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In Brief Library to host health care seminar

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BIG ANNOUNCEMENTS

UPPER JAY Ñ The Wells Memorial Library in Upper Jay will host Ò The Affordable Care Act and the New York State of Health Official Health Plan Marketplace,Ó presentation by Jill Rock, Education & Outreach Specialist, Adirondack Health Institute, on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at 1 p.m. RSVP by Tuesday, Nov. 26, by contacting 946-2644 or wellslib@primelink1.net.

By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com

Christmas bazaar scheduled

LAKE PLACID Ñ St. Agnes School in Lake Placid will once again be holding its annual Christmas Bazaar Saturday, Dec. 7 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. in the school gymnasium. It is a great event to fill in all of your holiday needs and get in the spirit of Christmas. There will be baked goods, gifts, toys, crafts, wreaths, trees, holiday plants and lots of raffle and silent auction items. Lunch will be served and complimentary babysitting is available while you shop. Vendor space is available. Please contact Kathleen at school at 523-3771 or email at info@ stagneselementary.com for more information.

‘Nutcracker’ at LPCA

LAKE PLACID Ñ The Lake Placid Center for the Arts (LPCA) will present the holiday favorite, Ò The Nutcracker,Ó in collaboration with the North Country Ballet Ensemble. Performances will take place Saturday, Dec. 7, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 8, at 1 p.m. Ticket prices are $18 for adults, $16 for students and seniors, and $12 for children 12 and under. To make advance reservations for this show, call the LPCA Box Office at 523-2512 or online at lakeplacidarts.org.

State brings together Trudeau, Clarkson

State Sen. Batty Little applauds as Gov. Andrew Cuomo announces $12 million in funding for the Whiteface Veteran’s Memorial Highway Nov. 20. Photo by Keith Lobdell

Funding tabbed for Vet’s Highway By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com

LAKE PLACID Ñ Wilmington Supervisor Randy Preston said that he is always pleased when New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo visits the area. Preston added that he felt CuomoÕ s visit Nov. 20 was made even more special, Ò when he comes with $12 million for you.Ó That is the amount the state will use to fund repairs to the Whiteface VeteranÕ s Memorial Highway, Castle and Summit Building. Ò The highway has been a concern of mine ever since I took office,” Preston said. Ò I canÕ t tell you what this means to Wilmington and to the region. This will preserve a treasure in the North Country for years to come.Ó

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

Wilmington Supervisor Randy Preston and New York State Assemblyman San Stec speak at the Nov. 20 announcement of funding for the Whiteface Veteran’s Memorial Highway. Photo by Keith Lobdell

LAKE PLACID Ñ Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the formation of a partnership which will keep the doors of the Trudeau Institute in Saranac Lake open for years to come. Cuomo announced a partnership between New York State, Clarkson University, and the Trudeau Institute to form a world-class biotech enterprise during a Nov. 20 press conference at the Lake Placid Conference Center. Ò We were in danger of losing the Trudeau Institute and it is a concern that has been going on for years,Ó Cuomo said. Ò That would not only have been an economical tragedy with the loss of 80 jobs, it also would have meant that a special part of the North Country would have been gone.Ó The partnership was welcomed news to Saranac Lake Mayor Clyde Rabideau, who is a Clarkson University alumnus. Ò I am very proud of the cooperation between the state, Trudeau and my alma mater,Ó Rabideau said. Ò Trudeau is part of our heritage in Saranac Lake. To be able to find a way to preserve that heritage and make it a part of our future is vital.Ó Ò This is huge not only for the economic impact that Trudeau gives to the area but also the legacy and history of the institution in the Tri Lakes and for the region,Ó Saranac Lake Community Development Director Jeremy Evans said. Ò I am glad to hear that they are partnering with the state and a strong institution like Clarkson University. This will be a real benefit and I canÕ t wait to see it in action.Ó CONTINUED ON PAGE 3

Index EDITORIAL

4

CALENDAR

5

HOLIDAY STROLL

8

SHOP LOCAL

9

OBITUARIES

10

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November 30, 2013

Organizers lay out plans for 2014 Empire State Winter Games By Keith Lobdell

keith@denpubs.com LAKE PLACID Ñ It just keeps getting bigger. The 2014 Empire State Winter Games, set to take place Feb. 6-9, will feature some new events and new venues for the 34th annual sporting competition, something that members of the regional organizing coalition have been striving to do over the last four years. Ò We are starting to see some of those goals come to be,Ó ROOST Executive Director Jim McKenna said. Ò We are growing the games throughout the region, we are growing it by the number of athletes and we are growing it by time. This is the largest multi-sport winter event held on an annual basis in the United States. The athletes all have uniforms and are on teams so they all feel like this is something special, which it is.Ó

The Empire State Winter Games return to Lake Placid for the 34th year Feb. 6-9.

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Session I: 9:30 am

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Photo by Keith Lobdell

The games will be held over four days, three of which fall on the same days as the start of the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia. Ò If you look at the alumni list of the Empire State Games, it is pretty impressive,Ó Sandy Caligiore said. Ò This event has a quality place in the winter sports world.Ó Ò It is an unbelievable opportunity for young people throughout the state of New York to get a high, Olympic quality experience they would not otherwise get,Ó Lake Placid Mayor Craig Randall said. Ò There are several of these athletes that have gone on to be Olympians, and that is what the goal of Lake Placid is.Ó Ò This is going to be a great tie-in with the Olympics opening in Russia,Ó McKenna said. ESG will also be expanding its reach into Tupper Lake, where the womenÕ s hockey competition will be held. Replacing womenÕ s hockey at the Olympic Center will be a youth ice hockey tournament. There will also be another version of hockey on display the Saturday of the games, adaptive sled hockey. McKenna added there will also be celebrations and events held throughout the games. Ò We want to make this a more festive event not only for the athletes and their families but for our local communities as well,Ó he said.

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This is the fourth year the event has been hosted by a regional coalition that includes North Elba, Harrietstown, Brighton, Wilmington, Jay, Lake Placid, Saranac Lake, Essex and Franklin County, ROOST and the New York Olympic Regional Development Authority. Over 1,000 athletes are expected for the games, with events taking place at the Olympic venues managed by ORDA in Lake Placid and Wilmington along with other sites in Tupper Lake, Saranac Lake and Paul Smiths. The ESWG Opening Ceremony, free and open to the public, will be held Thursday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. in the Olympic CenterÕ s 1980 Herb Brooks Arena in Lake Placid. A torch run will begin Wednesday, Feb. 5, and will travel through the North Country to its destination in Lake Placid at the Opening Ceremony. According to organizers, 21 different disciplines will be contested, from alpine skiing to figure skating to women’s ice hockey, including six different adaptive contests, with a higher level of competitive adaptive alpine racers who will ski the challenging DraperÕ s Drop course at Whiteface Mountain. Adaptive races in biathlon are set for the Olympic Sports Complex at Mount Van Hoevenberg, with adaptive cross country sprints on the Olympic Oval. Athlete registration will be available starting Nov. 25 on the Games website empirestatewintergames.com.

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Park Street Elizabethtown 873-6377 www.ech.org

December 2013 Clinic Calendar Monday 2

GYNECOLOGY Dr. Macco EYECARE Dr. Vilbert Veterans Day 9 GYNECOLOGY Dr. Macco PODIATRY Dr. Donela GYNECOLOGY 16 Dr. Macco UROLOGY Dr. Banko VASCULAR Dr. Roland

Tuesday NEPHROLOGY 3 Dr. Hurwitz ORTHOPEDICS Dr. Imobersteg SU RGE RY Dr. Sarmaroy PULMONARY 10 Dr. Kabeli ORTHOPEDICS Dr. Kneifel NEPHROLOGY Dr. Malseptic ORTHOPEDICS Dr. Imobersteg SU RGE RY Dr. Sarmaroy NEPHROLOGY Dr. Malseptic ACUPUNCTURE Dr. Macco

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Wednesday Thursday 4

Friday

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ONCOLOGY Dr. Duus

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ONCOLOGY Dr. Duus

ORTHOPEDICS Dr. Byrne

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PODIATRY Dr. Donela

PODIATRY Dr. Donela

30 GYNECOLOGY Dr. Macco

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New Year’s Eve

NEPHROLOGY Dr. Malseptic

Now offering Chemotherapy and infusion services. Please call 873-3168 for information. DIABETES CLINIC - Monday-Thursday. Call 873-9005 for Appt. DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP - 3rd Tuesday of Month at 5:30pm-7pm in Boardroom

Elizabethtown Health Center 66 Park Street Elizabethtown 873-6896

Westport Health Center 6097 Route 9N Westport 962-2313

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High Peaks Health Center 7 Community Circle Wilmington 946-1111

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November 30, 2013

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Trudeau

ing education and technologybased economic developContinued from page 1 ment. These activities include research into the use of fine Ò New York State has a maparticles for medicine, pharjor asset in both Clarkson macy, biotech, nanotech and University and in the Trudeau bioengineering Institute and we programs at must harness Clarkson and these strengths extend to adto continue ditional areas to strengthen such as instruour innovation mentation and economy,Ó Cuodevices, and mo said. Ò This other biomeditransformacal engineering tional partnerinitiatives in the ship will allow North Country for the best and that would not brightest minds be possible by to collaborate either instituand undertake tion acting on Ronald Goldfarb world-class reits own. search and develÒ Together, Trudeau and opment, building the region Clarkson have an opportuinto a global leader in the nity to transform the body of biotech industry and driving scientific knowledge that will new opportunities and jobs in emerge through collaboration Northern New York.Ó as well as bring direct benefit The state will invest up to to the North CountryÕ s econo$35 million over five years to my through technology-based support research and developinnovation and new educament efforts between Clarktional opportunities,Ó Clarkson and Trudeau, including son University President Tony establishing and coordinating Collins said. scientific research and expandÒ This infusion of funding

Public swim date set

CLINTONVILLE Ñ The AuSable Valley Central School swimming pool, located at the Middle School-High School in Clintonville will be open to the public on Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m. and Wednesdays from 7 to 9 p.m. starting Sunday, Dec. 1, and ending Sunday, March 2. There will be no public swim on Dec. 25, Dec. 29, Jan. 1 and Feb. 19. There will be limited locker facilities on Jan. 22, Feb. 5 and Feb. 12 due to sports conflicts. If there is no school, or if all after school activities are cancelled, open swim will also be cancelled. There will be no charge this year for public swim.

Energy workshop at CCE

WESTPORT Ñ Cornell Cooperative Extension of Essex County will be conducting a free energy workshop: ÒS ave Energy, Save Dollars.Ó Each workshop participant will receive three compli-

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New York State Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a partnership between New York State, Clarkson University, and the Trudeau Institute to form a world-class biotech enterprise during a Nov. 20 press conference at the Lake Placid Conference Center. over the next five years provides the momentum we need for stabilizing Trudeau and fast-tracks full implementa-

tion of a new business plan for the Trudeau Institute including translational research and new applications for our

mentary compact fluorescent light bulbs to use in their homes. The workshops will be offered on Monday, Dec. 2, 11 a.m., at the CCE building, 3 Sisco St., Westport. Pre-registration is required as class size is limited. For more information or to register for the class call 962-4810 ext. 401. These workshops are sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and developed by Cornell Cooperative Extension and NYSERDA. Cornell Cooperative Extension Essex County provides equal program and employment opportunities.

‘Lost Boy’ to speak in Willsboro

WILLSBORO Ñ Gabriel Bol Deng, one of the Lost Boys from Sudan, will be speaking at Willsboro Central School in the auditorium on Monday, Dec. 2, at 8:30 a.m. The assembly is open to everyone in our community.

discoveries,Ó Ronald H. Goldfarb, President, Director & CEO of the Trudeau Institute, said. Ò Enhancing our relation-

ship with Clarkson University will synergize initiatives between our respective, talented faculties.Ó

Camp to host open house

WESTPORT Ñ On Monday, Dec. 2, at 7 p.m., prospective campers, current campers, friends and alumni are invited to join Camp Dudley Director Matt Storey, Camp Kiniya for girls Director Marnie McDonagh and the year-round team at MacLean Lodge at Camp Dudley, 126 Dudley Rd., Westport, for a multimedia presentation and light refreshments. Learn about what we have to offer at our camps, bring a friend and meet fellow campers. Camp Dudley in Westport, NY, celebrated its 129th consecutive season this past summer as the oldest all-boys camp in the country along with the eighth season of Camp Kiniya girlsÕ camp across the lake in Colchester, Vt. Camp Dudley is proud of the scholarship program it offers. Thanks to our generous alumni, parents and friends last year, Dudley awarded over $700,000 in scholarship to deserving boys and girls, making it possible for them to attend camp. For more information or to RSVP, please visitcampdudley.org or call the Camp office at 962-4720.

