft Fine Jewelry & Design, Lake Champlain Bridge Community, Lake George Lettering, Powersheen Tire Brite, Rock Auto, Sugar Hill Manor B&B, Summit Racing, Tenneco and The Country Florist & Gifts. The 21st annual Ticonderoga Area Car Show winners include: Super Wheels Qualifiers: Jacques Chevalier; Best of Show Car: Jacques Chevalier; Best of Show Truck: Dennis Martinez; Best of Show Street Rod: Bill McGreevy; Best of Show Motorcycle: Mary Huryn; Best Display Winner: Ted & Amy Sheloski; Fans Choice: Dale & Deanna Gonyea; Chambers Choice: Travis Sherman; Most Likely To Get Pulled Over: Rich & Connie Wylie; Club Participation: Snake Mountain Boys; Muffler Rap: Whitney Tuthill; Piston Toss: Whitney Tuthill Class A: 1st: Chuck & Holly Moore 2nd: Elwin Hall 3rd: Christine & Ed Markiwicz; Class B: 1st: Jim Taylor 2nd: Holly Palmer 3rd: Mike Dangelico; Class B+: 1st: Richard Bennett 2nd: Vance Hargett 3rd: Bob Urban; Class C: 1st: Raymond Purner 2nd: Bob Baxter 3rd: Tim Wisell ; Class D: 1st: Ray Papandrea 2nd: Bill Steffes ; Class E: 1st: Ann Griffin 2nd: Larry Michael 3rd: Sandy Warrington; Class F: 1st: Ron Cossey 2nd: Don Elmore; Class G: 1st: Jacques Chevalier 2nd: Gary Little John 3rd: Doug Dekalb; Class H: 1st: Rick Rudolph 2nd: Travis Sherman 3rd: Gordy Gordon ; Class I:

1st: Rick & Connie Wylie 2nd: Doug Goodfellow 3rd: Stanley Morrow; Class J: 1st: David Cavagas 2nd: Billy Rooker 3rd: Bob LaBarge; Class J+: 1st: Deb & Bill Hall 2nd: Dan Newell 3rd: Brian Galusha; Class K: 1st: Gary Payne 2nd: Fred & Doreen Brown 3rd: Robert Ladieu; Class L: 1st: Mark & Linda Bonestead 2nd: Dennis Coderre 3rd:Rick & Sue Wilbert Class M: 1st: Bob Jaquis 2nd: Ted & Andy Shelaski 3rd: Marissa Collins; Class N: 1st: Tom Small 2nd: Dan Chriss 3rd:Bob Collins; Class O: 1st: Pete Green 2nd: Richard Parrotte 3rd: Mike Wetherby; Class P: 1st: John Goodroe 2nd: Julie Thompson 3rd: Travis Wallace; Class Q: 1st: James Provost 2nd: Russell Burke 3rd: John Zerbe; Class R: 1st: Harry Goodwin 2nd: Michael Reed 3rd: Tom Neddo; Class S: 1st: Dennis Martinez 2nd: Robert & Laura Brace 3rd: Russell Burke; Class T: 1st: Tim Supernaut 2nd: Shane Leonard ; Class U: 1st: Corteuessa 2nd: Cole; Class V: 1st: Vernon Centerbar 2nd: Rich Marilyn 3rd: Shirley McGire; Class W: 1st: George & Pat Riley 2nd: Dave Philipkosky 3rd: Mitzi Wood; Class X: 1st: Wayne Burch 2nd: George Demers 3rd: Dennis Brittle; Class Y: 1st: Mary Huryn 2nd: Fred Pelerin 3rd: Mary Huryn; Class Z: 1st: Rick Krammer 2nd: Larry Huestis 3rd: Kent Belden For more information contact the Ticonderoga Area Chamber of Commerce at 585-6619 or email chamberinfo@ticonderogany.com.

Ruth Fingland listens intently to a Christmas story during “The Family Holiday Book Reading” at the Black Watch Memorial Library. Library staff and volunteers read Christmas stories to children as part of the annual North Country Christmas in Ticonderoga. Photo by Nancy Frasier

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Guest Viewpoint

Support the ‘preferred alternative’ EditorÕ s Note: At the time of this printing, the Adirondack Park Agency was poised to make an historic classification of thousands of acres of former Finch Pruyn land, known as the Essex Chain of Lakes. The following is a joint statement from Hamilton County Board of Supervisors Chairman William Farber and Essex County Board of Supervisors Chairman Randall Douglas regarding a new proposed classification known as the ‘preferred alternative.’

T

he proposed APA Classification map released last week for the Essex Chain of Lakes sustains some key recreational priorities for Essex and Hamilton counties, particularly within the five towns that represent the Upper Hudson River Hub while providing protections for the most sensitive environmental areas. The establishment of a Wild Forest designation for key portions of the property will enhance recreational connections between our towns, and therefore economic opportunity for all of them. Plus, as we sustain the opportunity to connect these communities to the Forest Preserve, we cater to a broad group of recreational users and tie in our businesses back to the opportunity of the natural resource. Of particular importance to our communities has been: * Connecting the communities directly together, for recreational opportunities from mountain biking to snowmobiling * Assuring the general public access which is close and proximate to the Essex Chain, the Cedar River, and the Hudson River The packet released appears to assure the opportunities for those priorities and much more! The recommendation represents a tremendous amount of hard work, collaboration and compromises on the parts of the local communities, stakeholders, the APA and the state Department of Environmental Conservation. The result is a classification map which appears to weave together a rich maze of public comments, while achieving natural resource protection and fostering future economic opportunity. Breaking down traditional parochial boundaries and thinking is not easy, particularly in the Adirondacks. The efforts that these five towns have made to come together, plan together and, frankly, stand together, should be applauded and emulated going forward. The local governments deserve particular credit for their efforts to invite public input through community meetings, to foster productive dialogue through group planning exercises and, yes, to take the time to listen and understand the positions of those with differing views. When it comes to the Adirondacks being heard, this stands as a great success. It would appear that the State Agencies have been listening to all of us, as have Elected Officials right up to Governor Cuomo. It must be noted, that Governor CuomoÕ s willingness to come to the Park yet again, and listen to the concerns of the people involved, deserves our deep gratitude. Beyond that, Governor Cuomo demonstrated a deep understanding of Adirondack Park dynamic, when he suggested that Adirondack leaders should be talking more directly to each other. Governor CuomoÕ s view, that there existed an opportunity here, to respect the highest priority needs of the towns and the highest priorities of the environmental constituencies, may be about to play out, for the betterment of the Adirondack Park. Did our communities and constituents get everything we wanted in the proposed Essex Chain designation? Of course not! Nor should anyone have expected that one parcel of land could ultimately be classified in a way that would allow it to be everything for everyone. But the opportunities that could soon be before Essex and Hamilton Counties to provide unparalleled recreational opportunities and spur important new economic activity are exciting and historic, and set the stage for a much brighter future for our communities. Essex and Hamilton counties are the only two counties located entirely within the Adirondack Park, and represent more than 2.4 million of the ParkÕ s total 6 million acres. Adirondack Park. Even more significant, roughly 45 percent of Essex County and roughly 65 percent of Hamilton County are made up of state Forest Preserve land.

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December 14, 2013

Viewpoint

Give yourself the best gift of all

L

iving in our free society has true skill of a human willing to give many perks and benefits. and place personal needs below those All too often we never reof many others. After being jailed 27 ally appreciate how good we have it years for his life long battle against until we face that expected event that apartheid and injustice in South Afcould change ones life dramatically. rica, instead of becoming a bitter man Be it a health scare, a simple accident looking for revenge, he understood at home, a sudden job disruption or a that his nation needed to be healed. family/personal crisis or change. It can People of all skin color could begin happen to any of us, at any time or at addressing the problems in society any level of life. by putting their differences aside and Dan Alexander This wonderful and free society also working together for a true democratic Thoughts from comes with certain responsibilities; state. Knowing what needs to be done Behind the Pressline some mandatory like taxes, others are and having the courage to buck politioptional such as volunteering or concal and social trends is what sets Mantributing financially. Without individuals stepping dela apart. forward to accept these Ò optionalÓ responsibilities Mandela had the rare ability that few leaders have our society would surely fail. Like any organization to affect true change. IÕ m not suggesting that any of or group you belong to Ò duesÓ must be paid and sacus can live up to his accomplishments but each of rifices made for the good of the whole. us have the ability to do our small part to make an In recent weeks the news has been full of heroic impact in our communities. Sure times are tough and deeds and humanitarian tasks like guardsman and there is never enough money to satisfy all your needs. soldiers returning from the front protecting the freeBut look around. How much better do you still have doms we all enjoy; individuals donating organs so it than others around you? How many times in life that another may enjoy a fuller life; volunteer firedid someone, maybe even a stranger, extend a helpmen risking their lives and safety to enter into ing hand or an encouraging word when you needed burning buildings to save lives; volunteers devotit most? None of us ever know what the future holds. ing countless hours to shelter and feed homeless Mandela could have never imagined when he was individuals and even pets; toys being donated to thrown into jail in 1964 that someday he would be brighten a childÕ s Christmas; volunteers standing president of his country and be so beloved around out in the cold to ring bells at the red kettles collectthe world for his efforts. ing funds for those less fortunate and even children I urge you to do your part. If youÕ re unsure where sending funds to children in other countries ravaged to start, or even if you are already active in volunby storms and natural disasters. teering your time and making financial contribuNo one forces us to perform those tasks. We do tions, may I suggest a contribution to the United them because we know they are important things Way, your local hospital, church, shelter or one of that must be done. Some among us accept those rethe many excellent organizations serving the many sponsibilities cheerfully and with enthusiasm, deneeds throughout our communities. Drop that spare voting their life to good deeds whenever the need change in the Red Kettles around town or volunteer arises. Others accept them as part of life and do the some time helping out in an organization you may best they can to contribute what they can and yet know little about. There is always room for another others skirt bye, living off this wonderful society takset of helping hands. It won’t be easy at first, but ing as much as they can and putting back little. youÕ ll be pleased with the outcome. None of us are in a position to do it all, but each As we approach the holiday season make the of us in our own way needs to participate in the oppledge to do more this coming year than youÕ ve tional responsibilities of society. The difference bedone in the past. Volunteer your time, dig a little tween those who do and those who do not accept deeper when making that contribution and do it these added responsibilities can clearly be seen on with a smile on your face and joy in your heart. It their faces. The joy of helping someone other than is that type of effort made by millions around this yourself, is a gift that canÕ t be replicated. Folks going country and around the world that provides true through their own difficult times can often be lifted hope for mankind and sooner or later will aid in crein spirit by focusing their attention on others. The ating a world at peace and harmony. good deeds we do or, dues we pay, sooner or later circle back around making this a better community, Dan Alexander is publisher and CEO of Denton Publicountry and world that we all must share. cations. He may be reached at dan@denpubs.com. The recent passing of Nelson Mandela shows the

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6 - Times of Ti


December 14, 2013

www.timesofti.com

Times of Ti - 7

Letters to the Editor

Pay it forward To the Times of Ti: Nov. 28 the Canadian Pacific Holiday Train stopped in Ticonderoga as part of their 15th annual program to support local food programs. The Canadian Pacific representative, Katie Hill, wowed Margaret Beurlein from the Ticonderoga Food Pantry when she advised that the usual $1,000 donation was increased to $3,500 this year. Canadian Pacific is also matching donations made to Feeding America during the three weeks of the Holiday Train tour. Dec. 4 was the date for the annual Senior Citizens Holiday Luncheon at Ticonderoga Elementary-Middle School which is jointly sponsored by the school and Ticonderoga Kiwanis. Last year, Kiwanis started a new feature for this annual event, a door prize of $100 to the lucky individual whose number is drawn by Santa Claus. Before leaving at the end of the luncheon, this yearÕ s winner, Eileen McCabe, said that she had heard about the

Kiwanis BackPack Program and that she would like to donate her $100 prize to the program to help young children. Dec. 6 was the date for the fourth annual Shop & Dine Local sponsored by the Ticonderoga Area Chamber of Commerce. It was a busy evening all around, but the Burleigh Luncheonette was really jammed with Ò ElvisÓ Ð Jim Cawley providing the entertainment. One of Darlene TreadwayÕ s patrons was very pleasantly surprised to learn that one of the other diners, someone they had never met before, had paid their bill. Dec. 7 the students from Ticonderoga High School completed their annual Stuff-a-Bus event at the Ticonderoga Wal Mart store. Britney Shaw and Jay Wells coordinated the event. The students request that shoppers pick up a donation for the Ticonderoga Food Pantry while in the store and drop it off on their way out. Once again this year, the students were able to fill the bus thanks to the generosity of our local community members. In addition to the non-perishable foods, almost $300 in cash was collected for the food pantry. Also on Dec. 7 one of the diners at EddieÕ s Restaurant advised

that she had not been aware of what was being done with the local BackPack Program until she had seen the video report on Channel 3 - WCAX. She was impressed with the program and asked Dave Iuliano how she could make a donation to support the effort. She then wrote out a check for $1,000. This very generous donor prefers to remain anonymous. What goes around, comes around. The joyous spirit of the holiday season is all around us. No doubt, there are many other random acts of kindness that are not included here. Pay it forward. John Bartlett Ticonderoga

Laughter from the past To the Times of Ti: I thought thos article from the 1948 Ti Sentinel would bring some laughter to our community and to those who can remember those mentioned in the article. Happy holidays. Ann Morette Ti Sentinel Dec. 23, 1948

The Ticonderoga American Legion gathered to raise a flag Dec. 7 in remembrance of Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that killed 2,386 Americans and sparked U.S. entry into World War II. From left are Richard Gaulin, Harry Treadway, Jim McKee, Chuck Campney, Kendall Thompson, Charles Messier, Bill Sanders and Craig Cassidy.

