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Raising awareness for diabetes

WWW.THE-BURGH.COM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2012

CLINTON COUNTY, NEW YORK

This Week ELIZABETHTOWN

WORLD DIABETES DAY

NUTCRACKER BALLET

By Stephen Bartlett

North Country Ballet Ensemble to perform.

stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — Connor Sargeant learned he had diabetes at age five. “It was difficult to deal with when I first got the news,” he said. Suddenly, he had to take insulin and monitor himself, something that has continued throughout his life as he participates in sports. “It is easier now because I have an insulin pump,” said Sargeant, who is now 13. But even with what would be considered quality insurance coverage, there is still a monthly co-pay. Recently, members of the community and those affected by diabetes and their

PAGE 3 YARN SHOP

Plattsburgh Yarn & Gifts opens for business. PAGE 7 CARDBOARD BOATS

People gather at Plattsburgh State, dressed in blue and standing in a circle, to raise awareness about diabetes. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

Woman helps build understanding for mental illness By Stephen Bartlett stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — Throughout time, people have been afraid of what they do not understand, of what they view as different. The stigma and misconceptions about mental illness are vast, but Alison DohCarter hopes to help change that. She wants to help people understand that mental illness is a physical disease and enlist them in the fight to battle misunderstandings about it. “Mental illness doesn’t have the advocates, money and politicians fighting for it like other minority groups,” she said, speaking in Plattsburgh as part of a program called “In Our Own Voice.” The program is sponsored by the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and the

Alison Doh-Carter speaking about mental illness in Plattsburgh. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

presentation by Doh-Carter included conversation and short video segments portraying people with mental illness discussing such topics as “Dark Days” and “Coping Skills.” After each segment, Doh-Carter shared her own experience with mental illness. “People are afraid of what they don’t understand,” she said. “I am here to represent a large community that is often silent and is more apt to hide from being beat down so much.” Doh-Carter herself, for the most part, is a recluse these days. She was a full time teacher when suddenly she could not stay in the classroom and would run outside. She eventually lost her job, husband and step-children. “People start thinking and feeling things and they cover it up because society

Students learn by sinking boats. PAGE 8 SPORTS

Chazy Eagles win Class D state title for sixth time.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

PAGE 13

Index

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November 24, 2012

Students, College help hurricane relief efforts PLATTSBURGH — SUNY Plattsburgh students are joining forces to raise funds for the American Red Cross Hurricane Sandy relief effort. Organizations, individual students, sororities and fraternities have staged coin drives in the residence halls, are hosting tabling events at the Angell College Center and Champlain Centre Mall and will be engaging in other efforts in the coming weeks. “A couple of days after the hurricane hit, administrators of student affairs got together to discuss the fundraising efforts we knew the student groups were involved in,” said Allison Swick-Duttine, director of fraternity/sorority life and organization development at SUNY Plattsburgh. About 20 percent of the college’s student population hails from the regions most heavily impacted by the storm. “We knew many students were going to try to do things for the victims,” Swick-Duttine said. “We thought we’d try to harness their efforts to make a bigger impact. I volunteered to coordinate all that.” An initial meeting was held Nov. 1 where some 35 students, representing residence hall councils, organizations, clubs, fraternities and sororities across campus came to assist in the campaign. They discussed various fundraising options and efforts to increase involvement. “We’re trying to get the word out to students, faculty and

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staff that they can all participate,” Swick-Duttine said. Kathryn Castillo, a senior anthropology major from the Bronx, said that while she has been involved in community service and fundraising events throughout her years at SUNY Plattsburgh, Hurricane Sandy hit close to home — literally and figuratively. “We didn’t have much damage at our home, but we were really fortunate compared to so many others. I know so many people up here who have families and friends affected in New York and New Jersey,” Castillo said. “It made me sad.” Castillo headed an effort Saturday at the Champlain Centre Mall where she and other volunteers accepted donations for the Red Cross disaster relief. “We’ll be selling ribbons for a donation. The Red Cross will be there as well,” she said. “It is my goal to reach the entire community. I know they want to put efforts into helping, and this is an important way. We know the Red Cross doesn’t need canned goods or clothing, and sometimes people don’t know what else to do. It’s the best way to help the Red Cross at this time.” Senior nursing major Caitlin Leahey is familiar with volunteer activity as well. Like Castillo, she’s in a sorority and heavily involved in community service. “Allison reached out to our sorority and asked if we wanted to get involved. I volunteered,” Leahey said. “It’s a really good cause. I know what the Red Cross does to help during disasters, and this one affects so many of our students directly.” Of the ideas thrown out for discussion at the meeting, Leahey said one that had potential was for a local restaurant to bring in volunteer student servers, who would collect a percentage from each meal ordered. Leahey contacted the manager at Texas Roadhouse and is waiting to hear back as to what day — most likely after Thanksgiving — the charity servers will be brought in. For its part, the college is making sure students whose families were affected by the hurricane know there are resources available to them on campus and in the community. These include counseling services, assistance from faculty for academic challenges and possible adjustments to financial aid pack-

ages for qualified students. (Students who think they might qualify would need to discuss their circumstances with the Office of Financial Aid.) In addition, the Student Association sponsored a round-trip bus for students from the region who felt the need to go home last weekend. For more information on the student fundraising efforts or to contribute or volunteer, contact Swick-Duttine at 518-5644825 or email her at swickan@plattsburgh.edu.

Winter Farmers market held Saturday PLATTSBURGH — The Plattsburgh Winter Farmers Market is being held on Saturdays through Dec. 22 at the City Recreation Center, US Oval. The market began on Oct. 20 and is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be fresh sale greens, farm-stored winter vegetables, grass-fed pastured meats, free-range eggs, fresh local apples, breads and pastries, jams, jellies, preserves, honey and maple syrup, natural skin care, and of course handmade candles and crafts such as like knitted hats and scarfs.

County assesses overdue taxes

PLATTSBURGH — Penalty being assessed for overdue school taxes. Clinton County Treasurer Joseph Giroux is reminding property owners that the final day for the collection of school taxes is Nov. 30. The original bill should be mailed with payment that must include the school penalty plus a five percent county fee to: Clinton County Treasurer, 137 Margaret Street, Suite 205, Plattsburgh, New York, 12901. School taxes remaining unpaid after Nov. 30 will be relevied to the January tax bill and are subject to the prevailing school penalty plus a seven-percent county penalty. Taxpayers who are using the installment payment program must U.S. postmark All Sizes & Comfort Levels • Headboards • Frames their third installment no later than Nov. 30. If the final Memory Foam • Latex • Adjustable Beds payment is not made by that Hurry Offer Ends No Many models Incredible Limited Time Offers! vember 26th time, unpaid installments in stock for fast will be relevied on the Janudelivery! Over 20 ary tax bill and subject to the Qualifying Models! seven percent penalty. For more information contact the Clinton County Treasurer Joseph W. Giroux at 565-4730.

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November 24, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 3

The Nutcracker comes to Plattsburgh, Lake Placid By Shaun Kittle

tion and every position, and constantly make corrections. “No matter how old you get you always have someone mentoring you,” Schonbek said. “The rehearsal process is all about being corrected.” Teagan Plimpton, a 17-year-old senior at Peru High School who is playing five roles in the Nutcracker, can relate. “You don’t ever get everything the first time you try it,” Plimpton said. Besides school work and picking a college to attend after she graduates, Plimpton attends 2hour-long ballet classes and practices that can last more than two hours several times a week, and has attended summer intensives, an intense summer camp for ballerinas. Having danced since she was three, it’s safe to say it’s an intrinsic part of her life, like eating, sleeping and breathing. “I like expressing myself through music,” Plimpton said. “It’s totally worth the work.” Staying with ballet hasn’t always been easy, though. Besides the time it demands, Plimpton has never had full range of motion with her left hand, making it difficult for her to pull off some of the subtleties of certain ballet moves. Her solution was to learn to work around the problem, a methodology that has paid off. “When I first did the Nutcracker, I started off as a Bonbon,” Plimpton explained. “This year I’m playing North Wind, Chinese, Candy Cane, Arabian and Dew Drop.” Plimpton is excited to play so many roles, but she’s even more excited to share the stage with Therese Wendler, a professional ballerina from New York City who will play the Sugar Plum Fairy and Queen of the North Winds in the Snow variation in this year’s performance. Wendler has been performing the Nutcracker since she was seven, and said the show— with its dancing mice and spinning snowflakes— hasn’t lost its power for her. “I think it’s the music,” Wendler said. “Tchaikovsky is absolutely beautiful. After all these years, there are still parts that build up emotionally in the music.”

shaun@denpubs.com

PLATTSBURGH—The Nutcracker is a holiday tradition for fans of the show and a labor of love for those who put it together. This year, the North Country Ballet Ensemble will perform the popular ballet in Plattsburgh Nov. 23-25 and in Lake Placid Dec. 1 and 2. The performance was choreographed by resident choreographer Terpsie Toon of the Lake Placid School of Ballet and guest choreographers Rebecca Kelly of Rebecca Kelly Ballet and Michela Boschetto from the NCBE creative team. Led by NCBE’s Artistic Director Alice Schonbek, the show will feature 70 local student dancers, 10 community members and guest ballerina Therese Wendler. Guest performer Mikhail Ilyin, a native of St. Petersburg, Russia who dances for American Ballet Theatre, will assume the role of Cavalier in the Plattsburgh performance. In Lake Placid, the role of Cavalier will be performed by Andres Neira of New Jersey Ballet. But it isn’t all sugar plums and bonbons for the performers, many of whom take time out of their otherwise busy schedules to perfect their moves by rehearsing almost daily. For Schonbek, it’s easy to justify devoting that much time—she has had a passion for the art form since she was a child and watching her students evolve is a major component of that passion. “It’s the sheer number of hours of having to work to perfect things that aren’t necessarily natural for your body,” Schonbek said. “It’s a real balance between the athleticism and the finer points.” An advanced training schedule for a ballerina is a full-time job. Between daily classes and rehearsals, a dancer can easily net more than 30 hours a week in practice time. But the practice isn’t just about stretching and dancing—instructors analyze every mo-

As a child, Wendler began taking ballet lessons after her mother saw her walking around the house on her tip-toes. At first she didn’t care for it, but performing changed her mind. “Performing is a natural high,” Wendler said. “Here I am, showing you what I can do—it takes it to another level.” Wendler explained that different roles require different actions, which also takes the art form to a different level for her. A villain’s hands are positioned differently than a non-villain’s, and the motions are stark, sharp and demanding. In contrast, as the Queen of the North Winds she must use her body to emulate the movement of snow and how it relates to the occurrence of a snow storm that builds in intensity with the music. Since the show has been cochoreographed by Rebecca Kelly, Morgan Broderick of Lake Placid will dance the role of Claire in the North Country Ballet Ensemble’s performance of the Nutcracker. whom Wendler has worked with Photo by Shaun Kittle for nine years, she and the North Country dancers will be on the same page for their first full-cast rehearsal, The Nutcracker will be performed in Plattsburgh on Friwhich will happen just days before opening day, Nov. 23 and Saturday, Nov. 24, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. and night. Sunday, Nov. 25 at 2 p.m. at the Hartman Theater in the My“The nice thing is, I’ve worked with some of ers Fine Arts Building at Plattsburgh State. All categories of these students before, so I’m not a total tickets are on sale at The Party Factory at (518) 561-6001, stranger coming in,” Wendler said. “It’s inspir- and one hour prior to each performance on site . Ticket ing for me. I want to encourage them to dance prices are: General seating: $10 for children (12 and under) and seniors and $15 for adults. Reserved seating is $13 for and enjoy it.” Wendler added that she hopes that, in work- children (ages 12 and under) and seniors and $18 for adults. For ticket information and group sales, please call (518) 593ing with young ballet students, she can show 7490. Visit north-country-ballet-ensemble.org for informathem it is possible to become a professional bal- tion about the NCBE. lerina, so long as they possess passion and are Lake Placid Performances will take place at the Lake willing to commit to the full-time hours the art Placid Center for the Arts on 17 Algonquin Drive in Lake Placid on Saturday, Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2 requires. “To be a ballerina you have to have a strong at 1 p.m. Ticket prices are $12 for children (ages12 and under); $15 for seniors and students and $18 for adults. For mind and be strong in yourself,” Wendler said. reservations or ticket information, call the LPCA at (518) “Ballet is not an easy world to be in, but if you 523-2512 or visit LakePlacidArts.org. love what you do it will come out in your art.”

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4 - www.the-burgh.com

November 24, 2012

Opinion

A COMMUNITY SERVICE: This community newspaper and its delivery are made possible by the advertisers you’ll find on the pages inside. Our sixty plus employees and this publishing company would not exist without their generous support of our efforts to gather and distribute your community news and events. Please thank them by supporting them and buying locally. And finally, thanks to you, our loyal readers, for your support and encouragement over the past 65 years from all of us here at the Burgh and Denton Publications.