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Opinion

A COMMUNITY SERVICE: This community newspaper and its delivery are made possible by the advertisers you’ll find on the pages inside. Our sixty plus employees and this publishing company would not exist without their generous support of our efforts to gather and distribute your community news and events. Please thank them by supporting them and buying locally. And finally, thanks to you, our loyal readers, for your support and encouragement over the past 65 years from all of us here at the Valley News and Denton Publications.

Valley News Editorial

Avoid ‘charity fatigue’ this season

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fter several false starts winter is finally upon us, and as Thanksgiving gives way to the Christmas season, itÕ s also time for the annual Ò Season of Giving,Ó with all of the pitfalls and pleasures that go with it. The Christmas season is an obvious time of year to think of those in need. ItÕ s a time of year when we give to those we love, so itÕ s natural to think of those who either have no one to care for them, or donÕ t have enough to give to the people they love. But there is a down-side to this time of giving. The biggest is what weÕ ve heard called Ò charity burnout.Ó There are literally thousands of charities, and most are very worthy and do excellent work. ItÕ s not uncommon to go to a mall or shopping center and find a bell ringer at every door, tables set up inside the mall with other worthy charities requesting donations or selling wrist bands, paper angles or the like, cashiers at many stores inquiring if you would like to donate to another worthy cause. All this comes before ever turning on the television or logging onto the internet, or stopping by your place of worship, to be barraged with even more charity requests. ItÕ s hard to believe that anyone can make it through the holiday season without suffering charity burnout. One suggestion is to decide now, before the charity season hits full swing, how much you want to and can afford to give to charity, and decide which charities you wish to fund. Pick the one, three, or even five, charities that mean the most to you, and whose mission you most appreciate, and those will be the ones you donate to. Set that amount aside in your purse or wallet, and when you come by a worthy charity on your list, if you have money left in your budget, donate. You will be able to keep tabs on how much you are donating, and will feel at least some semblance of control over the process. If you feel like you are giving as much as you can afford to, you will likely not feel compelled to give to everyone. Another thing to keep in mind in this season is that not all giving needs to be monetary. If you have time on a weekend or in the evening, volunteer to ring the bell, cover a shift at the local food shelf or find some other way to volunteer. Look around your neighborhood; do you have elderly neighbors who need their walkway shoveled? This will cost you nothing, but will leave you and your neighbor both with the warm glow of the season in your hearts. This is an especially good thing to teach your children. Then your spirit of charity might end up expanding to the next generation. If you donÕ t have the time, but do plan to give monetarily, look for those charities that will help your North Country neighbors. Try to keep your money local. While there is nothing wrong with helping someone on the other side of the world, you will likely have a more immediate feeling of giving if you knit a pair of mittens or give a new coat or toy to a North Country child. That charity might someday get paid forward, and this region of the world will keep on being the special place to live that it has always been. There is also nothing wrong with asking a charity how much of your contribution will stay local, or even what percentage of your contribution will go to administration as opposed to going to the needy. With something like a coat or a toy, you know that 100 percent goes to those in need. The final thing to keep in mind, is that many, if not most, charities have needs year-round. It’s amazingly generous to serve meals to the needy on Christmas, but people are just as hungry in June. Give some thought to pacing your giving, or volunteering, to charity all year round. Then you might feel a little bit better about tempering things between Thanksgiving and Christmas, and you might be able to avoid charity burnout. Ñ Denton Publications Editorial Board

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Viewpoint

Count your blessings this Thanksgiving

O

tlers of our country, not all that n behalf of all of us many years ago. Today we comhere at Denton Pubplain about luggage fees and lications, let me wish TSA lines while we stand in line you a happy, safe and thankful to take a crowded jet across the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. country that will have us to our In these rapidly changing final destination in just a few times our culture is undergohours. They traveled in wooden ing a massive transformation. In boats or wagons facing untold times like these it’s easy to find dangers at every turn. Loved so many things about which to ones on either side of a trip back complain. All one needs to do is Dan Alexander then may have never known the look around, pick up a newspaThoughts from outcome of a visit gone bad. Nor per, turn on the radio or TV, or Behind the Pressline could they communicate any life log onto the Internet and youÕ ll changing events easily. find tons of material from which Complaining will always be a part of our you can sing the blues. Complaining seems to lives regardless of what age we live in, but be our most popular pastime these days. when put into the context of time, challenges We canÕ t take lightly the challenging ecoand frustrations will be seen as hurdles to nomic times we find ourselves in at this point some and opportunities to others. We can look in time, but this weekend, as much as any back to the past and we look ahead into the weekend, we need to realize and reflect on all we have to be thankful for as we sit here in future, but each of us was given only one lifetime to live and this is the time and place we 2013 in this region, of this country still full of find ourselves. While some may long for the promise and opportunity. past and others canÕ t wait for the future make Hopefully your Thanksgiving weekend was highlighted by a wonderful meal in the com- sure to take full advantage of the present. The opportunities you have today with family and pany of friends and family. Some of you may have lost those dear to you since last Thanks- friends may be very different by next year or even next week. Tomorrow will come soon giving and while it may be painful without them, be thankful for the good times you en- enough and the regrets of yesterday can only be fulfilled today. joyed with them while they were here and On this Thanksgiving 2013 count your blesstreasure those previous Thanksgiving meals ings and cherish those youÕ ve been able to when you were all together. share it with. Regardless of your situation in Not too many years ago, if you were unable life, hope and opportunity are out there. You to connect in person with all your love ones, as cross country travel was very expensive, what may have to open yourself up to find them, a task it was to just try a make a phone call. We but a truly thankful heart can always see things more clearly. LetÕ s all hope the unrest, had stationary, hard-wired, rotary phones with very expensive long distances charges. Many wars, pessimism and doubt concerning our futimes the phone lines were so busy during a ture can be replaced with peace and optimism major holiday weekend that calls couldnÕ t get when we realize and give thanks for the many through and of course back then we didnÕ t wonderful blessings we enjoy at this time and in this place. LetÕ s hope that as a society have speed dial nor answering machines or voice mail, so you might have to try many we take greater stock in what we have to be thankful for instead of fighting and stressing times before getting through. Today with our over the things we donÕ t or wonÕ t have in the Ò smart phones,Ó computers, tablets and social future. Life is so short and regrets can build up media we can not only send instant pictures over the years. DonÕ t wait until itÕ s too late to and minute by minute details of events to disappreciate the many blessings in your life. tance family and friends but we can call them Let me also take this time to thank all of you at will at almost any time or even Ò SkypeÓ them in real time and carry on face to face con- who read this column and our publications. We appreciate your support and the many versations through a computer screen across the world if need be. Best of all the charges are calls, emails and letter of support youÕ ve sent over the past year. We intend to work hard either part of your plan or free. Communication technology is just one of the to continue earning your support. Happy Thanksgiving. many luxuries we should be more thankful for having as part of our lives. But go back even Dan Alexander is publisher and CEO of Denton further than a few decades and think about the Publications. He may be reached at dan@denpubs. life and death dangers faced by the early setcom.


November 30, 2013

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Your complete source of things to see and do

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Friday, Nov. 29

• Week of Nov. 29-Dec. 5

Samuel James to perform Live at BluStage

SARANAC LAKE — Samuel James to perform for Live at BluStage on Nov. 30. The performance will be held at BluSeed Studios, 24 Cedar Street, The show begins at 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 30. The blues-based singer/songwriter has been playing for audiences around the world for the past 10 years. His musical styles are a fusion of artists such as Charlie Patton, Preston Reed, Bill Withers and Townes Van Zandt. The doors at BluSeed Studios open at 7 p.m., reservations are recommended. Admission is $15 or $12 BluSeed Members. For more information on this concert and other events call 891-3799 or visit www.bluseedstudios.org.

“The Nutcracker” ballet to be performed

PLATTSBURGH — North Country Ballet Presents “The Nutcracker,” SUNY Plattsburgh Hartman Theatre, Myers Fine Arts Building, 2 and 7:30 p.m. For more information go to www.north-country-ballet-ensemble.org. Performances will be held Friday, Nov. 29 at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 30 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 1 at 2 p.m. Additional performances will be held at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts, 17 Algonquin Drive on Saturday, Dec. 7 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 8 at 1 p.m. The annual production of The Nutcracker has evolved into a mature production and included, in the past, accompaniment by a live orchestra, as well as professional dancers in various roles. Since its inception in 1983, the Ballet Ensemble has become a regional ballet company, encompassing the geographical areas of Plattsburgh, Lake Placid, Keene, Saranac Lake and Tupper Lake. The organization was designed to develop a community of young people from the North Country, and to provide performing experience for student-dancers in the art of ballet and contemporary dance.

Student Guitarists to perform at Giltz

PLATTSBURGH — SUNY Plattsburgh will present the traditional fall semester student guitar ensembles concert with teacher Michael Fratino. The concert will be held at E. Glenn Giltz Auditorium, Hawkins Hall, 101 Broad Street on Dec. 4 beginning at 7:30 p.m. Michael Angelo Fratino has been teaching at SUNY Plattsburgh since 2002, where he teaches two sections of MUS 293 Guitar Class, directs the guitar ensemble, and teaches a studio of private students. He is building the Plattsburgh guitar program into its own entity by having the guitarists and guitar ensembles give a public performance in Krinovitz Recital Hall as a unit every semester. He promotes all styles of guitar playing, including popular, jazz, classical, rock, and contemporary guitar techniques. He also encourages students to find their own voices by catering the program to suit and exploit each individual’s technical abilities. For more information about the concert call SUNY Plattsburgh at 5650145.

Adirondack Jazz Orchestra performs at OR’s

PLATTSBURGH — Adirondack Jazz Orchestra will perform at Olive Ridley’s, 37 Court Street, on Dec. 4 beginning at 8 p.m. The Adirondack Jazz Orchestra was founded in 2003 under the musical direction of Mr. Matthew Pray. It’s sole purpose was to bring together some of the Adirondack’s finest musicians in a big band setting. The AJO is an expanded big band. It showcases the traditional big band sound of five trumpets, four trombones, and five saxophones with the added flavor of the tuba and guitar. Members of the group consists of high school music educators, college professors, and college students all who have the interest to perform on a regular basis. The orchestra is made up of members such as: Musical Director Matthew Pray, saxophone players: Hans Himelien, Nelson Bosworth, Wayne Davison, Todd Pray, Linda Sullivan. Trombone players: Mike Nystoriak, Rick Davies, Andrew West, Casey Belrose, and JoLee Yeddo, Trumpets: Matthew Pray, Herm Matlock, Bill Long, Matt Kasprzak, and Keith Kogut, and rhythm section: Bob Garrow on bass, Michael Lewandowski on drums, and Neil Wright on piano / saxophone.

St. Petersburg Men’s Ensemble to perform

PLATTSBURGH — The St. Petersburg Men’s Ensemble will be appearing at the Westport Federated Church, 6486 Main Street, on Sunday, Dec. 8 at 7 p.m. A free will offering will be collected to support their US tour. The St. Petersburg Men’s Ensemble, which includes the talents of Kirill Sokolov, Sergey Shapinskiy, Vadim Smantser, and Andrei Volikov, has been performing in churches throughout the United States since 2002. Their concerts reflect their culture and heritage, with a balance of sacred songs by Russian composers, and Russian folk songs. The members of The St. Petersburg Russian Men’s Ensemble bring extensive training and experience to the presentation of Russian folk songs and sacred selections. Members of the Ensemble have attended the Glinka Choir School and the St. Petersburg Conservatory. They have sung with many choirs and vocal groups including the State Academic Capella and the Choir of Smolny Cathedral. This year’s concert will feature choral works by Stravinsky, Tchaikovsky and Taneyev, among others. A free will offering will be collected to support their US Tour.