Adirondack Community Fellowship: 14 Park Ave. Tel: 518-636-6733. Pastor Steve Blanchard Email: PastorSteve@AdirondackCommunityFellowship.org www.AdirondackCommunityFellowship.org Sunday Service at 10:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. in cooperation with Hague Weslyan Church. Tuesday 6 p.m. Bible Study. Quaker Worship Group: Sunday at 4 p.m. At the residence of Mary Glazer and Mark Moss, 144 Lake George Ave. Potluck to follow at approximately 5:30 p.m. at 144 Lake George Ave. Contacts: Mary Glazer and Mark Moss, 518-585-7949. St. Mary’s: Masses: Sat. 4:30 p.m.: Sun. 8 a.m., 11 a.m. Pastor Rev. Kevin McEwan, Deacon Elliott A. Shaw. 12 Father Joques Place 585-7144 First Baptist Church: Services: Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10:45 a.m.; Sun. evening 6 p.m.; Wed. Prayer meeting 7 p.m. Rev. Larry Maxson. 210 The Portage 585-7107 First United Methodist Church: Sun. Services 8:30 & 10:30 a.m.; 9:30 Adult Education. Everyone Welcome! 518-585-7995. Rev. Scott Tyler. 1045 Wicker St. Ticonderoga Assembly of God: Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Sunday Worship 10:45 a.m. (Children’s Church Provided) Wednesday Bible Study at 6:30 p.m. Thursday Prayer Meeting 6:30 p.m.. Pastor Sheridan Race, 32 Water Street. 585-3554. The Episcopal Church of the Cross: Sunday Eucharist, Church Service 9 a.m., Sunday School 8:45 a.m. The Rev. Marjorie J. Floor Priest-InCharge. Champlain Ave. 585-4032 Cornerstone Alliance Church: Sunday School 9:30 a.m., Worship Service 10:30 a.m. Tuesday B.A.S.I.C. youth group 6-8 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting 7 p.m. 178 Montcalm Street. Everyone is Welcomed! Contact Pastor Charlie Bolstridge. Lakeside Regional Church (Hague Wesleyan Church): 2nd Sunday of every month 10 a.m. Service at the Best Western Conference Center. A fellowship café time immediately following the service. Children’s church and nursery available. Senior Pastor Skip Trembley. www.lakesideregionalchurch.com

Sunday School at 11 a.m.; nursery care available. Coffee hour at 10:00 a.m. Communion first Sunday of each month. All are welcome. 532-7770 or 532-7272. Simple Truth Outreach: Saturday Night Fellowship 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Coffee House, Christian Music, Games Room. NEW LOCATION: Schroon Lake Community Church, NY 532-9092. Meet monthly beginning Saturday May 2nd. Next meeting is Saturday, Aug. 1st.

SILVER BAY

Grace Memorial Chapel: Sunday service June 30th - September 1st at 10:00am. Communion services on July 28th and August 25th at 10 a.m. All Are Welcome.

HAGUE

St. Isaac Jogues Roman Catholic Church: 9790 Graphite Mountain Rd.; Sunday Mass at 9 a.m. thru Labor Day. Pastor Rev. John O’Kane. Lakeside Regional Church (Hague Wesleyan Church): Starting January 27th we will be having Sunday morning services at 10:00 a.m. at the Hague Campus with a fellowship cafe time immediately following the service. Children’s church and nursery available. Senior Pastor Skip Trembley. www.lakesideregionalchurch.com Hague Baptist Church: Pastor - Cory MacNeil. Sunday morning: Adult Bible Study 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service 10:30 a.m., 543-8899

CROWN POINT

Sacred Heart Catholic Church: Masses: Sat. 7 p.m. Sun. 9:30 a.m. Rev. Kevin McEwan, Deacon Elliott A. Shaw. So. Main St. 597-3924 Crown Point Bible Church: 1800 Creek Road, 5973318. Sunday Morning Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Youth. Discipleship Ministry and Adult Grow Groups 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer

Services Photo by Nancy Frasier

Meeting, 7 p. m. Pastor Doug Woods, 597-3575. Crown Point United Methodist Church: Sunday Service 9:30 a.m. beginning the 1st Sunday May 5th until December 29th. The church is located at 1682 Creek Rd. Reverend Gregg L. Trask. First Congregational Church: Sunday Service 9:30 a.m. Reverend David Hirtle, Reverend Gregg Trask, Assoc. 597-3398. Park Place.

PORT HENRY

Mount Moriah Presbyterian Church: 19 Church Street, 546-7099. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m., Communion on first Sunday of each month. All are welcome. Rev. Kenneth N. Parker St Patrick’s Church: Masses: Sat. 4 p.m., Sun. 10:30 a.m. Rev. Albert J. Hauser, Pastor. 12 St. Patrick’s Place. 546-7254 Lake Champlain Bible Fellowship: Adult Sunday School 9-10 a.m.; Coffee Fellowship 10-10:30 a.m.; Worship Service 10:30 a.m.; Nursery (ages 0-3) and Children’s Church (ages 4-12) provided during worship service; Teen youth group (ages 12-18) meets Sunday evenings at 6 p.m.; Variety of studies and groups available that meet weekly. Visit our website to see our full calendar, www.lcbible.org. 6 Church Street, Port Henry, NY 518-546-4200. Pastor Jeremiah Brinkerman.

MINEVILLE

The Church of All Saints: Sun. Mass 8:30 a.m. Rev. Albert J. Hauser, Pastor. Bartlett Pond Rd., 546-7254 Mountain Meadows Christian Assembly: office located at 59 Harmony Rd.,Mineville N.Y. 12956 518354-2140 Pastor’s Martin & Deborah Mischenko. Bible Study Wed.@ 7:00 p.m @ office. Thurs. morning Prayer 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. @ pastors office. Firefighters for Christ prayer meeting first Tues. of

SCHROON LAKE

Our Lady of Lourdes: Masses (school year): Saturday - 4:30 p.m., Sunday - 10:30 a.m., Masses (Summer): Saturday - 4:30 p.m., Sunday - 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Mountainside Bible Chapel: Sunday Worship Service, Children’s Church & Nursery - 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study & Prayer Meeting, Youth Programs Pre-K through Grade 12, Nursery - 6 p.m. For more information, call 518-532-7128 ext. 3. Mountainside is located four 40 Industrial Drive miles south of Schroon Lake Village. Schroon Lake, New York St. Andrews Episcopal Church: Sunday Eucharist 9 a.m.; Thursday 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist. Sales, Installation Service of Oil-Fired & LP Gas For information call Adirondack Missions 494-3314 Heating Equipment Schroon Lake Community Church United Keith, Tim & Darryl Vander Wiele Church of Christ United Methodist: Worship and

(518) 532-7968

42341

119 Montcalm Street Ticonderoga, NY 585-7717 42342

MORIAH

Moriah United Methodist Church: 639 Tarbell Hill Rd., Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m.; Fellowship coffee hour following. Sunday School offered.

PUTNAM

United Presbyterian Church: Join us for Sunday worship services at 10 a.m. All are welcomed! The choir rehearses on Thursdays at 7 p.m. - New singers invited! 365 County Rt. 2, Off Rt. 22 in Putnam. 5478378. Rev. Patricia Davies Log Chapel Fellowship: Rt. 22. Services: Sun. School 10 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m.; Pastor Roger Richards. Please call 260-9710 for more information.

WITHERBEE

Healing Waters Church of God: Meets at the VFW Building in Witherbee, NY. Services: Sunday 11 a.m.; Children’s Church (Ages 3-12) ; Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. - 11 a.m.; Intercessory Prayer - Before Service; Fellowship lunch follows service; Wednesday Service 6:30 p.m.; Children’s Ministry (Ages 3-12); Coffee Fellowship 6 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Pastor Kermit M. Lavigne. Office: 518-232-4397. Mailing address: 24 Neddo St., Whitehall, NY 12887

POTTERSVILLE

SonRise Lutheran Church: Sunday Worship and fellowship 10:30 a.m. in Faith Hall at SonRise Lutheran Ministries Conference Center, 8260 Rt. 9, Pottersville, NY. For information please call 494-7077. www.sonriselc.org Pastor Benjamin Bahr 12-11-13 • 42337

SNUG HARBOR

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month @ office, second Wed. of month @ St. John’s Church 7:00 p.m. Sunday worship services call for times and locations.

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Church

Taxi pilot Walter Hurlburt called excitedly to Copper Vincent Vosburg the other early ayem and pointed to an owl perched sereely atop the Community Bldg. Mister Vosburg rushed to the police station, snatched a rifle and galloped back to the civic edifice. He blasted away at the becalmed bird, but even after three volleys the owl sat there as unperturbed as the SS Queen Mary in a light breeze. Messrs. Vosburg and Mister Hurlburt Ñ equally amazed Ñ examined gun and ammo and THEN decided to examine the bird, which turned out to be a craftily stuffed owl, nailed to the building by Ò DoodaÓ Morette to frighten away mannerless pigeons and which DAMN near frightened away Messrs. Vosburg and Hurlburt with* its apparent immunity to lead poisoning, and theyÕ ve been getting the Ò birdÓ ever since.

Moses-Ludington Hospital Heritage Commons, Ticonderoga, NY 585-2831

42344


8 - Times of Ti

www.timesofti.com

December 14, 2013

Ticonderoga student speaks to garden club TICONDEROGA Ñ The Carillon Garden Club furnishes a Ò campershipÓ annually to a student in the Ticonderoga School District to attend Camp Colby in Saranac Lake. The camp is run by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Campers participate in a discovery group while at camp, completing six lessons ranging from group dynamics to field, forest, and pond explorations, to a study of human impact. College-educated counselor staff leads all activities, encouraging participation and respect among group members while interpreting the natural environment for campers. Riley Quigley of Ticonderoga attended the camp in August through the Carillon Garden ClubÕ s campership program. He presented a presentation to the club recently. Highlights of his week were participating in sportsman education classes and meeting people from all over the state. Campership Committee Chairwoman Heidi Karkoski stated, Ò One of the Carillon Garden ClubÕ s objectives is to aid in the protection and conservation of natural resources, and sending a student to an environmental education camp is a great way to foster an appreciation for the natural world.Ó The campership program will be available in 2014 to students 11-13 years of age. The Carillon Garden Club covers full tuition, made possible by fundraisers held throughout the year. Information and applications will be available in the spring for the upcoming summer sessions.

Riley Quigley of Ticonderoga attended camp in August through the Carillon Garden Club’s campership program. From left are, Campership Committee Chairwoman Heidi Karkoski, club member Joyce Cooper, Quigley, his mother Holly Quigley, and Samantha Wells, Ticonderoga middle School guidance counselor. Photo by Nancy Frasier

Sharon Batram and Karleigh Jo Thompson celebrated Halloween at Heritage Commons Residential Healthcare’s annual party.

Hannah Duncan prepares to help Santa during the seventh annual SantaFest in Ticonderoga. SantaFest concluded the 11-day Ticonderoga Area North Country Christmas. Held at the Community Building, SantaFest was a free event that included music, games, crafts, refreshments and a visit from Santa. Photo by Nancy Frasier

Dining

&

Entertainment


December 14, 2013

www.timesofti.com

Times of Ti - 9

Artist Maura Jebb gets help from Marcus Moser, left, and Mark Donohue in sealing a retaining wall that is now a mural on Wicker Street in Ticonderoga. The project will be completed in the spring.

A new mural on Wicker Street in Ticonderoga shows an Adirondack lake being fed by a waterfall. It was designed by Maura Jebb, a Ticonderoga High School student, and Joan Pulling, a local artist who is mentoring her.

Ticonderoga

unfinished, but the wait will be worth it. Spring is not that far off. This was a large project, so IÕ m proud that three women were able to get the mural this far.Ó Maureen Jebb is also anxious to complete the project. Ò IÕ ve really loved being a part of this mural project,Ó she said. Ò ItÕ s been so much fun and very rewarding.Ó Maura Jebb thanked those who have helped with the mural, especially Van Wert and Pulling. Ò Mrs. Van Wert and Mrs. Pulling have been my teachers throughout this whole process,Ó she said. Ò IÕ ve learned so much about team work and cooperation. I donÕ t know how they do it. ItÕ s hard to work with many people. ThereÕ s so many opinions to hear and so many people to please. IÕ ve also learned that is takes a lot of jumping through hoops. Ò When the time came, it felt good just to start painting,Ó she said. Ò Mrs. Pulling has been amazing in teaching me the tricks of the trade. SheÕ s taught me so many little things that only experienced painters would know. She has made the process effortless and for the most part stress free. Her trained hand has added a lot of energy to the mural I wouldnÕ t be able to provide. My mom and friends have been incredible. They sped up the process exponentially. My mom painted with Mrs. Pulling and me even during the lousy weather. SheÕ s the best.Ó Van Wert praised the artists for their work. Ò It is a beautiful, uplifting image and inspires positive feeling

From page 1 Ò With permission from neighbors Doug and Robin Trudeau to use their outside water source, Art Hatfield and Jim Beaty power washed the wall to remove dirt and mold from the surface,Ó Van Wert said. Ò The long Columbus Day weekend provided perfect weather for two coats of a protective water sealant to be applied by Maura and her parents Paul and Maureen Jebb, friends Mark Donohue and Marcus Moser, with the help of Art Hatfield, Jim Beaty and myself. The sealant was tinted a sky blue which will act as the base for the sky and water. Ò The weather had been exceptional until now and the artists worked as long as weather permitted,Ó she said. The project will be completed in the spring. “We are done with painting this year, and I can’t wait to finish it in the spring,Ó Maura Jebb said. Ò Mrs. Pulling and I tried to give it one last whack, but the weather wasnÕ t cooperating. The wall was just too wet.Ó Pulling said the design was completed without technical assistance. Ò I would like people to know that the sketch was done the old fashioned way Ñ by eye,Ó she said. Ò I donÕ t like leaving a job

OBITUARIES RAYMOND C. THATCHER AUG 15, 1944 - DEC 05, 2013 Ticonderoga. Raymond C. and her husband Thomas of Thatcher, 69, of Ticonderoga, Hague and their children, passed away on Thursday, Raycia and Reegan Decker, December 5, 2013, at Fletcher Wendy S. Courtright and her Allen Health Care of Burlinghusband, Matthew of Port ton, Vermont. Henry and their Born in Ticonchildren, Megan deroga, August Tatro and Alyssa 15, 1944, he was Courtright, and the son of the Daniel S. Tatro late Carl and and his wife HeiKatherine di of Burnt Hills (Davis) Thatcher. and their chilRaymond was a dren, Isabella, 1962 graduate of Dane and Ticonderoga Gabriella; one High School. brother, Carl He was a veteran Thatcher and his of the U.S. Air Force, having wife Jeanne of Ticonderoga; served during the Vietnam three sisters, Shirley ThompEra. son of Ticonderoga, Carlene Mr. Thatcher was a life long Wendell and her husband, resident of Ticonderoga and Pete of Ticonderoga, and owner of the Wagon Wheel Kathi Frazier of Queensbury; Restaurant of Ticonderoga his aunt Ruth Woods; and for more than 30 years. many nieces, nephews and He served as Director of cousins. Emergency Services of Essex Calling hours for relatives County from 1990 to 2008. and friends were held SunHe was a member of the day, December 8, 2013 from 3 Ticonderoga Fire Depart- 7 p.m. at the Wilcox & Rement, where he served as gan Funeral Home, 11 AlChief and most recently gonkin St., Ticonderoga. Commissioner of the DepartA Mass of Christian Burial ment. was celebrated on Monday, He was a member and December 9, 2013 at 11:00 trustee of the Ticonderoga a.m. at St. Mary's Catholic Historical Society and a dediChurch of Ticonderoga. The cated and instrumental memRev. Kevin D. McEwan, Pasber of the Ticonderoga Area tor, officiated. Chamber of Commerce. The Rite of Committal with He was pre-deceased by his Fireman and Military Honors brother-in-law, Floyd followed at the family plot of Thompson. the Valley View Cemetery of He is survived by his wife, Ticonderoga. Robbin L. (Ezzo) Thatcher; Donations in Ray's memory his children, Eric M. Thatcher may be made to The Ticonof Warrensburg, Raymond C. deroga Historical Society, 6 Thatcher of Ticonderoga and Moses Circle, Ticonderoga, his children, Carter and Carli New York 12883. Thatcher, Tarin P. Decker

