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From the Editor»

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Stephen Bartlett would like to see a little less pain in the world.

TAKE ONE!

PAGE 5

WWW.THE-BURGH.COM

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2012

CLINTON COUNTY, NEW YORK

This Week

CCC will RENOVATING THE STRAND receive funding increase

ELIZABETHTOWN

VOLUNTEERING

New volunteer center will benefit the entire region.

By Stephen Bartlett stephen@denpubs.com

PAGE 6

PLATTSBURGH – No one spoke up, for or against the budget increase. Clinton County Legislators unanimously agreed to help ease some of Clinton Community College’s fiscal woes. The lawmakers approved an additional $89,000 for CCC, bringing the county’s total contribution to the college to $2,465,040 for 201213. Clinton Community College President John Jablonski had requested the additional funds during a

ASSEMBLY RACE

Karen Bisso outlines platform in Assembly bid. PAGE 7 HOMICIDE

Sean Carlin of Clinton Masonic Charities, a non-profit group, recently volunteered his time to work on the Strand Theatre in Plattsburgh. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

Families share loss of losing a loved one to suicide By Stephen Bartlett stephen@denpubs.com

David and Linda Levandowski. Linda does not want another family to experience the pain of losing a child to suicide.

TREADWELL — Joshua DuFault returned home from the movies his normal, happy self. That night, he locked himself in his bedroom and hanged himself from his closet door, a little more than two months ago. “He told people, but no one told us,” said Linda Levandowski. Families who have lost loved ones to suicide wonder why, question themselves and are often riddled with guilt. They don’t want another family to go through what they went through and stress open communication within the family and society as a whole. The stigma of suicide only keeps it and mental illness, which is often associated with suicide, in the dark. This does not help

anyone, and may in fact result in more lives lost. “I just lost my son two months ago,” said Levandowski. DuFault had been in trouble before and was worried about getting into trouble again. He texted friends, telling them he was scared and planned to take his own life. “He told people,” Levandowski said, “but no one told us.” At home that night after the movies, she sensed something was wrong, but when she went to check on him, the door was locked. No one answered when she knocked, and she searched the house but could not find him anywhere. Levandowski called 911 and went outside and peered through the bedroom window. She saw his hat and phone. CONTINUED ON PAGE 11

Keeseville man’s death ruled a homicide. PAGE 10 OUTDOORS

Hackett talks about the Adk version of The Macnab. PAGE 15

Index CCC TO HOLD REUNION

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September 1, 2012

Clinton Community to hold alumni reunion PLATTSBURGH — Clinton Community College’s annual Alumni Reunion is sure to leave you in stitches this year. Vice President of Institutional Advancement Steven G. Frederick said, “We are really excited about this year’s line-up of events. We think there is something for everyone.” The Alumni Reunion will be held on Saturday, Sept. 15. With events to include the Richard Harmon Memorial Golf Tournament, Clinton Community College Alumni Bike Ride and an “Evening of Comedy, Cocktails and Conversation.” The day will get under way with the annual “Richard Harmon Memorial Golf Tournament” at Harmony Golf Course in Keeseville. Tee-times are 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Both are shotgun starts. Lunch is also included in the ticket price. All proceeds go to the “Clinton Community College Richard Harmon Full-Tuition Scholarship.” Prices are $45 for members and $65 for nonmembers. The “Clinton Community College Bike Ride” will hit the pavement at 10 a.m. The 6-mile course starts at the Alumni Cottage on campus and makes it way out to the Crete Center before finishing back at the Cottage. Price is $5 for individuals and families and free for Clinton students with a student ID. To cap off the evening, alumni, retirees and friends of Clinton are invited to enjoy an evening of “Comedy, Cocktails and Conversation” at the Moore Academic and Administrative Building at Clinton Community College. Headlining the Alumni Reunion is Clinton Alumnus Dean Rhodes, who attended Clinton in 1976-77 and starred in the college’s first three-act play “Charley’s Aunt” as the female-impersonating Lord Fancourt Babberly. He has been a professional comedian, having performed in Phoenix and Las Vegas for a number of years after leaving New York. “It’s been 35 years since I’ve graced a stage at Clinton Community College,” Rhodes said from his home in western Oregon. “I’m looking forward to seeing some old friends, catching people up on my skewed view of the world and not having to wear a dress this time around!”

The distinguished alumnus will also be honored that evening. Tom Middleton is a 1991 graduate who is also an Iraq War Veteran. Middleton wrote a book, “Saber’s Edge” that describes his time serving in Iraq. The event will also feature microbrew and wine tasting on the veranda overlooking picturesque Lake Champlain, a DJ to dance the night away to and plenty of hot and cold hors d’oeuvres. “We hope our alumni will come out and take advantage of this fun weekend,” Frederick said. “The Alumni Reunion is a perfect time to get back on campus and reconnect with those classmates and professors you haven’t seen in a while.” Alumni, CCC retirees, faculty, staff and friends of Clinton are invited to attend. The event runs from 6-11 p.m. Tickets are $40 each and can be purchases online at www.clinton.edu or by calling the Alumni Office at 561-4195.

Mini Scrapbook Convention planned at First Assembly of God PLATTSBURGH — First Assembly of God Women’s Ministries is hosting a Mini Scrapbook Convention as a fund raiser at the Senior Citizen’s Council, 5139 N. Catherine St. The event will be held on Friday Oct. 5 from 4 to 9 p.m. and Saturday Oct. 6, 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Registration costs: Friday only: $20; Saturday only: $30; Both days: $45 and Early Bird Special: Both Days is $40, includes access to several vendors, a 4-foot table space, lunch, and a chance to win a door prize. In addition, all participants will be entered in a separate Grand Prize drawing: $100 Michaels gift card. Four workshops will be offered for a fee of $10 each. All information including the registration form can be seen at: www.plattsburghag.org. Contact Colleen at 643-8774 or adkwoodwork@aol.com for more information. The registration deadline is September 15th and space is limited, so register early.

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Bombardier moving forward with significant cash award By Stephen Bartlett

stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — Bombardier Transportation is moving forward with its nearly $25 million expansion project in Plattsburgh with a little help from the North Country Regional Economic Development Council. The expansion project was awarded $2.5 million through the Regional Council initiative as a priority project. The project is expected to create 100 new jobs and retain 288 existing positions. “With the support of a $2.5 million grant from the Regional Council, Bombardier Transportation is investing ten times that amount in our state, creating and retaining nearly 400 jobs for the North Country,” said Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The scope of the transformational investment by Bombardier and New York creates a ripple across the region with construction and manufacturing jobs spurring growth in other areas of the North Country economy, said Tony Collins, co-chair of the North Country Regional Development Council. The transportation-equipment industry was identified as key to building regional strategies to support manufacturers to compete in the global marketplace, he said. “Our transit equipment manufacturers and talented workforce in this sector are well-positioned to demonstrate their preeminence and take full advantage of the global trends in transportation.” Bombardier plans to expand its main plant by 80,000 square feet and test facility by 2,100 square feet to accommodate longer cars and additional testing capacity. These changes will lead to increased efficiency, flexibility and capacity for new contracts.

Bombardier released a design rendering of the project and is expected to break ground in the next few months. To view the rendering, go to http://regionalcouncils.ny.gov/north-country/Plattsburgh-Plant-Expansion. “This is a truly exciting commitment for the future of the North Country economy,” said Garry Douglas, co-chair of the North Country Regional Economic Development Council and president of the North Country Chamber of Commerce. “It is the culmination of two years of steady efforts by Bombardier and its North Country partners, securing more than $1 billion in contracts this year from the MTA and BART and now this major expansion of Bombardier's presence in Plattsburgh.” He said this will solidify the area’s role as one of North America's top centers for the production of 21st century transportation equipment. The step forward in the future of the Plattsburgh site gives Bombardier the added manufacturing capacity to meet the challenges of upcoming projects and deliver on its commitment to customers, said Alan Aumais, Bombardier Transportation general manager of the Plattsburgh site. “Bombardier wishes to thank the North Country Regional Economic Development Council for its support.” Last year, a total of $785 million was awarded through the consolidated funding application for job creation and community development projects. The North Country was awarded $103.2 million in state support through the Regional Economic Development Council for some 70 projects across the region. “As a leader in transportation manufacturing, who recently signed a contract with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to manufacture 300 subway cars in Plattsburgh, Bombardier will now be able to add 100 new jobs to better position themselves to meet the needs of its customers and compete in the na-

tional and international marketplace,” said Kenneth Adams, Empire State Development president, CEO and commissioner. Bolstering the manufacturing industry is key to building a stronger regional economy, said Assemblywoman Janet Duprey. “The North Country Regional Economic Development Council did a great job to ensure that this globally leading business continues to invest, grow, and create jobs in the North Country.”

Farmers market coupons available PLATTSBURGH — It is the time of year when fresh crops from our local farmers are available to us at the local farmers markets and fresh produce stands. This makes it easier for each of us to select and enjoy fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables. The Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program, NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets in cooperation with Clinton County Office for the Aging cooperate to promote good nutrition for the area seniors through the distribution of Farmers Market Coupons. The purpose of the program, which provides a $20 coupon booklet to each eligible senior household, is to encourage purchasing locally grown fruit and vegetables. The coupons may be used through Nov. 15, but check the list for local market closing dates. To be eligible applicants must be 60 years old or older and fall within the income guidelines. The new USDA Income regulations levels are $1,772 for a 1 person household per month; or $2,333 per month 2 person household.

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September 1, 2012

Opinion

A COMMUNITY SERVICE: This community newspaper and its delivery are made possible by the advertisers you’ll find on the pages inside. Our sixty plus employees and this publishing company would not exist without their generous support of our efforts to gather and distribute your community news and events. Please thank them by supporting them and buying locally. And finally, thanks to you, our loyal readers, for your support and encouragement over the past 65 years from all of us here at the Burgh and Denton Publications.

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Burgh Editorial

Labor Day celebration? Who do we fear most? O American workers face difficult times

A

merica will celebrate Labor Day this Monday, but expect the party to be muted. These are tough times for American workers. Labor Day is a federal holiday observed on the first Monday in September that celebrates the economic and social contributions of workers. It became a federal holiday in 1894. Ironically, the legislation that declared the observance came six days after the famed Pullman Strike, during which a number of striking workers were killed by U.S. military and U.S. Marshals. Fearful of greater conflict, the legislation making Labor Day a national holiday was rushed through Congress unanimously and signed into law by President Grover Cleveland in an attempt to appease the labor force. Fortunately American workers aren’t being shot today, but things are tough. The ongoing presidential campaign is quick to remind us national unemployment is above 8 percent. That’s a sad number, but it’s not the number we should be most concerned about. According to the United States Federal Reserve middle class wealth — the value of assets such as homes, automobiles and stocks minus any debt — dropped 40 percent between 2007 and 2010. Median middle class income fell nearly 8 percent in 2010 alone. This during a time when the cost of everything from food to housing to fuel to education is soaring. The middle class happens to be the vast majority of the American labor pool. The typical American worker now has less wealth than 20 years ago. That’s nothing to celebrate. By the way, the wealthiest families’ median net worth rose slightly during the same time period.

The “One Percent,” as the Occupy Wall Street movement coined the nation’s financial elite, call such comparisons class warfare — while they contribute money to politicians determined to roll back workers’ rights. Look at Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, even New York. Are any workers celebrating New York’s new Tier 6 retirement plan this Labor Day? Winners get to write history, which probably accounts for the fact many seem to blame the recession on workers, particularly public employees, apparently forgetting the bankers, Wall Street managers and greedy business people who pushed our economy to the brink of collapse. They cite employee salaries and benefits that taxpayers and businesses can no longer afford. Union workers have been forced to make salary and benefit concessions. Non-union laborers have simply had to accept cuts to their pay and benefits. Workers are told they’re lucky to have jobs at all. There was a time in America when workers earned a living and respect by doing their jobs. Day-by-day, yearby-year the American labor force did its part and was rewarded with an improved quality of life. Those days are gone, at least for now. Workers are still expected to do their jobs every day, but for less pay and less respect. This Labor Day let’s do more than attend a parade or have a cook out. Let’s take a moment to acknowledge the difficulties encountered by American workers and thank them for continuing to do the job in the face of great adversity. This editorial is the collaborative opinion of a board comprised of Thom Randall, Fred Herbst, Shaun Kittle, Keith Lobdell, Stephen Bartlett, Andy Flynn, and John Gereau. Comments should be directed to denpubs@denpubs.com

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ver the next two weeks we’ll have the opportunity to hear the plans both presidential nominees and their respective parties have for our nation. As the accusations, truth twisting spin and political posturing takes place we can only hope that those who are undecided can find the information they need to reach a wise decision. One not reached from a position of fear, anger nor built on lies, but instead one made from sound facts and realistic hopes. This nation has been blessed over time with the right leadership at just the right time to guide the country through very difficult times. We can only hope that once again the nation can come together and get behind a plan that begins to turn things around. Certainly in my lifetime I know of no other time as critical as the one we currently face. Our national identity and many of the principles we’ve held closely in the past seem to be brushed aside in favor of self wants. Far too many are treating this election like a sporting event more than making a life altering choice. With so much at stake I wonder what we fear more in the coming election — that the “wrong side” will lead the nation back to security and prosperity receiving all the credit or that the “right side” will unleash all the negatives we heard from the other side and push the nation farther into debt and further into despair? If the contest is going to be about anything meaningful, it should be about how we are going to correct the nation’s finances, which presents a grave danger to American power and prosperity. The bi-partisan Bowles-Simpson plan offered solutions last year, but will either candidate be willing to address the issues in the same bipartisan manner that all Americans and both parties can get behind? The bipartisan commission of 18 members, including six senators and six representatives, tried to address the country's fiscal challenges, but Republican VP nominee Paul Ryan refused to support the majority's findings and President Obama also declined to pursue the suggested policies. If the solution is that radioactive and our current leaders refuse to even touch it what will it take for the nation to come to grips with these issues? Can anyone see a path to resolving these financial issues or will both camps simply retreat to their extreme political bases with neither side giving an inch, thus putting America’s future on the line while they play tug-of-war? David Wessel, a Wall Street Journal columnist, recently released a book titled "Red Ink," a handy new guide to understanding the politics of the federal budget. While nobody loves the cost of government, everybody

cherishes the things it specifically does for them. Wessel sums up the politics this way: "These diverse financial Dan Alexander arrangements have one Thoughts from thing in common: at the Behind the Pressline end of the pipeline is some real American person who is getting a check or a promise. Most are convinced due to their circumstances they deserve the money and/or the promise granted by Uncle Sam." On the other side of the ledger from out of control government spending is the lost income from billions of dollars in tax deductions, exemptions and loopholes, for the rich that they too are convinced they rightfully deserve. Such tax bennies are no easier to do away with than reducing beloved spending programs: Congress and presidents know full well seriously addressing both sides of the ledger — spending and taxes — is the only way to correct the course, but until a true leader steps up and makes a convincing case to the American public that both spending and taxes must be a part of the solution, each side will play to fears and cheers of their immediate constituency and the day of reckoning is pushed farther out into the future. It is for that reason that many people believe the day of reckoning should be addressed now without waiting until the issue is so massive the solutions will be far more costly and painful. With the US debt now nearing $16 trillion and the debt per taxpayer at about $140,000 how much longer can we go on allowing our president and Congress to ignore this crisis? It’s painfully clear neither side can solve the problem alone, but neither is prepared to work together and until that happens, nothing will happen except what we should really be fearing. America has many problems and the national economy, while topping the list, is but one of the hot buttons in this year’s election. So listen closely over the next two weeks and keep an open mind. Discount the mudslinging, ignore the vicious attack ads and listen closely for what you would consider a reasonable solution to break the stalemate. But remember, only when the plan is equally painful to all will there be something of value on the table and my greatest fear, one I hope is unfounded, is that neither side is prepared to go that far. Dan Alexander is publisher and CEO of Denton Publications. He may be reached at dan@denpubs.com.


September 1, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 5

A little less pain in the world would be a good thing S omeone recently said to me, “I can understand where Jane is coming from,” in response to Jane expressing she was in pain. It was because of this understanding that the someone approved of Jane’s pain. Another someone said, “I don’t feel sorry for her,” in response to another Jane expressing pain over a situation the someone didn’t believe should cause pain. In reality, their approval and disapproval doesn’t make the pain being felt a reality or a myth. The pain exists regardless. Someone else told me, “It’s freedom of speech. You can’t let words hurt you.” Maybe words don’t hurt that someone, but he or she doesn’t represent the entire race of human beings. What is it with rationalizing pain? We don’t need to understand or approve of it for it to exist. In fact, it doesn’t need to go any further than an expression of pain for it to be clear it exists in that moment. I’ve got a bright light bulb for

everyone: The only thing anyone needs to relate to pain is to have been in pain, in any of its form, themselves. If you have ever been in pain, then that is all that is required to understand it, relate to it and empathize with it. Moving beyond there, dissecting it, trying to force it away by saying something should or shouldn’t cause pain is ignorant and cruel. We all experience it differently. Different things hurt or do not hurt different people. But if someone says, “I am in pain,” then stop right there, because since you have felt pain, then you can empathize and can verify its existence, again, not that you are required or ever needed to do so. I am confident the person in pain can do this. Let’s discuss pain briefly. Researchers from the University of Michigan, Columbia University and the University of Colorado found that when it is in the processing stage, the brain makes little distinction between physical and emotional or psychological pain. So a punch is, say, processed the same as something that would be considered an emotional assault.