Burgh Editorial

28986

Viewpoint

Suicide: There is always someone willing to listen Let’s count our many blessings

T

he holidays can be a heartwarming time of year, when family members come together to make lasting memories. It can also be a very lonely and depressing time for some — a time that can push the deeply depressed to the brink. The North Country witnessed just such a situation last week when a 73-year-old Keene Valley woman was the apparent victim of a suicide at AuSable Chasm. While we cannot begin to pretend to understand what drove this woman to her ultimate decision, one thing is for certain — suicide and the events that lead up to it are almost always a cry for help, and there are people in place willing to offer that help to those who are willing to accept it. Suicide prevention professionals throughout the region want people to know that they are available around the clock to offer a sympathetic ear — and they want to get the word out that treatment does work. “The most important message here is that help is available and it works,” said Mary Anne Cox, a licensed clinical social worker with the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Champlain Valley (NAMI:CV), which serves Clinton, Essex and Franklin Counties. “Whether people are suffering from depression or are having thoughts of suicide, therapy is available and it works,” she said. Last Saturday, Nov. 17, was International Survivors of Suicide Day. Cox said NAMI offers a free suicide survivors grief support group in Plattsburgh the second Wednesday of each month beginning at 7 p.m. She also provides free one-on-one grief counseling. People can find out more by calling Cox at 563-1141 or NAMI at 561-2685. Suicide is a growing problem, both locally and nationally. According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the rate of suicide has been on the rise since 2010. It now ranks in the top 10 as the leading cause of death in the United States and accounts for more than 12 deaths per 100,000 people each year. That is the highest rate of suicide in 15 years. While suicide rates do trend up slightly during the holiday season, rates are even higher in the early fall and spring when people have even less of a safety net surrounding them, Cox said. “Often, after the holidays as families depart, heading into spring, people become even more

isolated and thus more depressed,” Cox said. “These are the times that they need to know that they are not alone. That we are there for them.” A study recently conducted by researchers from Hamilton College in Clinton, New York concluded that New York ranked lowest in suicide rates among all 50 states in the US. In contrast, however, New York ranked 45th out of 50 in “well-being” a calculation attached to how happy its residents are. Which means that while New Yorkers are the least apt to commit suicide, the state ranks 45th out of 50 in how happy its residents are. And, while suicide rates are lower in more urban areas like New York City, those rates rise in more isolated regions where there are less people to turn to for help, Cox said. “The prevalence of suicide in rural areas, like upstate New York is definitely higher,” she said. “Guns are more prevalent, people are more isolated from one another and help is harder to find.” Cox said there is always someone willing to listen, from a neighbor to a primary care provider. Here are some numbers to call for help: Clinton County Clinton County Mental Health, 565-4060 Suicide hot line number is (866) 577-3836 Essex County Essex County Mental Health Clinic Crisis Services (518) 873-3670 after hours: (888) 8543773 Mental Health Association of Essex County Hopeline (800) 440-8074 Franklin County North Star Behavioral Health Services Saranac Lake region: (518) 891-5535 Malone region: (518) 483-3261 Hamilton County Hamilton County Community Services Crisis Line - (800) 533-8443 St. Mary's Mental Health Hotline - (518) 8429111 Warren County Crisis Line of the Crisis Department of Samaritan Hospital - (518) 274-4345 Samaritans Suicide Prevention Center - (518) 689-4673. This editorial is the collaborative opinion of a board comprised of Thom Randall, Fred Herbst, Shaun Kittle, Keith Lobdell, Stephen Bartlett, Andy Flynn, Katherine Clark and John Gereau. Comments should be directed to denpubs@denpubs.com.

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O

n behalf of everyone here at Denton Publications, let me wish you a happy Thanksgiving. In these rapidly changing times, our culture is undergoing a massive transformation when it is easy to find so many things about which to complain. Look around, pick up a newspaper, turn on the radio or TV, or log onto the Internet and you’ll find tons of material from which you can sing the blues. Complaining seems to be our most popular pastime these days. We can’t take lightly the challenging economic times we find ourselves in at this point in time. But this weekend, as much as any other time, we need to realize and reflect on all we have to be thankful for as we sit here in 2012. This country is still full of promise and opportunity. Hopefully your Thanksgiving was highlighted by a wonderful meal in the company of friends and family. Some of you may have lost those dear to you since last year and while it may be painful without them, be thankful for the good times you enjoyed with them while they were here and treasure those previous Thanksgiving meals when you were all together. Not too many years ago, if you were unable to connect in person with all your loved ones, as cross-country travel was very expensive, what a task it was just to make a phone call. We had stationary, hard wired, rotary phones with very expensive long distances charges. Many times the phone lines were so busy over a major holiday weekend that calls couldn’t get through. We didn’t have speed dial, answering machines or voicemail, so you might have to try many times. Today with our smart phones, computers, tablets and social media, we can send instant pictures and minute-by-minute details of events to distant family and friends. Plus, we can call them at will from almost anyplace or even Skype them in real time and carry on face-to-face conversations through the computer screen across the world. Go back even further and think about the life-and-death dangers faced by the early settlers of our country. Today we complain about luggage fees and TSA lines while we wait to take a jet across the country that will have us to our final destination in just few hours. Our forefathers traveled in wooden boats or wagons facing un-

told dangers at every turn. Loved ones on either side of a trip may have never known the outcome of a visit Dan Alexander gone bad. Nor Thoughts from could they comBehind the Pressline municate any lifechanging events easily. Complaining will always be a part of our lives regardless of what age we live in, but when put into the context of time, challenges and frustrations will be seen as hurdles to some and opportunities to others. We can look back to the past and we look ahead into the future, but each of us was given only one lifetime to live and this is the time and place we find ourselves. While some may long for the past and others can’t wait for the future, make sure to take full advantage of the present. The opportunities you have today with family and friends may be very different by next year. The regrets of yesterday can only be fulfilled today. On this Thanksgiving, count your blessings and cherish those you’ve been able to share it with. Regardless of your situation, hope and opportunity are out there. You may have to open yourself up to find them, but a truly thankful heart can always see things more clearly. Let’s all hope the unrest, wars, pessimism and doubt concerning our future can be replaced with peace and optimism when we realize and give thanks for the many wonderful blessing we enjoy at this time and in this place. Let’s hope that as a society we take greater stock in what we have to be thankful for rather than fighting and stressing over the things we don’t or won’t have. Life is so short and regrets can build up over the years. Don’t wait until it’s too late to appreciate our many blessings. Let me also take this time to thank all of you who read this column and our publications. We are thankful for your support and the many emails and letters you’ve sent over the past year. We intend to work hard to continue earning your support. Happy Thanksgiving. Dan Alexander is publisher and CEO of Denton Publications. He may be reached at dan@denpubs.com.


November 24, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 5

Where should our priorities lie? D

uring the months leading up to the election several people ranted about socialism, claiming the country was headed that way or that this or that political candidate was a socialist. We already partially live in a socialist country with public schools and public police and fire departments and Medicare and Social Security. We also live in a country that embraces the free market and in which capitalism thrives. As I write this, an approaching holiday should calm the fears of anyone worried about a socialist takeover. Capitalism is clearly part of our very foundation – not that it shouldn’t be – and we overwhelmingly show our support for it every Black Friday. Nationwide, people hit the stores early, in the freezing cold, lining up at the doors hours before opening with folding chairs, blankets, food, coffee and even portable music and movie players, very likely purchased the previous Black Friday. This year, in anticipation of ever increasing numbers and because of public demand, the stores are opening earlier. That should come as a relief to the individuals waiting,

their breath white in front of them, with visions of LCD-TV’s and laptops and music players dancing in their heads. I’ve always felt sad during Black Friday, because while some people simply want to accumulate more stuff, others are there because this is the only time of year they can afford a gigantic television. I am not judging, because I might be there too, except I usually cannot afford the super-cheap gigantic television. Black Friday shows what people are willing to line up for hours for, and in that very act makes a statement about our priorities. It should relieve anyone worried about a socialist or communist takeover. Capitalism and the free market are not going anywhere, and not that they should, and if Black Friday is any indicator, consumer culture’s place in society is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, safe. Think about it—stuff, material stuff, is on sale, and we are willing to line up for hours in the freezing cold for those items that we do not need to survive, but we clearly want. I am not saying there is anything wrong with those items or in wanting or possessing those items. To each their own, and you are not

Stephen Bartlett

From the Editor’s Desk a bad person just because you spend a year planning how to secure your spot in line to land the deals on Black Friday. Yet why aren’t people willing to line up for hours in the freezing cold for the things we, in some cases, need to survive and thrive? Let’s examine our priorities. Various medical agencies offer free clinics and workshops and seminars geared toward educating the public about its health, touching on topics ranging from cancer to diabetes to obesity to exercise. I

don’t see anyone lining up hours for these free educational experiences that could save people’s lives, or at the very least considerably improve their health. In fact, there are often many empty seats at such events. Various agencies, including mental health and organizations that work with the disabled, hold events that touch on stigma, disabilities, mental illness, mental health, family support and more. These events provide valuable information that in some cases is vital to a healthy, functioning society, information that could alleviate much pain and suffering and improve the quality of life for so many people and answer an array of questions for individuals in desperate need of such answers, and I am not just speaking about the individuals afflicted and their families. No lines for these free events. No folding chairs and coffee and music players for entertainment while waiting in line. In fact, individuals holding these events are often quite pleased if at least a dozen people show up. Yet these events might reveal that you or a family member is mentally ill and there is help available or

that your actions hurt members of an already marginalized community. Perhaps you discover your family has poor eating habits and you take the information you gather and prevent your children from developing diabetes. Maybe one workshop saves you from cancer, another from a loved one committing suicide, a third is educational and gives you the tools you need to begin the process of changing careers, a fourth reveals there is support to help you go back to school, and yet another provides people with the tools to make the lives of themselves and those around them more pleasant and less tragic. I’m not saying stop turning out for Black Friday, but there are an array of free and/or cheap events in this community that we should be lining up for too. These events will help us in ways three hours in front of a massive wide screen ever will. So what are we willing to risk frostbite for? Healthy, happier lives in a supportive society, or televisions? Stephen Bartlett may be reached at stephen@denpubs.com

Chazy Eagles head and shoulders above the rest W

hen something has “the look,” you just have to stand back and appreciate what you are watching. Such was the case with the 2012 Chazy Eagles boys varsity soccer team. From the start of the season, everyone could see that there was something different that would end up setting this team apart from the others. In Chazy, that is a difficult thing to do, as the rest of Section VII measures success with Sectional banners and regional appearance, the Eagles measure them in plaques that resemble the state of New York (they really have to do something to make Long Island look better, though). Hey, David Poitras even said it, they had to get their trophy back. That is exactly what they did, rolling through every Section VII opponent save one (a 3-3 tie with Beekmantown that they won on penalty kicks, in our book making them 22-0-0, not 21-0-1). They then ran through the Sectional tournament, winning three games by a combined score of 25-2. That got everyone thinking, is this the worse we have ever seen Section VII soccer? Is it that these other teams are so bad they just make Chazy look that good? The answer was no. The Eagles then went on to beat Section X representative Heuvelton 6-0 to advance to the Class D final four in Middletown. Their first match-up was

a 1-0 win against the only team the experts thought stood a chance to beat them, second-ranked Poland. This game was not as close as the score sounds. Chazy dominated the shot chart, time of possession, possession in the opponents’ end, corner kicks, 50/50 balls — everywhere in the scorebook and on the field. The only place they didn’t have an edge was saves, as Poland keeper Mitch Jones single-handedly kept his team in the game making saves that no other goalie has made against the Eagles. Despite a drastic miscue on his part, Jones was in no way the blame for that loss. Then came the finals, a 4-0 coronation ceremony against Fort Ann out of Section II. After these 80 minutes, gone were the memories of a 1-0 game that was dominated by the Eagles but won by Hamilton one year ago. This team had a goal to get back and avenge that loss and, while not having to go through Hamilton (which did not make it out of its own section), did just that. It is the sixth state title for the Eagles, putting them in rarified air. Only three other teams have as many or more titles, with Southold and Shenedehowa having six and Pittsford Mendon seven. It also puts head coach Rob McAuliffe in rarified air. While not alone at the top of the mountain, he stands with Joe Borrosh and Mike Campisi as the only two coaches to

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Our Furry Friends Our Furry Friends is a weekly feature brought to you by Denton Publications. For more information about these and other fine pets available for adoption, contact: Elmore SPCA 556 Telegraph Road, Peru 643-2451 North Country SPCA 23 Lakeshore Road, Westport 962-8604

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uby is a fabulous dog that was found running at large in the town of AuSable, New York. This adult dog is very sweet and kind and just loves to be around people. She is great on a leash, asks for the door to go out and gets along with other dogs. She has no interest in the cats that roam the office at Elmore, and she is quite content to lay at my feet while I work at my desk. Ruby does not like to be kenneled or left outside in a kennel. She is a fabulous escape artist and tunneled under our fence once or twice to getto be with us. Ruby does like to exercise and will do best in an active home. Ruby is a super sweet dog that gets along with everyone she meets. Ruby will be available for adoption after she is current on vaccinations and tested for heart worm. Come in and meet this loving dog who would make anyone a great companion.

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ur featured pet this week is Roxie, a young Labrador Retriever/Staffordshire Terrier-mix who came to us terribly undersocialized and afraid. Roxie is cautious around new people and needs some time to become comfortable with you; once she does, you will find that she has a goofy, sweet, fun-loving side that is positively endearing. Roxie would benefit from a home with experienced dog owners, who can provide the structure and leadership she needs to help her become the best companion she can be.

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manage six teams to a state title. However, McAuliffe brought some rocks up the mountain with him in hopes of making it a little higher by collecting a seventh state title. As he said, their goal will always be to win a state title — that’s every year. But this championship also put this team, captained by Brandon Laurin and Nathan Reynolds, in by Keith Lobdell rarified air. As the game wound down, the mumble of “greatest Chazy team ever” started. McAuliffe said that they may very well be, using the 2005 team as an example. That team scored 164 goals and had 21 shutouts. This team allowed nine goals all season and was only tested twice — once by a Class B school that was a preseason favorite in Section VII and again by the second-ranked team in the state (based on the scoreboard). In Chazy, the debate has begun. What cannot be debated is that this, more than any other, was Chazy’s year. They had the team, they had the coaching and now they have to sew in a sixth star to the uniforms. Congratulations, Eagles.

The Tank


6 - www.the-burgh.com

November 24, 2012

Gaudette sentenced in meth arrest By Stephen Bartlett

Plattsburgh, Mooers, Keeseville, West Chazy and Altona. “Production of methamphetamine will not be tolerated by law enforcement in this county,” Collyer said. Law enforcement arrested Gaudette; Kristopher Peryea, 36; and Aaron Prim, 35; on July 17 at 10 Eleanor Way in the City of Plattsburgh. The arrests came after an investigation by the Adirondack Drug Task Force and the Clinton County District Attorney’s Office. The three men faced charges of second-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine and second-degree conspiracy. “Those who choose to produce meth here must be prepared to face the consequences when they are caught,” Collyer said. Gaudette pleaded guilty to third-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance on Sept. 14 in front of Clinton County Court Judge Patrick McGill. On Oct. 22, Peryea pleaded guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance.

stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH – They cooked meth on what appeared to be a quiet side street in the City of Plattsburgh. All three were arrested. All three pleaded guilty to related charges. Recently, one of them was sentenced to state prison. Jaime H. Gaudette, 36, was sentenced to four-and-a-half years in prison with two years post-release supervision. The Plattsburgh man was further ordered to pay $375 in mandatory surcharges and provide a DNA sample. “Four-and-a-half years in state prison will be the standard for first-time offenders caught producing methamphetamine in Clinton County,” said Assistant Clinton County District Attorney Douglas Collyer. There have been a rash of arrests in Clinton County related to methamphetamine this year, including the Town of

The Saranac has been recommended for a sentence of fourand-a-half years in state prison with two years post-release supervision. Perya will be sentenced on Jan. 3, 2013. He remains in Clinton County Jail in lieu of $20,000 bail. Prim pleaded guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance on Nov. 5 and has also been recommended to serve four-and-a-half years in state prison. He is remanded to ClinJaime H. Gaudette ton County Jail in lieu of $20,000 bail. The Redford man is scheduled to be sentenced on March 6, 2013.