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GERALDINE DOMINICA SCUDERI MAR 03, 1936 - NOV 29, 2013 Queensbury. Geraldine Doeri, Victor Scuderi, Dennis minica Scuderi of QueensScuderi and Carl Scuderi; bury, passed away on Saturthree sisters, Elsie Scuderi, day, November 30, 2013. She Lois Crawford and Yvonne was 77. Rich; four grandsons, Shawn Born on March 3, West, Joel Mail1936, in Ticonlet, Chris Froderoga, NY, she man and Alex was the daughter Winters; one of the late Emgranddaughter, manuel and Natasha Winters; Christine E. two great-grand(Scott) Scuderi. children, Vincent Geraldine was a Michael West 1953 graduate of and Natalie Ticonderoga Maillet; and High School. many nieces and She married in nephews. 1956 and is survived by four Calling hours for relatives children. and friends were held ThursGeraldine was fondly known day, December 5, 2013 from as "Cheech". Her passion in 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. at the life was her artwork. Her Wilcox & Regan Funeral paintings grace many homes Home, 11 Algonkin St., and businesses throughout Ticonderoga. New York and MasA Funeral Service took place sachusetts. at 11:30 a.m. at the Funeral Survivors include her four Home. The Rev. Kevin D. children, Loyal Ann West of McEwan, Pastor of St. Mary's Queensbury, Gina Mesnick Catholic Church of Ticonof Hyde Park, Michael Winderoga officiated. ters of Putnam Valley, and The Rite of Committal folMichelle Froman of Albany; lowed at the family plot of St. six brothers, Emery Scuderi, Mary's Parish Cemetery of Vincent Scuderi, John ScudTiconderoga. NANCY DELARM FOGWELL DEC 30, 1929 - NOV 25, 2013 Hague. Nancy DeLarm Fogtween Hobe Sound, FL and well died on November 25, Hague. Richard Fogwell died 2013 from Alzheimer's Disin 1995. ease. Nancy is survived by her 4 She was born in Norwood, children; Susan DeLarmMassachusetts Sandman of Anon December 30, dover, MA, Sally 1929, the only DeLarm Rypkechild of Francis ma of Hague, and Georgia BurNY, Sheri Deditt Perry. Larm Ginn also Nancy graduatof Hague, David ed from SpringKeith DeLarm of field High School St. Augustine, in Springfield, FL, their spousVT and attended es, 8 grandchilColby Junior dren and a stepCollege in New son, Richard London, NH. Fogwell of Stamford, CT. After spending a summer on She will be remembered lovLake George waitressing at ingly for her warmth, her the Island Harbor Hotel in friendly, spirited nature and Hague, she met and married her irrepressible sense of fun. William Keith DeLarm in A private burial was held 1948. Together they raised and a gathering of friends their family of 4 children and and family to remember and operated DeLarm's Dairy celebrate her life is planned and then Wintergreen Lake for early summer. Campsite until his death in Arrangements are under the 1979. Nancy remarried in direction of the Wilcox & Re1984 to Richard E. Fogwell gan Funeral Home of Ticonand they split their time bederoga.

for anyone passing by,Ó Van Wert said. Ò I would also like to recognize two Ticonderoga businesses who were so helpful in offering their expertise and generous with material donations. Anne Charboneau of Ticonderoga Paint & Decorating donated half of our paint supplies for the wall. Al Mattison of Aubuchon Hardware provided recommendations on the best water seal product to use which Aubuchon provided at their cost. Their expertise ensured the best materials to extend the life of the project and their donations allowed the project to be completed within the amount awarded by the grant.Ó Van Wert said the project has been made possible, in part, by the Essex County Arts Council CAP Grant supported by public funds from Essex County.


www.timesofti.com

10 - Times of Ti

December 14, 2013

Congratulations Students! Crown Point Teachers’ Association

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www.timesofti.com

Times of Ti - 11

CONGRATULATIONS CONGRATULATIONS CONGRATULATIONS Honor Roll Students! HonorRoll Roll Students! Honor Students!

From the From the TICONDEROGA TEEN CENTER TICONDEROGA TEEN CENTER &&SILVER BAY YMCA SILVER BAY YMCA From the

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December 14, 2013


12 - Times of Ti

www.timesofti.com

December 14, 2013

Ticonderoga school merger group to meet

Santa Run slated by Port Henry firefighters

Ticonderoga church to serve free dinner

TICONDEROGA Ñ The Ticonderoga Central School merger study advisory committee will meet Tuesday, Dec. 17, at 6 p.m. at the high school. A regular board of education meeting will follow at 7 p.m.

PORT HENRY Ñ The Port Henry Fire Department will hold its annual Santa Run Sunday, Dec. 15, beginning at noon. Santa Claus, as assisted by his firefighter elves, will distribute candy to all good girls and boys throughout the village of Port Henry.

Crown Point chamber plans Christmas dinner

Crown Point fire commissioners to meet

CROWN POINT Ñ The Crown Point Chamber of Commerce will hold its annual Christmas potluck on Tuesday, Dec. 17, at 6:30 p.m. at the home of Joe and Cindy Bodette (Crown Point Barbecue) 2796 Route 9N (across from the senior center). Door prizes will be given by Stoney Lonesome Bed and Breakfast and Crown Point Barbecue. Members are encouraged to attend. RSVPÕ s are encouraged to cbodette@cptelco.net or 5973160.

CROWN POINT Ñ The Crown Point Fire District board of fire commissioners will meet Wednesday, Dec. 18, at 7 p.m. The meeting is open to the public.

TICONDEROGA Ñ The next free community fellowship dinner at the First United Methodist Church in Ticonderoga will be Sunday, Dec. 15, 4:30 to 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome. The menu will include lasagna, salad, garlic bread, desserts and beverages. Christmas songs and a festive atmosphere will complete the time together. While there is no charge, a free-will donation is appreciated. High chairs, booster seats and a child friendly menu will also be available. Take-outs are also available. For more information about the free dinners or the church contact the church office at 585-7995 or visit the church web site at www.tifumc.com.

Putnam school board schedules meeting PUTNAM Ñ The Putnam Central School board of education will meet Monday, Dec. 16, at 6:30 p.m.

Schroon library to host children’s programs

Putnam school plans concert, early dismissal PUTNAM Ñ The Putnam Central School Christmas concert will be held Tuesday, Dec. 17 at 7 p.m. In the event of in bad weather, the concert will be held on Thursday, Dec. 19 at 7 p.m. Students will be dismissed from school at 11:45 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 20.

Times of Ti to be mailed to specific addresses

Moriah Food Pantry benefit scheduled PORT HENRY Ñ The Port Henry Knights of Columbus will host a benefit for the Moriah Food Pantry Saturday, Dec. 14, 7 to 11 p.m. The band White Hot Monkey Love will perform. Cost of admission are non-perishable food items, personal care products, serviceable clothing, etc. Raffle tickets will be given out for donated items and there will be a drawing held at the end of the night for gift certificates donated by local businesses.

CROWN POINT Ñ The Crown Point Central School board of education will hold a meeting on the Crown Point-Ticonderoga school merger study Tuesday, Dec. 17, at 6 p.m. in the district library. A regular board meeting will follow at 7 p.m.

TICONDEROGA Ñ Beginning with the issue of January 4, 2014 the Times Of Ti will begin individually addressing each paper to better manage and optimize the paperÕ s delivery each week. By doing so we can insure that each household is receiving a copy of the paper and at the same time this method will allow us to better manage addresses for unoccupied homes and homes that for whatever reason do not want to receive the printed copy each week. Over the course of the next few months we will be fine tuning the addresses and insuring that they follow USPS Carrier Walk Sequencing. If for some reason you do not receive the paper as you normally have in the past and you reside within our free delivery zone, please call our office at 518-873-6368 or you may email us at circulation@denpubs.com so that we may add you to our list of addresses.

Port Henry offices to observe holidays

Ti Revitalization Alliance holding raffle

Schroon Lake seniors accepting members

PORT HENRY — The village of Port Henry offices and departments will be closed on Christmas Day, Dec. 25, and New YearÕ s Day, Jan. 1.

TICONDEROGA Ñ The Ticonderoga Revitalization Alliance will raffle a Weber Performer Grill to celebrate the holidays and the opening of KeithÕ s Market. Aubuchon Hardware donated the grill, a $350 value. The grill is on display and tickets on sale for $5 each at KeithÕ s Market, 109 Montcalm St. Tickets are also available at the Downtown Gallery at 119 Montcalm St. and at the RathbunÕ s Jewelers at 126 Montcalm St. Tickets are tax deductible and all proceeds go to Ticonderoga Revitalization Alliance. The drawing will be held at KeithÕ s Monday, Dec. 23, at 3 p.m.

SCHROON LAKE Ñ The Schroon Lake Senior Center is accepting new members. Membership, open to people age 55 and older, is $20 a year. Activities include nutrition meals Monday through Friday, Wii bowling on Wednesday, bingo on Thursdays, game nights, potluck dinners, weekly shopping trips to Ticonderoga, Zumba Gold every Monday and bus trips to malls and casinos. For more information or to join call 532-7755.

SCHROON LAKE Ñ Ò Holiday Crafts for ChildrenÓ will be held at the Schroon Lake Public Library every Saturday in December 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Each week will have a different theme It is free for children age 3 and older. For further information contact the library at 532-7737 ext. 13.

Crown Point school board to meet on merger

Ticonderoga school to dismiss students early TICONDEROGA Ñ Ticonderoga Central School and St. MaryÕ s School will dismiss early Friday, Dec. 20. Ti Elementary School will dismiss at 1:05 p.m., the middle school at 1;10 p.m., St. MaryÕ s a 1:15 p.m. and Ti High School at 1:20 p.m.

Crown Point church to hold service CROWN POINT Ñ First Congregational Church of Crown Point will hold a service Sunday, Dec. 15, at 9:30 a.m. It will include lighting the third Advent candle by the Ingleston family. The service will be conducted by Pastor David Hirtle. There will be a menÕ s breakfast Friday, Dec. 13, at 7:30 a.m. at Silver Bay. Second Blessings Thrift Shoppe, located in the Hammond Chapel, will close for the season Tuesday, Nov. 26. If there is an urgent need call 597-3398 or 597-3520. For more information call 597-3398/3800 or 597-3520 or go online at www.Brickchurchonline.com

Schroon Lake school board meeting slated SCHROON LAKE Ñ The Schroon Lake Central School board of education will meet Wednesday, Dec. 18, at 7 p.m. in the school auditorium.

Putnam church to hold service PUTNAM Ñ The Putnam United Presbyterian Church will hold third Sunday in Advent worship service Dec. 15 at 10 a.m. The lighting ceremony will be conducted by Charles and Anne Turek. Scripture readings from Isaiah 35: 1-10 and Matthew 11: 2-11 will be read by Deacon Stan Burdick. Pastor Pat Davies will sermon will be Ò HumanityÔ s Hope Falls Short of Holy Hopes.Ó Coffee and fellowship will follow in the Martha OÕ Dell hall. The church is located on the Lower Road (County Route 2) in Putnam Station. For more information, call the church at 5478378.

Ti coffee house to feature Christmas program TICONDEROGA Ñ TiÕ coustics will hold a Ò Christmas Acoustic Song FestivalÓ coffee house Wednesday, Dec. 18, 6 to 9 p.m. at the Burleigh House, 120 Montcalm St., Ticonderoga. There is no cover charge, but donations are accepted. All money raised is contributed to the Ticonderoga Revitalization Alliance to be used to assist with plans for community redevelopment.

High Peaks Hospice, musician join forces LAKE PLACID Ñ High Peaks Hospice & Palliative Care and musician Martha Gallagher are joining together in 2014 in a unique partnership. Through her performances Gallagher, well known in the region as The Adirondack Harper, will help to raise awareness about the mission of and services provided by High Peaks Hospice & Palliative Care. Her tour of the Adirondacks, and her partnership with High Peaks Hospice & Palliative Care, kicks off with her new onewoman show, Ò Where the Heart IsÓ at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts, Friday, Jan. 24. For more information visit www. adkharper.com or highpeakshospice.org

Women’s Bible study available at Ti church TICONDEROGA Ñ There will be a womenÕ s Bible study and fellowship meeting weekly at Cornerstone Alliance Church in Ticonderoga. The study will be in the book of John and women are welcome to come to either the 10 a.m. or 7 p.m. study on Mondays. There is no cost involved. For more information call PJ Bolstridge at 585-7596.

Port Henry church plans Christmas celebration PORT HENRY Ñ Lake Champlain Bible Fellowship, located at 6 Church St., Port Henry, will host a community Christmas celebration Sunday, Dec. 15, at 6 p.m. The event will include Christmas carols, a childrenÕ s Christmas play and a reading of the Christmas story. Following the program there will be Christmas refreshments, hot chocolate and coffee in the fellowship area.

Schroon Lake Library book sale planned SCHROON LAKE Ñ The Schroon Lake Public Library Friends of the Library Bookstore will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14. The store will be closed after this sale until spring. The store is located in the basement of the Schroon Lake Health Center. For further information or to donate books or DVDs contact the library at 532-7737 ext. 13.

Ti craft fair to benefit children’s charity TICONDEROGA Ñ The Ticonderoga Walmart Store #2424 will host a holiday craft fair Saturday, Dec. 14, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Craft donations from local crafters are being sought. To donate drop items at the store to Elise, Amie or Yvonne. Proceeds will go to the ChildrenÕ s Miracle Network.

Schroon veterans seeking clothing donations SCHROON LAKE Ñ The Schroon Lake VFW and American Legion are asking that people drop their excess clothing and shoes into the large marked BlueBox container located behind the Schroon town hall, next to the food pantry entrance. Items will help the Schroon area veterans.

Ti school calendar has incorrect schedule TICONDEROGA Ñ The basketball schedule posted on the Ticonderoga school calendar is incorrect. For a correct schedule people refer to Ò AthleticsÓ on the Ticonderoga k12.org website.

Christmas Bazaar slated in Schroon Lake SCHROON LAKE Ñ The Schroon Lake Community ChurchÕ s WomenÕ s Society Christmas Bazaar will be Saturday, Dec. 14, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. A luncheon of homemade soup, sandwiches and pies will be served. A GrannyÕ s Attic table of new and used items and a bake table of homemade baked goods will be for sale.