Stephen Bartlett

From the Editor’s Desk It gets better. In an article published in Psychological Science, researchers indicated that emotional pain is basically worse than physical pain, not during the processing stage but in terms of the lasting impact. Dr. Kip Williams from Purdue said, “While both types of pain can hurt very much at the time they occur, social pain has the unique ability to come back over and over again, whereas physical pain lingers only as an awareness that it

was indeed at one time painful.” Free speech shouldn’t be used to inflict pain, maliciously, or not, in some cases. If you really examine it, one could say that for an intelligent individual, words are his or her tools or weapon, able to be wielded in intensely hurtful ways without the worry of getting into trouble. For a less intelligent person who is strong, maybe the physical is that individual’s only tool or weapon, except he or she might not use it for fear of getting in trouble, even though studies show the person inflicting emotional pain is actually causing more harm. I say don’t use either, though the existing system does seem sort of backwards and unfair. Pain is pain. I mean, yes, if someone tells us it hurts that person when we breathe, well, that is going to be a difficult pain to remedy. I guess I’d just stay away from the person. But often, we refuse to recognize pain, let alone alleviate it for someone, because after we go through our rationalizing process, we determine the pain should not exist. That is unfair, cruel and basically like

looking at all the evidence out there and saying, “The world is flat.” If we do decide, in our infinite wisdom, to recognize it, the next step would be doing something about it. Obviously that will be difficult and/or impossible at times, but in many instances it simply involves a change in language, ignoring that something might not bother us in a given situation and lending a hand or a hug, and standing up for someone even when we don’t understand or agree with the reason that person is in pain. An important thing to remember too, is that often, when someone’s pain triggers a defensive reaction in us, we should look within and examine ourselves, because while not always, that is a strong indicator we are guilty of something. Pain is pain, and I don’t know about you, but I’d like to see less of it in the world. And let’s be real, everyone who is ignorant in one moment, wants their pain relieved when they are experiencing it. Reach Editor Stephen Bartlett at stephen@denpubs.com.

Our life coaches, Style and Substance: Terms of endearment Dear Style & Substance:

I

was recently called “sweetheart” by a male acquaintance on the street in front of my office and was somehow thrilled by it. Other times when someone calls me “hon,” I am appalled! What is your take on using these terms with friends, family, colleagues and acquaintances? Terms of endearment….are they real, personal or habit? The thrill or discomfort you feel in these situations has either the effect of: he really is fond of me or strong ties to a past negative memory. There was a time when women were routinely called “hon”, “sweetheart”, and “doll” as throw away terms possibly to demean, or because the contributions of women were not valued either in the community, workplace, or home. The intention of the speaker makes all the difference in the reaction. Somehow if the term is used solely with you, it has a more powerful impact! The question then becomes, how do we respond when called sweetheart or honey in an oh-so flattering or not so flattering way? style & substance can surely save the day and solve the problem! Your response should be impactful and a bit jaunty. Be confident, look the speaker straight in the eye, and offer a brief yet witty comeback. For example, “Bob, you look cute as a button today.” Or you can try something a bit more direct, “Hello, I’m Sally (or Michele!), you must have me confused with your other friend, Honey.” Receiving it with a smile and saying, “that really made my day” can also be a gracious response. On the street is a much different situation than in the office; in which case the most important points – responding with style and not anger, being confident and purposeful,

and holding yourself with poise. A look can say it all; showing surprise and a “clearly you didn’t mean to say that” look in the office is a good way to start. You will need to be more direct should it continue. It is tricky, as you don’t want to leave yourself vulnerable by letting too much emotion hang out. It can be as simple as saying, “I feel disrespected by you when you call me that, and surely you didn’t mean to have that effect.” I (Michele) recently spent time with my five year old niece. She and I were chatting about school and she then ran outside to play with her brother. She flew out the door with me calling behind her, “be careful lovey!” A few minutes later she came back inside and said, “You called me lovey, I like that.” She has decided that is what I am to call her from this day forward, not every time, but at least once or twice whenever we have a conversation. She understands the power of sweet talk. Any term of endearment has the power to pull at deep emotion. No matter how young or old we are, we like to be appreciated. What we are trying to say, is the body language and humor of the speaker can give us clues to the real meaning. Some men and women like to naturally tease and in this context it is quite harmless. It is all about how we receive it and what we choose to do from there.

ASK Style & Substance creative life coaching solutions Email your questions or request a life coaching appointment to yourstyleandsubstance@gmail.com for more information: visit our website at yourstyleandsubstance.com

Elmore SPCA

Our Furry Friends Our Furry Friends is a weekly feature brought to you by Denton Publications. For more information about these and other fine pets available for adoption, contact: Elmore SPCA 556 Telegraph Road, Peru 643-2451 North Country SPCA 23 Lakeshore Road, Westport 962-8604

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obin is a gorgeous cat that has traveled all the way from Las Vegas! This young cat was a stray in Las Vegas, Nevada and a lovely couple took him in. Unfortunately, the older and less playful older cats in residence wouldn't accept him and it wasn't a good fit. At first Robin was very leery of the other cats in the cat colony, but he quickly settled in and is doing very well. Robin just loves to be around people. He is very affectionate, and he loves to laze around in the sun. Won't you consider giving this boy a home where he can feel safe and secure? Robin is current on vaccinations, altered and has tested negative for FeLV, FIV and Heart Worm.

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ur featured pet this week is Lexi, a grey tabby Domestic Shorthair/mix cat who was found in a box beside the road with her three kittens. Lexi is a tiny little lady with huge, amber eyes and a sweet personality. We can't understand why anyone would abandon her! Her three kittens are all healthy and growing quickly, and hoping to find their forever homes as well. If you are looking for a cat who is gentle in nature and will reward you with plenty of affection, Lexi is the cat for you. Why not stop by and meet her and the kittens today?

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Michele Armani and Sally Meisenheimer


6 - www.the-burgh.com

September 1, 2012

New volunteer center will benefit entire region By Stephen Bartlett

stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — Even a quick glance around the country reveals an abundance of negative dialogue, Congressman Bill Owens said. Thankfully, things like the North Country Regional Volunteer Center speak to the positive aspects of the American personality, he said. “This is a fascinating concept,” Owens said at the United Way of the Adirondack Region for the official announcement of the North Country Regional Volunteer Center. “This is important,” Owens said. The 24-hour web site will help connect volunteers with opportunities and provide organizations with a venue to post their needs. “Volunteering is a huge help to non-profits, and it is a big part of the United Way mission,” said Larry Pickreign II, Outreach Coordinator for the United Way of the Adirondack Region. “Most people don’t volunteer because they have never been asked.” The primary focus of the volunteer center is to engage volunteers and solve community issues. The goal is to include all service organizations in their activities as well as provide support to community organizations throughout the state. The North Country Regional Volunteer Center encompasses Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties. The center fortifies the system for areawide data collection that enhances advocacy efforts, case statements for founders and recruitment of volunteers. The web-based volunteer center matches registered volunteers with non-profit agencies that have volunteer opportunities. Volunteers and agencies can register at www.northcountryvolunteer.org. “Please visit the web site and check it out,”

John Bernardi, Bill Owens and Hillarie Logan-Dechene at the official opening of the North Country Regional Volunteer Center. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

Pickreign said. Funds for the center came from a grant established by the New York State Commission on National and Community Service. There are 10 regional volunteer centers throughout the state. Many agencies need volunteers, and prior to this, when someone called United Way, their name was taken with hopes they could be matched up with an organization. Prior to the news conference, the United Way hosted a training with 40 agencies ready and willing to sign up for the free service.

“We want to get a little over 7,000 new volunteers per year for our region,” said Kathy Snow, director of development for the United Way of the Adirondack Region. That is important as New York currently ranks 51st in the nation in volunteerism, though part of that is due to the lack of data collection. The new site will also generate a report detailing volunteer hours and number of volunteers, something that will be useful when writing grants. Statewide, the sites aim to inspire 1 mil-

lion new volunteers in three years. “That is one effort to reduce the myth,” said Hillarie Logan-Dechene, director of philanthropy at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake. The new site is a great way to celebrate volunteerism, said United Way of the Adirondack Region Executive Director John Barnardi. “We know volunteerism is alive and well in New York, and while we will collect data, the heart of it is to celebrate volunteerism.”

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Assembly hopeful outlines her vision stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — Karen Bisso has been to parades, gun shows and tractor pulls. She puts on her jersey each day and takes a hit, but she promised to talk to people and listen, and said she has done that over the past seven months. “I kept that promise,” said Bisso, a Republican and Conservative candidate for the New York State Assembly in the 115th Assembly District. She spoke recently at a press conference in the Town of Plattsburgh, during which Doug Hoffmann announced his full support of Bisso. He said he has known her for years, and she has an “incredible” work ethic and realistic approach to repairing New York state. Bisso, a veteran teacher and businesswoman, is tired of unfunded mandates in education, Hoffmann said, and has spoken out against rising taxes and increased government regulations that hamper business and job development. Following that announcement, Hoffman, a Lake Placid businessman and former congressional candidate, attacked Assemblywoman Janet Duprey. Bisso and David Kimmel are seeking to defeat Duprey, the incumbent, at the Republican primary on Sept. 13. The winner will run against Democrat Timothy Carpenter, a City of Plattsburgh councilor from Ward 1. Hoffmann accused Duprey of double-dip-

ping by drawing her Assembly salary while collecting a state funded retirement. “She is an elected representative and is supposed to be a role model,” said Hoffmann, who admitted she is doing nothing against the law, referring to it as a “loop hole.” “Additionally, as a resident of the area, I watched effects on families of corrections officers and employees when Camp Gabriels closed under her watch,” Hoffmann continued. “These families had to suffer the financial cutbacks.” Hoffmann said Duprey often casts liberal votes. “As a conservative, I am frankly disgusted by Janet Duprey ignoring her constituents by voting to change our historical and religious definition of marriage.” He called for voters to support Bisso on Primary Day, Sept. 13. Duprey, reached by phone, pointed out that she put in 31 years in county government and earned her retirement, a decision she made to protect her family. She further pointed out that it was not a “loop hole” but a law that allows an individual to retire and hold an elected position. “I worked very hard for Clinton County and did a good job,” Duprey said. “By taking retirement I am guaranteed retirement income that will protect my husband.” Duprey explained that it was the decision of the Commissioner of Corrections to close Camp Gabriels, along with other facilities around the state.

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In fact, Duprey and Senator Betty Little fought to keep Camp Gabriels open. She was unsure how the families suffered, pointing out that the corrections officers landed other jobs and did not have to leave the area. “It is always difficult when a facility closes and you never want to see it happen, but when people can still go home at night and put their head on their own pillows,” Duprey said. “We are fortunate to have Assembly hopeful Karen Bisso and Doug Hoffman at a press conference back up that allows that to Bisso recently held in Plattsburgh. Photo by Stephen Bartlett happen.” Duprey firmly believes gay marriage is a human rights issue and people down on the right side of history.” Bisso said at the press conference that she are entitled to happiness with the person they love. She doesn’t understand how anyone can would have voted differently on gay marriage. She said after speaking with people it is clear deny someone the opportunity to be happy with someone he or she loves and wants to that the topics they are most concerned about share a life with while enjoying the same legal are taxes, jobs and the “ever approaching hand protections “that are not available under any of state government.” “I want to bridge the things we have in comother thing but marriage.” mon to move forward.” “I am very happy I made that vote and came

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8 - www.the-burgh.com

September 1, 2012

Donor aids Clearly Clinton campaign By Stephen Bartlett

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PLATTSBURGH — An anonymous donor from Rouses Point has pushed Clinton Community College past the million-dollar mark in its first year of the Clearly Clinton campaign. The $300,000 donation is the single largest donation to date. “We are grateful for this sizeable donation,” said Vice President of Institutional Advancement Steven Frederick. “Like many of the donations made so far, it’s very rewarding to see the people of the North Country coming out to support this worth-while campaign.” The anonymous donor is now part of a lengthy list of benefactors who have given to the Clearly Clinton Campaign. Last month, Wayne and Sylvia Manor of Richardson, Texas pledged $200,000. They are alumni of CCC, making it the single largest donation by a Clinton alumnus in college history. The Manors are also serving as honorary chairs of the campaign. “Our community and alumni see the importance of this project and the need to make it a reality,” said CCC President John Jablonski. “We are on track to make year two of this campaign just as big as this year.” The Clearly Clinton campaign launched in January as a five-year, $7.5 million fundraising effort to help build a 21st Century Learning Commons on campus. The total cost of the project is estimated at $15 million. The State University of New York will match the $7.5 million the Clearly Clinton campaign raises.

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The recommendation to build the learning center arose from CCC’s 2007 Facilities Master Plan, which noted that the existing library is significantly undersized and poorly configured for a college of its size. “I cannot think of a better gift or a bigger impact for every student on this campus then building a state-of-the art learning commons.” Frederick said. “This is a gift that will continue to give for years to come.” In 2011, JMZ Architects and Planners confirmed the college and its students need a modern facility that includes traditional library functions, electronic research tools, areas for group study and for quiet study, tutoring services and accommodative services for students with disabilities. Larry and Judy Jeffords of Jeffords Steel and Engineering are the official co-chairs of the campaign. They own a multi-million engineering and manufacturing business, and Mrs. Steel graduated from CCC in 1971. Keeseville businessman George Moore is an honorary chair. He has long supported CCC’s mission “to provide educational opportunities that enrich minds, strengthen the economy and improve the quality of life in our region.” The Clearly Clinton Campaign will wrap up on June 30, 2016 or when the campaign goal has been successfully achieved.

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McGrail takes checkered at Airborne Raceway Modified Feature (30) Laps Liquor & Wine Warehouse Night 1) Pat McGrail Candiac, QC 2) Todd Stone 3) Patrick Dupree 4) Andy Heywood 5) Mike Reyell 6) George Foley 7) Maxime Viens 8) Andy Lindeman 9) Adam Bartemy 10) Todd Ormsby 11) Mike Wells 12) Roger Labreche 13) Mikail Labreche 14) Matt Woodruff 15) Alain Fournier 16) Aaron Bartemy 17) Richard Tisseur 18) Pierre Berthiaume 19) Craig Reyell 20) Leon Gonyo 21) Chris Cayea 22) Kris Vernold 23) Jessey Mueller 24) Greg Atkins.

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Artways Harvest project seeks submissions PLATTSBURGH — 2nd Round: Adirondack Coast ARTWays Project ARTWays is looking for artists to submit their original artwork based on the theme, "Adirondack Coast Harvest." To goal is for local artists to help create an identity for the North Country and the Adirondack region. Artists of diverse mediums are encouraged to apply, including but not limited to: paint, ink, pencil, mixed media, textiles, mosaic, glass, recycled materials, photography, calligraphy, collage, fiber art, graphic art, etc. Entries may be portrait or landscape – winning artwork will be featured on 20 by 30 poster with portrait orientation. Entries will be judged by a panel of individuals representing businesses, the travel, tourism and agritourism sector, artists and arts professionals, county and city officials, and non-profit organizations. The winner will be announced at this year ’s Adirondack Coast Wine, Cider and Food Festival on October 6 at the Crete Center. The original work and reproduction in the form of a 20 x 30 poster will be on display at the ceremony and the 2nd and 3rd place recipients will be invited to show their original work alongside the winner. Submissions are due Monday, Sept. 3. Please submit your images for the Harvest ARTWays via (JPEG or PDF) email to gallery@plattsburgharts.org. For more information call 563-1604.