Festival raises funds for developmental disabilities By Stephen Bartlett

ments. Life expectancy among people with developmental disabilities as a group is 20 years below average. Clinton County ARC cares for such individuals and helps them live life to its fullest, and the agency is again raising money and awareness through its Festival of Trees.

stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — Developmental Disabilities are lifelong disabilities attributed to mental or physical impair-

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Thom Randall 34 Years

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Stephen Barlett 14 Years

The ARC Foundation is hosting the sixth annual Festival of Trees to raise funds and awareness for the developmentally disabled in the community and their families. Individuals, civic groups and businesses choose themes and decorate holiday trees, which will be showcased at the Festival of Trees in Champlain Centre mall in Plattsburgh, near the inside entrance to Gander Mountain. Local judges award ribbons in the following categories: Most Original, Most Holiday Spirit, Most Creative and Judges’ Choice. People who wish to donate to the ARC Foundation will have their names entered into a drawing to win a tree. The cost for those interested is $5 per ticket or $20 for six tickets. Individuals who purchase tickets place them in receptacles located at the trees they hope win. The People’s Choice award is determined by the tree that receives the most ticket votes. The Festival of Trees runs until Dec. 1, with individuals who win trees notified by phone. Winning trees will be wrapped and ready for pickup from 10:30 a.m. to noon Sunday, Dec. 2, at Champlain Centre, or 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Dec. 3, at Champlain Valley Industries, 9 Industrial Boulevard in Plattsburgh. ARC will provide delivery within a 20-mile radius for a $10 fee. ARC officials say the event is a success each year and goes a long way in helping the developmentally disabled and their families in the community. It is considered one of the signature events of the agency. ARC has been in the community more than 50 years and also considers the event a way to give back to the community and hold a nice event for children and the community. It is also a good way to bring people together to enjoy the season, while showing there is support for those with developmental disabilities.

Fire fighters wish happy holidays PLATTSBURGH — The members of the Clinton County Firefighters Association (CCFA) would like to wish everyone a wonderful Thanksgiving Holiday. During this busy holiday, the FD members would like to remind everyone to stay safe during the holidays. Busy holiday preparation can easily distract and people may inadvertently leave food on the stove or in the oven. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) on Thanksgiving Day 2009 three times the daily average number of home fires occurred. We urge our area residents to “carve” out a little time for safety. With that in mind, we have attached a short list of Thanksgiving Safety Tips. The 28 Member Departments of the CCFA stand ready to serve their communities twenty-four hours a day. Feel free to stop by your local fire station if you have any questions. Currently, nearly a thousand volunteer and paid members of the association serve Clinton County, the Province of Quebec and portions of Vermont.

For more than 60 years, our experienced team of local journalists have kept our Adirondack/ North Country communities at the forefront of our reporting. And not just when the big story needs covering, but everyday news, sports and features of importance to you. While the larger, out-of-town news organizations pull back on coverage and reduce staff, our local, homegrown company and news team stands ready to provide you with timely news in-print, online at www.denpubs.com, through mobile devices, Facebook and

Bank raises money for Heart Assoc.

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PLATTSBURGH — Glens Falls National Bank and Trust Company hosted a Community Appreciation Day on Oct. 12 and raised funds for the American Heart Association. The health-focused event at 25 Margaret Street included blood pressure checks by City of Plattsburgh firefighters, as well as a bake sale, basket raffle and the sale of flowers from Nelson’s Flower Shop. The various fundraising activities generated $140 for the local chapter of the American Heart Association, which organizes the annual Heart Walk and aims to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The Margaret Street Office is among many Glens Falls National locations hosting Community Appreciation Days this year. The events are meant to show the Bank’s appreciation for its neighbors, while assisting local causes.

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Yarn finds a home in Plattsburgh By Stephen Bartlett

stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — For years, Sue Coonrod wanted a yarn and gift store with a personality of its own. She envisioned an old building with character, big front windows and a central location. First there was an education career to finish, but now that she has retired, Coonrod has seen her dream through to reality and has been enjoying success in the City of Plattsburgh where she opened Plattsburgh Yarn & Gifts at 16 Brinkerhoff Street. “I wanted a place where knitters could get together,” Coonrod said. Coonrod spent her educational career in college relations, teaching art and special education and as a special education administrator and school principal. She retired from Beekmantown Central School. She was passionate about her career in education, but she also had other dreams for herself. “My daughter is an avid knitter and I have knitted all my life,” she said. “You have to drive to Lake Placid or go across the lake to go to a yarn store.” Coonrod had been in business previously when she had run her own shop in Essex in 1997. Also an artist, she sold some of her pottery and paintings there and loved working for herself. She was determined to open a yarn store in Plattsburgh and wanted to be downtown. “I was able to get my first choice in locations, right across from the Arts Center,” Coonrod said.

Sue Coonrod at her business, Plattsburgh Yarn & Gifts. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

Early on as she set up her store, she found vintage fixtures that had been used in a general store in Vermont. When she went to refinish the floor, the flooring was on sale. She asked her daughter, Rosie, and friends what to fill the store with, what kind of yarns to carry. She conducted an informal survey on how to set everything up.

“Yarns have different weights,” Coonrod said. “They are made of different fibers. My daughter said when she goes into a yarn store she has a project in mind and likes to see it arranged by weight.” So Coonrod started with that, though with her artist’s eye it also became about color. “Then, out of the blue, I received an email

Vital energy assistance accepting applications PLATTSBURGH — For some, heating their homes during winter is a luxury they cannot afford. Many of them work, yet low pay, a rising cost-of-living, soaring energy costs and other factors make it nearly impossible to cover all the bills. The Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) works to ensure families don’t go cold over the winter. HEAP began accepting applications for benefits this week. “Rising energy prices and colder temperatures will make it even harder for many low-income families and senior citizens to afford their heating bills this winter,” said Elizabeth Berlin, Executive Deputy Commissioner of the State Office

lar benefit per season. But households may further be eligible for an emergency HEAP benefit if they are in danger of running out of fuel or having their utility service shut off. HEAP benefits will be accepted beginning Jan. 2, 2013. Applicants should apply early, because HEAP benefits are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. Applications for benefits will be accepted through March 15, 2013. New York residents interested in learning if they are eligible for HEAP and other benefits should go online at myBenefits.ny.gov and answer a few questions. Last year alone, 1.5 million households received HEAP.

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of Temporary and Disability Assistance. HEAP, overseen by the State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance, provides funding to low-income and elderly New Yorkers to help keep their homes warm in the winter months. “HEAP will provide sorely needed assistance to over 1 million New York state households, enabling them to keep their heat on when the cold weather sets in,” Berlin said. HEAP, a federally funded program, exists to assist eligible households in meeting their energy needs. The maximum regular HEAP benefit a household can receive this winter is $650. HEAP eligibility is based on income and household size. A family of four with an annual household income of $49,333 may qualify for a HEAP benefit. Households that qualify for HEAP can receive one regu-

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from Gretchen Barton, one of only 10 TKGA Certified Master Knitters in New York state,” Coonrod said. “She had relocated to Plattsburgh and was very interested in my venue. She now offers knitting classes and workshops at Plattsburgh Yarn & Gifts.” Coonrod’s daughter set up the web site, which she said has been extremely useful for customers and class registration. She chose her yarns for their high quality and reasonable prices, with brands that include Berroco, Cascade, Plymouth, Lambs Pride, Baby Wool, Rowan and James C. Brett. A local fiber artist named Heidi Fortsch also supplies the store with yarn she dies and spins herself. “She uses wool, alpaca, even a little cashmere,” Coonrod said. “I also carry Frog Tree Yarns.” Local handmade items at the store are truly a family affair with her mother, Margaret McCaw, creating knitting needle organizers, tote bags, aprons and table runners, and her niece, Lacey Ahrent selling framed local photos and photo greeting cards. Renee Hall, a former colleague, sews quilted knitting bags and Julie Fredette, another former colleague, offers felted purses and bags. Coonrod offers her artwork. She has enjoyed running the business so far and said the store has done well. “I was ready to work hard and do something for myself, and the pieces fell into place,” she said. Plattsburgh Yarn & Gifts is located at 16 Brinkerhoff Street in Plattsburgh and can be found online at: plattsburghyarnandgifts.com.

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8 - www.the-burgh.com

November 24, 2012

Cardboard boat races help students learn By Stephen Bartlett

stephen@denpubs.com CHAMPLAIN — As soon as the Chazy Central Rural School student hit water, his boat imploded around him. The student from Northeastern Clinton Central School sank only a few feet away. But one student, in a small cardboard box covered in duct tape managed to paddle across the pool as his peers shouted “Dylan!” “This is a problem-solving activities, and the students have limited supplies and most come up with the best possible design,” said Northeastern Clinton Central School Technology Teacher Cole Moon. “Problem-solving is one of the biggest challenges people have to face in life.” Students from both schools built cardboard boats as part of their technology classes and then participated in boat races at Northeastern Clinton Central School. “This is a team-building exercise,” said Chazy Central Rural School Technology Teacher Kyle Syck. As racers and pit crews entered the pool area, they lined their cardboard boats - some large, others small, and yet others with wooden and cardboard attachments to help them float – along the shallow end of the 45feet by 75-feet 190,383-gallon pool. They huddled for a safety meeting as Moon issued instructions. “If you hear a whistle you are probably doing something unsafe. Every racer will have a life jacket. No standing.” A lifeguard sitting on a flotation device set up in the middle of the deep end of the pool. Then, the doors opened, the noise increasing to a dull roar as spectators filtered into the pool area and surrounded three sides of the pool. The first heat, consisting of four racers, placed their cardboard boats in, two immediately collapsing around the racers, a third sinking seconds after the race started and the fourth, carrying Dylan, crossing the finish line as students from both schools cheered. As the third heat began, students in a giant boat paddled furiously, sinking a few feet from the edge of the pool. Suddenly, the crowd began screaming, “Brandon,” as a student in small boat crossed the finish line. A total of three boats in the third heat when one began to sink, leaving pieces of cardboard in its wake. A pair of students dove into the water to pull the boat’s remains across the finish line.

In the end, the smaller boats outlasted the large ones, soggy an unable to compete in the final rounds. “We didn’t have one boat that floated,” Syck said. He said the project helps students go through the engineering process, as well as learn about buoyancy and weight distribution. “I think this helps keep the students interested in their projects,” Moon said. Brandon Laurin, a senior at Chazy Central Rural School, appreciated that the two schools worked on the projects together. “It was fun,” he said. “Not just getting out of school, but doing something that relates to school.” Jeck Genier, a junior at Chazy, learned about the various types of boat bottoms and maritime history. “I look forward to next year.” Pictured at right: Students from Northeastern Clinton Central School and Chazy Central Rural School participate in cardboard boat races as part of a project for their technology classes. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

Glens Falls National Bank Plattsburgh staff honor veterans during the U.S. Avenue Office’s Community Appreciation Day on Friday, November 9. Pictured (l-r): Steve Bowmen, Director of the Clinton County Veterans Service Agency; Margaret Street Office Branch Manager, Cathy Steele; U.S. Avenue Office Branch Manager Mary Goddeau; Plattsburgh Regional Manager John VanNatten; and customers and veterans Robert O. Brooks and Paul Dumas. Photo by Tom Semeraro – Semeraro Photography

Champlain Centre mall changes Black Friday plans By Stephen Bartlett

stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — North Country residents hop in their vehicles when they are normally tucked tight in bed and brave the cold. They drive to retail centers and line up at the door, the crowds stretching through parking lots.

In their minds are visions of giant televisions, computers, music and more. Starting this year, for the first time ever, Champlain Centre mall will open its doors at midnight on Black Friday, along with all other Pyramid Management Group properties. Many individuals line up early in the night to wait for stores that open well past midnight. “Globally, the retail trend has increasing-

ly moved toward earlier store openings,” said Champlain Centre General Manager Dave Napolitan. “Last year, the stores that opened at midnight had great traffic and sales.” Champlain Centre has also decided to hold a drawing for gift cards from 12 a.m. to 6 a.m. Entry forms will be available at each mall entrance. Stores in Champlain Centre include Target, Best Buy, Sears, JC Penney, Dick’s Sport-

ing Goods and Gander Mountain. In all, the mall offers more than 60 retail shops, a food court, family arcade and Regals Cinemas. For more information on Black Friday trips, including sales, special offers, store listing and maps, visit www.champlaincentre.com. “This year we are expecting one of the busiest days since the Centre opened for business in 1987,” Napolitan said.

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November 24, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 11

Holiday Gift Certificate Giveaway! Brought to you by The Burgh and these fine establishments Hmmm... Christmas is almost here. I’d like a gift certificate from...

ENTER TO WIN ONE OF FOUR $25 GIFT CERTIFICATES YOU CAN CHOOSE FROM ONE OF THESE LOCAL BUSINESSES Complete the answers below and the entry form and mail to: The Burgh, Attn: GC Giveaway, P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 1. What restaurant has been Plattsburgh’s Italian Restaurant since 1951? 2. Looking for the perfect Christmas tree? Choose and cut your tree with the family at this business. 3. Who has delicious pies, cookies and doughnuts for your holiday treats? 4. Don’t know what to get that person that has everything? How about a gift certificate for an oil change from this local business. 5. Where can you stock up on all your holiday spirits? 6. Who is located at the Corner of Broad St. & Route 9? 7. Where can you buy in bulk and save? 8. Get the health “nut” in your family a gift certificate to this business?

GiftCe rtificates!

9. Looking for a fun gift for the family? Pick up a gift certificate for a night of family fun at this establishment. 10. Where can you get a “meal for your money, not a snack?”

available for games of bowling andme rchandise!

Name: Phone:

Call us for all your birthday parties, group and business outings.

North Bowl Lanes

Address:

State:

Zip:

Your Gift Certificate Choice: 41773

Deadline for entries is December 14th by 5 pm • Winners will be notified by phone! Published in our December 22nd edition.

Route 9N, Plattsburgh, NY • 561-1690

One entry per person. Employees and family members of Denton Publications are not eligible to enter.

41885

Tire Rotation $ 95*

19

+ Tax

Coupon expires 12/31/12. Toyotas only.

G SHIPPINIFT G APPLE KS PAC

Coupon expires 12/31/12. Toyotas only.

Alignment Special

Plattsburgh’s Italian Restaurant Since 1951

4 Wheel Alignment

$

7597

2 Wheel Alignment

$

59515

20 Margaret St., Plattsburgh • 563-3003

Dining Room Hours: Mon. 11am-10pm, Tues.-Sat. 11am-11pm, Sun. 4pm-10pm

www.ChazyOrchards.com

Dealer #7109024

BUY IN BULK & SAVE!!!