Pinochle, games to be played in Ticonderoga TICONDEROGA Ñ Adirondack Aerie #4410 of Ticonderoga will host pinochle, pitch, pool and shuffleboard games on Fridays at 6 p.m. through Dec. 28. Games are $3 a player, winner takes all. Call Jack Hargett at 942-3059 or Arnie LaFountain 585-6198 for more information.

Knitting group to form in Schroon Lake SCHROON LAKE Ñ The Schroon Lake Library is forming a once-a-week knitting group. Knitters will meet every Thursday from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. during the winter months. The group will meet to learn new techniques, work on projects together and free knit. The group is for all levels of knitters, from first time knitters to the more experienced knitter. People can bring work to share. The library has an assortment of needles for members to borrow for their knitting projects. For further information contact the library at 532-7737 ext. 13.

Raffle, sale to benefit memorial garden effort PORT HENRY Ñ Fund raising efforts for the Lake Champlain Memorial Garden and Angel of Hope Monument in Port Henry are under way. A raffle for $300 of home heating fuel or propane is being held. Tickets are $5 each or six for $25. The drawing will be Jan. 1. Also, glass angel ornaments/figurines are on sale for $10 each and birch bark snowflake ornaments are on sale for $5 each. To purchase raffle tickets or ornaments, contact Luci Carpenter at 572-6427 or at Lightworks Reiki, 4326 Main St. Suite 1, Port Henry.

Eagles plan Christmas party in Ticonderoga TICONDEROGA Ñ FOE - 4410 Eagles Club of Ticonderoga will have a Christmas party on Sunday, Dec. 15, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Penelope the Clown will be there at 2 and Santa will arrive at 2:30 p.m.

Crown Point Food Pantry available CROWN POINT Ñ The Crown Point Food Pantry is open Thursdays 9 to 11 a.m. In December it will be closed on Dec. 26. In case of emergency call Pat Sawyer at 597-3927.

Black Watch offers holiday book sale TICONDEROGA Ñ The Black Watch Library book sale will have a holiday two-for-one sale through Christmas. Hard cover books will be two for $1, paperbacks two for 50 cents, children and young adult books two for 25 cents. There is a large selection of free books. The book sale is located in the basement of the Ticonderoga Community Building and is accessible Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. All proceeds go to the Black Watch Memorial Library.

RSVP seeking tax-preparation volunteers PORT HENRY Ñ RSVP is looking for volunteer tax preparers for the Earned Income Tax Credit/ETIC Program in January. Volunteers will undergo training and become certified by the IRS to prepare income taxes for seniors, families and individuals making less than $50,000. Interested people can contact Barb Brassard at RSVP by Email at rsvp@logical.net or call 546-3565.

North Hudson auxiliary planning memory tree NORTH HUDSON Ñ The North Hudson Volunteer WomenÕ s Auxiliary will once again have a memory tree. People can purchase a red ribbon for $1 and have a loved one remembered on the memory tree. All names will be read at a tree lighting in December. Send your names and money to Brenda Bessey, 3084 US Route 9, North Hudson 12855 or call 532-7914 for more information.

Health insurance assistance available TICONDEROGA Ñ The Southern Adirondack Independent Living Center will have employees available locally who can help people apply, understand and enroll in the new health insurance options. To schedule an appointment call 792-3537 or email SailNavigators@gmail.com Assistance will be available at the Ticonderoga Community Building every Friday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through Dec. 27; at the Schroon town hall every Tuesday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through Dec. 31; and at the Crown Point town hall every Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to noon through Dec. 18.

Transfer station tickets available at site TICONDEROGA Ñ Transfer station tickets are available for purchase at the Ticonderoga Transfer Station during regular hours of Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. by check only.

Church youth group to gather TICONDEROGA Ñ The Cornerstone Alliance Church youth group will meet Sundays 6 to 8 p.m. It is open to people ages 1018. For information call Pastor Charlie Bolstridge at 585-6391 or email charlieandpj@aol.com


December 14, 2013

www.timesofti.com

Times of Ti - 13

With better broadband, telecommuting could help economy By Katherine Clark

katherine@denpubs.com CROWN POINT — With sufficient technology improvements, the Internet could provide jobs for locals and allow new people to come to the Adirondack Park to live and work at home. Job opportunities in the North Country is no longer reliant on the industries of mining, agriculture and timber. In rural communities, the future for filling homes and schools with year-round residents and job creation for current residents could come from employment at companies elsewhere through telecommuting. A roundtable discussion was held at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake on Oct. 24 to address community concerns and educate participants about how to bring successful broadband connections to rural communities. The forum was led by the New York State Broadband Program Office, USDA, and Adirondack Action for a Smart Rural Communities (SRC). Ò One of the major talking points was a lot of people donÕ t have access to broadband,Ó said Wild Center Director of Philanthropy Hillarie Logan-Dechene. Ò At the conference, the attending agencies listened to audience questions and gave people the right contacts for them to call if they are serious about improving their broadband connections.Ó Topics that were discussed included: USDA Rural Development and New York State Broadband Programs, eligibility requirements, program structures and purposes, funding pathways and statewide needs as well as general discussion on each of the programÕ s administration. About 70 community members attended the discussion. Speakers included Bob Puckett of the New York Telecommunications Assoc., Dave Wolf of Development Authority of the North Country, Rob Ottara and Renee Hotte of the USDA. Ò There are resources out there for people to bring broadband to their community. The number one person to call would be Angel Liotta, the Broadband outreach director with Empire State Development,Ó Logan-Dechene said. If the expansion of broadband is successful, programs such as Adirondack Teleworks Ñ based in the town of Indian Lake Ñ could help open up job oppoprtunities for Adirondackers and lure more telecommuters to the region. Adirondack Teleworks was built to help people find telecommuting jobs anywhere in the Adirondack Park through the Internet. Bill Murphy, public relations manager and member of the Adirondack Teleworks, said the not-for-profit group has been working for three years to get funding for broadband projects in the region. Ò WeÕ re trying to promote current teleworks. We now have the ability to live and work here,Ó Murphy said. Ò Also we need to bring in training for workforce investment. WeÕ re hoping to get money to start training people in digital literacy.Ó Murphy said if they can get the funding, the goal is to begin digital literacy training in local libraries with 120-hour courses. At the end of the course, participants will receive a work readiness certificate. “When people walk in with the course certification, they’ll have all the qualifications to work in a telecommuting situation,” Murphy said.

Dave Nethaway works from home with his sidekick, Daniel the dog. Photo Provided

losing the opportunity because they didnÕ t want to live where our offices were,” Nethaway said. Essentially, Nethaway built a system to support telecommuting and then used it himself by moving to the Adirondack Park with his wife, Jessica Hartley. Nethaway said he canÕ t do his job without email, VoIP technologies (voice over Internet protocol), chat technologies, video conferencing, mobile devices (smartphones and tablets), online collaboration services like Sharepoint, VPN (virtual private network) and other remote access technologies. During the first two years the couple lived in Keene, they both telecommuted for companies based in Boston. Hartley eventually took a position locally as the executive director for the North Country SPCA, based in Elizabethtown. Ò My wife and I had always come here for hiking or vacations,Ó Nethaway said. “We were married in Lake Placid. When we first decided to move here, we really didnÕ t have a place picked out, so we cast a wide net of where we could live.Ó Ultimately, their decisions were narrowed down to locations with sufficient broadband for their work. Ò Most of the bigger communities have big companies like Time Warner or Charter Communications offering broadband services. In Keene, they had to make a community effort and fundraised for a local broadband system,Ó Nethaway said. Ò We knew Keene from hiking trips when we were tourists. Now weÕ ve come to love it since we moved here. WeÕ re moving to a bigger place to support our growing family of dogs and cats, but weÕ re staying in Keene.Ó

Moving to Minerva

Keene couple

For Gore Mountain Region Chamber of Commerce Director Lisa Salamon, who lives in the town of Minerva, the viability of telecommuting made it possible for her to move to the Adirondack Park and earn a living. Salamon works in the insurance business as a freelance crisis consultant for businesses and major corporations. Ò I moved here from West Chester, Pa., an area with very reliable, very fast fiber optic network. There was never a technical problem,Ó Salamon said. Ò I had a lot of travel. There was a lot of working out of home and a lot of time in airports.Ó Salamon began working as the new chamber director in January. She had been visiting her traditional log cabin on Minerva

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Established telecommuters working in the digital field can more successfully move their home offices to the Adirondacks, as opposed to vacationing here, according to Keene resident Dave Nethaway, who is vice president of technology for the Human Services Research Institution, based in Cambridge, Mass. Ò The Adirondacks for us was always a place we said weÕ d want to retire one day or, if we were financially able, buy a second home,Ó Nethaway said. Ò Then we thought, Ô Why not live the dream now?Õ Ó From his Boston office, Nethaway established a technology management network for his companyÕ s West Coast branch. Ò We wanted to recruit the best candidates for the job without

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Lake with her family for years; it was their vacation home, away from the hustle and bustle of city life in West Chester, a county seat of 18,000 residents just outside of Philadelphia. So why move to the town of Minerva Ñ population around 800 Ñ in New YorkÕ s Adirondack Park? Ò We had a second home here that we loved, and we were trying to spend more time here,Ó Salamon said shortly after being hired by the chamber. Ò We were going back and forth between two homes and said, Ô We love it so much here, why are we doing this?Õ Ó So they moved here in August 2012. Almost empty nesters, the Salamons have two girls, one whoÕ s a senior at Boston University and another whoÕ s a college graduate living in Connecticut. They are proud transplants, Adirondackers at last. Ò Just like everyone else here I have several jobs,Ó Salamon said. Sustainable connection is key for Salamon to maintain her job and keep up with her work responsibilities. Ò I couldnÕ t tell you how many times Frontier Communications would crash when I was trying to send large files,” Salamon said. Ò I would recommend people have two or three backups when they work this way.Ó One of SalamonÕ s backup Internet connections is the Town of Johnsburg Library in North Creek, located across the street from her Chamber office at the Tannery Pond Community Center. Ò You canÕ t depend on one service entirely. It is better than it was two or three years ago,Ó Salamon said. Ò IÕ ve gone countless times to the library and parked outside. At 5 or 7 p.m., IÕ ve seen a couple people doing the same in their cars. All you can see is the glow of their laptops.Ó With the addition of a reliable Internet connection, Salamon said a viable telephone connection is a necessity for maintaining her connection to clients. Ò I have a Verizon cellphone extender, so it makes my home a hotspot to get cell service,Ó Salamon said. Ò ItÕ s a one-time purchase of the extender, then itÕ s connected through your DSL line and I can get cell service within 1,000 feet of my house.Ó Having a cell phone hotspot isnÕ t all itÕ s cracked up to be. Salamon said itÕ s attracted connection-hungry cell phone users who have parked their cars in front of her house. Ò There are camps up my street, and one time a van full of teenagers just stopped in front of my house because all of a sudden they had cell service,Ó Salamon said. Ò They kept coming back and sitting in my yard texting or calling people. We eventually disconnected the box for the night.Ó Salamon said the extender has otherwise been a god sent. She recommends anyone in who wants to telecommute to purchase the device for their homes. Nethaway said he realizes that telecommuting isnÕ t for everyone but for his family it was ideal for letting him embrace the way of life in the Adirondacks while maintaining his career. Ò The balance between development and the environment that can be found here,Ó Nethaway said. Ò I think that attracting telecommuters can be a way to strengthen and grow our communities while maintaining that balance, especially if we continue to be mindful about how we build out and provide the infrastructure that supports telecommuting.Ó


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14 - Times of Ti

December 14, 2013

Schroon Lake From page 1 wish includes information such as gender, age and clothing size. People can take a wish, purchase a gift and return it for distribution. Ò The names and wishes are collected from Schroon Lake Central School and the children have asked for specific items that they are hoping to receive this year,Ó Mehm said. Ò After taking a wish each unwrapped gift should be dropped back off as soon as possible, but no later than Wednesday, Dec. 18. We also take donations of wrapping paper, tape, etc.Ó People can also support the ChildrenÕ s Christmas Express by buying tickets to the Schroon Lake Chamber of Commerce basket raffle during the communityÕ s Olde Tyme Christmas Celebration noon to 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14. Proceeds from the raffle will assist the holiday gift program. Ò Please come out and support the chamber of commerce basket raffle,” said Tammy Leinhart, Christmas Express coordinator. “The chamber makes a huge impact on the ability of Children Express to fulfill all the Christmas wishes. As the Dec. 18 deadline approaches, Patti Mehm goes and collects all the remaining wishes still left on the trees and purchases every item, insuring every wish is fulfilled. Plus you may win one of the wonderful items or baskets at the raffle, which is a win, win.Ó A bake sale at the Underground Food & Craft Bazaar during the Olde Tyme Christmas Celebration will also raise money for the gift program. The bake sale will be 3:30 to 8 p.m. in the town hall. Leinhart said the ChildrenÕ s Christmas Express also accepts cash donations. Donations can be made at local businesses or can be mailed to Christmas Express, 276 Alder Meadow Road, Schroon Lake 12870. For more information contact Leinhart at 532-9643.

Schroon Lake teachers, from left, Kristy Barno, Rita Herbst and Laura Corey enjoy dinner during the school’s Thanksgiving celebration.

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December 14, 2013

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Fire victim died from smoke inhalation MORIAH CENTER — Sierra Daha, the victim of a Dec. 3 fire on Dugway Road in Moriah, died of asphyxiation due to smoke inhalation. An autopsy was performed on the victim by Dr. Michael Sikirica at Albany Medical Center Dec. 4. Sikirica positively identified the victim as Daha, age 22. Sikirica also determined the cause of death to be asphyxiation due to smoke inhalation. The manner of death is still pending the results of the investigation. The New York State Police and New York State Fire Investigators are still looking into what started the residential fire at 2726 Dugway Road. Two people Ñ the homeÕ s owner, Mary Daha, age 81, and Damian Sprague, age 20 — escaped the fire. Neither was injured.

Times of Ti - 15

The fire was reported at 5:04 a.m. when Sprague ran from the house and stopped a motorist passing by. The motorist called 911. New York State Police were the first on the scene, finding the house fully involved. Moriah, Mineville-Witherbee, Port Henry, Ticonderoga, Westport, Elizabethtown and Crown Point fire departments responded along with the Moriah Police Department, the Essex County SheriffÕ s Department, the Moriah Emergency Squad and the town of Moriah highway department. Police said their investigation into the fire will take some time because of the damage to the building. Police have interviewed the fire’s survivors and intend to speak to them again. Police are also seeking possible witnesses.

SANTA STOPS BY MINEVILLE

Maddox King and Angel Stockwell had a chance to visit with Santa Claus at the Mineville-Witherbee Fire Department recently. Santa stopped at the fire station to hear Christmas wishes from local children.