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PLATTSBURGH — Pat McGrail and Todd Stone, who will settle the Airborne DIRTcar Modified title next weekend, finished 1-2 in an exciting, hard-fought 30-lap battle on Liquor & Wine Warehouse/Bond Auto Parts Night. There were three lead changes in the last 10 laps. McGrail had to pass Patrick Dupree twice to earn his fourth win, which trimmed Stone’s point lead to 10 points heading into next week’s 50-lap finale. Stone sat a close third to a McGrail/Dupree duel in the closing laps, but Dupree gave way to Stone exiting the final turn. “The right rear was gone,” Dupree said. Dupree had smoked McGrail to retake the lead on the 6 of 7 restarts with 13 laps to go. McGrail first took the lead on lap 12 after four early cautions shuffled the field. “That was a hard race for an old guy like me,” McGrail said. “I think I lost concentration on that one restart and Patrick beat me. Then I had to study him and tried the outside. My right rear was pretty well gone too.” Andy Heywood ran strong all night to finish fourth. Mike Reyell had one of his best nights of the season to claim fifth, one spot better than George Foley. The red flag was out on lap 20 for Richard Tisseur, who got jostled into the backstretch area, but walked away from the wreck. Jessey Mueller of Olmstedville held off point leader Nick Heywood for his first win in the Bond Auto/Liquor & Wine Warehouse Sportsman Modified trophy dash. Jason Durgan finished third ahead of Travis Bruno and Chris Sousie. Bucko Branham continued to dominate the Limited Late Models even as Jamy Begor (2nd) and Robin Wood (3rd) made a race of it as the laps wound down. Begor and Wood drew within a car-length of Branham’s Bud Lite/Econo Lodge No. 20, but couldn’t make a winning pass. Shawn Duquette and Fred Lagoy were next in line. Rick Doner of Au Sable Forks and Joe Warren of West Chasy raced side by side for the first 15 laps of the 25-lap Renegade feature. Doner sped off in the Gordon’s Oil No. 1 in the final five laps for his first win. Warren, Kevin Boutin, Lance Rabtoy and Jason McClatchie were 2-3-4-5. The Busch Mini Modified feature also produced a first-time winner – Eric Reyell of Morrisonville. Reyell bested Josh LaPorte and Dale O’Neil.

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HAPPY LABOR DAY! In Recognition of our Working Men and Women The Very First Labor Day - September 5, 1882 - If you could create a holiday, what would it be called? What date would you choose for your holiday? Peter J. McGuire, a carpenter and labor union leader, was the person who came up with the idea for Labor Day. He thought American workers should be honored with their own day. He proposed his idea to New York’s Central Labor Union early in 1882, and they thought the holiday was a good idea, too. With four long months between Independence Day and Thanksgiving, Peter suggested a month halfway in between. The very first Labor Day was held on a Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City. The day was celebrated with a picnic, concert and speeches. Ten thousand workers marched in a parade from City Hall to Union Square. Soon after that first celebration, the holiday was moved to the first Monday in September, the day we still honor. Congress passed legislation making Labor Day a national holiday in 1894.

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September 1, 2012

Keeseville man’s death ruled a homicide; leaves behind two children By Katherine Clark

katherine@denpubs.com KEESEVILLE — New York State Police continue to investigate the murder of a Keeseville man whose body was discovered near the closed Iron Footbridge Sunday morning. The body of Robert M. Rennie, 45, of Keeseville was discovered at 6:14 a.m. on Aug. 26 by New York State Police and Emergency Medical Squad after a report of an unresponsive subject near the bridge. Emergency responders arrived and pronounced Rennie dead at the scene. Essex County Coroner Walter Marvin authorized the release of the body, which was transported to Albany Medical Center. An autopsy performed by Dr. Michael Sikirica, a forensic pathologist, ruled Rennie’s death a homicide. “As is the case with other homicide investigations I am not releasing the cause of death until the criminal investigation has been completed,” said New York State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigations Cpt. Robert LaFountain.

LaFountain said it was apparent Rennie’s death was a homicide based on undisclosed evidence gathered by initial responders to the scene. “Without going into further details, the New York State Police had various investigators throughout the region respond, including the Violent Crime Investigation team and the Forensic Investigation Unit,” LaFountain said. Investigators from the FIU were spotted in various locations in the Keeseville area throughout the day on Sunday and Monday. Investigators had blocked off Mill Hill Road on Monday afternoon and were seen leaving with evidence bags from a home located near the Lamp Light Mobile Home Park just down the road from Mill Hill. LaFountain said several search warrants have been obtained and were in the process of being executed. The investigation is continuing. LaFountain said Rennie had not been reported missing prior to the discovery of his body, though he would not say when Rennie may have been seen last and encouraged anyone with information to come forward.

“We don’t provide a lot of information and the reason for that is we’re trying to solicit information from potential witnesses,” LaFountain said. “We don’t want them to read something — we want to know what they have direct knowledge of.” At this time police will not release the names of any suspects or potential suspects in the murder investigation. “There is a homicide that has occurred and we urge everyone to use extreme caution until the person or persons responsible for Robert Rennie’s death have been apprehended,” LaFountain said. The investigation remains under intense investigation by state police and Essex County District Attorney Kristy Sprague. “I would like to take this opportunity to thank the community of Keeseville, and the various businesses who have cooperated and continue to cooperate in this investigation, and I would ask that anyone who has any information concerning the death of Robert Rennie or his whereabouts on Saturday or into Sunday morning contact the New York State Police at 563-3761,” LaFountain said.

from page 1 presentation to the County Finance Committee on Aug. 8. The spending plan he presented, and which was approved by CCC’s Board of Trustees, includes an unrestricted operating budget of $15.6 million on top of the county’s share and utilizes $436,220 in reserve funds. Clinton Community College has experienced a 21 percent, or nearly $1 million, decrease in state aid over the past three years. Yet costs continue to soar. The school is making some cuts, keeping positions open and slightly raising tuition, among other cost-savings steps. The additional contribution from Clinton County puts the increase in county funding at an average of 1.6 percent annually for the past three years. The county increased its share by $25,000 for the 2011-12 academic year, while the year before CCC only asked for a $1 increase. CCC’s operating costs this coming year are projected to jump by 26 percent. CCC is funded by tuition and contributions from the state and county. CCC, a significant resource to the area, not only provides individuals with a college education, but also technical training and services for area businesses that desire new skills for their employees. CCC further offers wind-energy-and-turbine- technology and industrial-technology, nursing and electrical-technology programs that support the area and enhance the workforce. CCC’s 2012-13 budget will reduce equipment costs by 35 percent, faculty and adjunct faculty overloads by $100,000 and leave seven positions vacant. The college managed to drop its two most expensive health-insurance options for employees. The school will also raise tuition for full-time in-state students by $100 per semester, pushing the cost for such students from $3,620 to $3,820, for an increase of 5.5 percent in 2012-13. The spending plan would not eliminate any programs.

PLATTSBURGH — The Salvation Army in Plattsburgh, New York, will be offering free training classes in emergency preparedness and disaster response on Friday, September 7 and Saturday, September 8 at the Corps on 4804 S. Catherine Street in Plattsburgh. The first course on Friday, from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. is “Introduction to Emergency Disaster Services,” the base training course for volunteers interested in becoming a member of the Salvation Army’s Emergency Disaster Services serving the local corps area in the North The course offers a basic understanding of how The Salvation Army responds to disasters at both the local and national level. Topics include the different phases of disaster response, how you can respond in your community and how to care for yourself and others in a crisis. The intro course is a prerequisite for advanced disaster training in the Incident Command System,Food Service and Food Safety, First Aid/CPR, Emotional and Spiritual Care, plus additional specialized courses. A meal will be available at 5 p.m. Saturday’s course runs from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and is an orientation to the “Incident Command System (ICS)” and explains how the system is used to command, control and coordinate disaster relief operations. A light lunch will be provided. ICS is standardized incident management response used by all levels of government which

www.the-burgh.com - 11

Talk openly about suicide, mental illness to end dangerous stigma By Stephen Bartlett stephen@denpubs.com

Robert Rennie, pictured, was found dead Sunday morning, Aug. 26. Police have ruled the death a homicide.

Salvation Army offering free training

CCC Budget

September 1, 2012

makes possible a coordinated response among government jurisdictions and non-profit agencies in an emergency. It covers the coordination of equipment, personnel, facilities and The classes are free and open to anyone who registers in advance. Materials will be both classes will be taught by certified instructor Ms. Leslie Vattimo, The Salvation Army’s Empire State Division Director of Disaster Services. Volunteers completing Introduction to Disaster Services and Incident Command System training then can become certified in Emergency Disaster Services and receive a Salvation Army photo ID, she said. “Last year ’s flooding from both the hurricane and tropical storm showed that upstate New York in not immune to disasters. The training offered in these courses enables participants to provide needed emergency assistance through The Salvation Army in his or her own community in the event of a disaster,” she said. Contact Envoys Frank or Belinda Smith at 5612951 to register for either or both of the courses. The Salvation Army is officially recognized by federal, state and local governments across the country as a sanctioned disaster relief and assistance organization. As a relief organization within the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NVOAD), The Salvation Army was involved in the development of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) recently released National response Framework.

PLATTSBURGH – Suicide. Just say it — suicide. The community needs to discuss mental illness and suicide, overcome the stigma, and empower people to reach out and to listen. “Suicide is a public health problem,” said Bonnie Black. “If it were any other illness, we would be out vaccinating people, but because it involves mental health, our society still carries a stigma.” Black spoke at a community dialogue on suicide at St. Joseph Church in Plattsburgh. “There is a sense of hopelessness and helplessness,” Black said. “A deep hole they feel they cannot get out of. “Yet people feel like if they don’t talk about mental illness it won’t exist.” Still, it does. In fact, one out of every four individuals suffer from mental illness, while one out of every six will be touched by suicide. A total of 36,909 suicide deaths were reported in the U.S. in 2009, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That made suicide the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. Nationwide, the suicide rate increased 2.4 percent over 2008, for a total of 12 suicides per 100,000 people. The rate of suicide has been increasing since 2000, and 2009 was the highest rate in 15 years. Every 14.2 minutes someone in the United States dies by suicide, while nearly 1 million people make a suicide attempt every year.

A total of 90 percent of people who die by suicide have a diagnosable and treatable psychiatric disorder at the time of their death. Men are nearly four times likely to die by suicide than women, yet woman attempt suicide three times as often as men. The highest rate of suicide in Clinton County is white males between the ages of 40 and 50. “Year to date, there have been 11 suicides so far in Clinton County,” said Sherri Gillette, director of the Community Services Board. “That is the highest in the last five or six years.” Clinton, Essex and Franklin counties have the second highest suicide rate per capita in New York state. “We deal with this on a daily basis,” Gillette said. Just the other day a girl posted on Facebook that she did not want to wake up in the morning. She had been extremely depressed. “We encourage anyone threatening harm to themselves to come into the clinic and be seen,” Gillette said. A man in the audience urged people never to assume suicide was an idle threat that will go away. His son made such a threat that he didn’t take in, and two days before Christmas in 2010 the young man took his own life. Debbie Jerdo told people they should go with their gut. She felt something was wrong and took her son, Joshua, to his primary care doctor. He was released, and 12 hours later completed suicide. “Joshua was a popular kid,” Jerdo said. “He was an A student and captain of the football team.

Suicide from page 1 She and her husband kicked the door in and found the young man dead, hanging by the closet door. Levandowski believes her son cried for help, but no one listened. “Take them serious if someone tells you they are planning suicide,” she said. “They might get mad at you, but they will be alive.” She doesn’t want to see another family experience such a loss. Suicide is a cry for help, she said, and there are always ways to get that individual help. “Nobody should have to go through this pain.” Angie LePage can relate to that pain all too well. “I lost my son, my precious son, to suicide.” She cannot recall any specific time he mentioned suicide, but if anyone is ever in that position, “don’t roll the dice,” she said. Her son, Michael, was struggling with alcohol and was facing his second DWI. “He was incredibly fearful with what would happen with him in the criminal justice system,” LePage said. “He got his second DWI, and in his mind he was done.” She recalls walking into the living room and glancing above the fireplace to see his picture face down. She asked him about it and Michael said that was how he wanted it.

John Gereau 22 Years Andy Flynn 20 Years

Where the locals go!

Shaun Kittle 3 Years Nancy Frasier 5 Years

Katherine Clark 1 Year

National Institute of Mental Health

Fri., Aug. 31 - Mon., Sept. 3, 2012

Research shows that risk factors for suicide include: Depression and other mental disorders, or a substance-abuse disorder (often in combination with other mental disorders). More than 90 percent of people who die by suicide have these risk factors: • prior suicide attempt • family history of mental disorder or substance abuse • family history of suicide • family violence, including physical or sexual abuse • firearms in the home, the method used in more than half of suicides • incarceration • exposure to the suicidal behavior of others, such as family members, peers, or media figures. • However, suicide and suicidal behavior are not normal responses to stress; many people have these risk factors, but are not suicidal. Research also shows that the risk for suicide is associated with changes in brain chemicals called neurotransmitters, including serotonin. Decreased levels of serotonin have been found in people with depression, impulsive disorders, and a history of suicide attempts, and in the brains of suicide victims.

“My Michael didn’t want to die,” LePage said. “He just didn’t know how to live.” Mary Gillen’s son didn’t exhibit any revealing behaviors. There was no warning, except possibly the time he gave away his prized possessions. Still, Gillen chalked it up to the young man preparing to leave for college. “You never know what is in someone’s head.” She urges families and the community to begin talking about suicide. If the conversation does not start, nothing will change, she said. “Talk about it so it is not that thing that is whispered about,” Gillen said. “You have to use the bad word, ‘suicide.’” Anytime someone throws around suicide threats, take that person seriously, she said. The individual might be angry, but tomorrow and beyond that person will be alive. “We have to make mental health issues acceptable,” Gillen said. “Be honest with people and quit dancing around it.”

2016: Obamas America (PG) 12:30PM • 2:40PM • 5:15PM 7:30PM • 9:40PM Hit and Run (R) 12:25PM • 2:40PM • 5:00PM 7:20PM • 9:40PM Hope Springs (PG13) 12:05PM • 2:25PM • 4:45PM 7:05PM • 9:25PM Ice Age: Continental Drift (2D) (PG) 12:30PM • 2:45PM Lawless (R) 12:40PM • 3:30PM • 7:00PM 9:35PM Paranorman (PG) 2:25PM • 9:30PM Paranorman (RealD 3D) (PG) 12:15PM • 4:40PM • 7:20PM Premium Rush (PG13) 12:45PM • 3:00PM • 5:05PM 7:25PM • 9:30PM The Bourne Legacy (PG13) 12:35PM • 3:25PM 7:15PM • 9:55PM The Campaign (R) 5:00PM • 7:35PM • 9:35PM The Dark Knight Rises (PG13) 8:00PM The Expendables 2 (R) 12:35PM • 2:55PM • 5:15PM 7:35PM • 9:50PM The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG) 12:20PM • 2:45PM • 5:10PM 7:30PM • 9:50PM The Oogleloves in the Big Balloon Adventure (G) 12:00PM • 2:00PM • 4:00PM 6:00PM The Possession (PG13) 12:50PM • 3:00PM • 5:10PM 7:25PM • 9:55PM

Church to hold rummage sale SARANAC — Saranac United Methodist Church Annual Fall Rummage Sale at the church on Route 3, Thursday, Sept. 13 through the 15. On Thursday Sept. 13, the rummage sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sept. 14 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. With half price with 25-cent bags starting at 4 p.m. and Sept. 15 from 9 to 10:30 a.m. with all items free. For more information call 293-8142.

31569

10 - www.the-burgh.com

Fred Herbst 36 Years Keith Lobdell 14 Years

Thom Randall 34 Years

Stephen Barlett 14 Years

For more than 60 years, our experienced team of local journalists have kept our Adirondack/North Country communities at the forefront of our reporting. And not just when the big story needs covering, but everyday news, sports and features of importance to you. While the larger, out-of-town news organizations pull back on coverage and reduce staff, our local, homegrown company and news team stands ready to provide you with timely news in-print, online at www.denpubs.com, through mobile devices, and on Facebook and Twitter. Oh, and did we mention we deliver it all to you FREE of charge? We’ll be here providing your news long after the others cut and run. The difference is simple —this is more than a business investment for us, this is our home!

149 Total Years of Professional Journalism Experience Under One Roof!

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2012

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www.northcountryman.com YOUR NUMBER ONE SOURCE OF COMMUNITY NEWS, SERVING THE LAKE CHAMPLAIN & TRI-LAKES REGION

VALLEY Y 1948

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September 1, 2012

Keeseville man’s death ruled a homicide; leaves behind two children By Katherine Clark

katherine@denpubs.com KEESEVILLE — New York State Police continue to investigate the murder of a Keeseville man whose body was discovered near the closed Iron Footbridge Sunday morning. The body of Robert M. Rennie, 45, of Keeseville was discovered at 6:14 a.m. on Aug. 26 by New York State Police and Emergency Medical Squad after a report of an unresponsive subject near the bridge. Emergency responders arrived and pronounced Rennie dead at the scene. Essex County Coroner Walter Marvin authorized the release of the body, which was transported to Albany Medical Center. An autopsy performed by Dr. Michael Sikirica, a forensic pathologist, ruled Rennie’s death a homicide. “As is the case with other homicide investigations I am not releasing the cause of death until the criminal investigation has been completed,” said New York State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigations Cpt. Robert LaFountain.