NATUROPATHIC Mondays through Thursdays Offering Holistic Health Care Options for Most Health Concerns. Herbalism, Nutrition & Lifestyle Counseling

3083 Rand Hill Road • P.O. Box 275 • Altona, NY Phone: (518) 493-6300 • Fax: (518) 493-6301

NEW HOURS: Mon.-Wed.8 -5; Thurs. & Fri. 8-6; Sat.8- 5; ClosedS unday

Gift Certificates Av a i l a b l e 41759

Dr. Debra Dahler, N.D.

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 33 Years Experience Specializing In: Headaches • Sciatic • Chronic Pain • Worker’s Comp Injuries Personal Auto Injuries

• Scotch Pine • Spruce • Balsam • Douglas Fir • Blue Spruce Bundles of boughs available. Choose and cut with the family. You Can Find Us At…

Spruce Mill Brook Campsites/Plantation Off Exit 32 / I-87 - Head West -Turn By Betty Beavers On To Redmond Rd, Then Left On To Hyde Rd. The Next Left On To Hulbert Rd Follow To The End! 41765

9-5pm 7 Days A Week • Call: 518-873-2024

42756

A meal for your money, not a snack!

An Alternative H ealth CareCenter Dr. Peter Vance, D.C.

A HOME FOR CHRISTMAS MAY TAG NOW… CUT LATER

32 DELLA DRIVE, PLATTSBURGH, NY See our entire inventory 24/7 at dellatoyota.net

GANIENKEH WHOLISTIC TREATMENT CENTER

CHIROPRACTIC

5497

1-800-640-5144

41761

HOURS: Monday-Sunday 7:00am - 5:00pm 7 Days a Week 9486 Route 9, Chazy, NY • (518) 846-7171

41762

Coupon expires 12/31/12. Toyotas only.

GIFT BASKETS, HOLIDAY PIES & COOKIES

WANTED!

BUY 4 TIRES & GET FREE MOUNT & BALANCE

(450) 247-2130 • 83 Covey Hill, Hemingford

G if t C e r t if i c a t e s M a k e G re a t S to c k in g S t u ff e rs !

59636

E at-I n or Take-O ut at Jre ck Subs 485 Rte. 3, Pl at t sb u rgh 561-3520 (ph) • 561-3696 (fa x) 41763

518-563-3740

41772

1/2 Mile North of Cumberland Head Corner, Next to Cumberland 12 Cinemas

City:


10 - www.the-burgh.com

November 24, 2012

November 24, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 11

Holiday Gift Certificate Giveaway! Brought to you by The Burgh and these fine establishments Hmmm... Christmas is almost here. I’d like a gift certificate from...

ENTER TO WIN ONE OF FOUR $25 GIFT CERTIFICATES YOU CAN CHOOSE FROM ONE OF THESE LOCAL BUSINESSES Complete the answers below and the entry form and mail to: The Burgh, Attn: GC Giveaway, P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 1. What restaurant has been Plattsburgh’s Italian Restaurant since 1951? 2. Looking for the perfect Christmas tree? Choose and cut your tree with the family at this business. 3. Who has delicious pies, cookies and doughnuts for your holiday treats? 4. Don’t know what to get that person that has everything? How about a gift certificate for an oil change from this local business. 5. Where can you stock up on all your holiday spirits? 6. Who is located at the Corner of Broad St. & Route 9? 7. Where can you buy in bulk and save? 8. Get the health “nut” in your family a gift certificate to this business?

GiftCe rtificates!

9. Looking for a fun gift for the family? Pick up a gift certificate for a night of family fun at this establishment. 10. Where can you get a “meal for your money, not a snack?”

available for games of bowling andme rchandise!

Name: Phone:

Call us for all your birthday parties, group and business outings.

North Bowl Lanes

Address:

State:

Zip:

Your Gift Certificate Choice: 41773

Deadline for entries is December 14th by 5 pm • Winners will be notified by phone! Published in our December 22nd edition.

Route 9N, Plattsburgh, NY • 561-1690

One entry per person. Employees and family members of Denton Publications are not eligible to enter.

41885

Tire Rotation $ 95*

19

+ Tax

Coupon expires 12/31/12. Toyotas only.

G SHIPPINIFT G APPLE KS PAC

Coupon expires 12/31/12. Toyotas only.

Alignment Special

Plattsburgh’s Italian Restaurant Since 1951

4 Wheel Alignment

$

7597

2 Wheel Alignment

$

59515

20 Margaret St., Plattsburgh • 563-3003

Dining Room Hours: Mon. 11am-10pm, Tues.-Sat. 11am-11pm, Sun. 4pm-10pm

www.ChazyOrchards.com

Dealer #7109024

BUY IN BULK & SAVE!!!

NATUROPATHIC Mondays through Thursdays Offering Holistic Health Care Options for Most Health Concerns. Herbalism, Nutrition & Lifestyle Counseling

3083 Rand Hill Road • P.O. Box 275 • Altona, NY Phone: (518) 493-6300 • Fax: (518) 493-6301

NEW HOURS: Mon.-Wed.8 -5; Thurs. & Fri. 8-6; Sat.8- 5; ClosedS unday

Gift Certificates Av a i l a b l e 41759

Dr. Debra Dahler, N.D.

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 33 Years Experience Specializing In: Headaches • Sciatic • Chronic Pain • Worker’s Comp Injuries Personal Auto Injuries

• Scotch Pine • Spruce • Balsam • Douglas Fir • Blue Spruce Bundles of boughs available. Choose and cut with the family. You Can Find Us At…

Spruce Mill Brook Campsites/Plantation Off Exit 32 / I-87 - Head West -Turn By Betty Beavers On To Redmond Rd, Then Left On To Hyde Rd. The Next Left On To Hulbert Rd Follow To The End! 41765

9-5pm 7 Days A Week • Call: 518-873-2024

42756

A meal for your money, not a snack!

An Alternative H ealth CareCenter Dr. Peter Vance, D.C.

A HOME FOR CHRISTMAS MAY TAG NOW… CUT LATER

32 DELLA DRIVE, PLATTSBURGH, NY See our entire inventory 24/7 at dellatoyota.net

GANIENKEH WHOLISTIC TREATMENT CENTER

CHIROPRACTIC

5497

1-800-640-5144

41761

HOURS: Monday-Sunday 7:00am - 5:00pm 7 Days a Week 9486 Route 9, Chazy, NY • (518) 846-7171

41762

Coupon expires 12/31/12. Toyotas only.

GIFT BASKETS, HOLIDAY PIES & COOKIES

WANTED!

BUY 4 TIRES & GET FREE MOUNT & BALANCE

(450) 247-2130 • 83 Covey Hill, Hemingford

G if t C e r t if i c a t e s M a k e G re a t S to c k in g S t u ff e rs !

59636

E at-I n or Take-O ut at Jre ck Subs 485 Rte. 3, Pl at t sb u rgh 561-3520 (ph) • 561-3696 (fa x) 41763

518-563-3740

41772

1/2 Mile North of Cumberland Head Corner, Next to Cumberland 12 Cinemas

City:


12 - www.the-burgh.com • Community Calendar

November 24, 2012

Friday, Nov. 23 TUNES & TRIVIA. Monopole, 17 Protection Ave, 4-7 p.m. FAMILY SWIM NIGHT. Family Swim night, Wellness Center, at PARC, 295 New York Road. 7-9 p.m. $2. Children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 562-6860. MIKE PEDERSON & FRIENDS TO PERFORM. Monopole, 17 Protection Ave, 10 p.m.

Saturday, Nov. 24 WINTER FARMERS MARKET. City Recreation Center, US Oval, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR. City Peru VFW Post 309 Ladies Auxiliary Holiday Craft Fair, 710 Pleasant St, 9a.m.-4p.m. BOSCO MCKINNEY OPENING RECEPTION. ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 5 p.m. SHAMELESS STRANGERS TO PERFORM. Monopole, 17 Protection Ave, 10 p.m.

Sunday, Nov. 25 HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR. Peru VFW Post 309 Ladies Auxiliary Holiday Craft Fair, 710 Pleasant St, 10 a.m.-4p.m. THANKSGIVING SERVICE. The Interfaith Council is hosting a Thanksgiving Service at the Newman Center, 90 Broad Street, asking is the donation of a non perishable food item for the Interfaith Food Shelf, 1p.m.

Monday, Nov. 26 SENIOR FITNESS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 8:15 a.m. 643-8774. COMPUTER CLASS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m. 643-8774. QUILTING CLASS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9:30 a.m. 643-8774. SENIOR SCRABBLE GAME. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m. 643-8774. QU-GONG TO BE HELD. Qi-Gong, ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Nov. 27 SUNRISE ROTARY. American Legion post 20, 162 Quarry Road, 7:20 a.m. OSTEO EXERCISE. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m. 6438774. SENIOR TAI CHI. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9:30 a.m. 6438774. SENIOR ZUMBA. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 10:30 a.m. 643-8774. WII BOWLING LEAGUE. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 10 a.m. 643-8774. RSVP TO PERFORM. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 11 a.m. 643-8774. STAINED GLASS CLASS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 1 p.m. 643-8774. ADULT RIFLE TEAM TO MEET. Rough Riders Adult Rifle Team, Plattsburgh Rod and Gun Club, Rte. 9, 5:30 p.m. 298-5161. TRIVIA NIGHT. Geoffries Pub and Restaurant, 5453 Peru Street, 8 p.m.

Courtesy of Denton Publications, Inc. 20537

Wednesday, Nov. 28 SENIOR FITNESS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 8:15 a.m. 643-8774. COMPUTER CLASS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m. 643-8774. SENIOR ZUMBA. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 6 p.m. 6438774. NOVEL WRITING WORKSHOP. National Novel Writing Month Workshop, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 563-1604. 5-6:30 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 29 JUNIOR RIFLE TEAM TO MEET. Rough Riders Junior Rifle Team, Plattsburgh Rod and Gun Club, Rte. 9, 6:30 p.m. $5. JOURNEY INTO READING. Reading for children up to age 16 with free book provided, Champlain Centre Mall, 60 Smithfield Blvd., 4:30-6:30 p.m. www.journeyintoreading.org. TUNES & TRIVIA. Monopole, 17 Protection Ave, 4-7 p.m. DYNOMATICS TO PERFORM. Monopole, 17 Protection Ave, 10 p.m.

Or choose an ornament on t h e t re e !

Choose a p re s e n t u n d e r t h e t re e !

Friday, Nov. 30 TUNES & TRIVIA. Monopole, 17 Protection Ave, 4-7 p.m. FAMILY SWIM NIGHT. Family Swim night, Wellness Center, at PARC, 295 New York Road. 7-9 p.m. $2. Children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 562-6860. SINECURE TO PERFORM. Monopole, 17 Protection Ave, 10 p.m.

Saturday, Dec. 1 WINTER FARMERS MARKET. City Recreation Center, US Oval, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. CREATE A MASK. For Ages: 7-12, Create a decorative mask, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $25/$20. CHRISTMAS TEA & BAZAAR. Plattsburgh First Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall, located on the corner of Brinkerhoff and Marian Streets, noon- 3 p.m. WAFFLE FROLIC. ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 11 a.m.- 2p.m. CREATE A PLATE FOR SANTA. Create a Cookie Plate for Santa, for kids ages 5-8, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. $25/$20 for members. materials included. CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR. Fall into Winter Christmas Craft Fair, St. Augustine's Parish Center, 3030 Main St. Pery, 10a.m.-3p.m. HOUSE ON A SPRING TO PERFORM. Monopole, 17 Protection Ave, 10 p.m.

In Memory Present Only $14 • In Memory Ornament Only $10 DATE OF PUBLICATION: Saturday, December 22nd PLEASE MAIL IN TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE NOW! DEADLINE IS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6TH AT 5PM!

In Memory Of “YourLove d One”

In Memory Of u o “Y r Loved One”

In Memory Of “Your Loved One”

Name

Monday, Dec. 3

In Memory Of “YourLov ed One”

SENIOR FITNESS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 8:15 a.m. 643-8774. COMPUTER CLASS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m. 643-8774. QUILTING CLASS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9:30 a.m. 643-8774. SENIOR SCRABBLE GAME. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m. 643-8774. QU-GONG TO BE HELD. Qi-Gong, ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 7:30 p.m.

In Memo ry Of “Your Love One” d

Tuesday, Dec. 4 ADULT RIFLE TEAM TO MEET. Rough Riders Adult Rifle Team, Plattsburgh Rod and Gun Club, Rte. 9, 5:30 p.m. 298-5161. TRIVIA NIGHT. Geoffries Pub and Restaurant, 5453 Peru Street, 8 p.m.

Wednesday, Dec. 5

Please check one…

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Present $14 Name of Newspaper Please return by December 6th. ALL MEMORY SPOTS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.

Please charge to…

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PLEASE MAIL TO: DENTON PUBLICATIONS CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPT. PO Box 338, 14 Hand Ave., ELIZABETHTOWN, NY 12932. Or Call 873-6368, ext. 201 or email: shannonc@denpubs.com

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20539

SENIOR FITNESS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 8:15 a.m. 643-8774. COMPUTER CLASS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m. 643-8774. SENIOR ZUMBA. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 6 p.m. 6438774.

Thursday, Dec. 6 JUNIOR RIFLE TEAM TO MEET. Rough Riders Junior Rifle Team, Plattsburgh Rod and Gun Club, Rte. 9, 6:30 p.m. $5. JOURNEY INTO READING. Reading for children up to age 16 with free book provided, Champlain Centre Mall, 60 Smithfield Blvd., 4:30-6:30 p.m. www.journeyintoreading.org. MUD & MERLOT. North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 5:30-7:30p.m. OPEN MIC/POETRY NIGHT. ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 7:30 p.m. TUNES & TRIVIA. Monopole, 17 Protection Ave, 4-7 p.m.

Friday, Dec. 7 FAMILY SWIM NIGHT. Family Swim night, Wellness Center, at PARC, 7-9 p.m. $2. Children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 562-6860.