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PLATTSBURGH — Disability Self Advocacy Support Group, North Country Center for Independence, 80 Sharon Ave, noon- 2 p.m. 563-9058. ELLENBURG — Turbo Kick class, Ellenburg Town Hall, 13 Brandy Brook Road, $7. 6- 6:45 p.m. PLATTSBURGH — North Country Ballet Presents “The Nutcracker,” SUNY Plattsburgh Hartman Theatre, Myers Fine Arts Building, 7:30 p.m. www.north-countryballet-ensemble.org. ELLENBURG — Zumba dance-fitness party, Ellenburg Town Hall, 13 Brandy Brook Road, $5. 6:45 - 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, Nov. 30

PLATTSBURGH — Figure Drawing Practice Group, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 10:30a.m. - 12:30p.m. $5-$10, 563-1604. LAKE PLACID — Wing Chun Kung Fu Classes, 462 Averyville Lane, 10-11 a.m. 524-1834 or email ipmanwingchunlp@gmail.com. ESSEX — Saturday Therapuetic Yoga, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 10-11:15 a.m. $12. 963-4300. SARANAC LAKE — Live at BluStage: Samuel James to perform, BluSeed Studios, 24 Cedar Street, 7:30 p.m. $15, $12 BluSeed Members, 891-3799, www.bluseedstudios.org. PLATTSBURGH — North Country Ballet Presents “The Nutcracker,” SUNY Plattsburgh Hartman Theatre, Myers Fine Arts Building, 2 and 7:30 p.m. www.north-country-ballet-ensemble.org.

Sunday, Dec. 1

PLATTSBURGH — Free Yoga with Chelsea Varin, ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, noon. PLATTSBURGH — Purple Sunday Shopping Relay For Life Craft and Vendor Fair, Gym at the City of Plattsburgh Recreation Center, US Oval. $3 donation for a door prize. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 569-7850. PLATTSBURGH — North Country Ballet Presents “The Nutcracker,” SUNY Plattsburgh Hartman Theatre, Myers Fine Arts Building, 2 p.m. www.north-country-ballet-ensemble.org.

Monday, Dec. 2

PLATTSBURGH — Figure Drawing Practice Group, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. $5-$10, 563-1604. PLATTSBURGH — Senior Citizen Computer Club of Clinton County “Best Buy” meeting, Senior Citizens Center, 5139 North Catherine Street, 1:30 p.m. WEST CHAZY — Zumba combination class, JCEO, 62 Cemetary Road, 6 - 7:30 p.m. $5. ESSEX — Monday Multi Level Yoga, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 4:30-5:45 p.m. $12. 963-4300.

Tuesday, Dec. 3

ter for Independence, 80 Sharon Ave, noon- 2 p.m. 563-9058. ELIZABETHTOWN — Advent Noontime Meditations, United Church of Christ, 7580 Court Street, 12:15 p.m. SARANAC LAKE — Sparkle Village Craft Show and Sale, Harrietstown Town Hall, 39 Main Street, 4- 8 p.m. $2. 891-1990.or email: katy@saranaclake.com. ELLENBURG — Turbo Kick class, Ellenburg Town Hall, 13 Brandy Brook Road, $7. 6- 6:45 p.m. ELLENBURG — Zumba dance-fitness party, Ellenburg Town Hall, 13 Brandy Brook Road, $5. 6:45 - 7:30 p.m. PLATTSBURGH — The SUNY Plattsburgh Jazz Ensemble Winter Concert Herm Matlock, Mambo Combo and Shawn Parrotte, SUNY Plattsburgh, E. Glenn Giltz Auditorium, Hawkins Hall, 101 Broad Street, 7:30 p.m. PLATTSBURGH — The Schmooze performs at Olive Ridley’s, 37 Court Street, 10 p.m. $3-$5.

Saturday, Dec. 7

SARANAC LAKE — Sparkle Village Craft Show and Sale, Harrietstown Town Hall, 39 Main Street, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. $2. 891-1990 or email: katy@saranaclake.com. ESSEX — Saturday Therapuetic Yoga, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 10-11:15 a.m. $12. 963-4300. WILMINGTON — Riverside Thrift Shop open Wednesdays and Saturdays, Adjacent to the Whiteface Community United Methodist Church, Route 86 and Haselton Road, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. 946-2922. LAKE PLACID —Author Signing with Vicki Addesso Dodd “A Moose In My Stable” Brian Heinz “The Coming of Winter in the Adirondacks”, The Bookstore Plus, Main Street, 3 - 5 p.m. www.thebookstoreplus.com, 523-2950. SARANAC LAKE — Clay Gingerbread House holiday family workshop with Artist Carol Vossler, BluSeed Studios, 24 Cedar Street, Two sessions of this class: 10 a.m. – noon, and a repeat afternoon session 1– 3p.m. $50 per family. 891-3799 or admin@bluseedstudios.org. PLATTSBURGH — Christmas Tea and Bazaar, noon- 3 p.m. Plattsburgh First Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall, corner of Brinkerhoff and Marian Streets. PLATTSBURGH — Figure Drawing Practice Group, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 10:30a.m. - 12:30p.m. $5-$10, 563-1604. PLATTSBURGH — Hot Neon Magic performs at Olive Ridley’s, 37 Court Street, 10 p.m. $3-$5.

Sunday, Dec. 8

TUPPER LAKE — Tupper Lake High Peaks Opera will host the annual Tri-Lakes Community Sing of Handel’s Messiah, at Holy Name Catholic Church, 113 Main Street, 3 p.m. WEST CHAZY — 2nd Annual West Chazy Auxiliary Holly Jolly Christmas Party, JCEO Building/West Chazy Town Hall, 7734 Route 22. PLATTSBURGH — Soulful Christmas 2013 presented by SUNY Plattsburgh’s Gospel Choir, E. Glenn Giltz Auditorium, Hawkins Hall, 101 Broad Street, 4-6 p.m. $15 general and $8 for students. www.plattsburghstategospelchoir.org. LAKE PLACID — Wing Chun Kung Fu Classes, 462 Averyville Lane, 10-11 a.m. 524-1834 or email ipmanwingchunlp@gmail.com. CHAZY — Christmas Open House at the Chazy Public Library, 1329 Fisk Road, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

PLATTSBURGH — Free Table Top Cooking by Shelly Pelkey and Thomas Mullen, North Country Center for Independence, 80 Sharon Ave, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 563-9058. PLATTSBURGH — Realistic Freestyle Self Defense, ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 5:30 p.m. $15. 645-6960. WHALLONSBURG — “The Battle for Christmas: A Cultural History of America’s Most Cherished Tradition” holiday lecture, The Whallonsburg Grange Hall, 7:30 p.m. $5 donation, www.thegrangehall.info. PLATTSBURGH — Trans Pacific Partnership Info Rally & Demonstration, Corner of Broad & Beekman streets, noon, 561-0291 PLATTSBURGH — Free 12-step Addiction Recovery Program every Tuesday night, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 26 Dennis Avenue, 5:30 - 6:30p.m. 561-1092.

WEST CHAZY — Zumba combination class, JCEO, 62 Cemetary Road, 6 - 7:30 p.m. $5. ESSEX — Monday Multi Level Yoga, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 4:30-5:45 p.m. $12. 963-4300. PLATTSBURGH — Figure Drawing Practice Group, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. $5-$10, 563-1604.

Wednesday, Dec. 4

Tuesday, Dec. 10

LAKE PLACID — LPCA Green Market Wednesday & Farmers’ Market, Lake Placid Center for the Arts, 17 Algonquin Drive, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 523-2512. www.LakePlacidFarmersMarket.com. ELIZABETHTOWN — Al-Anon Family Group for families and friends of problem drinkers to meet at the Hand House, 8273 River Street, noon - 1p.m. UPPER JAY — The Affordable Care Act And The New York State Of Health Official Health Plan Marketplace, presentation by Jill Rock, Education and Outreach Specialist, Adirondack Health Institute, Wells Memorial Library, 12230 New York 9N, 1-2 p.m. RSVP by Tuesday, Nov. 26, 946-2644. WILMINGTON — Riverside Thrift Shop open Wednesdays and Saturdays, Adjacent to the Whiteface Community United Methodist Church, Route 86 and Haselton Road, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. 946-2922. ESSEX — Wednesday Multi Level Yoga, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 5:30-6:45 p.m. $12. 963-4300. LAKE PLACID — Wing Chun Kung Fu youth classes for students age 12 and older, 462 Averyville Lane, 4:30 - 6 p.m. 524-1834 or email ipmanwingchunlp@ gmail.com. PLATTSBURGH — “A Radical Church’s Journey” in Opposing Slavery to Be Showcased in Talk, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, 4 Palmer Street, 7 p.m. 708-5607, www.northcountryundergroundrailroad.com. PLATTSBURGH — Michael Fratino’s student guitar ensembles concert, SUNY Plattsburgh, E. Glenn Giltz Auditorium, Hawkins Hall, 101 Broad Street. 7:30-9 p.m. PLATTSBURGH — Adirondack Jazz Orchestra performs at Olive Ridley’s, 37 Court Street, 8 -10 p.m. $3-$5.

Thursday, Dec. 5

ESSEX — Thursday Vinyasa/Flow Yoga, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 10-11:15 a.m. $12. 963-4300. PLATTSBURGH — Open Portrait Sessions every Thursday, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 10 a.m. - noon. $5-$10. 563-1604. ESSEX — Kids’ Yoga Thursdays, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 4-5 p.m. $12. 963-4300. PLATTSBURGH —The Northeastern Zone of the New York State Retired Teachers’ Association’s winter luncheon is open to all retired educators, Elks Club, 56 Cumberland Ave, 11 a.m. 563-0795. WILMINGTON — Ecumenical Food Pantry is open in the Reuben Sanford Building on Thursdays, Adjacent to the Whiteface Community United Methodist Church, Route 86 and Haselton Road, 4-6 p.m. 946-2922. WILMINGTON —Senior Lunch program under the director Tiffany Thomas serves lunch on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Adjacent to the Whiteface Community United Methodist Church, Route 86 and Haselton Road, 11:30 a.m. -2 p.m. SARANAC LAKE — Lucas Christenson will present “Fledging Cro: Community Farm Rising,” Cantwell Community Room at the Saranac Lake Free Library, 109 Main Street, noon, 891-4190. WESTPORT — 2nd Annual Holiday (Firetruck) Parade with Santa Hosted by the Westport Fire District, traveling from Wadhams down through Westport will end at the tree on the Library Lawn, 5 p.m. WESTPORT — Meet & Greet with Santa and tree lighting, Westport Library Lawn, Main Street, 6 p.m. PLATTSBURGH — Realistic Freestyle Self Defense, ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 5:30 p.m. $15. 645-6960. LAKE PLACID — Wing Chun Kung Fu Classes, 462 Averyville Lane, 4:30 - 6 p.m. 524-1834 or email ipmanwingchunlp@gmail.com. PLATTSBURGH — Still Life Painting practice group, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 6:30 - 8 p.m. $10. PLATTSBURGH — Rough Riders Jr. Rifle Team practice, Indoor Shooting Range located at the Plattsburgh Rod & Gun Club, 7450 Route 9 North, 6:30 p.m. Family membership $40 for the year, Students pay $5 a night to shoot. 298-7776. PLATTSBURGH — Open Mic Poetry Night, ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 8 p.m.

Friday, Dec. 6

PLATTSBURGH — Senior History Presentations of student’s independent research, Alumni Conference Room, Angell College Center, 101 Broad Street, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 564-5212. PLATTSBURGH — Disability Self Advocacy Support Group, North Country Cen-

Monday, Dec. 9

PLATTSBURGH — Free Table Top Cooking by Shelly Pelkey and Thomas Mullen, North Country Center for Independence, 80 Sharon Ave, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 563-9058. PLATTSBURGH — Free 12-step Addiction Recovery Program every Tuesday night, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 26 Dennis Avenue, 5:30 - 6:30p.m. 561-1092. WILMINGTON —Senior Lunch program under the director Tiffany Thomas serves lunch on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Adjacent to the Whiteface Community United Methodist Church, Route 86 and Haselton Road, 11:30 a.m. -2 p.m. PLATTSBURGH — Realistic Freestyle Self Defense, ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 5:30 p.m. $15. 645-6960.