LaFountain said it was apparent Rennie’s death was a homicide based on undisclosed evidence gathered by initial responders to the scene. “Without going into further details, the New York State Police had various investigators throughout the region respond, including the Violent Crime Investigation team and the Forensic Investigation Unit,” LaFountain said. Investigators from the FIU were spotted in various locations in the Keeseville area throughout the day on Sunday and Monday. Investigators had blocked off Mill Hill Road on Monday afternoon and were seen leaving with evidence bags from a home located near the Lamp Light Mobile Home Park just down the road from Mill Hill. LaFountain said several search warrants have been obtained and were in the process of being executed. The investigation is continuing. LaFountain said Rennie had not been reported missing prior to the discovery of his body, though he would not say when Rennie may have been seen last and encouraged anyone with information to come forward.

“We don’t provide a lot of information and the reason for that is we’re trying to solicit information from potential witnesses,” LaFountain said. “We don’t want them to read something — we want to know what they have direct knowledge of.” At this time police will not release the names of any suspects or potential suspects in the murder investigation. “There is a homicide that has occurred and we urge everyone to use extreme caution until the person or persons responsible for Robert Rennie’s death have been apprehended,” LaFountain said. The investigation remains under intense investigation by state police and Essex County District Attorney Kristy Sprague. “I would like to take this opportunity to thank the community of Keeseville, and the various businesses who have cooperated and continue to cooperate in this investigation, and I would ask that anyone who has any information concerning the death of Robert Rennie or his whereabouts on Saturday or into Sunday morning contact the New York State Police at 563-3761,” LaFountain said.

from page 1 presentation to the County Finance Committee on Aug. 8. The spending plan he presented, and which was approved by CCC’s Board of Trustees, includes an unrestricted operating budget of $15.6 million on top of the county’s share and utilizes $436,220 in reserve funds. Clinton Community College has experienced a 21 percent, or nearly $1 million, decrease in state aid over the past three years. Yet costs continue to soar. The school is making some cuts, keeping positions open and slightly raising tuition, among other cost-savings steps. The additional contribution from Clinton County puts the increase in county funding at an average of 1.6 percent annually for the past three years. The county increased its share by $25,000 for the 2011-12 academic year, while the year before CCC only asked for a $1 increase. CCC’s operating costs this coming year are projected to jump by 26 percent. CCC is funded by tuition and contributions from the state and county. CCC, a significant resource to the area, not only provides individuals with a college education, but also technical training and services for area businesses that desire new skills for their employees. CCC further offers wind-energy-and-turbine- technology and industrial-technology, nursing and electrical-technology programs that support the area and enhance the workforce. CCC’s 2012-13 budget will reduce equipment costs by 35 percent, faculty and adjunct faculty overloads by $100,000 and leave seven positions vacant. The college managed to drop its two most expensive health-insurance options for employees. The school will also raise tuition for full-time in-state students by $100 per semester, pushing the cost for such students from $3,620 to $3,820, for an increase of 5.5 percent in 2012-13. The spending plan would not eliminate any programs.

PLATTSBURGH — The Salvation Army in Plattsburgh, New York, will be offering free training classes in emergency preparedness and disaster response on Friday, September 7 and Saturday, September 8 at the Corps on 4804 S. Catherine Street in Plattsburgh. The first course on Friday, from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. is “Introduction to Emergency Disaster Services,” the base training course for volunteers interested in becoming a member of the Salvation Army’s Emergency Disaster Services serving the local corps area in the North The course offers a basic understanding of how The Salvation Army responds to disasters at both the local and national level. Topics include the different phases of disaster response, how you can respond in your community and how to care for yourself and others in a crisis. The intro course is a prerequisite for advanced disaster training in the Incident Command System,Food Service and Food Safety, First Aid/CPR, Emotional and Spiritual Care, plus additional specialized courses. A meal will be available at 5 p.m. Saturday’s course runs from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and is an orientation to the “Incident Command System (ICS)” and explains how the system is used to command, control and coordinate disaster relief operations. A light lunch will be provided. ICS is standardized incident management response used by all levels of government which

www.the-burgh.com - 11

Talk openly about suicide, mental illness to end dangerous stigma By Stephen Bartlett stephen@denpubs.com

Robert Rennie, pictured, was found dead Sunday morning, Aug. 26. Police have ruled the death a homicide.

Salvation Army offering free training

CCC Budget

September 1, 2012

makes possible a coordinated response among government jurisdictions and non-profit agencies in an emergency. It covers the coordination of equipment, personnel, facilities and The classes are free and open to anyone who registers in advance. Materials will be both classes will be taught by certified instructor Ms. Leslie Vattimo, The Salvation Army’s Empire State Division Director of Disaster Services. Volunteers completing Introduction to Disaster Services and Incident Command System training then can become certified in Emergency Disaster Services and receive a Salvation Army photo ID, she said. “Last year ’s flooding from both the hurricane and tropical storm showed that upstate New York in not immune to disasters. The training offered in these courses enables participants to provide needed emergency assistance through The Salvation Army in his or her own community in the event of a disaster,” she said. Contact Envoys Frank or Belinda Smith at 5612951 to register for either or both of the courses. The Salvation Army is officially recognized by federal, state and local governments across the country as a sanctioned disaster relief and assistance organization. As a relief organization within the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NVOAD), The Salvation Army was involved in the development of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) recently released National response Framework.

PLATTSBURGH – Suicide. Just say it — suicide. The community needs to discuss mental illness and suicide, overcome the stigma, and empower people to reach out and to listen. “Suicide is a public health problem,” said Bonnie Black. “If it were any other illness, we would be out vaccinating people, but because it involves mental health, our society still carries a stigma.” Black spoke at a community dialogue on suicide at St. Joseph Church in Plattsburgh. “There is a sense of hopelessness and helplessness,” Black said. “A deep hole they feel they cannot get out of. “Yet people feel like if they don’t talk about mental illness it won’t exist.” Still, it does. In fact, one out of every four individuals suffer from mental illness, while one out of every six will be touched by suicide. A total of 36,909 suicide deaths were reported in the U.S. in 2009, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That made suicide the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. Nationwide, the suicide rate increased 2.4 percent over 2008, for a total of 12 suicides per 100,000 people. The rate of suicide has been increasing since 2000, and 2009 was the highest rate in 15 years. Every 14.2 minutes someone in the United States dies by suicide, while nearly 1 million people make a suicide attempt every year.

A total of 90 percent of people who die by suicide have a diagnosable and treatable psychiatric disorder at the time of their death. Men are nearly four times likely to die by suicide than women, yet woman attempt suicide three times as often as men. The highest rate of suicide in Clinton County is white males between the ages of 40 and 50. “Year to date, there have been 11 suicides so far in Clinton County,” said Sherri Gillette, director of the Community Services Board. “That is the highest in the last five or six years.” Clinton, Essex and Franklin counties have the second highest suicide rate per capita in New York state. “We deal with this on a daily basis,” Gillette said. Just the other day a girl posted on Facebook that she did not want to wake up in the morning. She had been extremely depressed. “We encourage anyone threatening harm to themselves to come into the clinic and be seen,” Gillette said. A man in the audience urged people never to assume suicide was an idle threat that will go away. His son made such a threat that he didn’t take in, and two days before Christmas in 2010 the young man took his own life. Debbie Jerdo told people they should go with their gut. She felt something was wrong and took her son, Joshua, to his primary care doctor. He was released, and 12 hours later completed suicide. “Joshua was a popular kid,” Jerdo said. “He was an A student and captain of the football team.

Suicide from page 1 She and her husband kicked the door in and found the young man dead, hanging by the closet door. Levandowski believes her son cried for help, but no one listened. “Take them serious if someone tells you they are planning suicide,” she said. “They might get mad at you, but they will be alive.” She doesn’t want to see another family experience such a loss. Suicide is a cry for help, she said, and there are always ways to get that individual help. “Nobody should have to go through this pain.” Angie LePage can relate to that pain all too well. “I lost my son, my precious son, to suicide.” She cannot recall any specific time he mentioned suicide, but if anyone is ever in that position, “don’t roll the dice,” she said. Her son, Michael, was struggling with alcohol and was facing his second DWI. “He was incredibly fearful with what would happen with him in the criminal justice system,” LePage said. “He got his second DWI, and in his mind he was done.” She recalls walking into the living room and glancing above the fireplace to see his picture face down. She asked him about it and Michael said that was how he wanted it.

John Gereau 22 Years Andy Flynn 20 Years

Where the locals go!

Shaun Kittle 3 Years Nancy Frasier 5 Years

Katherine Clark 1 Year

National Institute of Mental Health

Fri., Aug. 31 - Mon., Sept. 3, 2012

Research shows that risk factors for suicide include: Depression and other mental disorders, or a substance-abuse disorder (often in combination with other mental disorders). More than 90 percent of people who die by suicide have these risk factors: • prior suicide attempt • family history of mental disorder or substance abuse • family history of suicide • family violence, including physical or sexual abuse • firearms in the home, the method used in more than half of suicides • incarceration • exposure to the suicidal behavior of others, such as family members, peers, or media figures. • However, suicide and suicidal behavior are not normal responses to stress; many people have these risk factors, but are not suicidal. Research also shows that the risk for suicide is associated with changes in brain chemicals called neurotransmitters, including serotonin. Decreased levels of serotonin have been found in people with depression, impulsive disorders, and a history of suicide attempts, and in the brains of suicide victims.

“My Michael didn’t want to die,” LePage said. “He just didn’t know how to live.” Mary Gillen’s son didn’t exhibit any revealing behaviors. There was no warning, except possibly the time he gave away his prized possessions. Still, Gillen chalked it up to the young man preparing to leave for college. “You never know what is in someone’s head.” She urges families and the community to begin talking about suicide. If the conversation does not start, nothing will change, she said. “Talk about it so it is not that thing that is whispered about,” Gillen said. “You have to use the bad word, ‘suicide.’” Anytime someone throws around suicide threats, take that person seriously, she said. The individual might be angry, but tomorrow and beyond that person will be alive. “We have to make mental health issues acceptable,” Gillen said. “Be honest with people and quit dancing around it.”

2016: Obamas America (PG) 12:30PM • 2:40PM • 5:15PM 7:30PM • 9:40PM Hit and Run (R) 12:25PM • 2:40PM • 5:00PM 7:20PM • 9:40PM Hope Springs (PG13) 12:05PM • 2:25PM • 4:45PM 7:05PM • 9:25PM Ice Age: Continental Drift (2D) (PG) 12:30PM • 2:45PM Lawless (R) 12:40PM • 3:30PM • 7:00PM 9:35PM Paranorman (PG) 2:25PM • 9:30PM Paranorman (RealD 3D) (PG) 12:15PM • 4:40PM • 7:20PM Premium Rush (PG13) 12:45PM • 3:00PM • 5:05PM 7:25PM • 9:30PM The Bourne Legacy (PG13) 12:35PM • 3:25PM 7:15PM • 9:55PM The Campaign (R) 5:00PM • 7:35PM • 9:35PM The Dark Knight Rises (PG13) 8:00PM The Expendables 2 (R) 12:35PM • 2:55PM • 5:15PM 7:35PM • 9:50PM The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG) 12:20PM • 2:45PM • 5:10PM 7:30PM • 9:50PM The Oogleloves in the Big Balloon Adventure (G) 12:00PM • 2:00PM • 4:00PM 6:00PM The Possession (PG13) 12:50PM • 3:00PM • 5:10PM 7:25PM • 9:55PM

Church to hold rummage sale SARANAC — Saranac United Methodist Church Annual Fall Rummage Sale at the church on Route 3, Thursday, Sept. 13 through the 15. On Thursday Sept. 13, the rummage sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sept. 14 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. With half price with 25-cent bags starting at 4 p.m. and Sept. 15 from 9 to 10:30 a.m. with all items free. For more information call 293-8142.

31569

10 - www.the-burgh.com

Fred Herbst 36 Years Keith Lobdell 14 Years

Thom Randall 34 Years

Stephen Barlett 14 Years

For more than 60 years, our experienced team of local journalists have kept our Adirondack/North Country communities at the forefront of our reporting. And not just when the big story needs covering, but everyday news, sports and features of importance to you. While the larger, out-of-town news organizations pull back on coverage and reduce staff, our local, homegrown company and news team stands ready to provide you with timely news in-print, online at www.denpubs.com, through mobile devices, and on Facebook and Twitter. Oh, and did we mention we deliver it all to you FREE of charge? We’ll be here providing your news long after the others cut and run. The difference is simple —this is more than a business investment for us, this is our home!

149 Total Years of Professional Journalism Experience Under One Roof!

News

4 192

www.adirondackjournal.com

Enterprise

2012

www.newsenterprise.org

www.northcountryman.com YOUR NUMBER ONE SOURCE OF COMMUNITY NEWS, SERVING THE LAKE CHAMPLAIN & TRI-LAKES REGION

VALLEY Y 1948

www.timesofti.com

2011

www.thevalleynews.org

73309

www.the-burgh.com

NEWS N


12 - www.the-burgh.com

September 1, 2012

Blue-green algae discovered in Rouses Point By Stephen Bartlett

stephen@denpubs.com ROUSES POINT – A blue-green algae bloom in Rouses Point had little impact, village officials said. They’ve asked the public to stay away from the area in Lake Champlain behind the Rouses Point Village Office. But they say the toxic bloom does not impact the village’s water supply. “I believe when the lake comes back up, the stuff will wash away,” said Mayor Francis “Bumper” Baker. “It is uncommon in that area.” The spot in Lake Champlain behind the Rouses Point Village Office is not one where people typically swim or play in, though there were some individuals there recently. “We had a few kids that went there and we asked them to leave,” Baker said. Rouses Point draws water for its public system from the lake and cannot use its secondary intake, located in that area, while the bloom is there. But there is no problem with the main intake. “We have a main water intake that goes way out 1,800 feet,” Baker said. “So we are fine.

“It just doesn’t have much of an impact,” he continued. “It is just a little bit on the stagnant side.” But Baker did want villagers to know that algae blooms can cause health issues. Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, is a phylum of bacteria that obtains energy through photosynthesis. It is best known for the extensive and highly visible blooms that can form in freshwater and the marine environment, giving off the appearance of blue-green pain or scum. There is evidence of it living up to 3.5 billion years ago. Blue-green algae produces toxins that can be dangerous to humans and other animals and marine life. Recent studies suggest that significant exposure to high levels of blue-green algae toxins can cause Lou Gehrig’s Disease. There are no documented cases of human illness related to blue-green algae in Lake Champlain. But if animals ingest the toxin, they can be quickly paralyzed and die. During the summers of 1999 and 2000, two dogs died from blue-green algae poisoning on Point Au Roche in the Town of Beekmantown. Two beaches in Essex County were shut down earlier this summer due to blue-green

algae. Blue-green algae toxins have been detected at many locations in Lake Champlain, though the highest concentrations of toxins are often found in blooms and shoreline scums. These accumulations pose the greatest potential health risks.

Baker said the blue-green algae was only found in that one small area behind the building. “It is not on the whole lake shore,” he said. “They haven’t said a word on how long this will take.”

Sean Carlin, Clark Forster and Travis James of Clinton Masonic Charities, a non-profit group, recently volunteered their time to work on the Strand Theatre in Plattsburgh. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

Scuba diving is safe, fun and easier than you think.

Don’t miss the adventure under the lake! Two full dive centers right on the lake. Easily accessible by land or water!

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Taste of Home Cooking School will be holding a cooking school November 3rd at the Crete Civic Center. We have limited booth space available for the show. Booths open 3 hours before show time and you can show and or sell your goods or products to over 1,500 eager shoppers. Contact us to see how you can get in on the many different opportunities for this show. 31686

518-873-6368 ext. 108

Call us for details and informational flyer.

31796

31602


September 1, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 13

With that thought in mind, think about how many more people you could attract to your business or event if your local newspaper made 5 TIMES MORE deliveries in your immediate area. The zip code comparison below shows the number of subscribers the Press Republican delivers to according to their most recent ABC Audit dated 12/31/2010 compared to the weekly postal deliveries made by Denton Publications, according to their most recent CVC Audited Statement dated 9/30/2011.