November 24, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 13

Denpubs Sports Fall sports season ends with familiar phrase: Chazy are state champs By Keith Lobdell

keith@denpubs.com MIDDLETOWN — After the final horn to the 2012 Class D soccer season sounded, David Poitras proclaimed that the mission was accomplished. “We knew that we had to come here for one thing, to get our trophy back,” he said. The Chazy Eagles varsity boys soccer team did just that, scoring a 4-0 victory over the Fort Ann Cardinals of Section II for their sixth New York State Public High School Athletic Association title since 2004. “We came in with one goal and that was to get back to this field and win on Sunday,” head coach Rob McAuliffe said. “I am very proud of these boys for doing that.” “This game was everything that I have ever wanted to play for,” said sophomore Josh Barriere, who scored three goals and was named the tournament MVP. “It meant everything to win for me, my teammates and our fans.” Barriere scored the second, third and fourth goals of the game. In the 29th minute, he collected the rebound off a shot generated by a Craig Botten direct kick for a 2-0 lead. “We were so physical in the air and we practice those all of the time and we know that we can get physical and finish,” Botten said. Barriere struck again in the 54th minute,

The Chazy Eagles hoist the New York State Public High School Athletic Association Class D championship trophy after a 4-0 defeat of Fort Ann Nov. 18. Photo by Keith Lobdell

after Poitras had carried the ball deep into Fort Ann’s zone. Poitras was dispossessed of the ball, which bounced back to Barriere, who fired a shot that bounced off of the crossbar and behind the goal line. “I was just trying to get in as close as I could to the net and get past as many defenders as I could,” Poitras said. “When the ball went behind me and I saw Josh was stepping up, I just wanted to get down and give him and open shot.”

In the 70th minute, Pelton took a corner kick that went over the arms of Fort Ann goalie Jonah Gould and found the head of Barriere for his third goal and a 4-0 lead. “I was just in the right place at the right time, and all I wanted to do was hit the ball right,” Barriere said. “We had Brandon who scored the majority of our goals this season, but we knew that other players would have to step up in critical times and that is what Josh did,” McAu-

liffe said. Laurin was held scoreless in the championship game but did have the goal that got the Eagles there against Poland. “I would have like to have gone out with a goal in my final game for this team,” Laurin said. “But today, everyone played like an all star.” The Eagles’ first goal of the game came off another Pelton kick, finding the head of Nathan Reynolds in the 26th minute. “We had a lot of people working hard to create an opportunity,” Reynolds said. “I saw Nelson getting ready to serve the ball back in and I just wanted to get my head down and put the ball on frame.” The Eagles finished with 28 shots, 20 of which were on net with Gould making 15 saves and John Allen one. Kyle Bissonette made a pair of saves for the Eagles as Fort Ann had three total shots, but was very active in getting to balls that entered the penalty area. “I knew that they would want to counter attack on us,” Bissonette said. “I wanted to take away anything that I could get to, and I knew that would shut down their offense.” The Eagles (2004, 2005, 2009, 2010 and 2012) joined Southold and Shenendehowa (1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 2005) as sixtime state champions, now trailing only Pittsford Mendon, which has won seven state titles (1979, 1982, 1989, 1991, 1997, 1998, 2005).

Greatest Eagles ever? Dominating 2012 championship season brings back memories, comparisons to 2005 squad MIDDLETOWN — In one of the most dominant seasons witnessed in Section VII and state history, the Chazy Eagles captured their sixth New York State Public High School Athletic Association Class D state title with a 4-0 win over Section II’s Fort Ann Nov. 18 in Middletown. “You have a great group of boys that you can all be proud of,” head coach Rob McAuliffe said to fans during the championship trophy presentation. “This may be the best team to have ever played at Chazy.” The Eagles allowed only nine goals during the season in capturing their sixth title, four in their opening tournament of the season and three to Class B Beekmantown, the only blemish on their 21-0-1 record, which was recorded as a tie but a game Chazy won in a shootout. “We’re definitely going to go down as one of the best teams in the history of this school,” senior captain Nathan Reynolds, who opened the scoring in the 26th minute when a Nelson Pelton corner kick was

cleared back out to Pelton, who crossed it back in, said. “Everyone talks about the 2005 team as the best one at our school, but this one is definitely in the discussion,” McAuliffe said. “I know that 2005 was a great team, but I believe that we are the best one,” Nelson Pelton said. “After the bad loss last year, we were all depressed, but I think that was the main motivation for this season, at least it was for me.” “We went undefeated and outscored every team by at least three goals except two (Beekmantown, Poland). This has to be one of the best ever,” senior captain Brandon Laurin said. “This is the best team that I have ever been a part of,” Nolan Rogers said. “We have to be one or two.” “I think that we are there with them,” David Poitras said. “If there was any way to play it, I think that a game with the 2005 team would be a really good one.”

Josh Barriere signals to the crowd after completing a hat trick, scoring his third goal of the game in the 70th minute against Fort Ann in the state championship game. He is joined by Nathan Reynolds, David Poitras, Nolan Rogers, Nelson Pelton and Brandon Laurin. Photo by Tom Baier

One for the other ring finger: McAuliffe tied atop state title list By Keith Lobdell

keith@denpubs.com MIDDLETOWN — Rob McAuliffe is now one of the three most decorated coaches in New York State soccer history. With a 4-0 win by the Chazy Eagles against the Fort Ann Cardinals Nov. 18 in the NYSPHSAA Class D state championships game, McAuliffe skippered his sixth title team since 2004, with other trophies coming in 2005, 2007, 2009 and 2010. McAuliffe was also the first to make sure that the entire Chazy community shared in the glory of another state title.

“I want to thank all of our fans and community for coming down here and traveling with the team throughout the season,” McAuliffe said during the championship ceremony. “You have a great group of boys that you can all be proud of.” McAuliffe said he feels the dedication that the current players see from their community to the sport has always been a key to the success of Chazy soccer. “They say it takes a village to raise a child,” he said. “It also does to produce

teams like this. This result comes from the effort of the students, the parents, the school and the town along with the coaches. This is much larger than just this team.” That commitment from the community feeds the students, McAuliffe said, to accomplish great things. “All of these kids work so very hard and while they are happy to win this title for their team, they are also proud to add to the history of our program,” he said. “They are happy to make the alumni and people of Chazy proud.”

McAuliffe also pointed to the tradition of Eagle soccer. “You had George Brendler and Tom Tregan who built this program and were great coaches for Chazy,” he said. Chazy stands only behind Pittsford Mendon (7) in team titles. If that title is won under McAuliffe, it would put him alone atop the state’s coaching title list. For his part, McAuliffe is hoping it does happen, and soon. “I do not think that there will be a time, anytime soon, where our goal will be anything less than to win a state championship,” he said.

They are all here! You can find pictures from throughout the 2012 fall sports season at valleynewsadk.com, the-burgh.com and northcountryman.com for

EVERY TEAM, EVERY SCHOOL, EVERY SPORT Just go to our home page, click on the media banner and choose galleries to find pictures from throughout the boys soccer, girls soccer, volleyball, football, girls swimming, gymnastics and cross country seasons


14 - www.the-burgh.com

Forest oddities A

November 24, 2012

nyone who has spent much time in the woods understands that nature is very fickle. In fact, it is quite often downright contrary. Possibly, this is the true natural attraction, as an ever changing, environment is certainly much more interesting than a static state. Over my years in the woods, I’ve stumbled across a wide collection of natural oddities. However, quite possibly the strangest incident I’ve ever witnessed occurred while bow hunting in the Southern Tier near Cobleskill. I was sitting in a tree-stand on top of a long ridge that looms over Cobleskill Reservoir. The small pond is a popular stop over for Canada Geese during their migration south. It was early bow season, and I was comfortably ensconced in a stand situated atop a long ridgeline locally known as Dow Hollow. The morning was crisp, the air still, and the woods were quiet. Before a glint of sun was evident in the morning sky, the silence was shattered by a colophony of geese taking off from the waters below. Peering through leaf bare oaks and towering white pines, I could make out a long dark mass of geese taking to the air; honking and barking on a southern journey. As the great flock flew over the ridgeline, the big birds were barely clearing the treetops, and the noise resounded through the forest. The birds were flying over the ridgetop so low; I could hear their powerful wing beats. Soon the birds were out of sight and the silence returned. I could hear the grey squirrels searching for acorns, otherwise the woods were still and quiet. I listened intently while waiting intently for the telltale sound of whitetails returning up the ridge from the fields far below. But there were none. The only sound was the chattering of my teeth, as I suffered through the long, cold lapse of time between first light, and a warm sun.There are no words to describe the agony of waiting for the warm morning sun to snake down from the treetops to your stand. Undeniably, it is the coldest part of the day, a slow misery. As I sat shivering in the stand, I heard a lone bark. It came from a short distance down the ridge. I heard it again, and after a prolonged rustling of leaves, it appeared to be getting closer.

Mental Illness from page 1 doesn’t want to accept it, and that only makes it worse,” Doh-Carter said. “You start to feel nonhuman, like an alien. Sometimes people run around with these feelings for years before anything is done, and sometimes they kill themselves first.” During the video, those diagnosed with a mental illness spoke of hiding in a parking lot until a spouse left the home so the individual could get back in bed and sleep the day away, being high as a kite in the morning and suicidal at night or having to sit through an exorcism by the family priest because the family found out about the voices in the individual’s head. Individuals on the video were diagnosed with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, clinical depression and more. Besides the impact of the disease on themselves and their loved ones, those in the video, and DohCarter, stressed the damage the misperceptions related to mental illness cause. “I lost my whole life and I felt like a loser and society would not accept me,” Doh-Carter said. “I turned to drugs to put a cloud around my head so it wouldn’t be so painful. I was high all the time, and before I knew it, it took over my life.” It took Doh-Carter eight years to start over again. Individuals on the video stressed the importance of medication with mental illness, the same as it would be if someone had a heart defect. Sometimes the medications carry side effects, but they are outweighed by the benefits. But Doh-Carter even runs into troubles there, with insurance companies often refusing to cover medications that help stabilize her. Besides medication, she benefits from a highly structured day and exercise. Still, many days she cannot leave her house. “The worst thing about mental illness is it’s in your brain,” she said. Sadly, Doh-Carter said, many mentally ill people need help but are behind closed doors giving up. “We could use some support,” she said. “You might change someone’s life. And what would really make it better is if society accepted that brains are very complicated and what works for one person may not work for the next. “It is hard. It is really hard.”

The noise continued, and off to my right, I could barely make out the outline of something running along the forest floor. It was coming my way, and it was traveling fast. Finally, I could see what appeared to be a large Canada goose. It was running and as just as it appeared to get airborne; a large turkey flew out of a nearby pine. The turkey hit the goose from behind, square in the shoulders and knocked it to the ground. There were feathers everywhere, as the birds got back on their feet. Before my eyes, the two birds faced off and a heavy weight fight broke out. While the turkey puffed its chest, gobbled and displayed its impressive fan. Across the leave littered ring, the goose stretched out its neck, lowered its head, and hissed like a mad cobra. The turkey continued the attack, and soon it chased the goose over the ridge and out of sight. However, I heard the battle continue for quite some time. After waiting for the whitetails that never showed up, I got out of my stand and followed a trail of feathers down the ridge. However, there was no sign of either the victor or the vanquished. Later, after relating the battle to an old birding friend, he surmised the goose likely clipped a wing on a treetop and fell to the ground. “Geese,” he explained, “need a lot of room to get airborne.” And without a clear runway in the thick woods, it would be difficult to take off. Compounding the matter, turkeys are notoriously territorial. He surmised that the big tom likely saw the comparably sized goose as a threat, and attacked it. Although I’ve seen many unusual sights in the woods, the combination of two heavyweights going at it in a natural ring, in the early morning light, has always struck me as the most exciting and unusual of all. However, I am always interested in learning of other such incidents, and if you’ve got a story; I’d be happy to hear it. Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

DEC fisheries explained that it is not unusual for fish to have such markings, especially as juveniles. Photo by Joe Hackett

Outdoor News Editor Steve Piatt wins Communications Award ELIZABETHTOWN — Steve Piatt, editor of the popular New York Outdoor News, was recognized at recent New York State Council of Trout Unlimited General Meeting for his outstanding contributions to sportsmen and conservationists, and proclaimed the winner of the 2012 Professional Communications Award. This yearly award is reserved for journalists who have made major contributions to New York’s sportsmen and women. Editor of the New York Outdoors News since its founding in 2004, Piatt was cited for his exemplary service, integrity and leadership in bringing current news of the outdoors to a wide audience in New York and neighboring states. With a circulation of over 33,000, the Outdoor News has grown to become the premier news source for outdoor recreation in the region. Trout Unlimited Council Immediate Past Chair Dee Maciejewski noted that the paper plays an important role in the legislative halls in Albany, where its consistent support of outdoors activities and conservation has been a significant voice for sportsmen and women. Walter Trzcienski, President of the Lake Champlain Trout Unlimited chapter that sponsored Piatt for the award, said “Steve has been a constant spokesman for the best in outdoor interests, be it fishing, hunting or other things we do in New York. All sportsmen join me in congratulating him on this achievement.”

Diabetes from page 1 families gathered in front of Plattsburgh State’s Hawkins Hall dressed in blue to join a human circle in honor of World Diabetes Day. Later, at dusk, the building itself was illuminated in blue to raise awareness of diabetes. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Diabetes is a leading cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attack, stroke and amputation. World Diabetes Day is a global event that unites millions of people trying to get the word out about the dangers of diabetes in more than 160 countries. “We want to help raise awareness of diabetes and the complications brought on by diabetes,” said Jill Folsom, an adjunct nursing faculty member at Plattsburgh State and a volunteer with the International Diabetes Federation. “A third of the Medicare budget goes to diabetes.” Plattsburgh State’s nursing club sponsored the event. “They see firsthand the number of patients fighting this disease as well as its debilitating complications during their clinical rotations both in the hospital and Abigail Ayotte and Reina Ayotte at an event to raise awareness about diabetes. throughout the community,” Folsom said. Photo by Stephen Bartlett Alissa Shinder, a nursing student at Plattsburgh State, pointed out that the obesity rate is increasing and obesity is a major risk factor for developing diabetes. “There is a high percentage of children being diagnosed with diabetes,” Shinder said. The number of people living with diabetes has increased considerably over the past 30 years. In 1985, an estimated 30 million people worldwide had the disease. Today, that figure exceeds 300 million, according to the International Diabetes Foundation and World Health Organization. There are three main types of diabetes. Type 1 results from the body’s failure to produce insulin. Type 2 results from insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to use insulin properly, sometimes combined with an absolute insulin deficiency. The third form, gestational diabetes, occurs when pregnant women with a previous diagnosis of diabetes develop a high glucose level. Sir Frederick Grant Banting was a Canadian medical scientist, doctor and Nobel Laureate and is noted as one of the main discoverers of insulin. Meghan Ketcham, another nursing student at Plattsburgh State, said it is important to raise awareness about the disease. “We need to further prevent something that is preventable,” she said.