Wednesday, Dec. 11

LAKE PLACID — LPCA Green Market Wednesday & Farmers’ Market, Lake Placid Center for the Arts, 17 Algonquin Drive, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 523-2512. www.LakePlacidFarmersMarket.com. WILMINGTON — Riverside Thrift Shop open Wednesdays and Saturdays, Adjacent to the Whiteface Community United Methodist Church, Route 86 and Haselton Road, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. 946-2922. ELIZABETHTOWN — Al-Anon Family Group for families and friends of problem drinkers to meet at the Hand House, 8273 River Street, noon - 1p.m. PLATTSBURGH — Friends of Art Tea and Desserts, Joseph C. and Joan T. Burke Gallery, Myers Fine Arts Building. Tea to follow in the adjoining Winkel Sculpture Court. Cost: $18. RSVP by Friday, Dec. 6. Contact Connie Nephew, museum office secretary at 518-564-2474 or nephewcl@plattsburgh.edu. ESSEX — Wednesday Multi Level Yoga, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 5:30-6:45 p.m. $12. 963-4300. LAKE PLACID — Wing Chun Kung Fu youth classes for students age 12 and older, 462 Averyville Lane, 4:30 - 6 p.m. 524-1834 or email ipmanwingchunlp@ gmail.com. PLATTSBURGH — Completely Stranded Stand Up Comedy performs at Olive Ridley’s, 37 Court Street, 8-10 p.m.

Thursday, Dec. 12

ESSEX — Thursday Vinyasa/Flow Yoga, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 10-11:15 a.m. $12. 963-4300. PLATTSBURGH — Open Portrait Sessions every Thursday, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 10 a.m. - noon. $5-$10. 563-1604. WILMINGTON — Ecumenical Food Pantry is open in the Reuben Sanford Building on Thursdays, Adjacent to the Whiteface Community United Methodist Church, Route 86 and Haselton Road, 4-6 p.m. 946-2922. WILMINGTON —Senior Lunch program under the director Tiffany Thomas serves lunch on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Adjacent to the Whiteface Community United Methodist Church, Route 86 and Haselton Road, 11:30 a.m. -2 p.m. PLATTSBURGH — Free Health Insurance Workshops hosted by the Chamber of Commerce, North Country Chamber, 7061 Route 9, noon. 563-1000. ESSEX — Kids’ Yoga Thursdays, Lake Champlain Yoga, 2310 Main Street, 4-5 p.m. $12. 963-4300. PLATTSBURGH — Realistic Freestyle Self Defense, ROTA Gallery, 50 Margaret Street, 5:30 p.m. $15. 645-6960. CHAZY — Holiday Music with Speedy & Alice, the Alice T. Miner Museum, 9618 Route 9, 7 p.m. 846-7336. CHAZY — Farm Transfer/Retirement Workshops Set for Farmers interested in transferring their farm to the next generation or another buyer, Miner Institute, 1034 Miner Farm Road, 962-4810 x409. WESTPORT — Baked Ham and Scalloped Potato Dinner, Westport Federated Church, Main Street, beings at 4:30 p.m. $9, $4 for kids. PLATTSBURGH — Rough Riders Jr. Rifle Team practice, Indoor Shooting Range located at the Plattsburgh Rod & Gun Club, 7450 Route 9 North, 6:30 p.m. Family membership $40 for the year, Students pay $5 a night to shoot. 298-7776. LAKE PLACID — Wing Chun Kung Fu Classes, 462 Averyville Lane, 4:30 - 6 p.m. 524-1834 or email ipmanwingchunlp@gmail.com. PLATTSBURGH — Still Life Painting practice group, North Country Cultural Center for the Arts, 23 Brinkerhoff Street, 6:30 - 8 p.m. $10.

Friday, Dec. 13

PLATTSBURGH — Disability Self Advocacy Support Group, North Country Cen


6 - Valley News • TL

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November 30, 2013

Lake Placid annual Village Holiday Stroll set next weekend By Keith Lobdell

keith@denpubs.com LAKE PLACID Ñ Arts, entertainment, music, events and shopping come together in the Olympic Village of Lake Placid each year for three days known as the Lake Placid Holiday Village Stroll. The Stroll, taking place this year starting Friday, Dec. 6, and running through Sunday, Dec. 8, throughout the village with events happening at several theaters, hotels and businesses. Ò The second weekend of each December, hundreds of visitors and residents join in a three day family-friendly celebration of the holidays in the quaint alpine village of Lake Placid,Ó said Kim Rielly of the Lake Placid Visitors Center/Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism. Ò The Lake Placid Holiday Village Stroll event includes a fun run, shopping, festive family fun, arts and entertainment.Ó Arts start the weekend events Dec. 6 with a artistsÕ celebration at the Northwoods Inn. The reception, held from 5 to 7 p.m., will showcase artists displaying various creations, which will be at the inn for viewing throughout the weekend. At 6 p.m., there will be a crafting event at the Lake Placid Olympic Museum, located at the Olympic Center. The event is put on by the Lake Placid-North Elba Historical Society and the museum. The event will run until 7 p.m. Also at the Olympic Center, people can take to the ice for the Holiday Skating Party. While those attending the event are asked to bring their own set of skates, rentals will be available. Saturday, Dec. 7, starts early with the annual Jingle Bell Run/ Walk, with registration starting at 7 a.m. at the Village Beach (racers can also register at Active.com). Racing begins at 8:30 a.m. with proceeds benefiting Adirondack Health’s “Fit for Life,” campaign. From 10 to 11 a.m. there will be an ornament making workshop inspired by Olympic medals at the Olympic Museum. Holiday Story Time will take place at the Mirror Lake Inn from 11 to 11:30 a.m. The big moment for children will take place starting at noon Saturday, as Santa Claus will arrive in Lake Placid thanks to the help of the Lake Placid Fire Department. The Ò Jolly Ole ElfÓ will make his way to MidÕ s Park, where there will be complimentary hot chocolate and holiday music to set the mood. Santa then gets to be the special guest at 5 p.m. for the annual MidÕ s Park Holiday Celebration, which includes a tree lighting, a musical performance by the Lake Placid High School chorus and the lighting of the Yule Log. Now, in order to light the Yule Log, you have to find it, which will be the focus of the High Peaks Resort Yule Log Hunt, which will start at 4:30 p.m. Those interested in hunting down the elusive log van meet at the corner of Saranac Avenue and Main Street to learn more about the tradition and then put their investigative hats on and join the search. Other events throughout the afternoon Dec. 7 include a childrenÕ s holiday crafts workshop at High Peaks Resort from 1 to 2:30 p.m.; Main Street Tastings, featuring treats and refreshment from several restaurants in the village from 1 until 2 p.m.; gift wrapping and wine tasting at The Pines Inn from 2:30 until 3:30 p.m. and free holiday movies at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts from 3 to 4 p.m. The evening ends with a special performance of Ò The Nutcracker Ballet,Ó at LPCA starting at 7:30 p.m. On Sunday, Dec. 8, families can start their morning with Santa Claus as he will make the rounds to several local hotels for breakfeast with Santa from 8:30 until 10:30 a.m. Throughout the day, Whiteface Mountain in Wilmington will be offering a Ò Super SundayÓ $40 lift tickets and will host a slope slide, games, food specials and drink specials. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Generations will be hosting a candy house making event that will be free with the purchase of a breakfast. The Palace Theater will be hosting a special screening of Ò The Polar Express,Ó at 10 a.m., while the LPCA will present an encore of Ò The NutcrackerÓ at 1 p.m. The weekend concludes at 5 p.m. at the Olympic Center with a special holiday skating show and the coronation of the King and Queen. New this year, The Lake Placid Holiday Village Stroll committee is inviting all interested artists to participate in its Inaugural Poster Design Competition. Each year, a poster is designed and distributed throughout the region to promote the Stroll. For 2014, the committee is looking for a unique poster design to capture the essence of this annual event. The winning design will be announced at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts Holiday Stroll Artist Reception and Show on Dec. 7 at 3 p.m. The winner will be notified in advance by email. For more information on the annual Lake Placid Holiday Village Stroll, visit lakeplacid.com/holidays.


November 30, 2013

Health officials still warn of Lyme Disease dangers ELIZABETHTOWN Ñ Even though the weather has taken a turn for the cool, public health officials are still warning about a disease more known for being contracted in the summer months. Ò The close of 2013 has provided us with relatively warm weather conditions that support extended activity of ticks and potential human exposure to Lyme Disease,Ó Essex County Public Health Director Linda Beers said. The Essex County Public Health Communicable Disease program conducts surveillance of Lyme; provider outreach about increased activity, reporting and testing recommendations; and community education and prevention outreach. Ò Because of the weather conditions this fall and extended season of risk for the transmission of Lyme Disease, it is important people continue to be aware of risk and how best to protect themselves,Ó said Beers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends conducting a full body check after being outdoors. Parents should check their children for ticks behind knees and between legs, inside the

TL • Valley News - 7

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belly button, under arms, behind the knees, around the ears and especially in hair. Ticks must typically be attached for longer than 36 hours to transmit the bacteria-causing Lyme Disease to people. If an attached tick is found, remove it by grasping firmly and as close to the skin as possible with tweezers and pulling straight up. Wash the bite site with warm soap and water or rubbing alcohol to clean it. Contact your health care provider if a rash develops or you think the tick may have been attached for longer than 36 hours. Typical symptoms of Lyme Disease include headache, fatigue, fever, and a bulls-eye rash. Left un-diagnosed or untreated those infected may also experience joint, heart and nervous system symptoms. For more information about tick protection around your home, and preventing Lyme Disease in people and pets, visit co.essex.ny.us/PublicHealth and click on the Lyme Disease button from the home page. Your doctor or a public health nurse (873-3500) are also able to answer your questions.

Wendy Courtright, Elizabethtown Branch Manager of the Ticonderoga Federal Credit Union (TFCU), and Alan Jones Adirondack Community Action Programs CEO, unloading food collected at the TFCU’s annual Shred Fest. Photo provoded

Shredfest leads to donation

ELIZABETHTOWN — The Adirondack Community Action Program (ACAP) was the beneficiary of some food donations during Ticonderoga Federal Credit UnionÕ s Credit Union Week celebrations. During Shredfest, an event held as part of Credit Union Week, which included three member appreciation barbecues and a carnival-themed member appreciation event, the free paper shredding event aimed at increasing public awareness of identity theft prevention produced over 5600 lbs. of shredded paper, resulting in a $443.10 donation to be split among three area food pantries, including ACAP. The public was invited to bring their personally identifying documents to shred on site in a mobile shredding truck. Non-perishable food donations were accepted in exchange for free paper-shredding and divided among three area food pantries.

NYSP blotter

Domestic incident leads to arrest ELIZABETHTOWN Ñ On Nov. 16, at approximately 10:30 p.m., State Police responded to 76 Water St, in the town of Elizabethtown for a report of domestic violence. Jessica L. Decker (left), 26, of Willsboro, was subsequently arrested for damaging multiple items at that address, biting one of the victimÕ s in the face, causing injury, as well as resisting arrest and attempted assault on the responding troopers. After being taken into custody, Decker damaged the troopers patrol vehicle when she kicked at the windshield several times, causing it to shatter. Decker was charged with Criminal Mischief Third Degree, Disorderly Conduct, two counts of Criminal Mischief Fourth Degree, Resisting Arrest, Assault Third Degree, two counts of Attempted Assault Third Degree and Obstruction of Governmental Administration Second Degree. She was arraigned in the Town of Elizabethtown Court and remanded to the Essex County Jail in lieu of $10,000 cash bail or $20,000 bond. She is to reappear on Dec. 12, at 1:30 p.m. Another suspect in the domestic dispute, Kyle P. Gowett, 23, was later charged with Harassment Second and Obstruction of Governmental Administration.

Burglary suspects charged LAKE PLACID Ñ On Nov. 18, Tara L. Reynolds (above right), 34, and Brandon S. Duby (below right), 22, of Peru were charged in connection to three burglaries in the Town of North Elba in September. On Sept. 20, Duby and Reynolds were arrested while committing a burglary at an unoccupied residence on Plank Road in Ellenburg. Following their arrest and a lengthy investigation, the two were found to have committed multiple burglaries throughout Clinton and Essex Counties. They were charged with the burglaries in Clinton County last month. State Police have now charged Duby and Reynolds with burglaries at the Olympic Ski Jump Facility Gift Shop on State Route 73 in Lake Placid; Personal Expressions Salon, Saranac Avenue, Lake Placid; and South Meadow Farms, Sugarworks Way, Lake Placid; which were all reported between the dates of Sept. 15 and Sept. 21. Duby was charged with two counts of Burglary Third Degree, and one count of Burglary Second Degree. Reynolds was charged with three counts of Burglary Third Degree. Both were arraigned in the Town of North Elba Court. Duby was remanded back to Clinton County Jail in lieu of $15,000 cash bail, $30,000 bond. Reynolds was remanded back to Clinton County Jail on no bail.