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COMPARISON PRESS REPUBLICAN CURRENT ABC AUDITED

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ZIP TOWN Denton n S P o ti S y a U a c DAILY d li ub Sun P Sunday d 1 2958 Mooers Delivere rise rp Home te Home n s-E 1 USPS 2 w d 9 e 5 re N 9 e se Press R Mooers Delivere Deliv 169 nterpri e Denton -E F p DAILY s o 1 u d Delivered rk 2 b w 9 li e s can 60 M N e 0 s P ri re o rp ss Rep Publica riah 233 290 TOWN s-Ente 12961 ublican tion lican w b e u N p e 9 0 IP Press R 82 Moriah Z 154 275 Press R North C epublic n of Ti Center 12962 ountrym an Times publica e 5 0 a P 6 R M 0 re rv s o e s 5 s rr i s Repu an isonville 90 37 Pre North C Min of T an 12964 blican ountrym Times 12851 epublic 213 0 mb Press R New R an 0 1,020 Press R Times o Newco ussia epublic an s of Ti 1 c e 2 li 9 b im 7 le u a f T il 0 p n T v 12852 e 1 132 i d Press R Paul Sm 796 ress R 104 f Ti Times o Olmste epublic ith 12972 tion P imes o ublican an f Ti 2,438 12857 0 Press R Peru am Sta ss Rep 39 T tn h re ,4 u 0 P T 2 P rg e n h u p a e 1 u B c Burgh 2973 blican The 12861 epubli 66 Press R n Lake Piercefi 223 0 Valley N Press R 15,170 Schroo rgh epublic eld an 12974 an ews The Bu 12870 27 ce epublic 17 ,1 P n P R 6 4 re o ra s rt s e s s 13 s v Henry 838 w 8 Republi Valley N Pre Se 12975 lley Ne blican can a a u e V g p 2 4 ws 12872 e 7 ,6 ro P P R e 2 3 re o d 9 Th rt Kent ss Rep 0 1,024 Press Ticon News e Burgh an 12976 ublican Valley 12883 129 epublic 49 Press R urgh man Rainbo R 2 y b s s tr 7 s tt n 2 14 re u la 5 Valley N o P w Lake 6 P epublic 12977 ublican an ews n North C 12901 775 0 Press R Raybro ss Rep ntryma 35 1,007 Times o ok PARC epublic 12979 s Pre rth Cou blican rk o u a f Ti o n N p n 4 F a 12903 19 e 9 P R m R le 5 2 ress Re y ouses P 7 tr ab ss n S 10 re u u 0 1, V o P A a n publica lley Ne a oint 12981 North C n ws 12912 125 epublic Press R Sarana 367 ingdale 0 1,160 Valley N c f Ti Press R epublic Bloom 12983 imes o ublican a ews n T n p 4 a 12913 17 e 3 P le S m R 8 3 il re a y v s ranac L ss Rep tr y 2 s n d 3 4 re u a 8 9 V o P 5 C a n C ll a a 1 u ey New ke 2985 blican North 1,204 12918 epublic Press R s lain 84 Schuyle 295 631 North C Press R epublic Champ r Falls n News 12986 ountrym an Valley publica 6 12919 9 e P 6 T 15 R re u 0 p y s s z s p s 5 s a an er Lake 0 9 w re R h 7 N 3 e P e C o n p N rt a 1 u y c h 2 b 1 987 U lican Countr Valle 2,625 1292 epubli Press R Point 156 yman pper Ja 86 400 Valley N Press R epublic Crown News y an 12989 y c 8 e li 2 ll b 9 a a u e 2 ra V n p w 4 1 e Press R 90 s Vermon 63 mo 60 125 The Bu Press R epublic Danne tville News 12992 rgh wn an ublican Valley 2,578 12929 0 Press R West C s ss Rep 2 abethto 3 z w re 0 li 6 V e e P h E a n p a N ll a 1 u z e y 2993 blican y News Valley 140 12932 epublic Press R Westpo 80 27 338 Valley N epublic Press R Essex rt n News 12996 an ews Valley publica 4 12936 3 e P 3 W 2 R 0 ls re e il s s ls ri s s s 4 5 boro Republi w 17 63 Valley N Pre Gab 12997 lley Ne can blican a e u 2 V ws p 12939 ,0 6 e P W 2 7 R re 0 ilmingto ss Rep 160 North C 1,665 Press Jay News 12998 ublican an n ountrym Valley 869 12941 epublic Press R 95 W R 4 it e s h n 4 s s an 2 e e 3 w rb 4 re e 3 Valley N epublic 6 P K ee* Ne an ews ublican ey 1,040 Valley 12942 Press R 0 Misc Z ne Vall s ss Rep 57 e 3 ,1 w re e V 7 ip e 2 e P a K s p n ll N u e a y b c y News lican Valle 585 12943 epubli Press R ille 136 37 Valley N 354 epublic Press R Keesev n of Ti an ews Times r publica a 12944 6 e 6 le R C s 0 s e 0 14 Times o 0 1,0 Pre Lak blican f Ti u 4 id p ,3 12945 c 2 e 0 11 la R 8 P 11,687 NE/TT Press Lake an 12946 epublic Compiled from Press Republican ABC Audited Publisher’s Press R Lewis 0 5 9 Statement 12/13/2010. Denton Publications CVC Audited 12 le Statement 09/30/11. Press Republican Sunday home Minevil 12956 delivery & mail. Denton Publications Free Community

PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT

VS. DENTON

PUBLICATIONS CURRENT CVC AUDITED STATEMENT

60,844!

Newspapers Delivered via USPS Thursday & Friday.

homes and business locations in your immediate market could significantly impact your results. Compare the zip codes most important to your event or business and see if adding that Denton publication to your media mix makes sense for your efforts. Call our office today and schedule an appointment to learn about your locally owned community publications and web sites.

73310

The above comparison only shows subscribers to the Press Republican and postal deliveries made by Denton Publications in the same zip codes. Newsstand sales and bulk drop distribution is not represented. Doing so would not substantially alter the differential.

Just like in golf you wouldn’t want to play the same course every time, so we are not suggesting you not place information in the Press Republican, it plays a valuable communication role in our region. We do think however, it’s important that you understand the significant differences between our delivered quantity in comparison to theirs and recognize that missing 49,157


14 - www.the-burgh.com • Sports

September 1, 2012

Denpubs Sports Phelan brings to SLCS what other teams lack - quarterback experience By Keith Lobdell

ence back.” Bennett said that he knows that there are still holes to fill, and the team will look to do so early in the season. “We are going to struggle early with ine x p e r i e n c e , ” h e s a i d . “ We h a v e h a d a tremendous preseason so far and we are committed to having a great year.”

keith@denpubs.com SARANAC LAKE — It’s the key position on the offensive side of the football n o m a t t e r i f y o u r s t y l e i s g ro u n d - a n d pound or run-and-gun. F o r a q u a r t e r b a c k , t h e re i s n o b e t t e r t e a c h e r t h a n t h e e x p e r i e n c e o f a re a l g a m e , w i t h re a l d e f e n s e a n d re a l p a s s ru s h e r s l o o k i n g t o t h ro w t h e m t o t h e ground. In the Champlain Valley Athletic Conference, only the Saranac Lake Red Storm will be returning a quarterback with a full season under center in senior signalcaller Matt Phelan. “Matt’s experience and ability to control the team are going to be a big advantage for us,” Red Storm head coach Eric Bennett said. “He has a coolness of character on the field and he has worked hard over the summer. He is prepared for the season and excited to compete.” P h e l a n w a s a d u a l t h re a t i n t h e R e d Storm’s no-huddle, fast-breaking offensive attack last season, leading the team to the then combined Section VII/X Class C title. Phelan threw for 1,441 yards and

Matt Phelan, left, looks on as Saranac Lake head coach Eric Bennett talks to the team during preseason workouts. Phelan is the only returning quarterback in the CVAC who started all 10 games under center for his team in 2011, experience the Red Storm hope will be crucial as they seek to defend their Section VII/Class C title. Photo by Keith Lobdell

20 touchdowns in his junior season, the first as starter for the Red Storm, while rushing for 834 yards and 12 more touchdowns. “Having started 10 games for us, he knows what to look for and how to get guys to where they need to be,” Bennett said. “ H e k n o w s t h e o ff e n s e , and it is like having a coach on the field.” For all that he did learn a s t h e s t a r t e r i n 2 0 11 , Phelan said that there are still things he is working on. “I still have a lot to learn, but I know what to expect from the coaches and what they expect from me,” Phelan said. “I am used to a lot of thins n o w t h a t a re g o i n g t o happen during the As a junior, Matt Phelan threw for 1,441 yards and 20 touchdowns while games, and I hope that I running for 834 yards and 12 scores. can learn from them.”

The Sched Friday, Aug. 31 Football Saranac at AuSable Valley, 7:30 p.m. Plattsburgh at Moriah, 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, Sept. 1 Football Saranac Lake at Peru, 1:30 p.m. Denpubs Game of the Week: The defending Class C champion Red Storm travel to take on the defending Class B champion Indians. Ticonderoga at Beekmantown, 1:30 p.m.

Thursday, Sept. 6 Girls Soccer Saranac Lake at Beekmantown, 4:30 p.m. Ticonderoga at Northern Adirondack, 4:30 p.m. Westport at Schroon Lake, 4:30 p.m. Moriah at Chazy, 5:30 p.m. Northeastern Clinton at Saranac, 6:30 p.m. AuSable Valley at Plattsburgh High, 6:30 p.m.

Cross Country AuSable Valley, Lake Placid and Seton at PHS Peru and Ticonderoga at Northeastern Clinton Beekmantown and Saranac Lake at Saranac

Friday, Sept. 7 Football AuSable Valley at Plattsburgh High, 7:30 p.m. Peru at Ticonderoga, 7:30 p.m.

Boys Soccer Beekmantown at Saranac Lake, 4:30 p.m. Willsboro at Seton Catholic, 4:30 p.m. Elizabethtown-Lewis at Lake Placid, 4:30 p.m. Northern Adirondack at Westport, 4:30 p.m. Saranac at Northeastern Clinton, 6:30 p.m. Plattsburgh at AuSable Valley, 6:30 p.m.

Volleyball AuSable Valley at Northern Adirondack, 4:30 p.m. Plattsburgh High at Northeastern Clinton, 4:30 p.m. Lake Placid at Beekmantown, 4:30 p.m. Saranac Lake at Saranac, 4:30 p.m.

Saranac Lake returns an experienced offensive line to help protect Phelan and make holes for the runWhile Phelan will be looking at a maning game. jority of new weapons at the skill positions (Mike Burpoe and S e t h P i c k re i g n a re t h e s o l e b a c k f i e l d re t u r n i n g players), there is a wealth of experience in the front seven. “It helps me out more with the line all having experience because I k n o w w h a t t h e y a re g o ing to do and they know my style,” Phelan said. “I w i l l h a v e a l i t t l e m o re t i m e t o t h ro w a n d t h e y can create some big holes when we run it.” “We have three starters that are returning to the o ff e n s i v e l i n e a n d t w o players that had significant playing time last year, so we have an exper i e n c e g ro u p , ” B e n n e t t s a i d . “ T h a t i s a l w a y s a Michael Burpoe will be a key member of the Saranac Lake backfield this key to have that experi- season as an experienced target for Phelan in the offense.

Broadwell No. 2 man on state athletic association W I L L S B O R O — T h e N e w Yo r k S t a t e Public High School Athletic Association has announced the appointment of Eileen Troy as the Association’s 46th President. Wi l l s b o ro S u p e r i n t e n d e n t S t e v e B ro a d well was also approved to move up to the First Vice President position and Jim Osborne was approved as the newest officer, Second Vice President. Broadwell has already served the Association in several capacities including ten years as a Central Committee representative as well as the Championship Advisory Committee (1997-99), Handbook Committee, Policy and Structure Committee, and Championship Philosophy Committee. Prior to his tenure at Willsboro starting in 2005, Broadwell was High School P r i n c i p a l a t P e ru C e n t r a l S c h o o l f ro m 1999-2005 following District Director of

Health, Physical Education and Athletics positions at Beekmantown (1993-99) and Susquehanna (1990-93). In Section VII, he served a term as the Athletic Council President and MVAC Exe c u t i v e D i re c t o r, b o t h f ro m 2 0 0 8 - 1 0 . B ro a d w e l l h a s b e e n h o n o re d s e v e r a l times for his service in high school athletics including the 1999 NYSAAA Chapter Award, the Physical Education Directors Zone Award (1992), and the NYS Distinguished Service Award (2003). Following his graduation from SUNY Cortland where he earned a bachelors degree, Broadwell earned a Masters in Education in 1989 from SUNY Oneonta. He has been married to his wife Susan for 27 years and the couple have two children, Kelly and Timothy. Broadwell

Fall Sports Preview coming! The 2012 Fall Sports Preview for the Valley News, North Countryman and The Burgh will be part of the Saturday, Sept. 8 edition of the paper. This will feature schedules, rosters and team previews from each of the 16 North Country schools in the Denpubs Sports coverage area that will be competing in football, soccer, cross country, volleyball, girls swimming and gymnastics.


September 1, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 15

OBITUARIES Autumn on the rise: Time for fur, fins and feathers

Sporting Traditions

In the Adirondacks, fishermen and women qualify for an Angler ’s Grand

Slam by catching at least three different species, or taking three fish of a singular species in a single day. According to the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) a saltwater Grand Slam is achieved when an angler lands a bonefish, tarpon and a permit during one day of fishing. An Inshore Grand Slam includes three species on the same day, including bonefish, tarpon, permit or snook. A freshwater, Grand Slam may include any combination of three distinct species such as bass, pike or trout in a single day’s outing. The achievement can also be ‘species specific’ with the combination of any three single species, whether brook, rainbow, brown, lake, splake, or tiger trout. A Super Grand Slam, also known as an Adirondack Five Star requires five of the same species such as a brook, brown, rainbow, lake and a splake to be taken in a single day. Similarly, a Super Grand Slam could be accomplished by combining five different game fish species including a Northern pike, walleye pike, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass and a lake trout or landlocked salmon. Any combination of warmwater or coldwater gamefish species is considered acceptable.

The Real Mcnab: Rod, Rifle and Gun

Once every four or five years, New York State’s sporting calendar provides sportsmen and women with a unique opportunity when the bird hunting, deer hunting and fishing seasons all overlap. The timeframe when these concurrent seasons occur is usually of a short duration, however it provides Adirondack sporting enthusiasts with an opportunity to pursue a unique American version of a fabled Scottish sporting accomplishment, known as a Macnab. A Macnab is a sporting challenge similar to an angler ’s ‘Grand Slam’, however, it is compounded by a combination of angling, stalk hunting and wing shooting required in the effort. To accomplish a pure Macnab, it helps to have a good friend with a large estate in Scotland, or a lot of money.

Opportunities to accomplish an Adirondack version of The Macnab are limited to three days Oct. 13 through 15. The effort will require catching a brook trout on the fly, harvesting a whitetail buck with a muzzleloader and taking a pair of ruffed grouse on the wing in a single day. Currently, Highland Lodges in Scotland offers a MacNab Challenge hosted at the Aberchalder Estate near Invergarry in the West of Scotland for roughly $2500 per person. Meals, lodging, transportation, gratuities, trophy fees and airfare are all extra. A New York state Sportsman’s license costs $47, and it entitles the holder to take fish, fowl and game. Typically, the day begins at dawn on the River Garry where an experienced Ghillie assists attempts to catch a salmon on the fly. Anglers are later whisked off to heather covered mountains to stalk a Red Deer Stag and the day is completed after shooting a brace of grouse on the wing. It is conducted under the guidance and advice of experienced Ghillies, Stag Stalkers and Gamekeepers. Fees include all licenses and permits. Rods, reels, flies, waders, rifles, shotguns and ammunition are all extra. In the Adirondacks, the annual trout season concludes on Oct. 15, and the Muzzleloader Season for Whitetail Deer begins on Oct. 13. Ruffed Grouse season opens on Sept. 20 and runs through Feb. 28, 2013. For the current year, opportunities to accomplish an Adirondack version of The Macnab are limited to just three days, from Oct. 13 through 15. The effort will require catching a brook trout on the fly, harvesting a whitetail buck with a muzzleloader and taking a pair of ruffed grouse on the wing in a single day. Good luck, and take plenty of pictures! Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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ccording to the most reliable reports, angling opportunities on most local lakes and ponds has slowed down significantly in recent weeks. Overall, it has been a very slow season, even for anglers with the expertise to fish in deeper waters. Anglers can only hope for cooler air temperatures and cold rains to help salvage what has been largely, a dismal fishing season. Although I’ve seen a few nice specimens, and heard tales of a few others, ‘few’ seems to be the most commonly used term. Many anglers have asked if the lack of finding active fish was just an oddity? I’m sorry to report that this season’s distinct lack of action appears to be a consistent trend for most fish species including trout, bass and walleye. Lake trout and salmon, which tend to inhabit the deeper, cooler waters were taken a bit more readily by those who prefer to plumb the depths with downriggers and wire or leadcore lines. It is open to debate whether the poor fishing can be attributed to the scouring effects that occurred on local waterways during last year ’s extreme water levels, or to the diminished oxygen content resulting from the season’s usually warm waters. While I have enjoyed a couple of days of consistently good fishing this season, the feeding has been largely sporadic, if at all. Fortunately, there is already the hint of autumn in the air, and the hardwoods have begun taking on their fall colors. Hopefully, the subtle seasonal changes will prompt a feeding streak that’ll last through the end of trout season. As September rolls around, so do many other sporting opportunities, with birds again available on the wing, and turkeys in fields. Big game hunters have been counting down the days to the start of Early Bear Season, as archers await the beginning of Bow Season for whitetail deer. Traditional hunting opportunities will mix easily with the tail end of trout season, and the beginning of the annual salmon spawn runs. With such a wealth of outdoor opportunities, it is easy to understand why autumn is considered the High Holy Days of Sportsmen.