November 24, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 15

D ecem ber 2012

Watch for New Items! This Menu is approved by a Registered Dietitian

Monday

4

Shepherd’s Pie California Vegetables Oat Bread Peaches

10

24

31

18

Chicken & Biscuit Mashed Potatoes Beets Mandarin Oranges

Herb Chicken Oven Browned Potatoes Squash Spiced Applesauce Beef Tips w/Gravy Spiral Noodles Brussels Sprouts Tapioca Pudding

25

Macaroni & Cheese Stewed Tomatoes Whole Wheat Roll Pears

12

19

26

Sites Closed

6

Manicotti Italian Vegetables Sour Dough Bread Chocolate Pudding

Baked Ham Sweet Potatoes Peas & Onions Carrot Raisin Salad Yellow Cake

13

Meatloaf w/Gravy Baked Potato Green Beans Strawberry Mousse

20

Roast Turkey w/Gravy Stuffing Harvest Vegetables Dinner Roll Apple Crisp

27

Goulash Cauliflower Wheat Bread Pistachio Pudding

Hot Pork Sandwich Smashed Potatoes Carrots Sugar Cookie Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce Tossed Salad Italian Bread Fruit Cup Baked Chicken Roasted Potatoes California Vegetables Ginger Cookie

7

Swedish Meatballs Egg Noodles Broccoli Fresh Fruit

14

Herb Baked Cod Rice Pilaf Capri Vegetables Whole Wheat Bread Fresh Fruit

21

28

Fish on Bun Baked Beans Peas & Carrots Fresh Fruit Ham & Vegetable Omelet Home Fries Muffin Fresh Fruit

Chicken Filet on Bun Roasted Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Fruit Cocktail

MEALS ON WHEELS Nutrition Program • 561-8320 Please Call Site For Reservations PLATTSBURGH • 561-7393 BEEKMAN TOWERS • 561-5360 ELLENBURG • 594-7311 SARANAC • 293-6666 LAKEVIEW TOWERS • 561-8696 PERU • 643-2829 MOOERS • 236-5111 ROUSES POINT • 297-7361

21044

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Sponsored by Senior Citizens Council of Clinton County, Inc. Funded by Clinton County Office for the Aging and New York State Office for the Aging

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Associates in Radiology & CVPH

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21002

DRAGOON’S FARM EQUIPMENT, INC.

R. W. Walker

Gary J. Dragoon Sales Manager

Funeral Home, Inc.

518-563-1760

CHEVROLET

W

69 Court Street, Plattsburgh, NY “Family Owned and Operated Since 1938, specializing in Funeral Pre-Planning.”

Ph: 518-236-7110 or 236-7148 Fx: 518-236-6528 Email: dragoon@primelink1.net

21008

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622 Rt. 11 • Exit 42 Champlain, NY 518-298-8272 www.parkercountry.com

BROWN FUNERAL HOME, INC.

supply your vitamin, mineral and herbal needs. Also with a new line of herbal personal care.

Naturopathic Care

38499

17

11

Chili Rice Wax Beans Dinner Roll Pineapple

5

Pork Chop Rice Spinach Lemon Whip

Friday

Thursday

Wednesday

21010

• Traditional and Advanced Funeral Planning • Cremation Service • Monuments and Memorials WARREN J. BENNETT RYAN P. BENNETT STEPHEN C. LAPOINTE Plattsburgh • Cadyville • Altona 561-3980 1-800-848-5308 Website: www.brownfuneralhomeinc.com

21006

3

Tuesday


16 - www.the-burgh.com

November 24, 2012

Appliances pp

For Sale Legals General Financial Services Garage g Sales

Equipment q p

Real Estate Automotive Apartments p For Rent Wanted

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INSURANCE

HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED Contact Woodford Bros. Inc. for straightening, leveling and foundation repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN / www.woodfordbros.com

PERMANENT LIFE INSURANCE. Qualify to age 86. Fast. Easy. Few Questions. No Exam! 1-800-9383439, x24;

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LOGGING

REPLACEMENT WINDOWS $179 Installed. Double Hung Tilt-ins, Lifetime Warranty,Energy Star tax credit available. Call Now! 1-866272-7533www.usacustomwindow s.com

LAVALLEE LOGGING is looking to harvest and purchase standing timber, primarily Spruce & White Pine Willing to pay New York State stumpage prices on all species. References available. Matt Lavallee, 518-6456351

BIKES FOR TYKES look for them in Items under $100 Super savers ads

REAL ESTATE

20 ACRES Free! Buy 40-get 60 acres. $0- Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee No Credit Checks! Beautiful Views. West Texas 1-800 -843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com 25,000 SQUARE FOOT BARN + 15 ACRES ONLY $89,900! Bring your horses- it's ready to go! Level, open land with beautiful views! Additional 60 acres next door available at a discount! Call (888)701-7509. www.newyorklandandlakes.com ABANDONED FARM + 60 ACRES$79,900! Beautiful trout stream, awesome valley views, quality hardwood timber, great hunting! Below market price! Call (888)905 -8847. www.newyorklandandlakes.com

ADIRONDACK 79 Acres, 20 min. to Whiteface, great for hunting or cross country skiing, road frontage, power, $69,000. 518-624-6055 DELAWARE: FOR Sale Several NEW Ranch Homes! 55+Peaceful Country setting with all amenities included. Low 100's, low taxes Call Today: 302-659-5800 www.bonayrehomes.com and www.lenapebuilders.net DISCOVER´ DELAWARE’S DISTINCTIVE, gated community. Larger than life amenities equestrian facility and Olympic pool. New Homes mid $40's. Low taxes. Brochures available 1-866629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com FORT PLAIN, NY: 33.4 acres hilltop view $69,000. 9.3 acres panaramic views $22,000. 3.6 acres $13,000. Owner financing. Great Investment www.helderbergrealty.com CALL, Henry Whipple: 518-861-6541. HUNTING LAND/CABIN BARGAIN 3 Acres w/ "Cozy Cabin"-$19,995 or $157/month* 5 Acres w/ Adirondack Style Cabin-$29,995 or $236/month* State land close by, great hunting, fishing & snowmobiling. Call 1-800-229-7843 or visit LANDANDCAMPS.COM *20% down, 8.49% rate, 15 years

APARTMENT

28989

48 SPRING STREET, PORT HENRY, NY 2 BR/1 BA, Large lakeview property. Nice neighborhood. Hdwd fls. Offstreet pk. pl. Village sewer line. No pets/smoking. Utilities included. 750. Security. References. (919) 239-3791 $750 robbiedobb@aol.com

ELIZABETHTOWN- 1 BDRM APT. in Private Home Off Street Parking, Porch, All Utilities Included, HUD Approved, No Pets, No Smoking No Exceptions. 518-873 -2625 Judy or 518-962-4467 Wayne or 518-962-2064 Gordon

KEESEVILLE, BRIGHT 1 bdrm apartment in Village, off street parking, $525 + security, pay your own utilities, non smoking, pet OK. Call 518-834-7647 LEWIS 2 BDRM apartment for rent, heat included, no pets. Call for more info 518873-6805

MOBILE HOME WESTPORT, NY Mobile for rent; 2 bdrm, 2 bath, fully furnished, Heat included. $800/mo., First/Last/Security Required Available Now 1st. 518-962 -2271

VACATION PROPERTY SKI RENTAL-JAY, NY (6 months) $1200/Mo. Plus Utilities Furnished-10 min to Whiteface. No Pets. Sleeps 6-7 call evenings 518-873-6433 OR 585421-3873

GARAGE SALE/ BARN SALE ATTN: GARAGE SALE ENTHUSIASTS! Buying or selling second-hand treasures?The NYS Department of State's Division of Consumer Protection, in conjunction with the Free Community Papers of New York, recommends checking the following websites to help assure that the item has not been recalled or the subject of a safety warning: http:/www.recalls.gov and the Consumer Product Safety Commission at www.cpsc.gov. For other important recall and product safety information visit the Division of Consumer Protection at www.dos.ny.gov NORTH HUDSON, NY, YARD SALE 2940 US Rte 9, North Hudson, NY, Fri Nov 16- Sun Nov 18. Another HUGE yard sale being held indoors at the former N. Hudson Grocery store! New-used, lots of Christmas items and priced to sell! Fri-Sun 9am - 4pm Rain or Shine.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.SCHEV certified. Call 1800-494-2785 www.CenturaOnline.com

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HELP WANTED AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-296-7093 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -TRAIN FOR hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program.Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1-877-202-0386. DRIVER- $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Choose your hometime. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com EARN UP TO $75000!! Interviewing for FT/PT Positions Now. Training provided. Pharmacy/Dental/Vision Discount Plans. Call Now for Special Bonus! 1-877 -308-7959 X-231 HELP WANTED Driver- $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Choose your hometime. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800414-9569 www.driveknight.com

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Deadline: Friday at 4pm Mail to: The Classified Superstore - P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 FFax: 518-873-6360 • Phone: 518-873-6368 • Email: adirondacksnorth@theclassifiedsuperstore.com

NYPS THE NEWSPAPER EXPERTS

www.nynewspapers.com 22664

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20652


November 24, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 17

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-296-7093 HELP WANTED Market Research Participants Wanted Need market research participants to evaluate local establishments. Apply FREE: shop.bestmark.com or call 800969-8477 HELP WANTED SOCIAL WORKER: Provide adoption home study, counseling, and training services. Home based position, travel required.Masterís Degree required. Email resume and salary requirements to tara@friendsinadoption.org HELP WANTED!! EARN EXTRA income mailing our brochures from home! FREE Supplies!Genuine Opportunity! Start Immediately! www.mailing-work.com LIVE LIKE a popstar. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091 MARKET RESEARCH Participants Wanted Need market research participants to evaluate local establishments. Apply FREE: shop.bestmark.com or call 800969-8477 NEED 18-24 fun, energetic people to travel with young successful business group. Paid travel expenses. No experience necessary. 1-877-646-5050

963...........Willsboro/Essex

VERMONT (802) 247.......................Brandon 372....................Grand Isle 388...................Middlebury 425......................Charlotte 434....................Richmond 438...............West Rutland 453.......Bristol/New Haven 462......................Cornwall 475.........................Panton 482....................Hinesburg 545...................Weybridge 655......................Winooski 658....................Burlington 758........................Bridport 759.......................Addison 654,655,656,657,658,660, 860,862,863,864,865,951, 985....................Burlington 877...................Vergennes 769,871,872,878,879 .. ................Essex Junction 893...........................Milton 897....................Shoreham 899......................Underhill 948..........................Orwell 888....................Shelburne

20956

NOW ACCEPTING!!! - up to $1000 WEEKLY PAID IN ADVANCE!!! MAILING BROCHURES or TYPING ADS ONLINE for our company. FREE Supplies! Genuine Opportunity. PT/FT. No Experience Needed! www.HelpMailingBrochures.com SOCIAL WORKER: Provide adoption home study, counseling, and training services. Home based position, travel required. Master's Degree required. Email resume and salary requirements to tara@friendsinadoption.org

HELP WANTED LOCAL ALL - SERVICE TECHNICIAN Boiler/HVAC Technician J. Hogan Refrigeration & Mechanical is seeking a technician to perform boiler servicing and HVAC work for commercial clients in Plattsburgh Area. Some experience required. Many posted wage jobs. Excellent benefit package including retirement and hospitalization. Call Roger 518-643-6687. AVON NOW RECRUITING Only $10 to start. Call Corrinne 518-578-1029. crinmarie1715@aol.com

ADOPT: A financially secure, energetic, happily married couple will cherish your child forever. Little one, we love you already! Expenses Paid: Lisa/Brian 1-888-9398399 www.Lbadopt.info ADOPTION ADOPT: A financially secure, energetic, happily married couple will cherish your child forever. Little one, we love you already! Expenses Paid: Lisa/Brian 1 -888-939-8399 www.Lbadopt.info ADOPTION ADOPT: Kindergarten teacher longs to give your precious baby endless love, secure home, large extended family, bright future. Expenses paid. Private. Legal. Jenny 1-866-7513377 PREGNANT? ANXIOUS? Get FREE, no-pressure, confidential counseling, guidance, financial assistance at our licensed agency; if adoption is your plan, from loving, pre-approved families. Call Joy: 866-922-3678 www.ForeverFamiliesThrough Adoption.org PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring adoption expert. You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6296 Florida Agency #100021542

DRIVER CDL-A for Local Plattsburgh Depot$13.75 per hr to start. Ability to cross into Canada, acquire Hazmat & Security Clearance Required! info@randrtruck.com, 1-866-2048006

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6292, 24/7 Void/Illinois

HELP WANTED Part Time Cook, 810 hrs per week, VFW Post #1418, Champlain, NY 518-236-7030

ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE WILLSBORO CENTRAL SCHOOL District is currently accepting applications for the following vacancies: Substitute Teachers/Assistants/Aides Substitute Cleaners Permanent Building Substitute Interested individuals should submit an application and letters of reference to: Stephen Broadwell, Superintendent of Schools Willsboro Central School, PO Box 180, 29 School Lane, Willsboro, New York 12996

BUY GOLD & SILVER COINS 1 percent over dealer cost. For a limited time, ParkAvenue Numismatics is selling Silver and Gold American Eagle Coins at 1 percent overdealer cost. 1-877-357-9566 CANADA DRUG CENTER is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Ourlicensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-877-207-6086 for $25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. DISH NETWORK STARTING AT $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels. Free for 3 Months! SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-888-8238160

WESTAFF SERVICES We'll find the perfect employee and make you the hero! Office /Clerical, Light Industrial Professional/Technical Managerial Call today 518-566-6061 ONE MAN’S TRASH is another man’s treasure. Denpubs classifieds can put you together. 1-800-989-4237

ADOPTIONS ADOPT: KINDERGARTEN teacher longs to give your precious baby endless love, secure home, large extended family, bright future. Expenses paid. Private. Legal. Jenny 1-866-751-3377

DIVORCE $450* NO FAULT OR Regular Divorce. Covers Children, Property, etc. Only One Signature Required! *Excludes govt. fees. Locally Owned!1-800-522-6000 Ext. 100. Baylor & Associates, Inc. Est. 1977 HIGHSPEED INTERNET EVERYWHERE BY SATELLITE! Speeds up to 12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.) Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW & GO FAST! 1-888-927-0861 RIDING LESSONS Levels - Beginners - Advanced, Adults and Children over 10yrs. Instructor - USDF Silver Medalist Marty Young Stratton School Horse Available Special Introductory Price $20 Each for First 2 Lessons. Contact 518-983-6454 SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. You WIN or Pay Us Nothing. Contact Disability Group, Inc. Today! BBB Accredited. Call For Your FREE Book & Consultation.1-888-587-9203

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES

22666

NW GA FARM REDUCED Was…$1.7M

Price Now…$895K

70 AC, 7000+ SF Lodge Type Home, 4 BR, 5 BA, indoor pool, 2 lakes, creek, pastures plus wooded areas, barn. Beautiful BY OWNER

770-548-0316

lfingram.nen42@rocketmail.com

22665

HAVE COIN WILL TRAVEL Buying Old U.S. coins, currency, commemoratives, bullion and other interesting items. Fair & Honest. Prices in today's market. Call anytime 7 days a week, ANA member. PO Box 151, Jay, NY 12941 518-946-8387 STEINBACH NUTCRACKERS 12 Original Stienbach Nutcrackers Pristine, Numbered, Paperwork Call (518) 438 1602

APPLIANCES HOT WATER HEATER 38 gallon Whirlpool lowboy residential electric hot water heater. Excellent condition. $200. 518637-3278

ELECTRONICS

FURNITURE

BUNDLE & SAVE on your CABLE, INTERNET PHONE, AND MORE. High Speed Internet starting at less than $20/ mo. CALL NOW! 800-291-4159

1-BRAND NEW Queen size mattress set, still in plastic, $150, 518-534-8444.