Mich. fugitive arrested in SL SARANAC LAKE Ñ On Nov. 20, State Police received information that a fugitive from the state of Michigan was currently residing in Saranac Lake. Christie Hope-Erwin Clancy, 33, of Westland, Mich., was wanted for kidnapping her two children, a four- and a 6-year old, after fleeing from Michigan with them in August, failing to return them to their father, the custodial parent. State Police and the Saranac Lake Police Department located Clancy residing in Saranac Lake and subsequently took her into custody. The two children who were kidnapped are currently in the custody of Child Protective Services. ClancyÕ s two other young children who were also living in the Saranac Lake home have also been turned over to CPS. Clancy is currently in Franklin County Jail awaiting extradition.

Toy drive set in Au Sable Forks

ELIZABETHTOWN Ñ The gift shop at the Adirondack History Center Museum will be open on Friday, Dec. 6, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Come to the museum and find the perfect gift for family and friends. Browse our shop for books, puppets, prints, music and stocking stuffers or give a museum membership as a gift. Members receive a 10 percent discount on all purchases. For more information call the museum at 873-6466 or email echs@adkhistorycenter.org.

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Museum gift shop to be opened

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UPPER JAY Ñ The Wells Memorial Library in Upper Jay will host Ò The Affordable Care Act and the New York State of Health Official Health Plan Marketplace,” presentation by Jill Rock, Education & Outreach Specialist, Adirondack Health Institute, on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at 1 p.m. RSVP by Tuesday, Nov. 26, by contacting 946-2644 or wellslib@primelink1.net.

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236.............Altona/Mooers 251.................North Creek 293.......................Saranac 297...............Rouses Point 298...................Champlain 327.................Paul Smiths 352..............Blue Mt. Lake 358...............Ft. Covington 359................Tupper Lake 483........................Malone 492.................Dannemora 493.................West Chazy 494................Chestertown 497.................Chateaugay 499.....................Whitehall 523..................Lake Placid 529...........................Moria 532..............Schroon Lake 543..........................Hague 546.......Port Henry/Moriah 547........................Putnam 561-566...........Plattsburgh 576....Keene/Keene Valley 581,583,584,587 ..............Saratoga Springs 582....................Newcomb 585................Ticonderoga 594..........Ellenburg Depot 597.................Crown Point 623...............Warrensburg 624...................Long Lake 638............Argyle/Hartford 639.......................Fort Ann 642......................Granville 643.............................Peru 644............Bolton Landing 647.............Ausable Forks 648..................Indian Lake 654.........................Corinth 668...............Lake George 695................Schuylerville 735.............Lyon Mountain 746,747..........Fort Edward / Hudson Falls 743,744,745,748,761,792, 793,796,798. . . .Glens Falls 834....................Keeseville 846..........................Chazy 856.............Dickerson Ctr. 873....Elizabethtown/Lewis 891..............Saranac Lake 942......................Mineville 946..................Wilmington 962......................Westport 963...........Willsboro/Essex

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Au SABLE FORKS — The holiday season is just around the corner; a sign that it is time to begin fundraising efforts for the Annual Holiday Toy Drive. This annual event has given numerous families in the towns of Jay and Black Brook residents a much brighter Christmas day because children awake to presents under the tree. Ò With continued generosity of the community, we can once again unite in making certain each child has a very merry Christmas,Ó Kelly Murphy said. Ò I once again ask for your support in helping families who are less fortunate during this time of the year. Ò Along with the Annual Toy Drive, Murphy has begun her fundraising campaign for the Annual Holiday (Christmas) Meal Basket Drive (Town of Jay and Black Brook residents). Approximately 50 Meal Baskets were given for the 2013 holiday season due to the generosity of community members. Holiday Meal Baskets consist of the following items: Turkey, vegetables, gravy, stuffing, potatoes, dinner rolls and one pie. To donate items or make a monetary contribution, contact Murphy at 524-5806 or kirish212@yahoo.com. To donate an unwrapped toy for a boy or girl or to make a monetary contribution, please contact Cynthia Murphy at 647-8264 or kirish212@yahoo.com. Please keep teenagers in mind as well. Gifts may be dropped off at M&M Diner in Au Sable Forks anytime during business hours. Families who wish to sign up for the Toy Drive are encouraged to obtain a an application at M&M Diner. Deadline for submission is Dec. 15.

North Country Telephone Exchange Directory (518)

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247.......................Brandon 372....................Grand Isle 388...................Middlebury 425......................Charlotte 434....................Richmond 438...............West Rutland 453.......Bristol/New Haven 462......................Cornwall 475.........................Panton 482....................Hinesburg 545...................Weybridge 655......................Winooski 658....................Burlington 758........................Bridport 759.......................Addison 654,655,656,657,658,660, 860,862,863,864,865,951, 985....................Burlington 877...................Vergennes 769,871,872,878,879 ..................Essex Junction 893...........................Milton 897....................Shoreham 899......................Underhill 948..........................Orwell 888....................Shelburne

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November 30, 2013

AuSable Valley CS hosts student musicians for Area All State By Keith Lobdell

keith@denpubs.com

Members of the Area All State mixed chorus participate in a dress rehearsal before the Nov. 23 concert at AuSable Valley Middle/High School. Photo by Keith Lobdell

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CLINTONVILLE Ñ More than 250 students from Essex and Franklin County schools made their way to Au Sable Valley to participate in the annual Zone 6 Area All State Concert Saturday, Nov. 23. The concert, hosted by the Middle/High School at AVCS, featured the best regional music students performing in concert band, womenÕ s chorus, mixed chorus and jazz ensemble. Students participated in two days of practice starting Friday, Nov. and throughout the following morning before participating in the Saturday concert. The concert was chaired by AVCS music teachers Steven Collier and Terry Saulsgiver. Michael Nystoriak was the band chairperson; Elizabeth Cordes the women’s chorus chair; and William Verity the mixed chorus chair. Saulsgiver and Jennifer Moore co-chaired the jazz ensemble. The concert band was conducted by Rick Regan and performed Ò Intrada,Ó Ò Variations On A Korean Folksong,Ó Ò Cloudburst,Ó and Ò Undertow.Ó Local members included: Saranac Lake: Anna Izzo (flute), Dominique Santiago (clarinet), Cassitty Rose (clarinet), Mitchell Deleel (trumpet), Haakon Pederson (euphonium) Tupper Lake: Kendall Davison (trumpet) The womenÕ s chorus was conducted by Dr. Barbara A. Brinson and accompanied by Elizabeth Cordes. They performed Ò Sound the Trumpet,Ó Ò Nigra Sum,Ó (violin accompaniment by Elaine Dewar and Dorit Gaedtke) Ò Fly, Singing Bird,Ó Ò Danny Boy,Ó and Ò Bring Me Little Water, Silvy.Ó Local members included: Lake Placid: Ally Wallace, Ashley Chris, Audrey Draper, Liza Marinis, Victoria OÕ Leary, Laura Stanton, Adele Jesmer, Hanna Potter, Ma-

toaka Riedl Saranac Lake: Ivy Huber, Elodie Linck, Maeve Peer, Julia Detar, Logan Hochwald, Olivia Hunt, Levi Valentin, Selena Baillargeon, Elsa Evans Kummer, Kaitlin Lawless, Morgan Paul The mixed chorus was under the direction of Jason Dashew with Collier as the accompanist. They performed Ò Cantate Domino,Ó Ò That I Ever Saw,Ó Ò Can You Hear,Ó Ò The Seal Lullaby,Ó and Ò Take Me to the Water.Ó Local members included: Lake Placid: Brenna Garrett, Sophie Morelli, Melissa Rath, Marina Waldy, Samantha Barney, Colin Briggs, Nick Saulpaugh, William Waldy, Davey Mihill, Blake Rey Saranac Lake: Autumn Buerkett, Gina Fiorille, Laura Kleist, Ellen Miner, Naomi Brandt, Shanna Buckley, Alexa Clark, Kasandra Cunningham, Rachel Fortier, Louisa Hameline, Dana Holmlund, Autumn LeFebvre, Liz Loso, Chloe Peer, Olivia Pridell, Maria Rothaupt, Esther Seacord, Michael Cross, Peter Curtis, Cameron Czadzexk, Matthew Keating, Pavel Khavlyuk, Austin Larabie, Max Paul, Will Gray, Eli Hameline, Michael Monroe, Mikey Rice, Ian Urquhart Tupper Lake: Theresa Bower, Annachristi Cordes, Mikaela Salem, Brionna Staves, Ian Gillis, Lance Vaillancourt Joel A. Martin conducted the jazz ensemble, which performed Ò It DonÕ t Mean a Thing if it AinÕ t Got That Swing,Ó Ò All of Me,Ó Ò Chopin in C Minor Prelude (Jazzical),Ó Ò Preluda Swinga Samba,Ó Ò Blue Miles,Ó and Ò Jive Samba.Ó Local members included: AuSable Valley: Noura Moussa (piano) Saranac Lake: Samantha Martin (saxophone), Chandler Gach (saxophone), Justina Hewitt (baritone saxophone), Ryan Murray (trumpet), Chaz Morgan (trumpet), Donny Nadon (trumpet), Evan Olsen (trombone), Travis Buck (bass).

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November 30, 2013

Veteran’s Highway

Continued from page 1

The Wilmington/Whiteface uphill bike race is one of many events utilizing the Veteran’s Memorial Highway.

ÒT he VeteranÕ s Highway has been in a bad state of repair for a very long period of time,Ó Cuomo said in making the announcement at the Lake Placid Conference Center. ÒI t is a great tourism attraction but it needs a lot of work. As a monument to our veterans, it should be in top flight shape.” ÒWh iteface Mountain is a special place within the state of New York,Ó ORDA Chair Pat Bennett said. ÒI t is our responsibility to keep these assets in good shape and Gov. Cuomo recognizes the importance of these ski areas to the economy of the North Country. This will enhance our efforts to make Whiteface Mountain a destination in the state and make our North Country economy more viable.Ó ÒT he highway is just the most gorgeous spot in the world,Ó Sen. Bettly Little said. ÒG ov. Cuomo knows how important tourism in to all of us here and it is wonderful that they would make this kind of investment here.Ó ÒT his is the product of allowing our own communities and region to pave their own roads to economic success,Ó Assemblyman Dan Stec said. ÒI am so thrilled the state is stepping up to fund these repairs,Ó Jay Supervisor and Essex County Chairman Randy Douglas said. ÒI t is a wonderful day to have the Governor come up here and lay that news on us,Ó ORDA President and CEO Ted Blazer said. ÒT hey have laid out a great plan to get the facility up to tip-top condition.Ó Blazer said that the road would continue to be a seasonal use highway. ÒWh en we toured the area with the state (Nov. 19), it was wild and woolly up there and we are just getting into November,Ó Blazer said. ÒW e will rely on DOT to come up with the plan and then we will work closely with them to get the proper permitting in place.Ó Blazer said that the construction may cause some disruptions in traffic patterns. ÒI t will involve some change in the normal operating schedule,Ó he said. ÒW e will work with the DOT to see how we can have traffic move around during the heaviest parts of the tourism season.” DOT Commissioner Joan McDonald said that the state will look for contractors with the, Òb est value,Ó t o work on the project. ÒW e will sit down with everyone involved and weigh our options,Ó McDonald said. ÒW e will look at the impacts of a complete closure, alternating one lane of service or the traditional phased plan. What we will look for is the way to get this done as quickly as possible as we deal with the weather and tourism.Ó Open from mid-May to mid-October each year, the highway is traveled yearly by more than 28,500 vehicles as well as numerous cyclists and hikers that traverse the eight-mile scenic roadway to the 4,867 foot high peak of Whiteface Mountain. In October 2008, the complex was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The highway has not been resurfaced since the early 1960s.