GRACE MARIE MARTIN JAN 26, 1918 - AUG 24, 2012 Willsboro, NY grandchildren. Grace Marie Martin, 94, of She was predeceased by 2 Willsboro, NY died at CVPH daughters-in-law Kay Martin Medical Center Friday, 8/ and Kathy Procter and her 24/12. She was born in sisters and brothers, Mabel Willsboro 1/26/18 the Denett, Stella Greenwood, daughter of John and Sarah Hazel Costin, Edna Young, Jane(Jennie) (Fuller) Frenier. Eldrick Frenier, William FreGrace was a very active nier, Edward Frenier, Mary Member of the St. Philip's Frenier, Alma Frenier, and Church Altar Rosary Society Lena Frenier. and the Willsboro-Essex SeCalling hours will be held on nior Center where she spent Monday 8/27/12 from 2many happy hours with her 4PM and 7-9PM at Huestis friends. Funeral Home in Willsboro, Mrs. Martin is survived by NY. A Funeral Mass will be her children Robert Martin of held Tuesday 8/28/12, Watertown, NY, Allan and 10AM at St. Philip's of Jesus Linda Martin of Church, Main St. Willsboro, Lawrenceville, GA, Carol with Fr. John Demo officiatand Michael King of Peru, ing. Burial will follow in CalNY, Duane and Barbara Marvary Cemetery, Essex Rd., tin of Poland, ME, Sharon Willsboro. In lieu of flowers, Martin of Lyon Mountain, donations in her memory NY, and Grant Procter of may be made to the WillsApache Jct., AZ, 16 grandboro Rescue Squad. children and numerous great RICHARD SHEPARD CURRAN SEP 20, 1936 - AUG 23, 2012 Willsboro, ing events where poppy was Richard Shepard Curran, 75, their number one died unexpectedly at his fan and most vocal supporthome in Willsboro Thursday, er. Aug. 23, 2012 with his He is survived by his wife of wife Alberta by 57 years, Alberta his side. He was (Hathaway)Curborn Sept. 20, ran of Willsboro, 1936 in Plattsfour daughters, burgh NY the Joanne son of John and and Gib Belzile Bertha of Willsboro, (Shepard) CurKim and Ken ran. Godfrey of Mr. Curran atMiffinburg, PA., tended Willsboro Yvonne and Central School, Ronnie Bruno of and proudly enWillsboro, Marilisted in the military on his lyn Strong and companion 17th birthday, Allen Alterie of Willsboro, serving in Japan from 1953 his grandchildren Jacqueline 1956. On April 16, 1955 he Benway, Christopher (Cormarried his sweetheart, Alrine) Provost, Jessie Benway berta Hathaway in and fianc'e Jason Morgan, Delmar, NY. He and Alberta Teri Provost and fianc'e raised four daughters togethJason Soucy, Kami Benway, er in Willsboro. In his later Ryan and Renee Bruno, Luyears he was also a cas Strong and fianc'e Ali caregiver for his mother who Bridge, Tayler Strong, was ill with Alzheimer's disgreat grandchildren, Chrysease. tan, Caetlyn and Conor Richard was employed for Provost, Ava Soucy, Aidan many years as a truck driver Gagnier, Bradie and Raegan for Joe Frank Construction in Hommes, Miles Henry MacKeeseville, and later Dougal, a sister Helen worked for Norco Concrete, (Stephen) Puzier, brother in retiring in 1996. He was a laws, Vaughn and Hilda member of the Teamsters Hathaway, Robert and Peggy Union 687. He was an Hathaway, Bradley and Linoriginal founding of Uncle da Hathaway, sister in laws, Jake's Hunting Lodge in Marjorie Curran, Keene and spent many great Ethel Hathaway, Mary Hathseasons hiking Giant away and several nieces and Mtn. He had a great love for nephews. He was predethe outdoors and usually ceased by his parents, could be seen walking in the one sister Marilyn Egglefield, early morning hours. two brothers Roderick and Although for many years an Bruce Curran and his son in avid hunter, he gained his law Stephen Strong. greatest pleasure in watching "Poppy, we are your legacy. the deer in Thank you for all of your neighboring fields of Reber. love and guidance." Richard was very proud of Calling hours will be held his family and home. He was Sunday August 25th from especially proud of the natu12:30 to 2:00PM at the United ral spring fed pond Methodist Church in behind his home. He spent Reber, with a memorial sermany hours maintaining and vice at 2PM. grooming the pond to attract Donations in Richards memwildlife such as ory may be made in lieu of heron, ducks, and geese that flowers to Disabled Amerimade it their home over the can Veterans, years. He wanted "The Pond" PO Box 14301, Cincinnati, to be a place his OH 45250-0301 or to the St grandchildren could continJudes Children's Hospital, ue to enjoy it years to come, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, observing and learning. TN. To say that our Poppy was 38105 proud of his family would be W.M.Marvin's Sons funeral an understatement. His home in Elizabethtown has greatest happiness came been entrusted with the arfrom family gatherings, rangements. teaching his grandchildren to For online condolences fish, bonfires and skating please visit parties on the pond, www.wmmarvins.com camping trips and attending all the grandchildren's sport-


16 - www.the-burgh.com

September 1, 2012

Friday, Sept. 7

BATTLE COMMEMORATION. Battle of Plattsburgh Commemoration, Downtown, all day, www.champlain1812.com.

Saturday, Sept. 8

BLIND OWL BAND TO PERFORM. Monopole, 7 Protection Ave., 9 p.m. 563-2222.

Friday,August 31

SENIOR FITNESS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 8:15 a.m. 563-6186, ext. 102. SENIOR ZUMBA. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9:30 a.m. 563-6186, ext. 102. INTRO TO ACCESS CLASS. Intro to Microsoft Access III class, Plattsburgh City Library, 19 Oak Street, 10-11 a.m. MAH JONGG CLASS. Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., Noon. 563-6186, ext. 102. EXCEL BUDGET CLASS. Completing a budget with Excel class, Plattsburgh City Library, 19 Oak Street, 1-2 p.m. WORD MERGE CLASS. Learning tables and mail merge with Microsoft Word class, Plattsburgh City Library, 19 Oak Street, 3-4 p.m. GARY PEACOCK TUNES AND TRIVIA. Monopole, 7 Protection Ave., 4-7 p.m. 5632222. HOOPING CLASS. Trinity Park., 6-7:30 p.m. $3. plattsburghooping@gmail.com EAT SLEEP FUNK TO PERFORM. Monopole, 7 Protection Ave., 9 p.m. 563-2222.

Saturday, Sept.1

CHILDRENS OPEN PLAY. Imaginarium Children's Museum, 4709 Route 9, 9a.m.noon. $3 per person, children under 2 free. 324-7426. LIFE DRAWING CLASS. North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. EDUCATION REFORM TO PERFORM. ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 7 p.m. $3$10. CHAMPIONSHIP NIGHT AT AIRBORNE. Championship Night-Modifieds Modifieds-50 lap special, Airborne Park Speedway, 70 Broderick Road, 6 p.m. www.airborneparkspeedway.com.

Sunday, Sept. 2

LIGHTHOUSE KAYAK TOURS. Bluff Point Lighthouse Tours to Valcour Island, begin at Kayak Shack, 1 p.m.-3 p.m. $35 includes kayak and gear.

Monday, Sept. 3

CHILDRENS OPEN PLAY. Imaginarium Children's Museum, 4709 Route 9, 10 a.m.2 p.m. $3 per person, children under 2 free. 324-7426.

Tuesday, Sept. 4

SUNRISE ROTARY. American Legion post 20, 162 Quarry Road, 7:20 a.m. PARENTS SUPPORT GROUP. Parents anonymous support groups, Child Care Coordinating Council, 194 US Oval, 5-6:30 p.m.

Wednesday,Sept. 5

HATHA YOGA. North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 9-10:15 a.m. ROTARY CLUB MEETING. American Legion post 20, 162 Quarry Road, noon. OVEREATERS SUPPORT GROUP. Auditorium A, CVPH Medical Center, 75 Beekman St. 7-8 p.m. PULIZER PRIZE WINNER TO SPEAK. Pulitzer Prize wining author Alan Taylor to speak about: Battle of Plattsburgh, SUNY Plattsburgh's Giltz Auditorium, 101 Broad St. 8 p.m. 473-7105.

Thursday, Sept. 6

PORTRAIT CLASS. North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $10 or $5 for members. PARENTS SUPPORT GROUP. Parents anonymous support groups, Child Care Coordinating Council, 194 US Oval, 10-11:30 a.m.

CHILDRENS OPEN PLAY. Imaginarium Children's Museum, 4709 Route 9, 9a.m.noon. $3 per person, children under 2 free. 324-7426. LIFE DRAWING CLASS. North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. FALL FEST. Gilligans Getaway, 7160 State Route 9, 12:30 p.m.- 2 a.m. $30-$50. MILITARY APPRECIATION DAY. Plattsburgh Military Appreciation Day, Crete Memorial Civic Center, 41 City Hall Place, 9a.m.-2 p.m.

Monday, Sept. 10

CHILDRENS OPEN PLAY. Imaginarium Children's Museum, 4709 Route 9, 10 a.m.2 p.m. $3 per person, children under 2 free. 324-7426.

Tuesday, Sept. 11

SUNRISE ROTARY. American Legion post 20, 162 Quarry Road, 7:20 a.m. PARENTS SUPPORT GROUP. Parents anonymous support groups, Child Care Coordinating Council, 194 US Oval, 5-6:30 p.m.

Wednesday,Sept. 12

ROTARY MEETING TO BE HELD. American Legion Post 20, 162 Quarry Road, noon. JOB FAIR. West Side Ballroom, 4-8 p.m. 563-1000, 253 New York Road, www.northcountrychamber.com. OVEREATERS SUPPORT GROUP. Auditorium A, CVPH Medical Center, 75 Beekman St. 7-8 p.m.

Thursday, Sept. 13

PARENTS SUPPORT GROUP. Parents anonymous support groups, Child Care Coordinating Council, 194 US Oval, 10-11:30 a.m.

Saturday,Sept. 15

AUTUMN FESTIVAL. United Methodist Church, 127 Beekman St. Festival: 10 a.m.2 p.m. Chicken BBQ 4-7 p.m. 420-6393. CHILDRENS OPEN PLAY. Imaginarium Children's Museum, 4709 Route 9, 9a.m.noon. $3 per person, children under 2 free. 324-7426.

PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE

I’M GOING FIRST! By James Sajdak ACROSS 1 Swiss capital 6 Brand on shells 10 Fictional writer of “The World According to Bensenhaver” 16 Union contract stat 19 Outcast 20 Love god 21 Fruit finder of rhyme 22 Leia’s love 23 #1 on a motivational speaker’s reminder list? 26 Kawasaki Brute Force, e.g., briefly 27 Place to recover, for short 28 Many look forward to them regularly 29 Pearly coating 31 Disreputable 34 Ancient knowledge 35 Creator 36 Scrooge portrayer Alastair 39 Fair 40 Device for the Six Million Dollar Man? 42 Start of a pregame ritual 44 Architect Mies van der __ 46 Former Wrigley Field star 47 Early problem for the Wright brothers? 54 Half of Mork’s sign-off 58 Costly, as a victory 59 “Almost done” 60 “Let __!”: “Get going!” 61 “Son of Frankenstein” blacksmith 63 Battle of Normandy city 64 French cathedral city 65 Casper in the courtroom? 70 Largish jazz ensemble

72 73 74 75 78 83 84 86 88 89 90 97 100 101 102 103 105 106 108 112 113 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

List Genesis creator Makeup item Rough up? Feelings Addams family spouse, affectionately Hinted about a player swap? Paris possessive Disney president during the Pixar acquisition Vaccine type European capital influence? Ewes’ guys Global financial org. Rush violently Former Israeli prime minister Olmert Brahms work “Wicked Game” singer Chris Dreamt things Throat WWII Sherman carrier Say “Smile!” to Hugh Jackman during dinner? Prussian pronoun Less complex Half a menu combo Tropical plant with large foliage Media mogul Turner They may be crossed Homeric creation Chaos antithesis DOWN Resell in a week, say San __: jet set resort They’re on the phone “Darn!” Emeril specialty Hi-__ monitor Trajectory Inane

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 24 25 30 32 33 35 36 37 38 40 41 43 45 48 49 50 51 52 53 55 56 57 60 62 64 65 66 67 68 69

Natl. Guard counterpart Investor’s index Like a June day, to Lowell Aging, in Ontario Lee and Landers __ center Union contracts? Ballroom dance Artist’s support Turn upside down Eyewear, in ads Dough for spanakopita, perhaps Sunken naval power, per Plato Jam fruit Get close, in a way Taiwan Strait port Bisque or broth Car trip alternative to Geography Bryn __ College One doing hard labor Analogy words “Babi __”: Yevtushenko poem Aetna offering, briefly Sounds mostly the same Try to unearth Snarky reply to “Why?” Bold relative: Abbr. Eponymous theater mogul Fire, to 85-Down Warrior god “Little Birds” writer “We <Heart> Logistics” co. “Let me rephrase that ...” Swab over Beef cattle They cause stirs on 10Down: Abbr. Northern Calif. landmark Factual Calvary letters 1943 Allied conference site

70 71 75 76 77 79 80 81 82 84 85

NCO with three chevrons Actor Wallach CDLI doubled Polish writing Winter quaff Zagreb’s land, to the IOC Dancer-turned-spy Deli wheel Note recipient? “__ you big-time” First-century emperor

87 1920s Hollywood breakthrough 90 “__ I alone did call upon thy aid”: Sonnet 79 91 Tasmanian, e.g. 92 Not for kids 93 “Out of Africa,” for one 94 Gradually eased (in) 95 Boring tools 96 Half of a major scale 98 Star seekers

99 103 104 106 107 109 110 111 114 115 116

Plaster finish Maple product Rite place __ facto Stood Swedish university city Bird that fishes Eye dropper? Gaping hole Jackie’s second Rank below cpl.

This Month in History - SEPTEMBER 1st - “Mary Had a Little Lamb” was published. (1830) 3rd - The image of “Uncle Sam”, a symobl of America, was first used. (1813) 4th - Ten year old Barney Flaherty becomes the first Newspaper Carrier. (1833) 6th - Cal Ripken Jr. broke Lou Gehrig’s baseball iron man record by playing in his 2,131st game.(1995)

SOLUTIONS TO LAST WEEK ’ S PUZZLES !