Damyn Dowe had a chance to visit with Santa Claus at the MinevilleWitherbee Fire Department recently. Photo by Nancy Frasier

Photo by Nancy Frasier

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EARLY CHRISTMAS & NEW YEAR’S DEADLINES For Display, Legals and Classified Advertising OUR OFFICES WILL BE CLOSED Wednesday, December 25th & Wednesday, January 1st

Vermont Zone: The Vermont Eagle Friday, December 20th at 10:00AM Friday, December 27th at 10:00AM Northern Zone: North Countryman, Valley News Lake Champlain, Valley News Tri-Lakes & The Burgh Friday, December 20th at 4:00PM Friday, December 27th at 4:00PM Southern Zone: Times of Ti, DENTON PUBLICATIONS Adk. Journal, News Enterprise 14 Hand Ave. Friday, December 20th at 4:00PM Elizabethtown, NY 12932 518-873-6368 Friday, December 27th at 4:00PM

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16 - Times of Ti

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December 14, 2013

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Times of Ti - 17


18 - Times of Ti

www.timesofti.com

December 14, 2013


December 14, 2013

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Ongoing

CROWN POINT — The Champlain Valley Flyers Club meets every Thursday evening, weather permitting, from 4 p.m. until dusk at 593 Bridge Road (Route 185) in Crown Point. For information call 802-758-2578. CROWN POINT — The Crown Point Food Pantry at the Crown Point Methodist Church on Creek Road is open Thursdays 9 to 11 a.m. CROWN POINT — The Knapp Senior Center in Crown Point is open every Wednesday and Thursday 3 to 6 p.m. Dinner will be served at 4 p.m. Senior Center is located at the Methodist Church on Creek Road. Call Tatum with any questions at 597-4491. HAGUE — Holistic stress management featuring T’ai Chi and Qigong, Wednesdays at the Hague Community Building, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. For more information e-mail returntomountain@yahoo.com or call 543-6605. HAGUE — Hague Fish & Game Club meetings are held on the third Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. MORIAH — The Moriah Senior Citizens Club meets on the first Monday of each month at 1 p.m. in the Port Henry Train Station. MORIAH — Moriah Arts and Crafts Group on Thursday from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Port Henry Train Station. Stay for a noon time meal sponsored by the Essex County Nutrition Program (reservations are required by calling 546-7941 the day before). MORIAH — The Holy Cow Thrift Corner, located next door to the Moriah Fire Department on Tarbell Hill Road,Moriah, is open every Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. All proceeds benefit the Moriah Methodist Church. Donations welcome. Call 546-7409 or 546-7121 for additional information. PORT HENRY — The Port Henry Knights of Columbus hold bingo every Monday at 7 p.m. SCHROON LAKE — The Schroon Lake Library knitting group will meet every Thursday from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. during the winter months. The group will meet to learn new techniques, work on projects together and free knit. The group is for all levels of knitters, from first time knitters to the more experienced knitter. People can bring work to share. The library has an assortment of needles for members to borrow for their knitting projects. For further information contact the library at 532-7737 ext. 13. SCHROON LAKE — TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Group meets at the Schroon Lake Senior Center across from TOPS Market on Tuesdays 6 to 7 p.m. For more information, contact Claudia at 494-8081. SCHROON LAKE — The Mountainside Share Shop is open Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Donations of clean, gently worn clothing may be left at any time in the

North Country SPCA

A

green drop box outside the building. For more information call 532-7128. Mountainside is located four miles south of Schroon Lake Village. SILVER BAY — The Northern Lake George Rotary Club is a service club that meets at Silver Bay YMCA of the Adirondacks at 7:30 a.m. every Tuesday. Contact Diane Dickson at 543-8051 for more information. TICONDEROGA -— ACBL Duplicate Bridge, Mondays and Thursdays at 12:30 p.m. For more information call 585-3322. TICONDEROGA — The Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group will hold a monthly support group for caregivers at Inter-Lakes Health, Ethan Allen Library, the second Tuesday of every month at 4 p.m. Call 564-3370. TICONDEROGA — The Adirondack Trailriders meet the second Wednesday of each month, year-round, at 7 p.m. at the Ticonderoga Fish & Game Club. TICONDEROGA — Support group for people with family members who have addictions. Meetings in the library at the Heritage Commons nursing home, every Monday at 6:30 p.m. TICONDEROGA — Celebrate Recovery meetings are every Wednesday 6:30 - 8 p.m. in the board room at Moses Ludington Hospital. Open to the public. For more information call Vince at 429-9173. TICONDEROGA — Champlain Valley Chorale rehearsals will be held each Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the First United Methodist Church, 1045 Wicker St., Ticonderoga. For further information, contact Bob Elling at 585-2173. TICONDEROGA — American Legion Post #224 will hold its monthly meeting the second Thursday of every month. TICONDEROGA — Bingo, Ticonderoga fire house, 6:45 p.m., every Thursday. Doors open at 5 p.m. TICONDEROGA — FOE #4410 meets the second and fourth Wednesday of each month at 103 Montcalm St., Ticonderoga (Upstairs). TICONDEROGA — The Ti Area Seniors meet the third Wednesday of every month at 1 p.m. at the Armory. TICONDEROGA — Cornerstone Alliance Church has formed a youth group for people ages 10-17. The group will meet in Tuesdays 6-8 p.m. For information call 585-6391. TICONDEROGA — Osteoporosis exercise classes are held weekly at Inter-Lakes Health in Ticonderoga on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. Classes are free. Interested people can contact RSVP at 546-3565 or email RSVP at RSVP@Logical.net. TICONDEROGA — Cornerstone Alliance Church in Ticonderoga youth group will meet weekly on Sunday nights at 6 p.m. The program is open to students ages 1018 years of age. Call the church office for more information @ 585-6391. TICONDEROGA — The Ticonderoga Assembly of God Church will host a coffeehouse the third Sunday of each month at 6:30 p.m. There is free admission. TICONDEROGA — Free arthritis exercises, Inter-Lakes Health cafeteria, first and third Monday of each month, 2 to 3 p.m. For more information contact Kathy L. Wilcox • 873-5000 Cornell Cooperative Extension of Essex County at 962-4810 or e-mail Mary mba32@cornell.edu TICONDEROGA — Free arthritis exercises, Ticonderoga Senior Center, second and fourth Wednesday each month, 10 to 11 a..m. For more information contact Cornell Cooperative Extension of Essex County at 962-4810 or e-mail Mary mba32@cornell.edu TICONDEROGA — The Essex County Leathernecks, Marine Corps League, Det. 791, meets the first Thursday of the month at the Ticonderoga American Legion Post at 6 p.m. All active Marines and Marine veterans are invited to attend.

re you struggling to come up with that perfect holiday gift for a family member or friend? How about a purr-sonalized jigsaw puzzle featuring their beloved pet? Adirondack Custom Puzzles is currently donating 25 percent of all funds raised from puzzle sales to the NCSPCA, from now until Dec. 15. To order, visit their website at adkpuzzles.com and choose the puzzle size and number of pieces you want. Next, upload your favorite picture of your furry friend. Enter promotion code NCSPCA at checkout, and your order is complete! The hardest part will most likely be choosing which picture to upload... I know in our household, we have too many pictures of our four-legged friends to count! Ralph Our featured pet this week is Ralph, a Clinton County - whatever breed he may be, he is certainly 12/2/13 Federal Home Mortgagemix Corp Ryan & Jala Alloggio Ausable $106,000 German Shepherd/Hound who came 12/2/13 Gregory Jasonbig Weir $136,206 one of a kind! Beekmantown We believe Ralph is under two in as aAngela stray. This outgoing, fun-loving 12/2/13 Terry & Janice Christopher Lagree $189,000 years old; this Saranac young fellow is well-behaved boy just wants to be Norcross buddies with everyone 12/2/13 Gabriel Lavarnway Beekmantown in his kennel, very neat in his habits $115,800 and he meets. He Girard is a bit uncoordinatedRicky - when 12/2/13 Daniel & Bobbie Jo Hitsman & Nicole Bombard Ausable for his turn to $93,969 patient when waiting go for he gallops along his legs seem to goJon every 12/2/13 Gholson Keri Hynes City of Plattsburgh $82,000 a walk. Ralph is going to make someone a whichDonald way which always brings a smile or 12/3/13 Judy Kendrick Thomas Durocher City Plattsburgh $65,000 very special dog - ifofyou need some laughs a giggle to shelter staff during his walks. He 12/4/13 Clayton & Charlene Lombard Joshua & Cassie Jenkins Peru $150,000 in your life please come in and meet this has webbed so we believe he may 12/4/13 Robertafeet, Decker Harryhave Rockwell Jr. Ausable $75,000 sweet, goofy guy - youÕ ll be glad you did! some Labrador Retriever in his background 12/4/13 Davis Garrant Jr & Jamie Nicholas & Courtney Trombley Chazy $213,000 Garrant 12/4/13 Deanne Dwyer, Wade Relation Lanny & Judy Relation Beekmantown $29,600 Estate of Wade Relation 12/4/13 Christopher Moll Scott Cartwright Luck Plattsburgh $390,000

Real Estate Transactions Essex County

12/4/13 Lorna Aldridge Michelle Baker & Daniel Hanczyk 12/4/13 Kenneth Anderson Sr & Jason & Samantha Burris Bernice et al 12/4/13 Robin Baxter Executor et al Louis & Rosalie Recchia 12/4/13 Edward Bresette et al Deborah Purdy 12/4/13 Paul Carpenter Cynthia Giovacchino 12/4/13 Calvin Carr Clinton & Karen Griffin 12/4/13 Gladys Cushing Ben Collins 12/4/13 Matthew Donahue Sarah Carnevale & Brandon Del Pozo 12/4/13 Milton Duntley Sarah Pastore 12/4/13 Essex County John Streeter 12/4/13 Nancy Fournier Duntley Sarah Pastore 12/4/13 Estate of Theresa Gadway M&T Bank 12/4/13 Brian Gary James Nichols 12/4/13 David Gibbs et al Margaret Rafferty Revocable Trust 12/4/13 William & Deborah Greene Ral & Elissa Mazza 12/4/13 Austen Hayes Audry Sparre 12/4/13 Virginia Johnson et al Terry Reno & Dolores Ford 12/4/13 Susan Weiss Katz Martha Weiss 12/4/13 James Kolysko Kara Fleury 12/4/13 Peter & Mary Ellen Kucharik Ellen Perran & Mary Ellen Greene 12/4/13 Patricia Labounty Malcolm & Carol Crowningshield 12/4/13 Richard Lawrence Gregory & Laura Lawrence 12/4/13 Eleanor Legnard Gary & Eileen Legnard 12/4/13 John McDonald Tamara Lane Inc 12/4/13 Thomas & Martha McGraw Gert Thorn & Lynn Drover 12/4/13 Timothy Montayne Sterling & Susan Goodspeed 12/4/13 Barbara Mulvey Spencer Reynolds 12/4/13 John Northup William Welch 12/4/13 Lee Peters Executor Mark Barber 12/4/13 Bruce Pierce Gage Pierce 12/4/13 Kathryn Schneider Trustee et al Kathryn Schneider 12/4/13 Ned & Donna Spaulding Dennis & Wanda Herlihy 12/4/13 Jason Westover Michael & Mary Anne Allen 12/4/13 Whiteface Real Estate Karen Kluger & Roehner Che Development 12/4/13 Marian Wilcox Marian Wilcox et al

North Elba Crown point

$190,000 $121,000

North Elba Chesterfield Willsboro Crown Point Willsboro Keene Lewis Ticonderoga Lewis Moriah St. Armond Ticonderoga Wilmington Essex Chesterfield Wilmington Ticonderoga North Elba Chesterfield Jay Elizabethtown Ticonderoga Essex Newcomb Wilmington Moriah Ticonderoga Willsboro Newcomb Crown point Moriah North Elba

$225,000 $80,000 $200,000 $30,000 $50,000 $207,000 $30,000 $728.38 $105,000 $75,330.18 $18,000 $225,000 $210,000 $360,000 $55,000 $90,000 $64,000 $53,000 $19,000 $39,475 $29,000 $500,000 $285,000 $85,000 $29,000 $90,000 $95,000 $60,000 $120,000 $125,000 $45,000 $400,000

Jay

$1

Saturday, Dec. 14

CROWN POINT — The Carillon Garden Club will be participating in “Wreaths Across America” at noon. A seasonal wreath will be placed at the Blue Star Memorial Garden Sign at the Crown Point Bridge information site to remember the nation’s veterans. PORT HENRY — The Port Henry Knights of Columbus will host a benefit for the Moriah Food Pantry 7 to 11 p.m. The band White Hot Monkey Love will perform. Cost of admission are non-perishable food items, personal care products, serviceable clothing, etc. Raffle tickets will be given out for donated items and there will be a drawing held at the end of the night for gift certificates donated by local businesses. SCHROON LAKE — The Schroon Lake Community Church’s Women’s Society Christmas Bazaar will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. A luncheon of homemade soup, sandwiches and pies will be served. A Granny’s Attic table of new and used items and a bake table of homemade baked goods will be for sale. SCHROON LAKE — Schroon Lake will host its 27th annual community holiday celebration this winter beginning at 5:30 p.m. The town Christmas tree will be lit at 5:30 p.m., kicking off the celebration, in the town park. A living nativity scene will march from the park to Our Lady of Lourdes Church on Main Street, followed by holiday carolers. The Schroon Senior Citizens Club will light its memory tree following the caroling. Santa will arrive at the Strand Theater to greet children at 6 p.m. Schroon Lake Central School music students will perform throughout the hamlet from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Performances will be held at the Community Church, Joannies Goodies and The Towne Store. There will be horse and carriage rides along with a petting zoo from 6 to 8 p.m. The Towne Store will holiday a children’s holiday craft program at the same time. TICONDEROGA — The Ticonderoga Walmart Store #2424 will host a holiday craft fair 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Proceeds will go to the Children’s Miracle Network.

Sunday, Dec. 15

PORT HENRY — The Port Henry Fire Department will hold its annual Santa Run beginning at noon. Santa Claus,

Times of Ti - 19 as assisted by his firefighter elves, will distribute candy to all good girls and boys throughout the village of Port Henry. PORT HENRY — Lake Champlain Bible Fellowship, located at 6 Church St., will host a community Christmas celebration at 6 p.m. The event will include Christmas carols, a children’s Christmas play and a reading of the Christmas story. Following the program there will be Christmas refreshments, hot chocolate and coffee in the fellowship area. TICONDEROGA — FOE - 4410 Eagles Club of Ticonderoga will have a Christmas party 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Penelope the Clown will be there at 2 and Santa will arrive at 2:30 p.m. TICONDEROGA — There will be a free community fellowship dinner at the First United Methodist Church in Ticonderoga 4:30 to 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome. The menu will include lasagna, salad, garlic bread, desserts and beverages. Christmas songs and a festive atmosphere will complete the time together. While there is no charge, a free-will donation is appreciated. For more information about the free dinners or the church contact the church office at 585-7995 or visit the church web site at www.tifumc.com.