GENERAL DIRECT TO Home Satellite TV $19.99/mo. Free Installation FREE HD/DVR Upgrade Credit/Debit Card Req. Call 1-800-795-3579

FINANCIAL SERVICES $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! Injury Lawsuit Dragging? $500-$500,000++ within 48 /hrs? 1-800-568-8321 www.lawcapital.com CREDIT REPAIR SPECIALIST Have a 720 score? You can! FREE CONSULTATION 888-316-2786 ext102 www.raisemycreditasap.com GOLD AND SILVER CAN PROTECT Your Hard Earned Dollars. Learn how by calling Freedom Gold Group for your free educational guide. 1-866-930-7729

FIREWOOD FIREWOOD FOR SALE Log Length Firewood, mixed hardwood, 3 full cord, 4'x8'x12', $350. 518-335-7083.

FOR SALE $90 LAPTOPS, $30 TV's, $8.50 Smart Phones, $4.50 Jeans, $1 DVD's. Brand Name Electronics, Apparel, Furniture, Toys, Cosmetics from over 200 leading liquidators. Visit CloseoutsOnline.com 1972 GRAND TORINO runs, needs work comes with some new parts $3200; Chevy Van 30 Travelmaster camper $2500. 518-962-4394 2003 FISHER MINIT Maountz Plow, head gear, best offer, new shape; Also Miller Furnace Gun, ran 10/19/12, Good, Best Offer, fits Miller 100 CMF Furnace. 518-493-3283. 6 ALUMINUM Dock Sections, 4' wide 10-13' long, $2400. 518-523-0190 CLARINET, VIOLIN, FLUTE, TRUMPET, Amplifier, Fender Guitar $75 each. Upright Bass, Cello, Saxophone, French Horn, Drums $189 each. Others 4-sale 1-516377-7907 FOR SALE one set Ping Golf Irons, complete set- 3 thru PW, $150.00. Call 518 -569-1962 GARAGE DOOR 8'x16', White Aluminum, insulated, very good condition, no dents, will be available on or around August 9th. Asking $450 OBO. 518297-2241. HAS YOUR BUILDING SUFFERED STRUCTURAL DAMAGE FROM THE RECENT WEATHER? Contact Woodford Brothers for structural repairs on all types of buildings. At 1-800-653-2276 or WWW.Woodfordbros.com MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N PELLET STOVE PIPE 3" - Simpson, 3', 1', 6", adjustable, elbow, T, clean-out, adapter, exhaust & thimble. 518-561-6201. RANCH MINK Coat, Black, size 12, seldom worn. A 1 condition. New $2000 Asking $700 OBO. 518-335-3687 SNOWBLOWER - DEERE TRACT. Front-end, for 100 series lawn tractor. $1350 new. 518-963-4582 kalma.dennis@gmail.com $500 SPORTS CARDS 1000's hockey,baseball,football,basketball,nascar singles,sets,boxlots from the 70's to present call 518-846-6023 or 518-420-3631 chazy,n.y. WELL PUMP Gould, 1 HP, 4 months old, $500.00. 518-5760012

52" COLOR (J.V.C.) T.V., perfect condition, $250.00 (or) 35" Samsung Color T.V. $100.00 New. 518-523-1681 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM (888) 6861704 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866)453-6204 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Authorized 800494-3586 www.CenturaOnline.com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Authorized. Call 888-201-8657 www.CenturaOnline.com CA$H PAID-UP TO $27/BOX for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! 1 DAY PAYMENT & PREPAID shipping. SE HABLA ESPANOL. Emma 1888-776-7771. www.Cash4DiabeticSupplies.com CANADA DRUG CENTER. Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1-888-734-1530 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.) CASH FOR CARS, Any Make or Model! Free Towing. Sell it TODAY. Instant offer: 1-800-8645784 CASH FOR CARS: All Cars/Trucks Wanted. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Any Make/Model. Call For Instant Offer: 1-800-864-5960 DISHNETWORK/DIRECTV/CABLE /HIGH Speed Internet Starting @14.95/mo. Call now 1-866-4184935. New Customers Only, 1st 100 Customers Receive $25.00 Visa Card! 1-866-418-4935 DIVORCE WITH or without children(Limited Time Only $79.95). Includes marital property settlement, child custody, name change. Call 888.366.2024 GET A FREE VACATION BY DONATING your vehicle, boat, property, collectibles to Dvar. Maximize your IRS deductions and help teens in crisis. Call: 1-800-3386724 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here - Online training for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800 -510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-888909-9905 MISCELLANEOUS ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Authorized. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com SAWMILLS FROM only $3997.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

MEET SINGLES NOW! No paid operators, just people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages, connect live. FREE trial. Call 1-877-737-9447 MISCELLANEOUS GET A FREE VACATION BY DONATING your vehicle, boat, property, collectibles to Dvar. Maximize your IRS deductions and help teens in crisis. Call: 1-800-338-6724 MUSIC LESSONS for All Ages! Find a music teacher! Take Lessons offers affordable, safe, guaranteed music lessons with teachers in your area. Our pre screened teachers specialize in singing, guitar, piano, drums, violin and more. Call 1-888-7060263! REACH OVER 17 million homes nationwide with one easy buy! Only $1,995 per week for a 20 word classified! For more information go to www.naninetwork.com REVERSE MORTGAGES -NO mortgage payments FOREVER! Seniors 62+! Government insured. No credit/income requirements. Free 28 pg. catalog. 1-888-660 3033 All Island Mortgage VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg! 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement, Discreet Shipping. Save $500! Buy The Blue Pill! Now 800-213-6202 WORK ON JET ENGINES - Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866) 854-6156.

HEALTH MEDICAL ALERT FOR SENIORS 24/7 monitoring. FREE Equipment. FREE Shipping.Nationwide Service. $29.95/Month. CALL Medical Guardian Today. 1-877-372-9162 OVER 30 MILLION WOMEN SUFFER FROM HAIR LOSS! Do you? If so, we have asolution! CALL KERANIQUE TO FIND OUT MORE 1-877-218-1590 TAKE VIAGRA/CIALIS? 40 100mg/20MG Pills + 4 FREE only $99. Save $500! 1-888-7968870 VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg! 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement, Discreet Shipping. Save $500! Buy The Blue Pill! Now 1-888-796-8870 WERE YOU IMPLANTED WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEFIBRILLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and December 2010? Have you had this lead replaced, capped or did you receive shocks from the lead? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

LAWN & GARDEN BRUSH HOG Model EFM600. Used 1 year, like new. Finish mower. 518-570-8837 $1,000

MUSIC **OLD GUITARS WANTED! ** Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker. Prairie State, D'Angelico, Stromberg, and Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1920's thru 1980's. TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401-0440 PIANO LESSONS *New Students Welcome. Please Call for Information 518-643-0152. *Experienced Teacher. YAMAHA KEYBOARD With Axman Stand, Excellent Condition $75.00 518-578-5500

WANTED TO BUY BUYING EVERYTHING! FURS, Coins, Gold, Antiques, Watches, Silver, Art, Diamonds."The Jewelers Jeweler Jack" 1-917-696-2024 By Appointment. Lic-Bonded. BUYING/SELLING: GOLD, gold coins, sterling silver, silver coins, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek, Phillippe), paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY


18 - www.the-burgh.com WANTED TO BUY CA$H PAID- up to $26/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. Hablamos Espanol. 1-800 -371-1136 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS Wanted Check us out online! All Major Brands Bought Dtsbuyers.com 1-866-446-3009 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS Wanted Check us out Online! All Major Brands Bought Dtsbuyer.com 1866-446-3009 GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES Looking for in the near future, Lost 2 recently of cancer at age 11 1/2, missed deeply, Lake Clear, NY. Require 518-891-7159 RECORD COLLECTOR would like to buy record collections and sheet music. Cash Paid! Please Call 518-846-6784. WANTED ALL MOTORCYCLES, before 1980, Running or not. $Top CASH$ PAID! 1-315-5698094 WANTED TO BUY Good used Cider Press, Please Call 518-358-4152.

November 24, 2012 WANTED TO BUY Wanted: Will Pay up to $15.00 for High School Yearbooks 1900-2012. Any School/Any State. www.yearbookusa.com or 214514-1040 WANTED: WILL Pay up to $15.00 for High School Yearbooks 19002012. Any School/Any State. www.yearbookusa.com or 214514-1040

HORSEBACK LESSON PROGRAM Saddleback Ranch. Saranac Lake. All season. Complete Horsemanship. No Pressure setting. English & Western. Indoor Ring & Trails. Call or Text 518-302-6227

DOGS

WANTS TO PURCHASE minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201 WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201 YEARBOOKS UP to $15 paid for high school yearbooks 1900-2012. www. yearbookusa.com or 214514-1040

HORSES HORSE BOARDING Saranac Lake 19 min from LP. Large Indoor & Outdoor Riding Ring, Private Trail system. Full or pasture board. Competitive Rates. Call or Text 518-302-6227

AMERICAN BULLDOG Puppies NKC Reg. M/F, Johnson Type, Family Raised, Shots & Wormings UTD, Genetic Health Guaranteed, Parents on Premises, 4th. Generational Pups, with 18 yrs. Experience, Pet Only $1000.00 (OR) with Full Reg. $1200.00 For more information please call: 518-597-3090 www.coldspringskennel.com

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY Call and place your listing at 1-800-989-4237

WESTPORT: OFFICE SUITES. Fully furnished w/ cubicles, desks, computer & phone hook-ups. 720 sq. ft. Lake views. Contact Jim Forcier @ 518962-4420.

FARM NEW YORK STATE Farm, HANDYMAN FARMHOUSE. 5 acres - $69,900. 4BR, 2 Bath, solid! Must sell due to bankruptcy! Gorgeous country setting just off Exit 30! Owner terms! Make offer! 1-888-701-1864 www.NewYorkLandandLakes.com NEW YORK STATE Farm, HUNTING LAND/CABIN BARGAIN - 3 Acres w/ "Cozy Cabin" - $19,995 or $157/month;5 Acres w/ Adirondack Style Cabin $29,995 or $236/month. State land close by, greathunting, fishing & snowmobiling. Call 1-800229-7843 or visit WWW.LANDANDCAMPS. COM. 20% down, 8.49% rate, 15 years. NEW YORK STATE Farm, 25,000 SQUARE FOOT BARN - 15 ACRES ONLY $89,900. Bring your horses - It'sready to go! Level open land with beautiful views! Add'l 60 ac next door avail at a discount! Call 1-888-7758114 www.newyorklandandlakes.com

LAND LAND FOR SALE HUNTING LAND/ CABIN BARGAIN 3 Acres w/ "Cozy Cabin"-$19,995 or $157/month* 5 Acres w/ Adirondack Style Cabin$29,995 or $236/month* State land close by, great hunting, fishing & snowmobiling. Call 1-800229-7843 or visit LANDANDCAMPS.COM *20% down, 8.49% rate, 15 years LAND FOR SALE FORT PLAIN, NY: 33.4 acres hilltop view $69,000. 9.3 acres panaramic views $22,000. 3.6 acres $13,000. Owner financing. Great Investment www.helderbergrealty.com† CALL, Henry Whipple: 518-861-6541 LAND FOR SALE ABANDONED FARM + 60 ACRES- $79,900! Beautiful trout stream, awesome valley views, quality hardwood timber, great hunting! Below market price! Call (888)905-8847. www.newyorklandandlakes.com LAND FOR SALE 25,000 SQUARE FOOT BARN + 15 ACRES ONLY $89,900! Bring your horses- it's ready to go! Level, open land with beautiful views! Additional 60 acres next door available at a discount! Call (888)701-7509. www.newyorklandandlakes.com CHECK us out at www.denpubs.com

5 ACRES BORDERS 538 ACRE STATE FOREST, use Deer Creek, $16,900. 7 acres, 2brooks, $19,900. Financing. www.LandFirstNY.com 1-888-683 -2626 LAND FOR SALE ABANDONED FARM + 60 ACRES- $79,900! Beautiful trout stream, awesome valley views, quality hardwood timber, great hunting! Below market price! Call (888)905-8847. www.newyorklandandlakes.com

MOBILE HOME 96 COLONY 14X80, Mobile Home, 3br/2ba, master bathroom has jet tub, deck, gardens,appraised at $23,000 but selling at $20,000 obo 518-5725468.