(Answers Next Week)


September 1, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 17

Appliances pp

For Sale Legals General Financial Services Garage g Sales

Equipment q p

Real Estate Automotive Apartments p For Rent Wanted

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Help Wanted

Sell it local or sell it regionally! Call 1-800-989-4237 x201 today! or visit our self-service site at www.theclassifiedsuperstore.com APPLIANCE

APARTMENT

BLOWN HEAD GASKET? ANY vehicle repair yourself. State of the art 2-Component chemical process. Specializing in Cadillac Northstar Overheating. 100% guaranteed. 1-866-780-9041 www.RXHP.com

APARTMENT AVAILABLE Keene Valley Horse Farm Large living room with mountain view and sleeping alcove, also separate bedroom. Full kitchen and bathroom with washer dryer. All utilities included. $775 per month. 518.576.4423

100%WOOD HEAT no worries. Keep your family safe and warm with an OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE from Central Boiler. Adirondack Hardware Company 518-834-9790 FOR SALE, 9 light Steel Entrance Door w/ Storm door. $50 for both OBO call 518-643-9391 HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED Contact Woodford Bros. Inc. for straightening, leveling and foundation repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN / www.woodfordbros.com QUALITY, DURABLE AND AFFORDABLE COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS. Free on-site consultation. Call CB Structures 1-800-9400192 or www.cbstructuresinc.com

INSURANCE LIFE INSURANCE, EASY TO QUALIFY, NO MEDICAL EXAMS. Purchase through 86.Fast acceptances. 1-800-938-3439, x24; 1516-938-3439, x24

LOGGING LAVALLEE LOGGING is looking to harvest and purchase standing timber, primarily Spruce & White Pine Willing to pay New York State stumpage prices on all species. References available. Matt Lavallee, 518-6456351

ELIZABETHTOWN 2- 2 bedroom Apartments for rent, newly remodeled, with decks & pond, heat & hot water included. No pets or smoking. Available September 1st., $800/mo., Plus 1 month security. 518-873-9538 or 518-873-6573 SCHROON LAKE 2 bdrm 1st. floor Apt. in country home, $600/ mo., includes electric, W/D hookup, suitable for 2, non smoking, no pets, sec.& ref. required. 518265-9875 WESTPORT SELF STORAGE & APARTMENTS has 1 bdrm clean, ready to move in, onsite laundry, $500/mo., utilities separate. Also 10x10 & 10x15 storage units available. Please call 518-962-8500

MOBILE HOME WESTPORT, NY Mobile for rent; 2 bdrm, 2 bath, fully furnished, everything included. $800/mo., Available September 1st. 518-962-2271

VACATION PROPERTY CRYSTAL RIVER, FLA. 12x60 2 bdrm mobile home, Florida room, carport, $700/mo. +utilities, 3-5 mo. lease. Also Private RV lot, 50 amp service, cable TV, 34' wooden deck, $200 + utilities, 3-5mo. lease, no smoking, no pets. Please call 518-873-6606.

ESTATE SALE

REAL ESTATE ADIRONDACK 79 Acres, 20 min. to Whiteface, great for hunting or cross country skiing, road frontage, power, $69,000. 518-624-6055 ADIRONDACK " BY OWNER" www.AdkByOwner.com 1000+ photo listings of local real estate for sale, vacation rentals & timeshares. Owners: List with us for only $275 per year. Visit online or call 518-891-9919 OWNER WILL FINANCE. Bank or seller won't finance? We help! No qualifying. No credit! Low Down. Call Today! 1-800-563 -2734 kanthony@cigrealty.com

Looking for a part-time job? Check out the classifieds.

Call 1-800-989-4237

BEZON ESTATE LIQUIDATION SALE 19 Tobey St, Port Henry, NY. Sat&Sun, Sept 1&2. 8-4 Entire House & Garage Contents. Antiques, Tools, Home & Office Furniture, Religious Antiques. House & Property are for sale

GARAGE SALE/ BARN SALE GOOD STUFF YARD SALE! 46 Orlin Duell Rd. Brant lake, NY. Saturday-Mon. 9/1-9/3, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM. Antiques, furniture, tools, horse and rider gear, household items, appliances, air conditioners. ATTN: GARAGE SALE ENTHUSIASTS! Buying or selling second-hand treasures?The NYS Department of State's Division of Consumer Protection, in conjunction with the Free Community Papers of New York, recommends checking the following websites to help assure that the item has not been recalled or the subject of a safety warning: http:/www.recalls.gov and the Consumer Product Safety Commission at www.cpsc.gov. For other important recall and product safety information visit the Division of Consumer Protection at www.dos.ny.gov NEAR PIZZA Hut, Garage Sale 26 Edward St, Saranac Lake, Saturday September 01, 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM. 4-Generation from Antiques to New. Over 1000 items, large & small. Many items never offered before. Rain or Shine.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.SCHEV certified. Call 1800-494-2785 www.CenturaOnline.com

HELP WANTED ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS needed immediately! $150-$300/ day depending on job. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800-5611762

AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-296-7093 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -TRAIN FOR hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program.Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1-877-202-0386. CDL-A TEAM needed for dedicated run, Earn $100k per year! Home every 10-14 days! Must qualify for Hazmat www.RandRtruck.com: 1-866-204 -8006 COMBINATION P&D DRIVERS Full-Time: Excellent Wages, Benefits, Pension! Home nightly! Safe Equipment! Burlington VT location. CDL-A w/Combo and Hazmat, 1yr T/T exp, 21yoa req. EOE-M/F/D/V Apply online atwww.yrcw.com/careers DRIVERS- ANNUAL Salary $45K to $60k. $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Quarterly Bonuses. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com DRIVERS: CDL-B: GREAT PAY, Hometime! No-Forced Dispatch! New singles from Plattsburgh, NY to surrounding states. Apply www.truckmovers.com or 888567-4861 HEALTHCARE SERVICES - AFTER SCHOOL ASSISTANT After school assistant needed for 17 yr old disabled girl. Duties include assisting with: exercise, homework, family life, chores. Drivers license and references required. Keene 518-576-4668

OVER 18? A can't miss limited opportunity to travel with successful young business group. Paid training. Transportation/lodging provided. Unlimited income potential. Call 1-877-646-5050.

THE OCEAN CORP. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a New Career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid available for those who qualify. 1-800-3210298.

HELP WANTED LOCAL ESSEX COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT Announces a Vacancy for a Part Time Staff Psychiatrist In our outpatient facility. $91.60/Hour - No residency requirements. Last Date to submit applications is September 4th, 2012. For applications contact Essex County Personnel 518-873-3360 or they are available on our website: http://www.co .essex.ny.us/personneljobs.asp

RESTAURANT/FOOD SERVICES DELI WORKERS/DISHWASHERS smart, hardworking, clean, nice appearance, great customer service, must LOVE food. Part & full time, benefits with full time. Great shifts for parents with school age children 518-523-3111, 518-6374775, simply.gourmet@hotmail.com, Ask for Holly or Phoebe.

MYSTERY SHOPPERS Needed Earn up to $150 per day Undercover Shoppers Needed to Judge Retail & Dining Establishments Experience Not Required Call Now 888-380-3513

WESTAFF SERVICES We'll find the perfect employee and make you the hero! Office /Clerical, Light Industrial Professional/Technical Managerial Call today 518-566-6061

Inside Sales/Customer Service Representative

Assistant Director for Advancement Communications For position details and application process, visit http://jobs.plattsburgh.edu and select “View Current Openings” SUNY College at Plattsburgh is an equal opportunity employer committed to excellence through diversity. 27471

ADOPT: A happily married couple seeks to adopt. We'll provide your baby with love, laughter, education, security. Wonderful extended family nearby. EXPENSES PAID. www.annieandnickadopt.info 888964-4269 AN ACTIVE young couple with so much love to give wish to adopt your newborn into our loving home. Expenses paid. Please call Courtney and Dan 1-888-942-9599. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring adoption expert. You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6296 Florida Agency #100021542 PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6292, 24/7 Void/Illinois

ANNOUNCEMENTS BUY GOLD & SILVER COINS 1 percent over dealer cost. For a limited time, ParkAvenue Numismatics is selling Silver and Gold American Eagle Coins at 1 percent overdealer cost. 1-877-357-9566 CANADA DRUG CENTER is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Ourlicensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-877-207-6086 for $25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

HELP WANTED!! EARN EXTRA income mailing our brochures from home! FREE Supplies!Genuine Opportunity! Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net LIVE LIKE a rockstar. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091.

OTR CDL DRIVER 3 yrs experience Entry into Canada BEE LINE TRUCKING ELLENBURG DEPOT 518-907-4472

ADOPTIONS

CAREER TRAINING

Denton Publications is now accepting applications for an

Qualified candidates must be organized, detail orientated, outgoing and self-motivated.

DISH NETWORK STARTING AT $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels. Free for 3 Months! SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-888-8238160 DIVORCE $450* NO FAULT OR Regular Divorce. Covers Children, Property, etc. Only One Signature Required! *Excludes govt. fees. Locally Owned!1-800-522-6000 Ext. 100. Baylor & Associates, Inc. Est. 1977 PUG PARTY & PARADE October 14 at Dynamite Hill Registration 10-12, Judging at 12 Noon, 15 Categories with Awards, Parade to follow. Free Admission, Registration and Parking. North Warren Chamber: 494-2722 SAVE $800 SWITCH TO DISH. Promotional prices start $19.99/ mo. Next DayInstallation Available! 1-800-413-3897

Candidates must also have experience with current computer and software technology and be open to learning new technology and programs. Responsibilities include prospecting from multiple sources to generate advertising revenue for all Denton publications; greeting and assisting customers in our Elizabethtown office; telemarketing; input classified ads into our database; and various other sales and sales support tasks as needed.

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. You WIN or Pay Us Nothing. Contact Disability Group, Inc. Today! BBB Accredited. Call For Your FREE Book & Consultation.1-888-587-9203

Apply online at www.denpubs.com; by email to tom@denpubs.com; by fax to 873-6360; or by mail to:

BUNDLE & SAVE on your CABLE, INTERNET PHONE, AND MORE. High Speed Internet starting at less than $20/ mo. CALL NOW! 800-291-4159

Tom Henecker, HR Manager Denton Publications PO Box 338 14 Hand Ave. Elizabethtown, NY 12932

ELECTRONICS

DIRECT TO Home Satellite TV $19.99/mo. Free Installation FREE HD/DVR Upgrade Credit/Debit Card Req. Call 1-800-795-3579

27424

28989

HOME IMPROVEMENT

CAZENOVIA, ESTATE SALE RIPPLETON CROSS ROAD, CAZENOVIA, Friday August 17, 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM. ENTIRE HOUSE ESTATE SALE FRIDAY AUGUST 17TH AND SATURDAY AUGUST 18TH 8AM-3PM RIPPLETON CROSS ROAD CAZENOVIA Rain or Shine.

SAVE OVER $800 when you switch to DISH. Promotional prices start at $19.99/mo Call Today ask about Next Day Installation. 800-306-5814


18 - www.the-burgh.com ELECTRONICS SAVE OVER $800 when you switch to DISH. Promotional prices start at $19.99 a month. Call Today and ask about Next Day Installation. 800-348-6191

FINANCIAL SERVICES $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! Injury Lawsuit Dragging? $500-$500,000++ within 48 /hrs? 1-800-568-8321 www.lawcapital.com CREDIT CARD DEBT? LEGALLY HAVE IT REMOVED! Minimum $7,000 in debt to qualify. Utilize Consumer Protection Attorneys. Call now! 1-888-2370388 GOLD AND SILVER CAN PROTECT Your Hard Earned Dollars. Learn how by calling Freedom Gold Group for your free educational guide. 1-866-930-7729 LAWSUIT CASH Auto Accident? All Cases Qualify. Get CASH before your case settles! Fast Approval. Low Fees. (866) 709-1100 or www.glofin.com

FOR SALE 1972 GRAND TORINO runs, needs work comes with some new parts $3200; 7140 Hesston Chopper, hay & corn head, $1,275; Chevy Van 30 Travelmaster camper $2500. 518-962-4394 6 ALUMINUM Dock Sections, 4' wide 10-13' long, $2400. 518-532-0190 CLARINET, VIOLIN, FLUTE, TRUMPET, Amplifier, Fender Guitar $75 each. Upright Bass, Cello, Saxophone, French Horn, Drums $189 each. Others 4-sale 1-516377-7907 GARAGE DOOR 8'x16', White Aluminum, insulated, very good condition, no dents, will be available on or around August 9th. Asking $450 OBO. 518297-2241. WELL PUMP Gould, 1 HP, 4 months old, $600.00. 518-5760012

FURNITURE ADIRONDACK RUSTIC Bentwood Furniture 2-Loungers 1-Tall 2 Tier Shelf Unit 1- Lge Bentwood Cradle Ideal items for Log Home 518-597-3133

GENERAL $$OLD GUITARS WANTED$$ Gibson,Fender,Martin,Gretsch. 1920's to 1980's. Top Dollar paid. Toll Free: 1-866-433-8277 52" COLOR (J.V.C.) T.V., perfect condition, $300.00 (or) 35" Samsung Color T.V. $200.00 New. 518-523-1681 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM (888)6861704 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866)453-6204 ANTIQUE LOVERS TAKE NOTE: BRIMFIELD, MA starts Sept 4. 5,000 Dealers of Antiques/Collectibles. Visit www.brimfield.com For info on 20 individual show openings. September 4-9, 2012 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical,*Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com

September 1, 2012 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-201-8657 www.CenturaOnline.com CA$H PAID-UP TO $27/BOX for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! 1 DAY PAYMENT & PREPAID shipping. SE HABLA ESPANOL. Emma 1888-776-7771. www.Cash4DiabeticSupplies.com CANADA DRUG CENTER. Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1-888-734-1530 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.) CANADA DRUG CENTER. Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1-888-432-1479 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping) CASH FOR CARS, Any Make or Model! Free Towing. Sell it TODAY. Instant offer: 1-800-8645784 CASH FOR CARS: All Cars/Trucks Wanted. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Any Make/Model. Call For Instant Offer: 1-800-864-5960 FINISH HIGH School at home in a few weeks. First Coast Academy, 1 -800-658-1180x130. www.fcahighschool.org HOT-TUB/SPA... DELUXE 2012 Model Neckjets, Therapyseat, Never Used, Warranty, Can Deliver. Worth $5950. Sell $1950. (800) 960-7727 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here - Online training for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800 -510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com MEMORYFOAM THERAPEDIC NASA MATTRESSES T-$299 F$349 Q-$399 K-$499 ADJUSTABLES - $799 FREE DELIVERY LIFETIME WARRANTY 90 NIGHT TRIAL 1-800-ATSLEEP 1-800-287 -5337 WWW.MATTRESSDR.COM REACH OVER 20 million homes nationwide with one easy buy! Only $2,395 per week for a 25 word classified! For more information go to www.naninetwork.com REVERSE MORTGAGES -NO mortgage payments FOREVER! Seniors 62+! Government insured. No credit/income requirements. Free 28 pg. catalog. 1-888-660 3033 All Island Mortgage SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. WIN or Pay Nothing! Start Your Application In Under 60 Seconds. Contact Disability Group, Inc. Licensed Attorneys & BBB Accredited. Call 1-888-606-4790 WORK ON JET ENGINES - Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866) 8546156.

HEALTH 24/7 EMERGENCY Response $1/ day Living alone? You could fall! Deaths from falls can be avoided. Helps a button push away. Lifewatch 1-800-207-4078 CANADA DRUG CENTER. Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1-877-743-0508 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.) VIAGRA 100MG AND CIALIS 20MG! 40 Pills + 4 FREE $99. #1 Male Enhancement,Save $500! 1888-796-8870

OVER 30 MILLION WOMEN SUFFER FROM HAIR LOSS! Do you? If so, we have asolution! CALL KERANIQUE TO FIND OUT MORE 1-877-218-1590 TAKE VIAGRA? TAKE VIAGRA? SAVE $500! 100mg,/Cialis 20mg. 40+4 FREE, PILLS. Only $99.00 Discreet. 1-888-797-9024 VIAGRA 100MG, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills +4 FREE only $99. #1 MALE ENHANCEMENT! Discreet Shipping. Save $500! Blue Pill now! 1-888-7968870 WEIGHTLOSS MEDICATIONS Phentermine, Phendimetrazine, etc. Office visit, one-month supply for $80! 1-631-462-6161; 1-516754-6001; www.MDthin.com

LAWN & GARDEN BRUSH HOG Model EFM600. Used 1 year, like new. Finish mower. 518-570-8837 $1,000

LAND 20 ACRES FREE! 60 acres for 40 acre price. $0Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee NO CREDIT CHECKS. West Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com 5 ACRES, BORDERS SANDY CREEK STATE FOREST, $16,900. 2.5 acres Waterfront Property, $19,900. www.LandFirstNY.com 1 -888-683-2626 LITTLE FALLS, NY LAND FOR SALE: 59.9 acres, fields/woods on NYS Route 5 $69,000. 17.9 acres fields/woods scenic views $39,000. Owner financing. www.helderbergrealty.com 518861-6541 SPRINGFIELD VT 4 acres on the CT River, 743 ft River Frontage, All State and Local Permits for Well and Septic have been filed and approved. Access to River Possible for Great Fishing and Boating $150,000 call 802885-1725 or email robertsnorth@vermontel.com

MUSIC SINGLE-FAMILY HOME

**OLD GUITARS WANTED!** Fender, Gibson, Martin,Gretsch, Prairie State, Euphonon, Larson, D'Angelico, Stromberg, Rickenbacker, and Mosrite. Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1930's thru 1970's TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401-0440

OWNER WILL FINANCE. Bank or Seller won't finance? We Help! No qualifying. No credit! Low Down. Call Today! 1-800-5632734. kanthony@cigrealty.com

WANTED TO BUY

FOR SALE

BUYING EVERYTHING! Furs, Coins, Gold, Antiques, Watches, Silver, Art, Diamonds."The Jewelers Jeweler Jack" 1-917-696-2024 By Appointment. Lic-Bonded.