OBITUARIES ROBERT R. PURDY AUG 20, 1935 - NOV 13, 2013 Elizabethtown and Keene; family and going for rides in Robert R. Purdy, 78, passed the car with Denise. He was a away early Wednesday special person who will be morning, missed. November 13, 2013, at his Survivors include his loving home. wife Denise of Bob was born Elizabethtown; August 20, 1935 His daughters in Greece NY, Diane of Keene; the son of the Tammy Leon of late Wilmont Milwaukee, WI, Monty and Anna Heather (Rob) Lorraine (Burritt) Shaw of Lake Purdy. Bob was Placid; Nichole also predeceased (Ty) FitzGerald by his son Bobby of Colchester Vt. in 2006. and Brittany Bob was a veterPurdy of Elizaan of the US Air Force, servbethtown; his daughter-in ing from 1952 until 1956.He law Debbie of Peru; his sister was Supervisor of the Town Beverly (Paul) Greenwood of of Keene from 1970 until 1982 Keene and his brother and from 1992 until 1997, He Ronald (Katy) Purdy of served as the Essex County Keene; his grandchildren ErFire coordinator for several ic, Zachery and Ali Leon, years. Bob was a member of Thomas Vassar, Nicholas and the Keene Volunteer Fire DeLauren Shaw, Emily, Leah partment for 48 years and and Andrew FitzGerald and served as Commissioner of Shelby and Jake Purdy; his the Department for a time. great grandchildren Lucas He was very active in the Leon and Emmitt Ives; his NYS Association of Counties Aunt Betty Smith of and Towns. Bob was a forRochester, NY, and several mer National Chairman of nieces nephews and the US cousins. Olympic Bob Sled CommitA Memorial Service will be tee and was a bob sled driver held Saturday November 23, for many years. He was a 2013 at 11:00 AM at the member of the American LeKeene Valley Congregational gion Post 504 in AuSable Church. Funeral arrangeForks and a former long time ments are under the direction member of the Keeseville of the Edward L. Kelly Lodge 2072 BPO Elks. Funeral Home in Schroon Bob had many friends all Lake. over the country. He was The family would like known for his jolly personalimemorials to take the form of ty, storytelling, humor and donations to the Keene Volhospitality. He enjoyed cookunteer Fire Department, ing, attending his childrens' Keene, NY 12942, or St. Jude athletic events, riding his Childrens Hospital, 501 St lawn mower on the lawn or Judes Place, Memphis Tn. around town, and he espe38105. cially enjoyed being with his


November 30, 2013

TL • Valley News - 11

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Common Core criticized at Schroon Lake education forum State officials hear complaints from parents, teachers, school leaders By Fred Herbst

fred@denpubs.com SCHROON LAKE Ñ The Common Core learning standards are not popular in the North Country. About 300 people attended a forum on the education program with state officials in Schroon Lake Nov. 20, delivering a clear message Ñ they donÕ t like efforts to standardize learning across the country. John King, state education commissioner, Merryl Tisch, state board of regents chancellor, state Sen. Betty Little and Assemblyman Dan Stec listened as 48 people criticized the Common Core, which was adopted by the state in 2010 and is now being implemented. While everyone supported improved education, no one supported implementation of the Common Core. The Common Core curriculum, which lays out what and how students should learn, has been adopted by 45 states at the urging of the federal government, which gives states Ò Race to the TopÓ money if they participate. ItÕ s critics claim Common Core takes control away from local schools and teachers, while assuming all students learn the same way. The Common Core, standardized testing and KingÕ s presentations have created controversy. Parent groups across New York have been critical of the new standards and the New York State Assessments, which were revised to align with the Common Core. Low scores on the 2013 assessments raised concerns. Unlike a forum in Poughkeepsie, where King was shouted off the stage, the Schroon Lake event was civil. Speakers were required to register in advance and were limited to two minutes. State officials did not directly address any speaker. Kyle Lang, a Ticonderoga English teacher, said the Common Core curriculum discourages reading. He pointed to the seventh grade

English plan that calls for students to spend 10 weeks reading a book on the second Sudanese civil war. Ten weeks is too long to hold student interest, he said, especially in a topic they donÕ t care about. Without Common Core, he said, students could read several books in 10 weeks on a variety of topics. Ò I havenÕ t encountered anything in my 13 years (as a teacher) thatÕ s a greater deterrent to reading,Ó Lang said. Ò We shouldnÕ t be making education decisions in corporate offices.Ó Common Core provides teachers with specific, daily lesson plans for students. King said those plans are optional and local schools can make their own plans. Several teachers and school administrators challenged that assertion. While the lesson plans may be optional, the mandatory standardized tests in Common Core are based on the lesson plans. Not following the lesson plans could lead to poor scores on tests, which are used to evaluate students, teachers and schools. Sarah Fink, a Minerva teacher and parent, questioned the financial wisdom in following the Common Core. Minerva Central School, she said, got $8,000 in Ò Race to the TopÓ money for Common Core, but lost $800,000 in state aid during the past four years. Ò The state must decide to adopt a budget that fully funds the initiatives for which it advocates so strongly,Ó she said. Ò Schools need sufficient time and resources to build the capacity that it will take to uphold the promise at the root of the Common Core. There needs to be a moratorium on high-stakes testing and accountability until the state agrees to restore the funding lost to the Gap Elimination Adjustment and correct the inadequacies in the state aid formula that only further disadvantage our rural Adirondack schools.Ó Many people objected to the Ò one size fits allÓ approach of Common Core. Dan DÕ Agostino of Schroon Lake told state officials he may take his children out of public school because of the Common Core. He said itÕ s wrong to expect every student to meet the same standards. Ò Success in life is determined by a personÕ s ability to better themselves,Ó he said, Ò not by

a state mandate.Ó Others criticized the Common Core for its emphasis on math and reading. Jane Claus of Schroon Lake believes the Common Core is shortsighted in its treatment of art, music and other subject areas. Ò The arts seem to be minimalized every time something new comes out,Ó she said. Ò ItÕ s the arts that make us human.Ó The Common Core applies to all New York students, including special education students, several speakers pointed out. That means special needs students are taking the same standardized tests as high-achieving performers. A Queensbury mother of a special education students was in tears as she described her daughter pulling out her own hair because of Ò test stress.Ó Ò These tests arenÕ t showing us what our kids know,Ó she said. Ò TheyÕ re telling us what they donÕ t know. They (students) feel like failures.Ó King later admitted changes need to be made to Common Core to accommodate special ed students. Ò WeÕ ve made some adjustments,Ó he said. Ò WeÕ ll continue to make adjustments.Ó King said the Common Core is needed because New York students arenÕ t well prepared for college and careers following high school. He pointed to statistics showing New York in the middle of states in educational performance. Ò The Common Core reflects the knowledge and skills our students need,Ó King said. Ò ItÕ s been developed with extensive research. ThereÕ s a lot of evidence to support the use of Common Core.Ó Several people compared the Common Core to the federal Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. While the intention may be good, its implementation fails, they said. Ò The Common Core roll out has been dismissal,Ó Rick McClintock, a Ticonderoga math teacher, said. Ò Parents, teachers, school boards are questioning the Common Core. We need the state education department to restore our confidence in them.Ó John Armstrong, Schroon Lake school

board president, agreed. Ò There are some good ideas in the Common Core,Ó he said, Ò but the process is poorly done.Ó Paul Berry, Hadley-Luzerne school superintendent, suggested the Common Core implementation be delayed. Ò As you can see from the revolt, the roll out has been unsuccessful,Ó he said. Ò Educators agree with the mission, but give us more time.Ó A number of people asked why the public forums were being held three years after the state adopted the Common Core. Why wasnÕ t public input sought before making a decision, they wondered. Several charged the forums are simply attempts are improved public relations. Ò I truly hope you are listening,Ó Shawn Baker of Schroon Lake told state officials. Ò From your body language I donÕ t believe you give two hoots.Ó Each official promised they were listening and cared about the comments from speakers. Teresa Cheetham-Palen, president of the Keene school board, told the panel the Common Core is unnecessary. North Country schools are successful and meet all state standards. Ò We graduate 99 percent of our students. They go on to college and jobs. They lead happy and successful lives,Ó she said. Ò Now, all the sudden, weÕ re told weÕ re failing.Ó Little expressed some reservations about the Common Core and said she supports North Country schools. Ò IÕ m very proud of the schools I represent,Ó Little said. Ò I think they do a good job.Ó Stec was cheered by the crowd when he acknowledged his concerns with the Common Core. Ò ItÕ s certainly captured the attention of New Yorkers,Ó Stec said. Ò IÕ m concerned about its affect on innovation, out-of-the-box thing and imagination in our schools. I know itÕ s very frustrating to our parents and teachers. The teachers in the North Country are first-rate. Ò If I were king for a day,Ó he said, Ò I would take a step back and re-evaluate the Common Core.Ó

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Hunting the far side

R

ecently, while driving through the Wilmington Notch, I noticed a couple of guys wading across the Trophy Trout section of the West Branch of the Ausable River. It seemed unusual to anyone on the river without a flyrod in hand, especially when considering that stretch of river remains open to fishing all year round. I got a closer look as they reached the far bank and I realized they were carrying rifles. Obviously, the hunters were headed off to hunt the other side of the river, which surprisingly is not so commonly practiced in a region laced with with a multitude of lake, rivers, streams and ponds. They were wading over to the far side of the river to hunt their own deer, to where most others donÕ t bother to go. ItÕ s likely they enjoyed a wide swath of territory that is lightly hunted and the deer arenÕ t pressured. The advantages are significant. With fewer hunters there is less pressure, and deer are likely to be less wary. I know many hunters who use boats or canoes to access their hunting camps. It is a traditional component of the Adirondack culture, where guideboats and canoes have long provided lightweight, portable transportation, primarily on the lakes and ponds. It makes it a whole lot easier to haul in camp supplies, and to haul out game, both of which travel more efficiently in the bottom of a boat than on on your shoulders. ItÕ s also easier to transport a 200-pound deer in the bottom of a boat, than it is to drag it for miles. One the primary benefits of hunting areas that are boat access only is the distinct lack of competition. Locating such a place can be pretty simple, and it can usually be accomplished while enjoying a bit of spring trout fishing. The possibilities for finding a place all to yourself are seemingly endless. While there are many camps located along major rivers such as the Hudson, the Schroon, the Grasse and the Raquette; there are still thousands of miles of lesser rivers and streams that are rarely prospected by hunters. Over the years, IÕ ve floated the Boquet River during the hunting season several times, and though I saw deer, I never had the opportunity to take a shot. River corridors also create convection currents, which helps dissipate human scent. As water flows downstream, air currents flow upstream which makes it easier to fool a

November 30, 2013

deer Õ s nose. Sandy riverbanks also capture evidence of tracks, stream crossings and runways, which provide hunters with a potential location for a stand. Yet, the most distinct advantage is likly the lack of competition. Fewer hunters means less pressure. Deer are likely to be less wary, and the chances of encountering other hunters is diminished if you travel over to the Ò Far Side.Ó

Archery in schools program hits bullseye Recently, the the International Bowhunting Organization (IBO) and the National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP) announced the two organizations would be launching a Ò NASP IBO 3D ChallengeÓ at next year Õ s NASP Nationals. The wildly, successful program recently established a Guinness World Record for the largest gathering of archers in a single location at last years at the National Archery in the Schools National Championships.. For archery enthusiasts, the opportunity for youth to participate in IBO 3D competitions will allow to more kids to get involved in the sport of the archery. For several years there has been growing interest among the NASP leadership and the IBO to provide students with a 3D venue for national competitions. Recently, the International Bowhunting Organization (IBO) and the National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP¨ ) announced they will launch the Ò NASP¨ IBO 3D ChallengeÓ at next year Õ s NASP¨ National Tournament which draws over 10,000 young archers to participate in the annual event. While the bullseye tournaments have proven popular, the 3D Tournaments are wildly entertaining, as participants target full size, foam animal replicas (3D targets). According to NASP National Director Roy Grimes, Ò NASP¨ has no intention of modifying its wildly successful bullÕ s eye tournament competitions.Ó The bullseye format is currently practiced in more than 12,000 NASP¨ schools across 10 countries by nearly 2.5 million students per year. However, the IBO 3D competitions are considered a more entertaining venue as archers take aim at full size replicas of bear, deer, coyote and other game animals. According to Grimes, Ò In every survey conducted among NASP¨ students over the past 12 years, kids tell us they just want to have as much fun as possible in archery,Ó says Grimes. Ò They report that shooting arrows is the most fun but practicing and competing with their new archery friends is also important. A majority of students (56 percent) also advise they want to know more about bowhunting. An online survey of students involved in the National Archery in the Schools Program conducted by the Easton Foundations in 2012 indicated nearly nine of ten participants en-

joy the program and almost half have their own bows. - Of the 1236 survey participants, 46 percent (569) presently own archery equipment, with 44 percent (198) indicating they purchased the equipment prior to taking part in NASP and 56 percent (251) saying they purchased bows after beginning NASP. - A total of 18 percent (200) of those completing the survey indicated they have purchased a hunting license. - Given a choice, a total of 88 percent of those surveyed said the either Ò likedÓ or Ò lovedÓ shooting archery in NASP. - Further, one-quarter (25 percent) of those surveyed said they have visited a local archery club in addition to taking part in NASP at school, and 97 percent of those who have visited a club or archery range have returned. And now, with the expansion of NASP competition into 3D targets, watch for those numbers to keep on growing well into the future. Growing, just like archeryÕ s bottom line. Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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November 30, 2013

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HOME IMPROVEMENT HEAT YOUR ENTIRE home, water and more with an OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE from Central Boiler. Adirondack Hardware Company 518-834-9790

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LOGGING

BUYING ANY TYPE STANDING WOOD & Or Property. Highest Prices Paid. Land Clearing. Courteous, Professional, Neat. Please Call 518-593-8752.

