Page 1

Proudly sponsored by Denton Publications and Small Bank. Big Ideas.

NORTHERN NEW YORK’S FUN FAMILY NEWSPAPER • JUNE 2009 More fun at www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

Our Sponsors Support Education & Make Kidsville News Possible

A Denton Publication

Pediatric Dentistry of Glens Falls (518) 798-9966 Farzad Sani, DDS

denpubs.com

34106

If you care about education and literacy and would like to help support Kidsville News, please call 518-873-6368


Congratulations Mr. Merrihew...

The Treats with Truman Winner for June!

Treats With Truman!

I received 5 letters from students in Tupper Lake’s 4th grade class! Boy! Did we have a good time!

Your Friend Truman

34103

34109

MARK E. THOMSON DDS, PC SPECIALIST IN ORTHODONTICS Your children’s eye sight is everything. They do a lot of reading, writing and using the computer. Make sure they are seeing what they need to!

561-3380 Your Smile Is Our Specialty!

Call for your appointment today!

Dr. Thomson & Staff

The Eye Care Team: Kjell Dahlen, M.D., Benjamin Vilbert, M.D. Gault Farrell, M.D., Phil Dafler, M.D., Frederick Shaw, M.D., Stanley Hatch, O.D., David Kirkpatrick, O.D., Richard Erenstone,

Sally, Don, Jamie, Paula, Andrea, Lisa, Lori, Teresa

O.D., Bradley Catton, O.D., Douglas Franz, O.D. Locations: 450 Margaret St., Plattsburgh, 566-2020 / 14861 State Rte. 30, Malone, 483-0065 51 Woodruff St., Saranac Lake, 891-8412 / 96 Nash St., Lake Placid, 523-2020

PAGE 2

41228

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

41229

JUNE 2009


Dear Kids, NORTHERN NEW YORK’S FUN FAMILY NEWSPAPER Serving Clinton, Essex and Warren Counties PUBLISHER Gayle Alexander gayle@denpubs.com 518-873-6368 Ext. 207 GENERAL MANAGER Allen K. Dunham aldunham@denpubs.com 518-570-7248 TRUMAN ASSISTANT/GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laurie Goff graphics@denpubs.com ILLUSTRATOR Cover & Truman • Dan Nelson MARKETING DIRECTOR Gayle Alexander gayle@denpubs.com 518-873-6368 Ext. 207 NATIONAL EDITOR Joy G. Kirkpatrick kvnews@kidsvillenews.com Kidsville News, Inc. Bill Bowman President For Sponsorship Opportunities Please Call: 518-873-6368 P.O. Box 338, 14 Hand Avenue, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 Published Locally By Denton Publications, Inc. Copyright 2009 Kidsville News! Inc., All Rights Reserved. Truman is a service mark of Kidsville News! Inc. and the Kidsville News! logo is a registered trademark of Kidsville News! Inc. No part of this issue of Kidsville News! may be reproduced in whole or in part in any form without permission of the publisher or the copyright holder. Neither participating advertisers nor the publisher will be responsible or liable for misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors. The publishers reserve the right to edit any submitted material. Kidsville News! Inc. is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork or other material. Children’s submissions should include name, address, telephone number, and permission to publish signed by a parent or guardian.

Email Me,

June, at last! Summer begins on June 21. That I love Mail!!! means you’ll probably be spending a lot more time Truman@denpubs.com outside. Maybe you like to go hiking or fishing. I love to be outside and at the beach especially, but I always remember that I need to cover up with my hat or umbrella and wear sunscreen to protect me from the sun. It’s also important to protect yourself from mosquitoes during the summer months. If you like the ocean and underwater creatures, you’ll love this issue. Read about the unusual sea horse and about what it’s like to be a marine biologist. There’s lots of fun stuff happening in June. Of course, you want to spend some time with your Dad for Father’s Day. Help your Mom or Dad put out your flag for Flag Day. Check to see if it has holes in it or is too worn out. If it is, you should replace it. Read all about the U.S. flag in this issue of Kidsville News! Visit atat www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny andinstay in touch Visitmy myWedsite Web site www.kidsvillenews.com and stay touch durduring the summer. I hope you have a ing the summer. I hope you have a jamjam-packed-with-fun June! packed-with-fun June! Your friend,

27760

20528

JUNE 2009

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

PAGE 3


Kidsville News!