PIRELLI MT 43 DUAL SPORT MOTORCYCLE TIRES Rear 4.00-18$60 Front 2.7521$39Tubeless $99 shakira12883@yahoo.com

BUYING/ SELLING- gold, goldfilled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe) coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY

SHINKO DUAL SPORT MOTORCYCLE TIRES *New* Tube type. Rear, 4:00-18 $60 Front, 2:75-21 $39 DOT H6" $99 shakira12883@yahoo.com

CA$H PAID- up to $26/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. Hablamos Espanol. 1-800 -371-1136

AUTO DONATION

HAVE COIN WILL TRAVEL Buying Old U.S coins,currency, commemoratives,bullion and other interesting items. Fair & Honest. Prices in today's market. Call anytime 7 days a week, ANA member Po Box 151, Jay, NY 12941 (518) 946-8387 LOOKING FOR 3-4 bdrm Home in Elizabethtown -Lewis Central School district. Please call 518-873-1022 MINERALS WANTS to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201 WANTS TO PURCHASE minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201 YEARBOOKS "UP to $20 paid for high school yearbooks 1900 1988. www.yearbookusa.com or 214-514-1040. YEARBOOKS WANTED: Will Pay up to $20.00 for High School Yearbooks 1900-1988. Any School/Any State. www.yearbookusa.com or 214514-1040

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY WESTPORT: OFFICE SUITES. Fully furnished w/ cubicles, desks, computer & phone hook-ups. 720 sq. ft. Lake views. Contact Jim Forcier @ 518962-4420.

Looking for a new home? Check out the classifieds. Call 1-800-989-4237.

A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR! Breast Cancer Research Foundation! Most highly rated breast cancer charity in America! Tax Deductible/Fast Free Pick Up. 1-800-771-9551 www.carsforbreastcancer.org CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We're Local! 7 Days/ Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-4162330 DONATE A CAR- HELP HOMELESS PETS! Free Next-Day Towing. Tax Deductible. Non- Runners OK. Receive $1,000 Grocery Coupons. Call National Animal Welfare Foundation 1-888-333-3848 DONATE YOUR CAR to CHILDREN'S CANCER FUND of AMERICA and help end CHILDHOOD CANCER. Tax Deductible. Next Day Towing. Receive Vacation Voucher. 7 Days 1-800-4698593

AUTO WANTED CASH FOR CARS AND TRUCKS. Get A Top Dollar INSTANT Offer! Running or Not! 1-888-416-2208 (888) 416-2208

2001 SUPRA SANTERA low hrs., mint cond., great ski wake board boat, beautiful trailer included, $19,500. 518-354-8089 2005 WHITEHALL SPIRIT rowing/sailboat. Classic boat, rare find. Must sell! Asking $6400 OBO. 845-868-7711

CARS 95 CHRYSLER New Yorker solid body, good tires will not pass inspection $1500 Call: (239) 989-8686 1952 DESOTO White/Blue, no rust, small Hemi,, great project car. Serious inquires only. $3500. 518-962-4688 1989 TOYOTA SUPRA fully loaded, all electric, all power, 5 spd., hatch back, sunroof, runs good, $4500. 113 Flat Rock, Morrisonville, NY. 518-563-9967 1997 DODGE INTREPID 6 cyclinder, 127,000 miles, Good condition. $1,300 Call: (518) 594-5015 2001 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE Black 2 door. New tires, rotors, brakes catalytic converter. $4,500 Call: (518) 946-7550 2002 TOYOTA SIENNA Silver/Gray 107,000 miles, Good condition. SYMPHONY EDITION, REMOTE START, CRUISE CONTROL JBL AUDIO WITH CD $6,000 Call: (518) 563-4133

MOTORCYCLES 1985 YAMAHA MAXIM 700CC, 29K, excellent condition, Red, original manual, helmet, $1295. Wayne 518-963-4060 1989 YAMAH Virago runs good $1250; 2003 Hyosung runs good, $2000. Please call 518-962-4394 2002 HONDA VTX 1800, mint condition, many extras, $5000. 518-492-2348 2005 SUZUKI BOULEVARD S50 VS 800CC, New battery & tires, 13,000 miles, very clean, garaged. (518) 946-8341. $2,800 2010 HONDA STATELINE 1200 Miles, Black, 1312cc $8,500 518-569-8170 WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLE KAWASAKI 19671980 Z1-900, KZ900, KZ1000, ZIR, KZ1000MKII, W1-650,H1500, H2-750, S1-250, S2-350, S3400 Suzuki GS400,GT380, CB750 CASH PAID. FREE NATIONAL PICKUP. 1-800-772-1142, 1-310721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com YAMAHA 2000 TTR 90cc 2000 Yamaha TTR 90cc, runs great, great shape, comes with brand new full face helmet, riding pants, chest protector. $900.00 518-623-1088 leave message

TRUCKS

TOP CASH FOR CARS, Any Car/ Truck, Running or Not. Call for INSTANT offer: 1-800-454-6951

1981 INTERNATIONAL single axle dump truck, runs great, inspected and on the road. $4000 OBO. 518-834-9088.

BOATS

1999 FORD F350 XLT SUPER DUTY Black/Gray 90K Plow attachment. $6,500 Call (518)293-7479

1977 156 GLASTRON Boat with 70 HP Johnson motor, with trailer, excellent condition. $3000. 518-359-8605 1980 18 1/2 FT. Century Cuddy Cabin, 120 HP I/O, trailer, GPS depth finder, down rigger, plus. $2900 negotiable. 518-963-8220 or 518-569-0118

2000 RANGER 2000 Ranger XLT 4x4 Super Cab, camper top, liner, tonneau cover, 6 cyl., auto, AC, stereo, 130K, Asking $3595. 518-576-9042 BIKES FOR TYKES look for them in Items under $100 Super savers ads

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-494-3586 www.CenturaOnline.com 37132

37133

North Country Telephone Exchange Directory (518) 236.............Altona/Mooers 251.................North Creek 293.......................Saranac 297...............Rouses Point 298...................Champlain 327.................Paul Smiths 352..............Blue Mt. Lake 358...............Ft. Covington 359................Tupper Lake 483........................Malone 492.................Dannemora 493.................West Chazy 494................Chestertown 497.................Chateaugay 499.....................Whitehall 523..................Lake Placid 529...........................Moria 532..............Schroon Lake 543..........................Hague 546.......Port Henry/Moriah 547........................Putnam 561-566...........Plattsburgh 576....Keene/Keene Valley 581,583,584,587 ..............Saratoga Springs 582....................Newcomb 585................Ticonderoga 594..........Ellenburg Depot 597.................Crown Point 623...............Warrensburg 624...................Long Lake 638............Argyle/Hartford 639.......................Fort Ann 642......................Granville 643.............................Peru 644............Bolton Landing 647.............Ausable Forks 648..................Indian Lake 654.........................Corinth 668...............Lake George 695................Schuylerville 735.............Lyon Mountain 746,747..........Fort Edward / Hudson Falls 743,744,745,748,761,792, 793,796,798. . . .Glens Falls 834....................Keeseville 846..........................Chazy 856.............Dickerson Ctr. 873....Elizabethtown/Lewis 891..............Saranac Lake 942......................Mineville 946..................Wilmington 962......................Westport 963...........Willsboro/Essex

VERMONT (802) 247.......................Brandon 372....................Grand Isle 388...................Middlebury 425......................Charlotte 434....................Richmond 438...............West Rutland 453.......Bristol/New Haven 462......................Cornwall 475.........................Panton 482....................Hinesburg 545...................Weybridge 655......................Winooski 658....................Burlington 758........................Bridport 759.......................Addison 654,655,656,657,658,660, 860,862,863,864,865,951, 985....................Burlington 877...................Vergennes 769,871,872,878,879 ..................Essex Junction 893...........................Milton 897....................Shoreham 899......................Underhill 948..........................Orwell 888....................Shelburne

20956


September 1, 2012

www.the-burgh.com - 19

Summer Sales Day 2012 FORD FOCUS SE

NEW!

AUTO, AIR, CRUISE, CD, PW, W, PPL, L, ST STK# EN539

38 MPG HWY

2012 FORD FIESTA SE

NEW!

OFFER ENDS 9/3/12

AUTO, AIR, CRUISE, PW, W, PL, SSPORT PORT PO R PPKG., SYNC, STK# SEN424 OFFER ENDS 9/3/12

Choose

39 MPG

0%

HWY

for 60 mos.*

2012 FORD FUSION SE

NEW!

AUTO, AIR, CRUISE, PW, PL, PS, CD STK# EN491

SYNC SYSTEM, REAR CAMERA, PUSH BUTTON START, HEATED SEATS, STK# EN291 OFFER ENDS 9/3/12

$1,500

OFFER ENDS 9/3/12

$2,000

+ choose

+ choose

0%

0%

for 60 mos.*

NEW!

0% for 60 mos.*

2012 FORD TAURUS SEL

NEW!

Choose

for 60 mos.*

2012 FORD F150 SUPERCAB XLT 4X4

2012 FORD F250 SUPERDUTY 4X4

NEW!

AAIR, IR, 6 SPD., AUTO, PW, PL, PS, CRUISE, SNO-PLOW PREP, LOCKER REAR STK# EN377 OFFER ENDS 9/3/12

5.0 V8, 6 SPD., AUTO, AIR, PW, PL, PS, CRUISE, SYNC SYSTEM STK#EN439 OFFER ENDS 9/3/12

$1,000

Choose

0%

+ choose

0%

for 60 mos.*

for 60 mos.*

31989

*Requires FMCC Credit approval. All customers may not qualify. **Trade in of 1995 or newer vehicle required.

Find Your Super Star Using The Superstore $

20 (4 Lines)

HELP WANTED CLASSIFIEDS 1 ZZone • A Add dd EExtra t ZZone ffor $$10 1100

Fall Into Great Savings at The Classified Superstore!

$

FREE BORD ER

24 (4 Lines)

Choose 2 Zones for 3 Weeks & Get a Personal Perso nall CClassi Classifi lassi lassifi siified fiedd AAds ds OOnly nly - N No CComm Commercial ommer ercial ciiall Accou AAccounts. cccounts. nts nt t Ad M ts Mu Must stt BBe Prep Prepaid aid Cancellations Accepted At Any Time, No Refund After Ad Is Placed. * 4 Lines is approximately 15 words

FFREE REE BBORDER

Commercial Comm Comme rcial AAds Only! Onl ! Ca Canc Cancellations ellat a ions Accep Acceptted AAtt Any Ti Accepted Time Time,, N No Refun Re Refund efun fu d Af Aft After fter Add IIs PPlaced Placed. laced acc . * 4 Line Lines es iis appro app approximately p xximat pp imat m elyy 1155 wor words o dss

Adirondacks A d South - Times of Ti, Adirondack Journal, News Enterprise se Adirondacks Adi d k North - North Countryman, Valley News, The Burgh Vermont - Addison Eagle, Green Mountain Outlook Capital p District - Spotlight p g Newspapers p p • Central New York - Eagle g Newspapers p p

Adirondacks Adi Ad dir iron iro ondacks da South - Times of Ti, Adirondack Journal, News Enterprisee Adirondacks Ad Adiron ndacks North - North Countryman, Valley News, The Burgh Vermont - Addison Eagle, Green Mountain Outlook Capital p District - Spotlight p g Newspapers p p • Central New York - Eagle g Newspapers p p

Name: ________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________ Phone: ________________ E-mail (Required): __________________________________ Amount Enclosed:________Card #: _________________________ Security #: _________ Exp. Date: ___________________ Signature: __________________________________

Name: ________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________ Phone: ________________ E-mail (Required): __________________________________ Amount Enclosed:________Card #: _________________________ Security #: _________ Exp. Date: ___________________ Signature: __________________________________

All Ads will appear on our classified network site at NO ADDITIONAL COST!

Add a Picture for $12.50

Add Shading for $7.50

Add a Graphic for $12.50

Deadline: Friday at 4pm Mail to: The Classified Superstore - P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 Fax: 518-873-6360 • Phone: 518-873-6368 • Email: adirondacksnorth@theclassifiedsuperstore.com

31594

All Ads will appear on our classified network site at NO ADDITIONAL COST!

Add a Picture for $5.00

Add Shading for $3.00

Add a Graphic for $2.00

Deadline: Friday at 4pm Mail to: The Classified Superstore - P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 Fax: 518-873-6360 • Phone: 518-873-6368 • Email: adirondacksnorth@theclassifiedsuperstore.com

27392


20 - www.the-burgh.com

September 1, 2012

REPUBLICANS, DEMOCRATS & INDEPENDENTS AGREE

ELECT ADIRONDACK AUTO BRAND 2013 DODGE DART SE NEW! STK#AN10, TRUE NIM BLUE, DENIM SEATS, AUTO, UTO, 4 CYL.

2012 RAM BRAND BRAND 2012 RAM 1500 BRAND ! W 1500 QUAD CAB CREW CAB E N NEW! NEW! EXPRESS 4X4

STK#AM289, MINERAL GRAY, 5.7 HEMI, TRAILER TOW, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, CRUISE, SIRIUS, 20” WHEELS, DUAL EXHAUST

EXPRESS 4X4

STK#AM146, DEEP CHERRY RED, 5.7 HEMI, 20” WHEELS, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, HITCH, TUBULAR SIDE STEPS

2012 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X4

STK#141, DEEP EP CHERRY RED, 4 AL CYL., MANUAL TRANS., AC, POWER WINDWOS

$18,885 $35,560 $37,263 $21,565 BRAND NEW!

2012 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE 4X4

STK#AM78, BRIGHT SILVER, AUTO., 4 CYL., REMOTE START, SIRIUS

BRAND 2013 DODGE DURANGO NEW!

BRAND NEW!

SXT AWD 2, STK#AN12, BRILLIANTT BLACK, 3.6 V6, S, 3 18” WHEELS, RD ZONE AC, 3RD ROW SEAT, FOG IUS LAMPS, SIRIUS

2012 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

M325, STK#AM325, RAL MINERAL GRAY, 6 CYL., PO AUTO., POWER OWS, WINDOWS, D-TRAC COMMAND-TRAC YSTEM M 4WD SYSTEM

BRAND NEW!

2012 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4

7, STK#AM277, YL., BLACK, 6 CYL., MANUAL C TRANS., AC

$24,560 $32,780 $26,520 $23,865 With the addition of

First Time Visitors, plug in to your GPS “7440 US Route 9, Elizabethtown, NY 12932” and we’ll greet you at the door!

Located just 1/4 mile south of Cobble Hill Golf Course on Route 9 in Elizabethtown.

(518) 873-6386

WELCOME DAVE! Dealer#3160005 www.adirondackauto.com

Court Street, Elizabethtown, NY

873-6386 2010 Dodge Caliber SXT - Stk. #CP230, white ..................$14,888

2007 Jeep Compass Ltd - Stk. #AM178A, tan....................$13,888

2010 Dodge Caliber SXT - Stk. #AP1255, orange ..............$14,388

2007 Chrysler Sebring Touring - Stk. #AL210A ..............$12,888

2010 Dodge Caliber SXT - Stk. #AP1257, black .................$14,888

2001 Chevy Monte Carlo - Stk. #AM194B, black ................. $6,888

2009 Dodge Caliber SXT - Stk. #AM222A, white ..............$13,888

1999 Jeep Wrangler - Stk. #AM294A, green......................... $8,888

2012 Chevy Malibu LT - Stk. #AM280A, silver ....................$21,888

2011 Chevy Silverado 1500 - Stk. #AM270A, green .........$22,788

2010 Honda Civic EX - Stk. #AM308A, gray ........................$15,888

2011 Ram 1500 Quad Outdoorman - Stk. #AM314A, silver ...$27,888

2010 Chrysler Town & Country Touring - Stk. #AM288A, red ...$20,888

2012 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon - Stk. #AM328A, red .......$31,888

2009 Dodge Journey SXT FWD - Stk. #AM275A, tan.....$15,888

2003 Jeep Wrangler Sport - Stk. #AN3A, green ..............$13,888

2008 Chevy Trailblazer LT - Stk. #AL67A, black ................$17,888

2010 Chevy Equinox - Stk. #AM305A, red ...........................$19,888

2007 Dodge Durango SLT - Stk. #AM292A, blue...............$13,788

2010 Buick Lacrosse - Stk. #AN4A, brown .........................$22,888

Dealer #3160005

31988

Court Street • Elizabethtown, NY

DAVE FOLEY from Peru/Plattsburgh, our sales staff is in place and ready to work for you!

www.adirondackauto.com

And Many More To Choose From! Stop In, Call, Look At Our Inventory On Our Website adirondackauto.com FIRST Come, FIRST Served!

*Tax, title and registration not included. 31990


TB_09-01-2012_Edition