Monday, Dec. 16

PUTNAM — The Putnam Central School board of education will meet at 6:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec. 17

CROWN POINT — The Crown Point Chamber of Commerce will hold its annual Christmas potluck at 6:30 p.m. at the home of Joe and Cindy Bodette (Crown Point Barbecue) 2796 Route 9N (across from the senior center). Members are encouraged to attend. RSVP’s are encouraged to cbodette@cptelco.net or 597-3160. CROWN POINT — The Crown Point Central School board of education will hold a meeting on the Crown Point-Ticonderoga school merger study at 6 p.m. in the district library. A regular board meeting will follow at 7 p.m. HAGUE — Hague Fish & Game Club meeting, 7 p.m. PUTNAM — The Putnam Central School Christmas concert will be held at 7 p.m. In the event of in bad weather, the concert will be held on Thursday, Dec. 19 at 7 p.m. SCHROON LAKE — Schroon Lake Chamber of Commerce meeting, Schroon town hall, 5:30 p.m. TICONDEROGA — The Ticonderoga Central School merger study advisory committee will meet at 6 p.m. at the high school. A regular board of education meeting will follow at 7 p.m.

Wednesday, Dec. 18

CROWN POINT — Crown Point Central School elementary holiday concert, 1 p.m. CROWN POINT — The Crown Point Fire District board of fire commissioners will meet at 7 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. SCHROON LAKE — The Schroon Lake Central School board of education will meet at 7 p.m. in the school auditorium. TICONDEROGA — Ticonderoga High School holiday concert, 7:30 p.m. TICONDEROGA — Ti’coustics will hold a “Christmas Acoustic Song Festival”coffee house 6 to 9 p.m. at the Burleigh House, 120 Montcalm St., Ticonderoga. There is no cover charge, but donations are accepted. All money raised is contributed to the Ticonderoga Revitalization Alliance to be used to assist with plans for community redevelopment.

Thursday, Dec. 19

HAGUE — Hague Fire Department board meeting, 5:30 p.m., fire station. HAGUE — Hague zoning board of appeals meeting, 7 p.m., Community Center. PORT HENRY — Moriah Elementary School holiday concert, 7 p.m. PORT HENRY — The annual senior citizen Christmas party at Moriah Central School will be held 4 to 6 p.m. in the school cafeteria.

Tuesday, Dec. 30

HAGUE — Hague town board meeting, 6:30 p.m. Community Center.

Monday, Jan. 6

PUTNAM — Twelfth Night will be celebrated by the Ticonderoga Festival Guild at 7 p.m. at the Putnam Presbyterian Church. Area choirs will perform their favorite Christmas music. Light refreshments will follow the program. The program is free to all, but donations will be accepted following the program. For more information, call the festival guild office at 585-7015.

Weddings

Wayman marries Courtney Wayman and Travis Tabor were married Oct. 5, 2013, at Sacred Heart Church in Crown Point by Rev. Kevin McEwan. A reception followed at the VFW in Mineville. The bride is the daughter of John and Becki Wayman. The groom ins the son of Gary and Linda Tabor of Crown Point. Hillary Price of Crown Point was maid of honor. Best man was Jeff Ross of Crown Point. Bridesmaids were Shannan Allen, Hilary Primo, Mr. and Mrs. Travis Tabor Jerrica Manley, Marijane Stanley, Cody Lang and Adrienne Lang. Ushers were Brock Ross, Taylor Price, Nathan Tabor, Cody Wayman, Bobby Primo and David Potter. Flower girl was Madison Manley. Courtney Wayman earned a masterÕ s degree from St. Rose in education. She is employed by Moriah Central School and the Hot Biscuit Diner. Travis Tabor graduated from Hudson Valley and is employed by National Grid of Ticonderoga. The couple are honeymooning in Hawaii in February. The Tabors reside in Crown Point.


www.timesofti.com

20 - Times of Ti

December 14, 2013

The Week In Sports

Wildcats top Crown Point; Ti downs ELCS Schroon 54, Crown Point 17

Ticonderoga 69, ELCS 34

Schroon Lake dominated Crown Point, 54-17, in winning the season-opening Northern Basketball League boys game Dec. 3. The Wildcats led all the way, holding a 26-11 advantage at the intermission. The Ô Cats then put the contest away with a 28-6 run in the second half. Tanner Stone scored 18 points to pace Schroon Lake. Joe Maisonville added 11 points and Alex Shaughnessy nine for the winners. Jaice Spring tallied five points for the Panthers.

Ticonderoga pounded Elizabethtown-Lewis, 69-34, in the Coaches vs. Cancer Challenge in boys basketball play Dec. 6. The Sentinels broke open a close game with a 28-9 run to start the second half. Mike Graney scored 19 points and Garrison Hughes 10 for the winners.

Schroon 35, Johnsburg 24 Schroon Lake led wire-to-wire as it topped Johnsburg, 35-24, in Northern Basketball League boys play Dec. 5. Caleb Maisonville scored 10 points to pace the Wildcats, who used a 16-6 run in the third period to secure the victory. Alex Shaughnessy and Brandon Hall each had eight points for the winners.

Indian-Long Lake 64, Crown Point 58 Crown Point fell to Indian Lake-Long Lake, 64-58, in Northern Basketball League boys play Dec. 5. The Orange raced to a 21-12 lead and Crown Point was never able to recover. Jaice Spring tallied 18 points for the Panthers. Joe Foote and Noah Macey each contributed 15 markers for the locals.

Poland 47, Schroon 32 Poland topped Schroon Lake, 47-32, in the Coaches vs. Cancer Challenge in boys basketball play Dec. 6. The Wildcats held a two-point lead at the break, but Poland closed the contest with a 30-13 spurt to win. Tanner Stone scored 16 points for Schroon.

Moriah 74, West 66, 3 OT Moriah edged Westport, 74-66, in triple overtime in the Coaches vs. Cancer Challenge in boys basketball play Dec. 7. Jarrod MacDougal nailed back-to-back hoops in the final OT to lift the Vikings to victory. He finished with 10 points. Adam Jaquish led the Vikings with 22 points. Taylor Slattery added 14 points and Noah Gilbo 13 for the winners. At right: Schroon Lake’s Alex Shaughnessy splits the Johnsburg defense during Northern Basketball League play Dec. 5. Shaughnessy scored eight points as Schroon won, 35-24. Photo by Nancy Frasier

Crown Point rallies past Lady Wildcats Crown Point 39, Schroon 36

Schroon 30, Johnsburg 17

Crown Point rallied to down Schroon Lake, 39-36, in Northern Basketball League girls action Dec. 4. Trailing by 12 points at the half, the Panthers went on a 15-5 run to open the third period and get within a bucket. They then closed the game with a 14-7 spurt to secure the win. Brittany Foote scored 15 points, 12 in the second half, to pace Crown Point. Amanda Wolf added 14 points for the winners. Abby Veverka scored 13 points and Julianna Finnerty 11 for the Wildcats.

Schroon Lake toppled Johnsburg, 30-17, in Northern Basketball League girls play Dec. 6. The Wildcats raced to a 12-1 lead and coasted to the win as Julianna Finnerty tallied 18 points. Abby Veverka added eight points for the Ô Cats.

Crown Point 50, Indian-Long Lake 41 Crown Point defeated Indian Lake-Long Lake, 50-41, in Northern Basketball League girls play Dec. 6. Leading by a point at the half, the Panthers steadily pulled away in the second half to win. Amanda Wolf had 16 points and 14 rebounds for the victors. Brittany Foote added 12 points, 10 in the second half, and Logan Harrington had 10 markers for the Panthers.

ELCS 50, Ticonderoga 26 Elizabethtown-Lewis raced to a big lead and beat Ticonderoga, 50-26, in Northern Basketball League girls play Dec. 7. The Lions led 20-9 after one period. Jasmin Barnes scored 23 points for ELCS. Kylie Austin topped Ti, scoring 12 points. Pictured at right: Brittany Foote scored 15 points as Crown Point rallied to down Schroon Lake, 39-36, in Northern Basketball League girls action Dec. 4. Photo by Nancy Frasier

Ticonderoga Sentinels on a roll in bowling action Ticonderoga sweeps Ticonderoga defeated Moriah in Champlain Valley Athletic Conference bowling action Dec. 4. The Sentinels won the boys match, 6-4. William Gonyo fired a 263 game and 547 series for the Sentinels. Cole Frasier added a 500 set for the victors. Tom Rancour rolled a 436 and Toot Whalen a 432 for Moriah. Ti won the girls match, 4-0. Cheyanne Tuthill had a 173 game and 491 series to lead the Sentinels. Cassidy McKee added a 418 for the winners. Carly Newton had a 357 series to top Moriah.

Moriah girls win Moriah beat AuSable Valley, 4-0, in Champlain Valley Athletic Conference girls bowling Dec. 6. Carly Newton had a 125 game and 359 series to key the Vikings. Moriah lost the boys match, 10-0. Tanner Conley led the locals with a 157 game and 449 set.

Sentinels win Ticonderoga rolled to victories over Plattsburgh in Champlain Valley Athletic Conference bowling action Dec. 6. Ti claimed the boys match, 10-0. Cole Frasier had a 202 game and 581 series

to pace the Sentinels, who got a 208 game and 575 set from Gavin Fleury and a 571 from Konner Bruce. Ticonderoga took the girls match, 4-0. Cassidy McKee rolled a 201 game and 582 series to key the win. Jeanette Coon added a 238 game and 577 set.

Vikings score victory Moriah topped Willsboro, 10-0, in Champlain Valley Athletic Conference boys bowling Dec. 9. Derek Petro rolled a 197 game and 489 series to pace the Vikings. Tom Rancour added a 456 and Joe Ridriguez a 416 for the winners. Moriah lost the girls match, 4-0. Carly Newton had a 335 series for the locals.

Ticonderoga falls Ticonderoga lost to Peru in Champlain Valley Athletic Conference bowling Dec. 9. Ti dropped the boys match, 8-2. Konner Bruce fired a 194 game and 588 series for Ti. Cole Frasier added a 198 and 568 for the locals. The Sentinels lost the girls match, 3-1. Lucy LaPeter had a 182 game and 520 set for Ti. Jeanette Coon added a 489. Pictured at right: Cassidy McKee rolled a 201 game and 582 series as Ticonderoga beat Plattsburgh in Champlain Valley Athletic Conference bowling action Dec. 6. Photo by Nancy Frasier


December 14, 2013

www.timesofti.com

Times of Ti - 21

The Week In Sports

Annual Resolution Run to kick off new year Jan. 1 road race slated in Ti By Fred Herbst

fred@denpubs.com TICONDEROGA Ñ Will one of your New YearÕ s resolutions be to get more exercise? If so, the LaChute Road Runners Club of Ticonderoga can help. The club is planning its 12th annual Resolution Run Jan. 1, 2013. The event will include a five-kilometer (3.1 miles) run and a four-kilometer (2.5 miles) walk. Both events will begin and

end at the Community Building on Montcalm Street at 11 a.m. At 11:30 a.m. there will be a kilometer race for children age 12 and younger. The course follows Lake Champlain Avenue to Water Street to Lake George Avenue back to Montcalm Street. Registration will be that day beginning at 10:15 a.m. at Bicentennial Park. People can also register online at www.active.com Registration fee is $2 or two food items. All proceeds will be donated to the local food pantry. Following the run there will be light refreshments and presentation of awards. Awards will be home-baked goods.

The event will be held regardless of weather conditions. For information visit the club website at www.lachute.us The 2012 Resolution Run was dominated by the Berube family. Jesse Berube won the menÕ s race and Connie Berube the womenÕ s division. Jesse Berube, a former Ti High track and cross country stalwart, covered the 5 kilometer course in 16 minutes, 46 seconds. Jay Berube, another former Sentinel distance standout, was second in 16:56. Connie Berube made it a sweep for the family, finishing first in the 4 kilometer walk in 33:50.

Bowling Scores Results of Mineville VFW Lanes bowling leagues through week 11 include: Monday MenÕ s League 200 games - Tom Brassard: 225; Adam Clark: 210; Matt Glebus: 237; Cy Treadway: 208; Matt Vargo: 216 Standings - 1. The Old Mine 2. Adirondack Chevy 3. Dribs and Drabs 4. Nephews 5. KingÕ s Guzzlers 6. Team Charboneau. Wednesday MenÕ s League 200 games - Jerry Ashline: 201; Tim Cook: 240; Arnie LaFountain: 212; Marty Nephew: 230,212; Matt Scorsome: 219; Cy Treadway: 226. 600 series - Tim Cook: 619; Marty Nephew: 634 Standings - 1. BryantÕ s 2. Adirondack Concrete 3. Adirondack Aeries 4. Champlain Bridge Marina 5. Mountain Lake Services 6.Woodworkers Thursday WomenÕ s League Standings - 1. Squirrels 2. Twisters 3. Who Cares 4.Gutter Girls 5. Swilling Buddies 6. AC Misfits

The St. Mary’s School fourth and fifth grade soccer team, coached by Tom Wranosky and Sean Greene, won a number of awards this season. The team included, Adrian Paige, Alexis Gibbs, Jack Michalak, Avery Kidder, Kiyanna Stockwell, Tyler Wranosky, Kennice Rich, Travis Hunsdon, Aidan Stacey, Cory Lender, Michael O’Donnell, David LaPointe, Shannon Jordan, Lorelei Leerkes and Vivian Bowman.

Last of the season

A

fter enjoying one last, long day of hunting, I sat out on my back porch deck to watch the sun set. I stayed out long enough to see the stars begin to sparkle in the night sky. It had been a good day to be in the woods and on the hunt. There had been adequate snow cover to illustrate the comings and goings of deer, and all sorts of other woodland creatures. Even a few winter moths were in the air, fluttering by and catching my eye with a I finished up the last day by taking the long route back to camp, which went up and over a long ridge that features stunning vistas of the surrounding hills and mountains. I decided to go up there because I hadnÕ t climbed the ridge even once during the entire season. The hike took me through some thick spruce, and lots of open hardwoods, but surely the finest part of my final journey was the time I spent sitting alone, atop a huge glacial erratic that is set on the edge of a wide open field of moss. WeÕ ve always referred to the clearing as the Big Grassy, even though the moss is so thick, it feels like youÕ re walking on a big, down mattress. I guess my urge to hike over the hill was my one last chance to grasp for a little bit of the pieces and places that were still left in my season. This year, I didnÕ t get into the woods near as often as I have in the past. It appears there were more responsibilities this year, and less time to escape them. It canÕ t be that IÕ m slowing down! Overall, the season was a productive one, with a few nice bucks taken. The high point came when Poppy, the oldest member of our crew, took a buck on the first hunt of the morning of the season. The deer was promptly dressed, dragged back to camp and hung before the morningÕ s coffee even had a chance to cool. When the Big Game Hunting season officially came to a conclusion on Sunday, Dec. 8, I expect there were many sportsmen and women celebrating another year of outdoor adventures. Whether a tag was filled during their annual fall forays is likely inconsequential.