REAL ESTATE ADIRONDACK "BY OWNER" AdkByOwner.com 1000+ photo listings of local real estate for sale, vacation rentals & timeshares. Owners: List with us for only $299 per year. Visit on-line or call 518-891-9919

WILLSBORO, NY 3bdrm, 2 bath Cape, newer house, nice lot, $750/mo.+ utilities & deposit. 802-377-5300

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ESTATE SALE PINE SPRINGS PARK 142 Pine Springs Drive, Ticonderoga, . *November 23, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM, *Friday November 29, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM. Moving Moving Sale EVERYTHING must go! 4 piece queen bedroom set like new. 4 seat bench kitchen set. 3 piece oak dining room set like new. 2 piece used living room set with end table & coffee tables. Roll top desk. Antique pump organ. . Antique Secretary (desk). Assorted wall pictures. 1 dresser. Rug shampoo machine. Stuffed mink. Glass door cabinet for stereo. Brand new in box 7ft pre lit revolving Christmas Tree. Craftsman 4ft tool chest. 19" Color TV. All offers will be considered. PLEASE call for directions and or further information. 518-5736151 Rain or Shine.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

BUILDING AND LOT IN MORIAH 1.3+ acres, paved driveway, town water and sewer. Can be used for residential and/or commercial, Asking $45,000. 518-546-3568 SKI-IN-SKI-OUT PARCELS Starting at $24,900. Located on the slopes of Titus Mtn. Approved and ready to build on. Major improvements underway. LaValleyRealEstate.com 518-4834163

BUSINESS SERVICES - OTHER PAPARAZZI JEWELRY REP Earn $100-$1500/week. Paparazzi Accessories home business. $5 jewelry www.fab5jewelry.com

APARTMENT CROWN POINT NY Lakefront Apt 2BR/1BA, upstairs, furnished, quiet road near CP. LR, Kit, porch, wa/dr, heat/elec. incl. Beautiful outdoor areas. No smoking or pets. Sec, refs, lease. $775 (860)-235-4504 ELIZABETHTOWN 1 bedroom 2 nd floor apt all utilities $525. 2 bedroom 1 st floor $600 all utilities except propane. 518-4197980

ELIZABETHTOWN- 2 BDRM. apartment, heat, hot water, stove & refrigerator furnished, HUD Approved, No Pets, No Smoking No Exceptions. 518-873-2625 Judy or 518-962-4467 Wayne or 518-962-2064 Gordon RETIREMENT APARTMENTS, ALL INCLUSIVE. Meals, transportation, activities daily. Short Leases. Monthly specials! Call (877) 2104130 WESTPORT - 1 bdrm , electric heat, laundry on site, freshly painted, utilities separate, $550 plus security. 518-962-8500

HOME FOR RENT *Westport 1271 County Rt 8 4BR 2Bath, Totally Renovated Colonial 3 Acres with Attached Barn $950/ month *Keeseville 41 Liberty St 3BR House with Large Front Porch $650/month *Essex 4BR Farm House, 10 acres w/barn, lake view, $1200/ month 845-742-7201

TL • Valley News - 13

www.valleynewsadk.com

HELP WANTED - $1000 WEEKLY** PAID IN ADVANCE!!! MAILING BROCHURES or TYPING ADS from home. FREE Supplies! Genuine Opportunity, PT/FT. No Experience Needed! Www.MailingBrochuresFromH ome.com ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 per day depending on job requirements. No experience, All looks needed. 1-800-561-1762 Ext A-104, for casting times/locations. AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-2967093

NOW HIRING!!! $28/HR. Undercover Shoppers Needed To Judge Retail & Dining Establishments. PT/FT. No Experience. If YouCan Shop - You Are Qualified!! www.AmericanShopperJobs.com

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AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE Get FAA approved Aviation Tech training. Financial aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1 -866-296-7094 www.FixJets.com GOOD MONEY! Weekly! Processing Mail and Mailing Brochures! Experience Unnecessary! Start Immediately! WWW.MAILINGNOW23.COM 1888-285-7643 HELP WANTED Earn Extra income Assembling CD cases From Home. Call our Live Operators Now! No experience Necessary 1-800-4057619 Ext 2605 www.easyworkgreatpay.com HELP WANTED! MAKE $1000 weekly mailing Brochures From Home! Helping home workers since 2001! Start Immediately! www.needmailers.com HELP WANTED!!! Local People Needed to MAIL OUR BROCHURES or TYPING ADS Online for Our Company. PT/FT. Genuine Opportunity! No Experience Needed, All Welcome! www.EasyPayWork.com IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITY for Men and Women. Entry-Level Oilfield Jobs Starting at $64,000$145,000/Year. No Experience Necessary. Call 24hr Free Recorded Message 1-888-450-4902

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Clinton County Real Estate Transactions

Date Filed Amount 11/7/2013 $54,000 11/7/2013 $56,000 11/7/2013 $119,000 11/7/2013 $46,000 11/7/2013 $243,000 11/7/2013 $198,000 11/7/2013 $152,000 11/8/2013 $229,000 11/12/2013 $410,000 11/12/2013 $225,000 11/12/2013 $112,500 11/12/2013 $126,000 11/14/2013 $126,000 11/14/2013 $192,500 11/15/2013 $122,106 11/15/2013 $43,000 11/18/2013 $52,000 11/18/2013 $150,000 11/18/2013 $83,852 11/18/2013 $79,900 11/19/2013 $950,000 11/19/2013 $65,000 11/19/2013 $22,000

Seller Buyer Location Steven Bechard, Vina Bechard Steven Roy, Redline Drainage Beekmantown Kenneth DuQuette, Deborah Parrott Deborah Parrott Plattsburgh Edmund Ryan Terrence Rowe Champlain David Robertson, Wendy RobertsonWilliam Ashline, Karen Ashline Schuyler Falls Daniel Rillahan Kimberly Dragoon Mooers Chad Davis, Michelle Davis Beekmantown J&N Manufactured Housing Inc. James Francesconi, April Hamilton Mark Revette Plattsbrugh William Ezero, Kelly Miller Charles Delise Peru Dennis OHara Dray Properties LLC Plattsburgh TRB Development LLC Mark Rebar, Theresa Rebar Plattsburgh Sandra Desso Brenna Lancto Peru Matthew Ludemann, Daniel Mooney, Cathy McCann Federal National Mortgage Assoc. Chazy Troy Slag Products Co. Inc. Debbie Bruno Peru Frank Davis, Sharon Davis Jan Properties LLC Schuyler Falls Anthony Moran Jr., Cynthia Moran Walantus Champlain Beverly Grace Rogelio Alama, Nympha Alama Travis, Scott, Blaine and Kevin Smith Altona Matthew Shutts, Jennifer Shutts Plattsburgh Joseph Szot, Aya Alt Sheila Facteau Thomas Brown, Sarah Brown Plattsburgh Frank Zappala, Jason Lemieux TD Bank N.A. Champlain Arlene Defayette John Milligan, Karen Milligan Beekmantown Cedar Knoll Log Homes Inc. Clinton Co. Dev. Corporation Plattsburgh Scott Liberty, Ann Liberty Brian Wilson Saranac William Morgan Leon Blair Peru

Date Filed Amount 11/12/2013 $650,000 11/15/2013 $300,000 11/14/2013 $537,000 11/12/2013 $23,500 11/12/2013 $900,000 11/13/2013 $986,100 11/13/2013 $28,900 11/14/2013 $51,500 11/13/2013 $205,000 11/14/2013 $63,000 11/14/2013 $139,600 11/12/2013 $108,000 11/15/2013 $83,000 11/14/2013 $40,000 11/13/2013 $32,000

Seller Buyer James Brucia, Judith Brucia David Rosner, Martha Rosner Rosemary Corwin Robert Thiesing, Marjorie Thiesing Eugene Davis I I I, Susan Davis Paul Lamparski, Lee Slocum Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp Luxor Enterprises 401k David Foster, Gretchen Foster Maria Castaldi, Robert Diraimo Andrew Gilchrist, Ann Marie Gilchrist Margaret Greenslade Andrew Gilchrist, Ann Marie Gilchrist Margaret Greenslade Catherinejordan Gary Vanherpe Theodore Minissale, Mary Minissale John Tabb Sr. Trustee Schroon Moongate Limited Partnership Rabideau Corp Hull Roger H Rabideau Corp Michael Raczynski, Angela Izzo Eric Buzzell, Nancy Buzzell Gary Rich, Carol Edwards-Rich Gardner Denno William Sawyer, Laura Sawyer John Smith Ver-Ny Properties Beth Green

Essex County Real Estate Transactions Location North Elba North Elba North Elba Ticonderoga North Elba Schroon Schroon North Elba

North Elba North Elba Chessterfield Ticonderoga North Elba Moriah

ANNOUNCEMENTS BRENDA QUILTS & CRAFT SHOP 1732 Front Street, Keeseville, NY. I would like to sell your crafts or products on consignment, especially for the upcoming Holiday Season. Call Brenda 518-5692781.

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ROUND BALES of Hay for Sale, 4x5 w/net wrap. $30 each. 518962-4452.

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FARM PRODUCTS

FINANCIAL SERVICES $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! Injury Lawsuit Dragging? $500-$500,000++ within 48 /hrs? 1-800-568-8321 www.lawcapital.com DIVORCE $450* NO FAULT or Regular Divorce. Covers children, property, etc. Only One Signature Required! *Excludes govt. fees. 1-800-522-6000 Ext. 100. Baylor &Associates, Inc. Est. 1977

FOR SALE

SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB. Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved byArthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-SlipFloors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-888720-2773 for $750 Off.

CLARINET, VIOLIN, FLUTE, TRUMPET, Amplifier, Fender Guitar $75 each. Upright Bass, Cello, Saxophone, French Horn, Drums $189 each. Others 4-sale 1-516377-7907

APPLIANCES

CM 2000 TRAILER 38"x54", tong 33", ideal for motorcycle or car, $350.00. 518-643-8643.

MICROWAVE HOOD White Microwave Hood, Great Condition, Selling because we did a remodel. $100 OBO call 5782501

FOR SALE Antiqua Hot Tub by Artsinan Spa's, excellent condition, $2500. For more info call 518 -643-9391

ELECTRONICS

FOR SALE Countertop Convention oven new $100; Baby Stroller $50; Gracco Pack N Play $50. Please call 518-643-2226.


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14 - Valley News • TL FOR SALE FRIGIDAIRE 6500 BTU’S AC Unit, $200; Cosilidated Dutch West wood stove $500; 1 man Pontoon boat $300. 518-708-0678 HAMILTON DRAFTING Table, 5' x 3', Oak w/ 4 drawers, like new, $300. 518-576-9751

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TWO TOOL BOXES full of Snapon Craftsman Tools $2500 OBO Call 518-728-7978 or Email pparksfamily@gmail.com WELL PUMP Gould, 1 HP, 4 months old, $500.00. 518-5760012 WOLFF SUNVISION Pro 28 LE Tanning Bed, very good condition, $700.00. 518-637-1741 WOMEN’S WINTER BOOTS Creekside, size 7 M width, Tan, Suede/ Rubber, rated -20 below, brand new in box, never worn. $100 new first $50. Call 518-354-8654

FURNITURE COMPLETE BEDROOM SET New In Box Head Board, Dresser, Mirror, Night Stand, and Chest $350 Call 518-534-8444 QUEEN PILLOWTOP Mattress Set, New in Plastic, $150.00. 518-534-8444.