REAL ESTATE WANTED NORTHERN LAND, Wanted for home building, 3 to 50 acres within 25 miles of Plattsburgh. bonitarose12@gmail.com or call 518 563 2849

The Classified Superstore

1-800-989-4237

PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE

FLIPPING OUT By Steven J. St. John

1 8 15 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 29 30 31 33 36 38 44 45 46 47 49 52 54 57 59 62 63 64 65 69 71 72 77

ACROSS Psychiatrist’s diagnosis Biblical patriarch Jet set How shrimp cocktail may be served Period named for an element Flash lamp gas Join, as a lucrative deal Pay attention to a word game? Culinary tide-me-over __-ran Critic, at times “Stand” band Mentalist’s claim Like Charles Bronson Fellowship Ask, “Is this really diet?” Sympathetic Lines at the market? Where many races are seen, briefly Evergreen shrubs High roller’s quarters “Stupid __ stupid does”: Forrest Gump Picnic remnants Trade with Marineland? Find out whether a strikeout king is doping? Has permission to Loose things to tie up One might be significant Busts Little rascal Inventing initials Advertise some prime real estate? Yang counterpart

80 “Doing a crossword with a broken pencil is pointless,” for example 81 It may share a kit with a 113-Down 82 Djokovic rival 86 Cicero’s love 88 “Gimme a __” 90 Present a styling award? 93 Fill a cargo bay? 98 Corduroy feature 99 Delay cause 100 With 116-Across, noted finger-pointer 101 Sands of Chad 103 Connections 105 Texter’s “two cents” lead-in 106 Made haste 108 Move a chess piece? 112 So on 115 Godzilla creator, in the story 116 See 100-Across 117 Suffer 118 Baldwin and Guinness 121 Somber genre 123 Jewish teacher 127 Redecorate a castle? 131 Ruling periods 133 West of hip-hop 134 Payback 135 Butcher’s array 136 Amusing zoo creature 137 Indulged at Thanksgiving 138 Skeptic’s retort

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

DOWN Minor players Item most frequently heated up for dinner? Intro to physics? Comparison shopper’s data Connects with “Baudolino” author Gabrielle’s rescuer Targets

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 25 28 32 34 35 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 48 50 51 53 55 56 58 60 61 66 67 68 70 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Café pastry Howard of Hollywood “So?” Possesses, biblically Ottoman VIP Assembles Cast out, as demons Relay race part Piece of the pie? Sign of a clean apartment? Opposition “It’s going to __” K-O connection Selling technique Do the impossible with cats, proverbially 10-Down played him Restroom door sign Capital at 9,350 feet Improbable win PayPal currency Wind in a pit Andean staple Hurricane-resistant tree It takes you up and down but never moves “Look!” Besides Apple projection Infant Big name in paper products Choir selection It may be laid or set This, in Seville Unit of resistance Christian denom. Parlor utensil Restricted, with “up” Exhilarated reaction Many pray on them Potent start? Bleachers support Chinese border river “Sign me up!” Careless?

83 Biker’s fabric 84 “Battlestar Galactica” commander 85 Enter one’s credentials 87 Ignited again 89 Dry and crack 91 Actress Lena 92 Allows to use temporarily 94 “Glee” extra 95 “Well now!” 96 Lid hair 97 Bit

102 In a single attempt 104 How the riot act is usually read 107 1996 runner-up 109 “Nothing on my calendar” 110 Asian sash 111 Weightless correspondence? 112 Not firing on all cylinders 113 Percussion pair 114 Aquarium favorite 119 Jazzman Baker

120 Golfer Ballesteros 122 Ones on the field who aren’t team players? 124 Coffee or tea 125 “Little Women” woman 126 Playground rebuttal 128 Science guy Bill 129 Mauna __ 130 Tolkien tree creature 132 Fla. airport

This Month in History - NOVEMBER 26th - The first lion was exhibited in America (1716) 28th - The “Grande Ole Opry “debuts on radio. (1925) 28th - Disney’s Steamship Willie premieres Mickey Mouse is “born”! 30th - The United Stated and Great Britain sign a peace treaty in Paris, formally ending the Revolutionary War. (1782)

SOLUTIONS TO LAST WEEK ’ S PUZZLES !

(Answers Next Week)


November 24, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 19

SINGLE-FAMILY HOME BUILDINGS FOR SALE HAS YOUR BUILDING SUFFERED STRUCTURAL DAMAGE FROM THE RECENT WEATHER? Contact Woodford Brothers for structural repairs on all types of buildings. At 1-800653-2276 or WWW.Woodfordbros.com STONE HOUSE ASKING $133,000 8619 ROUTE 9 - LEWIS 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, large two car garage, lots of storage Recently remodeled bathroom , granite sink counter top, new living room with cathedral ceiling, kitchen includes raised ceilings, recessed lighting, corian counter top, new refrigerator, electric stove and dish washer. New windows, wood flooring, storm doors, laundry room with new washer and dryer. Living room contains large stone fireplace with Vermont cast iron insert. Lot contains nine small apple trees and birch trees. Willing to help with down payment. Please call 518-873-2120 to schedule a showing

REAL ESTATE Discover Delaware's distinctive, gated community. Larger than life amenities - equestrian facility and Olympic pool.New Homes mid $40's. Low taxes. Brochures available 1-866-6290770†or www.coolbranch.com REAL ESTATE Delaware: For Sale Several NEW Ranch Homes! 55+Peaceful Country setting with all amenities included. Low 100's, low taxes Call Today: 302-6595800 www.bonayrehomes.com and www.lenapebuilders.net

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We're Local! 7 Days/ Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-4162330 CASH FOR CARS AND TRUCKS. Get A Top Dollar INSTANT Offer! Running or Not! 1-888-416-2208 (888) 416-2208 TOP CASH FOR CARS, Any Car/ Truck, Running or Not. Call for INSTANT offer: 1-800-454-6951

ACCESSORIES

BOATS

AUTO DONATION

1977 156 GLASTRON Boat with 70 HP Johnson motor, with trailer, excellent condition. $3000. 518-359-8605

DONATE YOUR CAR to CHILDREN'S CANCER FUND of AMERICA and help end CHILDHOOD CANCER. Tax Deductible. Next Day Towing. Receive Vacation Voucher. 7 Days 1-800-4698593

6 spd., SYNC system, sport pkg., cruise, Stk. #SEN507

$20,965 -2,000 -1,000

2001 SUPRA SANTERA low hrs., mint cond., great ski wake board boat, beautiful trailer included, $19,500. 518-354-8089 2005 WHITEHALL SPIRIT rowing/sailboat. Classic boat, rare find. Must sell! Asking $6400 OBO. 845-868-7711

MOTORCYCLES 1989 YAMAH Virago runs good $1250; 2003 Hyosung runs good, $2000. Please call 518-962-4394

HEWITT PONTOON BOAT Lift, model# 1501, sits on the bottom of the lake. Make an Offer. 518-891-2767 Leave Message on Mail Box 1.

2006 HARLEY DAVIDSON SPORTSTER 883 Mint condition. 11,000 miles. Many extras incl. new battery, removable luggage rack, back rest & windshield. 518-946-8341. $4,500 2010 HONDA STATELINE 1200 Miles, Black, 1312cc $8,500 518-569-8170

37

$17,965

SYNC system, reverse sensing, push button sport, rear camera, heated leather seats, Stk. #EN2911

MSRP Dealer Discount

WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLE KAWASAKI 1967-1980 Z1-900, KZ900, KZ1000, ZIR, KZ1000MKII, W1-650,H1-500, H2-750, S1-250, S2-350, S3-400 Suzuki GS400,GT380, CB750 CASH PAID. FREE NATIONAL PICKUP. 1-800772-1142, 1-310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com

$33,640 -4,000

27

CARS 1952 DESOTO White/Blue, no rust, small Hemi,, great project car. Serious inquires only. $3500. 518-962-4688 1980 OLDSMOBILE 4 door Cutlass, good transmission, body, 4.3L/260, 8 cyl., 97K, rear brake fluid line leak, must tow away. Asking $750. 518-563-2509 Leave Message. Call: (518) 563-2509

HYUNDAI ACCENT 2010, never been driven in snow, very good shape, well maintained, 68,000 miles, DK Blue Black Interior, am/fm CD, air, auto, front wheel drive, great tires, new battery, new wiper blades, 38 mpg., $7600. 518-873-1067 no call after 8pm.

SNOWMOBILES 1993 BOMBARDIER SNOWMOBILE Formula 500. Good condition. Runs well. Asking $400. 518-5636919.

TRUCKS 1978 CJ7 JEEP 7' Fisher Plow, $1500 OBO. 518354-8261 2000 RANGER 2000 Ranger XLT 4x4 Super Cab, camper top, liner, tonneau cover, 6 cyl., auto, AC, stereo, 130K, Asking $3595. 518-576-9042

NEW 2012 FORD F150 4x4 Supercab XLT

NEW 2012 FORD TAURUS SEL MPG HWY

MOTORCYCLES WANTED CASH PAID Select watercraft, ATV, snowmobiles. FREE National Pickup-NO Hassle. 1-800-963-9216 www.SellUsYourBike.com www.USAPowerSportsMi.com Mon-Fri 9-7 (cst)

2002 HONDA VTX 1800, mint condition, many extras, $4500. 518-492-2348

TIRES FOR SALE Almost New 4 Sigma Regent Touring Tires 215/60r16 $50 EACH Call 518-332-7277

NEW 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 4DR.

MSRP Ford Retail Cust. Cash Dealer Discount

AUTO WANTED

MPG HWY

$29,640

3.5L Eco-Boost, 6 spd. auto, trailer tow, SYNC system, pwr. grp., chrome pkg., Stk. #SEN559

MSRP $39,330 Ford Retail Cust. Cash -2,000 -500 Ford Retail Trade Assist* FMCC Retail Bonus*1 -1,000 Dealer Discount -2,135

21

M MPG H HWY

$33,695

AND SEE THE NEW 2013 Focus ST

Escape

C-Max

* Requires trade-in of 1995 or newer. 1 Requires FMCC credit approval. All customers may not qualify.

41660


20 - www.the-burgh.com

BRAND NEW 2013

November 24, 2012

DODGE DURANGO SXT AWD $35,805

STOCK #AN91

EVERYBODY’S PRICE*

THANK YOU NEIGHBORS!

$33,299

$39,425 $39,42 25

STOCK #AN94

EVERYBODY’S PRICE*

$38,925 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING

RAM 1500 QUAD CAB EXPRESS 4X4

STOCK #AM289

$35,560

EVERYBODY’S PRICE**

$29,960

$30,485 CASHMERE PEARL, 6 CYL., AUTOMATIC AUTOMATIC, IC LLEATHER EATHER EATH EAT HE SEATS, SEATS DVD, DVD NAVIGANAVIGA TION, POWER SLIDING DOORS, POWER LIFTGATE, BACK-UP CAMERA, 7 PASSENGER SEATING, ROAD TRIP READY

MINERAL GRAY, 5.7 HEMI ENGINE, AUTOMATIC, 20” WHEELS, SPRAYIN BEDLINER, DUAL EXHAUST, HITCH, READY TO WORK HARD!

RAM 2500 LARAMIE CREW CAB 4X4

STOCK #AM349

$$56,450 ,

EVERYBODY’S PRICE*

DODGE AVENGER SE

OUR BUSINESS WORKS BECAUSE OF

$50,949

YOUR

MINERAL GRAY, 6.7 CUMMINSS TURBO DIESEL DIESEL, AUTOMATIC AUTOMATIC, LEATHER HEATED/VENTILATED SEATS, REMOTE START, NAVIGATION, BACK-UP CAMERA, LONG HAULING LUXURY

YOU MAY QUALIFY FOR MORE REBATES - ASK US! Tax, title extra. Must qualify for low financing if available. Low financing in lieu of rebate. *Everybody’s price includes consumer rebate.

BUSINESS! First Time Visitors, plug in to your GPS “7440 US Route 9, Elizabethtown, NY 12932” and we’ll greet you at the door!

(518) 873-6386

873-6386

$$20,485 ,

STOCK #AN81

EVERYBODY’S PRICE**

$17,985 REDLINE, 4 CYL. , AUTOMATIC AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS LOCKS, BLUETOOTH, 17” WHEELS

Photos are for illustration purposes only.

Dealer#3160005 www.adirondackauto.com

Court Street, Elizabethtown, NY

2012 Dodge Journey SXT - Stk. #AM301A, Blue ................... $22,988 2009 Dodge Journey SXT - Stk. #AN71A, Black..................... $17,988 2009 Dodge Journey SXT - Stk. #AN275A, Tan...................... $15,988 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT - Stk. #AN51A, Gray ....... $18,988 2010 Chrysler Town & Country Touring - Stk. #AM288A, Red ... $20,988 2009 Chrysler Town & Country Touring - Stk. #AM336A, Gray .. $17,988 2007 Chrysler Town & Country Touring - Stk. #AM323A, Brown.. $11,988 2007 Chrysler Town & Country Touring - Stk. #AM334A, Green .. $10,888 2006 Dodge Grand Caravan SE - Stk. #AM335A, Gold ......... $8,488 2010 Jeep Patriot Sport - Stk. #AM303A, Red........................ $13,988 2011 Jeep Patriot Latitude - Stk. #AM351A, Blue................. $20,988 2007 Dodge Durango SLT - Stk. #AM292A, Blue ................... $13,788 Dealer #3160005

BRAND NEW 2013

41661

Court Street • Elizabethtown, NY Located just 1/4 mile south of Cobble Hill Golf Course on Route 9 in Elizabethtown.

BRAND NEW 2013 $32,285

STOCK #AN93

EVERYBODY’S PRICE* E*

BRAND NEW 2012

BRAND NEW 2013

TRUE BLUE, 6 CYL., AUTOMATIC, LEATHER SEATS, START, SEAT ATS S REMOTE REM EEM START BACKUP CAMERA, KEYLESS ENTER N GO, NAVIGATION, QUADRA TRAC II, 4 WHEEL DRIVE SYSTEM, WINTER CONFIDENCE IN STYLE

BRIGHT WHITE, 6 CYL., AUTOMATIC, RALLYE APPEARANCE, 20” WHEELS, DUAL EXHAUST, THIRD ROW SEAT, EYE CATCHING STYLING

BRAND NEW 2012

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO X 4X4

2005 Dodge Durango SLT - Stk. #AN35A, Black..................... $10,988 2008 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo - Stk. #AM332A, Blue....$14,988 2007 Toyota Highlander - Stk. #AM302B, Silver..................... $17,588 2007 Jeep Compass LTD - Stk. #AM178A, Tan....................... $13,988 2011 Chrysler 200 LTD - Stk. #AM226A, Gray .......................... $21,988 2012 Chevy Malibu LT - Stk. #AM280A, Silver ........................ $21,988 2011 Chevy Impala LS - Stk. #AN41A, Silver ........................... $15,788 2010 Honda Accord LX - Stk. #AM313A, Blue ........................ $15,988 2011 Dodge Challenger RT - Stk. #AN68A, Orange .............. $29,888 2009 Chevy Cobalt LS - Stk. #AM352A, Blue ............................. $8,988 2010 Chevy Silverado LS - Stk. #AM219A, Black................... $19,988 2005 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited - Stk. #AN21A, Silver ........ $16,988

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And Many More To Choose From! Stop In, Call, Look At Our Inventory On Our Website adirondackauto.com FIRST Come, FIRST Served!

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TB_11-24-2012_Edition  
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