Too often, there is too much emphasis placed on the Ò take,Ó with little regard for the Ò give.Ó After having spent many of my years in the pursuit of fish, fowl and game, IÕ ve come to realize and understand the true rewards. Certainly, there are benefits of the wild harvest which may include medallions of venison loin, smoked wild turkey or fresh salmon. These are the tangible, and tasteful rewards of the hunt. Such physical aspects of the wild pursuit and harvest are readily available. But whatÕ s often overlooked are an equal measure of benefits that are rarely considered, except by those who share them of course. Surely there are the physical health benefits achieved through long hours of hiking, climbing and occasionally dragging. There are also the important skill sets required in the process of putting together the necessary organization, planning and preparation to put on the hunt. It has been widely acknowledged that any amount of time we spend in natural surroundings is more beneficial than a comparable duration of time spent indoors. In fact, it is likely the camaraderie and regular tomfoolery of camp life that remains the most overlooked aspect of the sporting life. There is no sleep so deep to compare with a camp sleep. Despite the usual snoring, wheezing and an occasional toot or two, there is nothing like a soft bed and a warm stove to restore the weary bones and sore muscles of a hunter whoÕ s been busy tromping through the thick woods since before dawn. Camp life is an experience that provides great stress relief, offers fine companionship and delivers a host of other positive benefits, including personal responsibility, punctuality and of course, compassion, communication and freedom. Hunting camp is a most unique location where men can become boys and boys can become men. IÕ ve been reduced to tears on many occasions, when I was laughing so hard it hurt. Unfortunately, less than 7 percent of the nationÕ s population continues to take to the hunt. Overall, participation levels continue to hold solid, due to the consistent influx of female hunters. All across the nation, traditional deer camps have been bringing in does to keep the numbers up. Hunters do indeed need to cross the gender line. Hunting is an age old activity that helps to sharpen our senses, steel our resolve, improve our memory and hone our hereditary predatory skills. It is a natural activity Ithat requires regular practice to restore our innate hunting skills. It also provides us with the opportunity to experience and explore the concrete matters of both life and death. There is a unique change that comes over a person when they are far removed from typical human interactions. It is a process thatÕ s been described as the Ò freedom of the hills.Ó It comes

Saturday Mixed League 200 games (men) - Nick Anderson: 204; Brad Hammond: 233; Andy Mattison: 236. 175 games (women) - Stacey Anderson: 175; Alyssa Glebus: 181; Gloria Pepper: 192,179 500 series (women) - Gloria Pepper: 512; Paula Petro: 507 Standings - 1. Los Jugadors 2. Wingnuts 3. South Park 4. Ensane Lane Robbers 5. Rolling Thunder 6. PBA

Snow moths, aka Winter Moths often appear in the late Fall woods on warm days. The warmer weather often stirs them to come out from under leafy cover and fly about erratically. The sight of something white flickering in the distance, always seems to catch a whitetail hunter’s attention, especially when viewed out of the corner of an eye. I’ve spun around more than once to see nothing but a moth. from a unique combination of primitive living and primeval adventure. Anglers certainly get a taste of it on occasion, but only hunters have to deal with it head on. Freedom is likely the greatest reward a hunter receives in return for putting in their time in the woods. For many, it is the only such opportunity they have available throughout the entire year to shed the worries and responsibilities of everyday life. For many, it provides welcome and well earned relief. And there are still a few intrusions from those who have to deal with cell phones, and those who have to deal with the folks who deal with cell phones. Cell phones certainly provide a valuable purpose, but as an irate camper once pointed out; Ò If they can get ahold of you on the damn phone, they can get ahold of me. I go to camp in order to escape such intrusions.Ó For those of us who continue to live by a sporting calendar, the seasons will continue to be defined by the outdoor activities that are available, rather than by some simple dates printed on an appointment calendar. In the process, the seasons will continue to present new realities and provide unique challenges as weather patterns fluctuate, forests change and time passes more swiftly than before. Through it all, there will remain only one core tenet, which can only be found huddled around a warm stove on a cold evening in camp. Camps may come and go, in all shapes, sizes and comfort ranges. But it isnÕ t the physical structure of camp that provides the main attraction. It is the camaraderie of the hunt, of the shared chores, and the near misses that must be shared. The season is officially over, and my next trip into camp will probably require skis. IÕ ll likely be back soon to seal up a few cracks; rodent-proof a few holes and pack out one last load. Then, IÕ ll sit and stare at the coals which glow in the stove and begin planning for next yearÕ s adventure. Maybe IÕ ll start the year by climbing the far ridge, while I still have the energy. Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.


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AUTOMOTIVE

REAL ESTATE

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INSURANCE

TREE SERVICE

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FIREWOOD FIREWOOD $65 Face Cord, You Pick Up. Delivery Extra. 518-4944788.

LOGGING

BUYING ANY TYPE STANDING WOOD & Or Property. Highest Prices Paid. Land Clearing. Courteous, Professional, Neat. Please Call 518-593-8752. LAVALLEE LOGGING is looking to harvest and purchase standing timber, primarily Popal & White Pine. Willing to pay New York State stumpage prices on all species. References available. Matt Lavallee, 518-645-6351

APARTMENT CHESTERTOWN - Large 2 bdrm upstairs. Newly remodeled. Walk to everything. Utilities, garbage and plowing included. Laundry facilities on premises. No dogs. Available now. 518-494-4551.

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HOME CROWN POINT - 2 bdrm house, stove & refrigerator included, references & deposit required. $500/ mo. 518-597-3935 CROWN POINT - 3 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath, large covered deck, W/D hook-up, pets OK with additional deposit, $700/mo. plus utilities. 518-585-2500. CROWN POINT - 5 bdrm house, $650/mo., references & deposit required. 518-597-3935 SOUTH TICONDEROGA - Country home, large yard, 2 year lease, security required, $900/mo. 518-585 -7907.

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December 14, 2013

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December 14, 2013

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HELP WANTED LOCAL

CAREER TRAINING

MEDICAL DIRECTOR-ESSEX COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES The Medical Director serves a chief of professional services and medical advisor at an OHM-licensed community mental health outpatient clinic, located near the heart of the Adirondack Mountains. Essex County has been designated as a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) according to Section 1833(m) of the Social Security Act. The duties of this full-time position include: psychiatric evaluations, assessments, medication evaluation/therapy, consultation/ clinical support with staff members of the Essex County Mental Health Clinic and other Essex County agencies, facilities and physicians, participate in AOT and civil commitment procedures, and review client records and approve treatment plans and diagnoses by signing appropriate documents when requested in accordance with NYS regulations. For further information please contact the Essex County Department of Personnel (518)8733360. Applications are available on our website; www.co.essex.ny.us/ personneljobs.asp

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NOTICE TO BIDDERS: Crown Point Fire District will be accepting sealed bids for snowplowing for 2013- 2014. Snowplowing will be for station 1 when there is at least 4" of snow and includes shoveling walkways in front of doors and sanding. Crown Point Fire District Board of Commissioners reserve the right to reject any bids. Please submit sealed bids to PO Box 194, Crown Point, NY 12928 before December 18th, 2013. Bids must be sealed and marked Snowplowing Bid clearly on the envelope. Sealed bids will be opened at the regular monthly Board of Fire Commissioner meeting December 18th, 2013.

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

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HELP WANTED EastView is continuing to grow and we are adding more members to our team! Servers- Part-time and full-time positions available Our dining team provides residents with a fine dining experience and full table service in a dynamic retirement community. With a manageable schedule and superb kitchen facilities, we offer a work environment that is hard to find in the hospitality industry. These positions will be primarily during the evenings and applicants must be willing to work weekends and some holidays. Cook –Per Diem EastView, residents are provided with a fine dining experience. With a manageable schedule and superb kitchen facilities, we offer a work environment that is hard to find in the hospitality industry. Our cook will have experience producing high quality soups, sauces and entrees from scratch, demonstrated experience in all cooking aspects of cooking from grilling to sautéing, and strong attention to food consistency, quality, and delivery. This position requires some weekend and holiday availability. 3rd Shift -Residential Care Assistant- Part-time and full-time positions available The Resident Care Assistant participates as a key member of the health care team implementing care delivery systems in a manner that maintain a nurturing environment that supports the health and independence of the residents. The Residential Care Assistant uses primary care assignments to provide resident—centered care to support the resident’s activities of daily living. Residential Care Assistants use their care-giving skills to ensure the physical and cognitive wellbeing of residents, as well as their emotional and social wellbeing. In addition, they provide support and information to families/others where appropriate. Residential Care Program Coordinator The Program Coordinator plans and delivers events, programs, and activities designed to support the active, lives of EastView Residential Care residents. Our Coordinator will work with residents and their families to bring intellectually and culturally stimulating programs to our community, and to connect EastView to existing programs and events in the broader Vermont community. We seek candidates with at least 2-years of related experience in Alzheimer’s or dementia event planning, or program management and supervision. The candidate will need to be creative in nature and willing to learn from our residents to produce and implement a wonderful calendar of events and group activities. The program coordinator will have excellent communication skills, experience working with seniors, understanding of the 6 dimensions of wellness, a creative nature, The program coordinator will have excellent communication skills, experience working with seniors and adults with dementia. Residential Care Programming Assistant This position plans and delivers events, programs, and activities designed to support the active lives of EastView residential care residents. This person will work with an existing resident programming team and the residents to bring intellectually and culturally stimulating programs to our community. We seek candidates who are creative in nature and who are willing to learn from our residents to produce and implement a wonderful calendar of events and group activities. This position requires excellent communication skills, experience working with seniors. Evenings and weekends required.

For more information about EastView at Middlebury, go to: www.eastviewmiddlebury.com

AT M I D D L E B U R Y

Resident Centered, Locally Governed

Interested candidates please email: greatplacetowork@eastviewmiddlebury.com or send cover letter and resume to: EastView at Middlebury 100 Eastview Terrace, Middlebury, VT 05753 EOE 75316

Times of Ti - 23


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LOST & FOUND REWARD $200 - Man's gold wedding ring lost in the Ticonderoga area on November 20th. If found, please call 518-543-6811.

WANTED TO BUY ADVERTISE TO 10 Million Homes across the USA! Place your ad in over 140 community newspapers, with circulation totaling over 10 million homes. Contact Independent Free Papers of America IFPA at danielleburnett-ifpa@live.com or visit our website cadnetads.com for more information. Let’s Go Garage & Yard Sale-ing Thru The Classified Superstore

1-518-873-6368 Ext. 201

LEGALS Times of Ti Legal Deadline Monday @ 3:00pm Please Send Legals By EMAIL To: legals@denpubs.com

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED L I A B I L I T Y COMPANY (ìLLCî) Name: BARNETT FUELS, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State (“SSNY”) on 10/24/13. Office Location: Essex County. The “SSNY” is designated as agent of the “LLC” upon whom process against it may be served. “SSNY” shall mail a copy of any process to the principal business location of LLC: 1753 Creek Road, Crown Point, NY 12928. Purpose: All lawful activities. TT-11/9-12/14/20136TC-53958 ----------------------------NOTICE TO BIDDERS: CROWN POINT FIRE DISTRICT will be accepting sealed bids for snowplowing for 20132014. Snowplowing will be for station 1 when there is at least 4” of snow and include shoveling walkways in front of doors and sanding. Crown Point Fire District Board of Commissioners reserve the right to reject any bids. Please submit sealed bids to PO Box 194, Crown Point, NY 12928 before December 18th, 2013. Bids must be sealed and marked “Snowplowing Bid” clearly on the envelope. Sealed bids will be opened at the regular monthly Board of Fire Commissioner meeting December 18th, 2013. TT-12/7, 12/14/20132TC-52164 -----------------------------

NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, on behalf of the Essex County Board of Supervisors, will accept sealed bids at the Office of the Purchasing Agent until 2:00 P.M. on December 19, 2013 for Medical Supplies for the Essex County Department of Public Health and other Departments. The bids shall be opened and read aloud on December 19, 2013 at 2:00 P.M. at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, 7551 Court Street, Elizabethtown, New York. If additional information concerning the bidding is required, please call (518) 873-3330. All bids submitted in response to this notice shall be marked "SEALED BID – MEDICAL SUPPLIES" clearly on the outside of the envelope. All bids shall be submitted on the bid sheets included in the package, and no other forms shall be accepted. Specifications and standard proposals for the proposed work may be obtained at the above address, by calling 518-873-3330, or on the County’s website at www.co.essex.ny.us. Essex County reserves the right to reject any and all bids not considered to be in the best interest of Essex County, and to waive any technical or formal defect in the bids which is considered by Essex County to be merely irregular, immaterial, or unsubstantial. In addition to bid sheets, the bidder shall submit executed non-collusion bid certificates signed by the bidder or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103d. The bidder shall also submit an executed certificate of compliance with the Iran Divestment Act signed by the bidder or one of

its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103g. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that Essex County affirmatively states that in regard to any contract entered into pursuant to this notice, without regard to race, color, sex, religion, age, national origin, disability, sexual preference or Vietnam Era veteran status, disadvantaged and minority or women-owned business enterprises will be afforded equal opportunity to submit bids in response hereto. Dated: December 9, 2013 Linda M. Wolf, CPA Purchasing Agent Essex County Government Center 7551 Court Street – PO Box 217 Elizabethtown, New York 12932 (518) 873-3332 TT-12/14/2013-1TC56715 ----------------------------NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, on behalf of the Essex County Board of Supervisors, will accept sealed bids at the Office of the Purchasing Agent until 2:00 P.M. on December 19, 2013 for DPW Office Building Materials. The bids shall be opened and read aloud on December 19, 2013 at 2:00 P.M. at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, 7551 Court Street, Elizabethtown, New York. If additional information concerning the bidding is required, please call (518) 873-3332. All bids submitted in response to this notice shall be marked "SEALED BID – DPW OFFICE BUILDING MATERIALS" clearly on the outside of the envelope. All bids shall be submitted on the bid sheets included in the package, and no other forms shall be accepted. Specifications and

standard proposals for the proposed work may be obtained at the above address, by calling 518-873-3332, or on the County’s website at www.co.essex.ny.us. Essex County reserves the right to reject any and all bids not considered to be in the best interest of Essex County, and to waive any technical or formal defect in the bids which is considered by Essex County to be merely irregular, immaterial, or unsubstantial. In addition to bid sheets, the bidder shall submit executed non-collusion bid certificates signed by the bidder or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103d. The bidder shall also submit an executed certificate of compliance with the Iran Divestment Act signed by the bidder or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103g. A Contract awarded pursuant to this notice shall be subject to the provisions of Sections 103-1, 103-b, 103-d and 103-g of the General Municipal Law. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that Essex County affirmatively states that in regard to any contract entered into pursuant to this notice, without regard to race, color, sex, religion, age, national origin, disability, sexual preference or Vietnam Era veteran status, disadvantaged and minority or women-owned business enterprises will be afforded equal opportunity to submit bids in response hereto. Dated: December 9, 2013 Linda M. Wolf, CPA Purchasing Agent Essex County Government Center 7551 Court Street – PO Box 217 Elizabethtown, New York 12932 (518) 873-3332 TT-12/14/2013-1TC56716