©

Happy Father’s Day Each June, families gather to celebrate Dad and the special men in their lives. How did this special day to honor dad come about? In 1909, Sonora Smart Dodd was listening to a Mother’s Day sermon and thought that it would be appropriate to have a similar event to honor fathers. Having been raised primarily by her father, Dodd held a celebration in June (her dad’s birthday) in her hometown of Spokane, Washington, in 1910 to show her father how much she cared about him. An official Father’s Day was still a long time coming. It wasn’t until 16 years later that a National Father’s Day committee was formed. In 1956, a joint resolution of Congress recognized Father’s Day. The holiday became a permanent national observance under President Richard Nixon in 1972 and is celebrated on the third Sunday in June. This year it is June 21. Father’s Day is a time for sons and daughters to recognize the men in their lives. There is no doubt that fathers are special people. Whether they are running alongside your bike as you learn to ride, playing catch in the backyard, or just sharing an ice cream cone, they play an important part in your life. When it comes to offering Dad gifts in honor of his special day, handmade gifts from the heart are ones Dad probably cherishes the most. Here are a number of heartfelt, crafty ideas that you can put together for Father’s Day. 1. Brimming basket: Fill a basket full of Dad’s favorite foods or items related to his hobbies. Place a handcrafted card inside and wrap with colored cellophane. 2. Scrapbook: Gather your favorite photos of moments you’ve shared with Dad and put together a small scrapbook with artwork or cutouts from magazines. Craft stores now devote entire aisles to scrapbooking supplies. 3. Personalized baseball cap: Use fabric paint or fabric markers to draw designs or messages on a light-colored baseball hat. 4. Coupon book: Put together a book of coupons that treat Dad to special things, such as a homemade breakfast, a day off of any chores or

anything you can think of. Sign all the coupons and make a personalized cover. Staple everything together, and then give it to Dad. 5. Footprint craft and poem: Children can either trace their footprints onto a piece of poster board or make a ceramic print (like those handprints often done in school). Craft stores sell plaster kits that harden in mere minutes after an impression has been made into the mixture. Accompany the footprint masterpiece with a poem. Image source: metrocreativegraphics.com. Many countries have a special holiday to honor the flag of their country. In the United States, Flag Day (or National Flag Day) is celebrated on June 14. The entire country is encouraged to Pause for the Pledge at 7 p.m. (EDT) on June 14. This day commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, which happened by resolution of the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. The flag of the United States consists of 13 equal horizontal stripes of red alternating with white, with red stripes at the top and bottom. The blue rectangle in the upper hoist-side corner (the top left when you are facing it) has 50 small, white five-pointed stars arranged in nine offset horizontal rows of six stars alternating with rows of five stars. The 50 stars on the flag represent the 50 states, and the 13 stripes represent the 13 original colonies. The red stands for bravery, blue for justice and white for liberty. There are certain rules of etiquette that apply to the flag of the United States. The United States Flag Code outlines these. Here are just a few to remember: • The flag should be flown from sunrise to sunset. If it is flown at night, it should be properly illuminated. • No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any person or thing. • The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground. • The flag should never be flown upside down except as a signal of distress. • The flag can be lowered to half-staff when someone important to our country dies, but only at the order of the President or a state governor.

Pet of the Month Contest Your pet could be featured as our To enter send your favorite pet photo & name to: Kidsvillepets@denpubs.com! New Winner Each Month!

in the Post-Star “Best of Region Awards”

PAGE 4

Whole Animal Wellness & Nutrition Center 1161 Dix Ave., Hudson Falls, NY 747-3060 • Open 7 Days A Week

GOMER

Here’s my best bud Gomer. He has a funny name and makes me laugh all the time when he does silly things. He is a beagle and he has a big bark when he wants to get your attention. Lin 34102

ER 2007 & 2008 WINN “Best Pet Supply Store”

Pet of the Month with a Photo. PLUS Win a $25 Gift Certificate from Sutherland’s PetWorks!

Featured Pet of the Month!

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

JUNE 2009


Hi! I’m Digger Mole and I work for NYCO Minerals. Did you know that our mineral, called “Wollastonite”, is shipped all around the world?

30218

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS... MADAGASCAR?

It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world!

You've heard of Madagascar, the movie, but where in the world is Madagascar, the country? To find Madagascar, get out your globe, and find longitude 47º E and latitude 20º S. Located in Southern Africa, the island of Madagascar is in the Indian Ocean, east of Mozambique. The island is about twice the size of the U.S. state of Arizona (and a little bigger than France), making it the world's fourth largest island! If you've seen the movie, you know that Madagascar is home to many wonderful plants and animals. But there are also over 20 million humans that call Madagascar home! These people share the island with 5% of the world's plant and animal species. Many of these plants and animals are found nowhere else in the world. There are 40 species of lemur that are indigenous to Madagascar! But the country isn't just a wildlife paradise. There are several endangered species on the island. It also has many natural hazards, like cyclones, drought and locust infestations. The terrain is varied. There are mountains and cliffs, plateaus and plains. You'll also find coastal beaches with mangroves, rain forests and farmland, as well as lagoons and bays. The coast is bordered by coral reefs and volcanic islands. July is the coolest month in Madagascar, and December is the Where in the warmest. World Word The people of Madagascar are called Malagasy. The country gained its indepenindigenous [in-dij-uhdence from France on June 26, 1960. The country's main agriculture crops are coffee, nuhs], native, or originating and living in a vanilla, sugarcane, cloves, cocoa, rice, cassava (tapioca), beans, bananas and peanuts. Sources: “Madagascar,” The World Factbook, Central Intelligence Agency, certain area or country. www.cia.gov; "Madagascar," Encyclopædia Britannica.