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WANTED TO BUY

November 30, 2013

ADVERTISE ADVERTISE to 10 Million Homes across the USA! Place your ad in over 140 community newspapers, with circulation totaling over 10 million homes. Contact Independent Free Papers of America IFPA at danielleburnettifpa@live.com or visit our website cadnetads.com for more information. BUYING EVERYTHING! FURS, Coins, Gold, Antiques, Watches, Silver, Art, Diamonds."The Jewelers Jeweler Jack" 1-917-696-2024 By Appointment. Lic-Bonded. CASH FOR Coins! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NY 1-800-959-3419 CASH PAID- up to $28/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. 1-DAY PAYMENT. 1-800371-1136 WANTED OLD Glass Insulated Telephone Poles. Call Phil 518-891 -4521

FARM FOR SALE. UPSTATE, NY Certified organic w/ 3 bdrm & 2 bath house and barn. Concord grapes grow well on hillside. Certified organic beef raised on land for 12 years. bounded by brook w/open water year round. Prime location. FSBO Larry 315-3232058 or email spvalfarm@gmail.com.

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We're Local! 7 Days/Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-416-2330

NYS LAND, ON TWIN PONDS W/ 34 ACRES $39,995 -Beautiful Woods w/ Large Wildlife Ponds Fullof Ducks, Geese & Deer. Minutes to Syracuse, Salmon River, Oneida Lake. Call 1-800 -229-7843. Financing Available. Or Visit www.landandcamps.com.

GET CASH TODAY for any car/ truck. I will buy your car today. Any Condition. Call 1-800-8645796 or www.carbuyguy.com

SINGLE-FAMILY HOME $29,000 REMODELED 2 bdrm, .3 acre, Rte. 9, Front Street, Keeseville, NY. Live in or a P/E Ratio of 5 to 1 investment. 518-3356904.

WANTED ALL MOTORCYCLES, before 1980, Running or not. $Top CASH$ PAID! 1-315-5698094 WANTED TO BUY 1 Horse Walk Behind Plow. Please call 518-792 -1431 Leave Message. WANTS TO PURCHASE minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201 WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

ACCESSORIES

DOG CONTAINMENT PEN - 4 panels w/door, 10'tall x 6' long. Galv. steel., 8x8'pressure treated wood frame for it to sit on once pen is re-assembled, 7 yrs. old. purchased from FE Hart Co., replacement cost $650, will sell for $300 OBO. Call 802-524-6275 9AM-9PM.

LAND 1 ACRE OF Land at Wood Rd., West Chazy, NY, close to schools, nice location. Please call 518-4932478 for more information. CRANBERRY LAKE 90 Acre Hunting Camp, 8 cabins, well, septic, off grid, solar power generator, on ATV/snowmobile trail, 1/2 acre pond, wood & propane heat, 55 miles from Lake Placid, one mile off Route 3. $155,000. 518-359-9859

CASH FOR CARS AND TRUCKS. Get A Top Dollar INSTANT Offer! Running or Not! 1-888-416-2208 (888) 416-2208

TOP CASH FOR CARS, Any Car/ Truck, Running or Not. Call for INSTANT offer: 1-800-454-6951

BOATS 14 SECTIONS OF 8’ Pressured treated boat docking w/ latter, adjustable hight stands, excellent condition, Also 12x14 Floating Raft w/latter. 518-563-3799 or 518-563-4499 Leave Message. 16’ CENTER CONSOLE FIBERGLASS SCOUT BOAT, 50hp & 6hp Yamaha motors, Humming chart & depth plotter, trailer & cover. $10,500. 518-4834466

ALTONA, NY 3 BR/2 BA, Single Family Home, bulit in 1994, Perfect entertainment home, peaceful country setting 15 minutes from Plattsburgh. Large deck, 28' pool, patio with built in gas grill, 2 car garage with workshop. A MUST SEE $105,000 518-570-0896 BIG HUNTING LODGE: House, 8 acres adjoins 538 acre Deer Creek Forest. Bass ponds, fruit woods, $99,900. www.LandFirstNY.com 1-888-683 -2626. MORRISONVILLE RENOVATING,$125,00 As Is or Finished to Suit 32 Acres Connected 3K/Acre 518-593-8752 MORRISONVILLE 4 BR/2.5 BA, Single Family Home, 1,920 square feet, bulit in 1998, Colonial Cape, attached 2 car garage, gas fireplace, finished basement, large fenced in backyard with above ground swimming pool on corner lot. Located in Morrisonville in the Saranac School District. Great Family Neighborhood. $229,500 Call 518-726-0828 Dfirenut@gmail.com

FOR SALE

16’ HOBIE CATAMARAN parts, hulls, masts, booms, decks, rudders, rigging, $500 takes all. 518 -561-0528 1967 17’ HERMAN Cat Boat ready for restoration, inlcudes trailer, $2500. 518-561-0528 1968 LAUNCH Dyer 20’ Glamour Girl, Atomic 4 inboard engine, 30HP, very good condition. Safe, reliable, spacious, ideal camp boat. Reasonable offers considered. Located in Essex, NY. 802503-5452 1977 156 GLASTRON Boat with 70 HP Johnson motor, with trailer, excellent condition. $2500. 518359-8605 1980 18 1/2 FT. Century Cuddy Cabin, 120 HP I/O, trailer, GPS depth finder, down rigger, plus. $2400 OBO. 518-963-8220 or 518 -569-0118 2001 SUPRA SANTERA low hrs., mint cond., great ski wake board boat, beautiful trailer included, $19,500. 518-891-5811 2005 WHITEHALL SPIRIT rowing/sailboat. Classic boat, rare find. Must sell! Asking $4500 OBO. 845-868-7711

FOR SALE HOTPOINT CHEST FREEZER $50.00 CALL 5638360 $50 LIVE CACTUS large candelabra tree cactus 4' tall in pot. healthy $50 962-4514

ACCESSORIES (2) TRAILERS (OPEN) - both excellent condition; 2010 Triton 20' Aluminum - max wgt. 7500 lbs. Asking $4900 and 1989 Bison 31' overal Gooseneck, Asking $2900. 518-546-3568.

2007 STINGRAY BOAT 25' Stingray Criuser, only 29 hours, LIKE NEW, sleeps 4, has bathroom, microwave, fridge, table, includes trailer, stored inside every winter. (518) 570-0896 $49,000

(4) CHEVY RIMS, Steel, 16" x 6.5", 6 lug w/pressure monitors. $250 OBO. 518-524-7124.

BOAT 1990 Supra ski boat 351 ford engine excellent condition w/ trailer 518-637-1741 $6,000

FISHER SNOW PLOW 7' 6" Minute Mount 2, used 2 winters, $3500 Negotiable. 518-524-0582 or 518643-5244

AUTO DONATION DONATE A CAR - HELP CHILDREN FIGHTING DIABETES. Fast, Free Towing. Call 7 days/week. Nonrunners OK. Tax Deductible. Call Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 1-800-578-0408 DONATE YOUR car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-AWish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 518-650-1110 Today!

42274

AUTO WANTED

BOAT FOR SALE 1984 Cobia 17' bowrider, 115HP Evenrude outboard (newer), 2002 Karavan trailer, runs but needs some work. $1,500. 518-576-4255

CARS 1990 NISSAN MODEL 240, 2 door, 5 spd. manual, excellent condition, 180,000 miles, never driven in Winter, all original, $2000. Call 518-297-2443 Juggling Your Budget? Advertise Small, Get Big Results! Call 1-518-873-6368 Ext. 201


November 30, 2013 CARS

MOTORCYCLES

2006 MINI COOPER, 5 spd, 2 dr. New tires, brakes & exhaust. Dual sunroof, leather interior, excellent condition. Comes w/warranty if wanted. $8500 OBO. Call: (518) 524-6709

WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLE KAWASAKI 1967-1980 Z1900, KZ900, KZ1000, ZIR, KX1000MKII, A1-250, W1-650, H1 -500, H2-750, S1-250, S2-350, S3 -400 SUZUKI GS400, GT380, GT750, Honda CB750 (1969,1970) CASH. FREE PICKUP. 1-800-7721142, 1-310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com

CLASSIC 1973 CAMARO, 350 Auto, V-8 Engine, original 55,000 miles, $12,000, very good condition 518-359-9167.

LEGALS Valley News Legal Deadline Monday @ 3:00pm Please Send Legals By EMAIL To: legals@denpubs.com

SURGE VAULT LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/14/13. Office location: Essex County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: C/O Will Larzelere, P.O. Box 9, Lake Placid, NY 12946. General Purpose. VN-11/9-12/14/20136TC-53956 -----------------------------

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EVERGREEN HIGH VOLTAGE, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/22/13. Office location: Essex County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, P.O. Box 9, Lake Placid, NY 12946. General Purpose. VN-11/9-12/14/20136TC-53955 ----------------------------NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) Name: NORTHEASTERN STATES KILNS, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with New York Secretary of State (SSNY) on September 11, 2013. Office location: Essex County. SSNY desig-

2010 HONDA STATELINE 1500 Miles, Black, Factory Custom Cruiser, 312 CC $7,800 518-5698170

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES 2002 COACHMAN MIRADA self contained, 24,840 miles, clean & runs great, Asking $16,800. 518846-7337

nated as agent of LLC upon whom process against LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Northeastern States Kilns, LLC, 25 Ellsberry Lane, Willsboro, NY 12993. Purpose: Purchase and operate kilns and all other legal purposes. VN-11/23-12/28/20136TC-53997 -----------------------------

All candidates must file a petition signed by Twenty-Five qualified voters from the Willsboro Fire District, with the District Secretary by November 30, 2013. By Order Of, Jean Gay Secretary Willsboro Fire Commissioners VN-11/23-11/30-20132TC-54098 -----------------------------

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of the Willsboro Fire Commissioners election to be held on December 10, 2013. The Willsboro of Fire Commissioners shall hold election according to Town Law 175 for the purpose of electing One (1) Fire Commissioners for a peried of Five (5) years - (From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2018)

NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, on behalf of the Essex County Board of Supervisors, will accept sealed bids at the Office of the Purchasing Agent until 2:00 P.M. on December 6, 2013 for Medical Supplies for the Essex County Department of Public

Health and other Departments. The bids shall be opened and read aloud on December 6, 2013 at 2:00 P.M. at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, 7551 Court Street, Elizabethtown, New York. If additional information concerning the bidding is required, please call (518) 873-3330. All bids submitted in response to this notice shall be marked "SEALED BID – MEDICAL SUPPLIES" clearly on the outside of the envelope. All bids shall be submitted on the bid sheets included in the package, and no other forms shall be accepted. Specifications and standard proposals for the proposed work may be obtained at the above address, by

calling 518-873-3330, or on the County’s website at www.co.essex.ny.us. Essex County reserves the right to reject any and all bids not considered to be in the best interest of Essex County, and to waive any technical or formal defect in the bids which is considered by Essex County to be merely irregular, immaterial, or unsubstantial. In addition to bid sheets, the bidder shall submit executed non-collusion bid certificates signed by the bidder or one of its officers as required by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103d. The bidder shall also submit an executed certificate of compliance with the Iran Divestment Act signed by the bidder or one of its officers as required

by the General Municipal Law Sec. 103g. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that Essex County affirmatively states that in regard to any contract entered into pursuant to this notice, without regard to race, color, sex, religion, age, national origin, disability, sexual preference or Vietnam Era veteran status, disadvantaged and minority or women-owned business enterprises will be afforded equal opportunity to submit bids in response hereto. Dated: November 19, 2013 Linda M. Wolf, CPA Purchasing Agent Essex County Government Center 7551 Court Street – PO Box 217 Elizabethtown, New York 12932

(518) 873-3332 VN-11/30/2013-1TC52133 ---------------------------NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) Name: 312 ESSEX, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with New York Secretary of State (SSNY) on November 12, 2013. Office location: Essex County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o 312 Essex, LLC, 44 Farm Way, Essex, NY 12993. Purpose: Real Estate ownership and all other legal purposes. VN-11/30-01/04/20136TC-52146 -----------------------------


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