----------------------------NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, on behalf of the Essex County Board of Supervisors, will accept sealed bids for LETSONVILLE ROAD BRIDGE DECK R E P L A C E M E N T, SCHROON NY (B.I.N. 3-30192-0). The bids shall be received at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, 7551 Court Street, Elizabethtown, New York by 2:00 P.M. on December 20, 2013, at which time they will be opened and read aloud. If additional information concerning the bidding is required, call (518) 873-3332. All bids submitted in response to this notice shall be marked "SEALED BID – LETSONVILLE ROAD BRIDGE DECK REPLACEMENT" clearly on the outside of the envelope. All bids shall be submitted on the bid sheets included in the package, and no other forms shall be accepted. Plans, specifications, standard proposals and drawings for the proposed work may be obtained at the above address or on the County’s website a t www.co.essex.ny.us. Each proposal must be accompanied by either a Certified Check or a Bid Bond, in a form acceptable to the Essex County Attorney, payable to Essex County Treasurer in the amount of five percent (5%) of amount of the bid. All Certified Checks and Bid Bonds, except those of the three (3) low bidders will be returned within ten (10) days after the bids are opened. The checks or bonds of the three (3) low bidders will be returned after the execution of the Contract. Essex County reserves the right to reject any and all bids

not considered to be in the best interest of Essex County, and to waive any technical or formal defect in the bids which is considered by Essex County to be merely irregular, immaterial, or unsubstantial. In addition to bid sheets, the bidder shall submit executed non-collusion bid certificates signed by the bidder or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103d. The bidder shall also submit an executed certificate of compliance with the Iran Divestment Act signed by the bidder or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103g. A Contract awarded pursuant to this notice shall be subject to the provisions of Sections 103-1, 103-b, 103-d and 103-g of the General Municipal Law. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that Essex County affirmatively states that in regard to any contract entered into pursuant to this notice, without regard to race, color, sex, religion, age, national origin, disability, sexual preference or Vietnam Era veteran status, disadvantaged and minority or women-owned business enterprises will be afforded equal opportunity to submit bids in response hereto. Dated: December 9, 2013 Linda M. Wolf, CPA Purchasing Agent Essex County Government Center 7551 Court Street – PO Box 217 Elizabethtown, New York 12932 (518) 873-3332 TT-12/14/2013-1TC56717 ----------------------------NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, on behalf of the Essex County Board of Supervisors, will accept sealed bids for

LETSONVILLE ROAD BRIDGE RAILING, SCHROON NY (B.I.N. 3-30192-0). The bids shall be received at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, 7551 Court Street, Elizabethtown, New York by 2:00 P.M. on December 20, 2013, at which time they will be opened and read aloud. If additional information concerning the bidding is required, call (518) 873-3332. All bids submitted in response to this notice shall be marked "SEALED BID – LETSONVILLE ROAD BRIDGE RAILING" clearly on the outside of the envelope. All bids shall be submitted on the bid sheets included in the package, and no other forms shall be accepted. Plans, specifications, standard proposals and drawings for the proposed work may be obtained at the above address or on the County’s website a t www.co.essex.ny.us. Each proposal must be accompanied by either a Certified Check or a Bid Bond, in a form acceptable to the Essex County Attorney, payable to Essex County Treasurer in the amount of five percent (5%) of amount of the bid. All Certified Checks and Bid Bonds, except those of the three (3) low bidders will be returned within ten (10) days after the bids are opened. The checks or bonds of the three (3) low bidders will be returned after the execution of the Contract. A labor and material Payment Bond and a Performance Bond in the form contained in the Contract documents will be required of the successful Bidder. Attention of the bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates under the Contract.

Essex County reserves the right to reject any and all bids not considered to be in the best interest of Essex County, and to waive any technical or formal defect in the bids which is considered by Essex County to be merely irregular, immaterial, or unsubstantial. In addition to bid sheets, the bidder shall submit executed non-collusion bid certificates signed by the bidder or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103d. The bidder shall also submit an executed certificate of compliance with the Iran Divestment Act signed by the bidder or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103g. A Contract awarded pursuant to this notice shall be subject to the provisions of Sections 103-1, 103-b, 103-d and 103-g of the General Municipal Law. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that Essex County affirmatively states that in regard to any contract entered into pursuant to this notice, without regard to race, color, sex, religion, age, national origin, disability, sexual preference or Vietnam Era veteran status, disadvantaged and minority or women-owned business enterprises will be afforded equal opportunity to submit bids in response hereto. Dated: December 9, 2013 Linda M. Wolf, CPA Purchasing Agent Essex County Government Center 7551 Court Street – PO Box 217 Elizabethtown, New York 12932 (518) 873-3332 TT-12/14/2013-1TC56718 -----------------------------

Fishing For A Good Deal? Catch The Greatest Bargains In The Classifieds 1-518-873-6368 Ext. 201


December 14, 2013 WANTED TO BUY BUYING EVERYTHING! FURS, Coins, Gold, Antiques, Watches, Silver, Art, Diamonds."The Jewelers Jeweler Jack" 1-917-696-2024 By Appointment. Lic-Bonded. CASH PAID- up to $28/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. 1-DAY PAYMENT. 1-800371-1136 SCRAP METAL & SCRAP CARS We Will Pick Up All Call Jerry at 518-586-6943

www.timesofti.com MODULAR HOME 3 bdrm, 2 baths, on 1 acre of property, 2 car garage, 2 decks, $87,500. Port Henry, NY 518-962-4685 PARADOX HOME For Sale By Owner, Schroon Lake School District, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, fully renovated, 2 garages, shed, large fire place, $149,900. No owner terms. See forsalebyowner.com Listing ID# 23972428.

VACATION PROPERTY

WANTS TO purchase minerals Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

SCHROON LAKE - Leased Land with Camp in Excellent Condition, 50' lakefront, 48' wooden dock, asking $50,000. Call for details 518-495-7683.

LAND BRANT LAKE 9.1 acre building lot for sale by owner. Harris Road. $63,000. (518) 494-3174. CROWN POINT - 600 + feet on Putts Creek, 2.78 acres, 20' x 32' livable building. Fix up or tear down and rebuild. $30,000 FIRM quick sale. 518-354-7167.

SCHROON LAKE - Leased Land with Camp in Excellent Condition, 50' lakefront, 48' wooden dock, asking $50,000. Call for details 518-495-7683. SCHROON LAKE WATERFRONT CAMP on leased Land. Screened porch, 32' aluminum dock + more. $37,900. 518-569-6907. SINGLE FAMILY Home, Lovely single family home, 3 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath. To trade, swap, sell for equal value home in area, $129,000. Located in beautiful Edgewater, FL. 518-696-2829.

ACCESSORIES (2) TRAILERS (OPEN) - both excellent condition; 2010 Triton 20' Aluminum - max wgt. 7500 lbs. Asking $4900 and 1989 Bison 31' overal Gooseneck, Asking $2900. 518-546-3568. CROWN POINT LAND - 53 Peasley Road. Property offers 3.5 acres on Putnam Creek with 600 feet of road frontage, a 50' x 30' 2 story frame barn with electricity and oil heat. Zones residential. Can be converted or build new. Beautiful spot and minutes to the Northway or Ticonderoga. $65,000. Purdy Realty LLC - 384-1117. Call Frank Villanova - 878-4275 cell NYS LAND, ON TWIN PONDS W/ 34 ACRES $39,995 -Beautiful Woods w/ Large Wildlife Ponds Fullof Ducks, Geese & Deer. Minutes to Syracuse, Salmon River, Oneida Lake. Call 1-800 -229-7843. Financing Available. Or Visit www.landandcamps.com. STONEY CREEK 50 Acres secluded easy access 1800 ft. black top frontage, mountain views, Stoney Creek, NY 100K, no interest fianancing. 518-696-2829 FARMFARM666@YAHOO.COM TOWN OF Lake George 1/2 acre building lot. Access to Village water. Ideal for build-out basement. $47,000. Will hold mortgage for qualified buyer, 20% down. 518668-0179 or 518-321-3347.

MOBILE HOME

FOR SALE PARK MODEL - 1986 LEDGEVIEW Camp - Hwy 149 5 Pine Breeze Trail - $49,500 Come see, it's really neat!! New In 2012: roof, siding, bedroom, deck and shed! 518-636-3429 or 352-428-8767

SINGLE-FAMILY HOME CROWN POINT - Cute, cozy, 3 bdrm/2 bath, A frame, porch, 1/2 acre, $83k. 518-351-5063, 860673-6119, 917-679-4449. LOVELY SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath. To trade, swap, sell for equal value home in area, $129,000. Located in beautiful Edgewater, FL. 518-696-2829.

DONATE A CAR - HELP CHILDREN FIGHTING DIABETES. Fast, Free Towing. Call 7 days/week. Nonrunners OK. Tax Deductible. Call Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 1-800-578-0408

AUTO WANTED CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We're Local! 7 Days/Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-416-2330 CASH FOR CARS AND TRUCKS. Get A Top Dollar INSTANT Offer! Running or Not! 1-888-416-2208 (888) 416-2208

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY PORT HENRY Duplex apartment building, completely renovated, excellent rental history, some owner finanancing available. $69,000. 518-546-8247.

AUTO DONATION

DONATE YOUR CAR to Veterans Today! Help those in need! Your vehicle donation will help US Troops and support our Veterans! 100% tax deductible Fast Free pickup! 1-800-263-4713

WANTED ALL MOTORCYCLES, before 1980, Running or not. $Top CASH$ PAID! 1-315-5698094 WANTS TO PURCHASE minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

STUDDED SNOW Tires Two new condition studded Firestone Winterforce snow tires, 215/70R 14, mounted and balanced on Ford Aerostar rims, asking $60 each. 518-585-5267 or 410-833-4686.

CENTURY 6’ Fiberglass Truck Cap has 3 sliding windows w/screens. Also bedliner. Fits Toyotas. Excellent condition. $1100 value, asking $500. 518-546-7913. SNOW TIRES Hakkapelita snow tires 195/65/R15 non studded 14K on 60 K tires. Great shape, good tread. $200 for all 4. 524 4328 Juggling Your Budget? Advertise Small, Get Big Results! Call 1-518-873-6368 Ext. 201

GET CASH TODAY for any car/ truck. I will buy your car today. Any Condition. Call 1-800-8645796 or www.carbuyguy.com TOP CASH FOR CARS, Any Car/ Truck, Running or Not. Call for INSTANT offer: 1-800-454-6951

BOATS ’88 BAYLINER 22’, V8, open bow, great shape, cover included, many extras. $4,000 firm. 518-942-7725 14’ ADIRONDACK Guide Boat complete w/trailer, oars, cover & cherry caned seats. Never been used. $5500 firm. 518-642-9576. 1968 LAUNCH Dyer 20’ Glamour Girl, Atomic 4 inboard engine, 30HP, very good condition. Safe, reliable, spacious, ideal camp boat. Reasonable offers considered. Located in Essex, NY. 802503-5452 1980 18 1/2 FT. Century Cuddy Cabin, 120 HP I/O, trailer, GPS depth finder, down rigger, plus. $2400 OBO. 518-963-8220 or 518 -569-0118 20’ SEA Ray Bowrider, blue, 1979, V8 M/C, 5.7L Mercruiser, galvanized trailer, mooring cover. $2,798. Sue 973-715-1201. 2005 WHITEHALL SPIRIT rowing/sailboat. Classic boat, rare find. Must sell! Asking $4500 OBO. 845-868-7711 Juggling Your Budget? Advertise Small, Get Big Results! Call 518-873-6368

Times of Ti - 25

CARS

SUVS

2004 CHEVROLET IMPALA LS 82,000 miles, $5000. 518-4945289.

2003 FORD Explorer 2003 Ford Explorer, tan, 127,000 miles, loaded, power everything, A/C, remote start, new battery, alt, belts. $4500. 518-668-2970.

2008 CHEVROLET Impala, color mocha metallic, 58k miles, great gas mileage, like new inside & outside. $10,800. 518-668-2884 2008 PONTIAC G5 60,000 miles, PS, PB, PL, Cruise. New tires, brakes. 518-585-2131. $8,475 VEHICLES FOR SALE: 2002 & 2003 Ford Taurus, 1999 Dodge Stratus, 1999 F150 4x4, 1999 Silverado 3/4 Ton 4x4, 1999 Windstar, 1995 Bronco. (518) 5973270

MOTORCYCLES

TRUCKS 1999 FORD F250 w/Fisher Minute Mount Plow, 95k original miles. Asking $5500 OBO. Blue Mt Lake. Contact Lenny 518-352-7006 or bluemtrest200@gmail.com 2004 FORD F250 Super Duty, Super Cab, V8, 6.0 diesel, 4x4, 8'box, Jericho cap, many accessories, 7' plow, 156,000 miles, in good mechanical condition. $10,500. 518232-3815.

BUCKET TRUCK FOR SALE 1987 International 1900 Single Axle, with Steel Out-Riggers on the rear near back wheels. Truck has DT466 Diesel engine with 132,000 miles, in very good condition. A one man bucket, will reach 50' high. Bucket also equipted with winch and picking point from both booms. Truck licensed, and ready to drive or work. Asking $7,500 or Trade. Owner: Don Thew- 518-6438434 802 Bear Swamp Road, Peru, NY 12972 or Thew802@verizon.net

WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLE KAWASAKI 1967-1980 Z1900, KZ900, KZ1000, ZIR, KX1000MKII, A1-250, W1-650, H1 -500, H2-750, S1-250, S2-350, S3 -400 SUZUKI GS400, GT380, GT750, Honda CB750 (1969,1970) CASH. FREE PICKUP. 1-800-7721142, 1-310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES 1979 SOUTHWIND Motor Home 27', sleeps 6, self contained generator, air condition, micro oven, everything works. Firm $3500. 518-494-3215. 2008 KEYSTONE Cougar XLite Travel Trailer, 26', 1 slide, sleeps 6 -8, bunks, polar package, TV, many extras, one owner, mint condition. $15,000. 518-494-7796. 2013 JAYCO 33RLDS 35’, custom built, 3 slides, all leather interior, 2 flat screen TVs, built-in fireplace, every option available, mint condition, $24,500. 631-885-0198 or 516-967-5260.

SNOWMOBILES 2005 YAMAHA Venture 600 Snowmobile, 717 miles. $4,500. 518-623-4152 22730


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