JUNE 2009

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

PAGE 5


21870

AR

UND THE W

Puerto Rico

On June 24, San Juan Day in Puerto Rico celebrates the birth of John the Baptist, an important figure in the Bible. But on this day in Puerto Rico, the kids don’t go to church; they go to the beach. At the beach, they walk into the water and back out of the water seven times. They throw themselves into the sand for good luck. Then they jump back into the water for a swim. After all the fun at the beach, families get together for a big meal and celebrate the good luck they’ve had in the past year.

Malta

On June 22 and 23 in Malta, they celebrate Mnarja. This is a traditional harvest festival that is held all night. They celebrate with folk music, dancing and singing. There are also exhibits of animals and farm produce, as well as donkey races. It is called Mnarja from the word luminarja (as in luminaries). The festival originated in the Middle Ages, and the ancient capital used to be illuminated by torches for the festival.

RLD

Japan

In Chiyoda, Japan, Day of the Rice God, or Mibu Flower Rice Planting, is an annual ricetransplanting festival held on the first Sunday in June. This centuriesold rural folk ritual is celebrated with colorful costumes, parades, dancing and prayers to the Shinto rice God Wbaisama. On June 14 in Osaka, they hold the Rice-planting Festival at Sumiyoshi Shrine. Twelve beautiful women perform a ceremony and transplant rice seedlings in the shrine’s rice paddy. They also celebrate with music and rice-planting folk songs.

Sea horse

Is it a fish? Is it a horse? It’s a sea horse! The sea horse is actually a species of marine fish related to pipefishes. It’s called a sea horse because, well, it looks kind of like a horse! The name of the genus that contains sea horses — hippocampus — Kingdom: Animalia comes from the Greek words hippos, which means Phylum: Chordata “horse,” and kampos, meaning “sea monster.” A sea horse is not your ordinary fish. It has a bony Class: Actinopterygii body with rings around it that look like armor. They Order: Syngnathiformes swim upright, so they are not very good swimmers. Family: Syngnathidae They are mostly found hanging around in sea grasses or Genus: Hippocampus coral reefs, clinging to the plants with their tails. When small organisms like plankton swim by, they suck them up with their long snout into a small toothless mouth. They also eat small shrimp and tiny fish. Sea horses vary in size and can range from .8 inches to 14 inches in length. Sea horses have special relationships with their mates. While the male and female are courting, they swim side by side holding tails and do a dance together, changing colors. The male carries the fertilized eggs in his pouch, and the male and female greet each other each morning. For most species of sea horse, the male releases 100 to 200 babies when it is time for the eggs to hatch. Sources: Encyclopaedia Brittanica Online. Photographer: Mohammed Al Momany, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

20529

PAGE 6

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

JUNE 2009


WHAT’S IT LIKE

WHAT’S IT LIKE TO BE... TOA MARINE BE... A MARINE BIOLOGIST? BIOLOGIST?

It’s June, and Father’s Day is coming up. Do you like to go fishing with your Dad? Or maybe to visit a lake, beach or aquarium? I love to watch all of the different sea creatures at the aquarium. This month, I spoke with Angela Collins, a marine biologist for the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in Florida. Angela has been a marine biologist for 10 years and has worked for worked for Mote Marine Laboratory, Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON) and Disney’s Living Seas. Keep reading to learn more about what it’s like to be a marine biologist! TRUMAN:What What does take to become a marine biologist? doesit it take to become a marine biologist? TRUMAN: ANGELA: I have a bachelor’s degree in marine biology as well as a master’s ANGELA: I have a bachelor’s degree in marine biology as well as a

degree in biology, and I am currently working on my PhD – but education is only master’s in abiology, and I am currently working on my PhD one part ofdegree becoming marine biologist. Field experience is very important, and – I began volunteering for aquariums nature centers as soon as I was old Field but education is only one part and of becoming a marine biologist. enough. Dedication is important, as well as a willingness to work experience is very important, and I began volunteering hard for and get dirty doing some jobs that are not always so glamorous (I once spent a summer aquariums and nature centers as soon asYou I was vacuuming manatee poop out of an aquarium!). alsoold needenough. to really love Dedication is important, as a willingness towith work what you’re doing – a passionas forwell the animals that you work as hard well as the environments they live in will keep you motivated. and get dirty doing some jobs that are not always so

TRUMAN: So, the good days and have to what put upare with rough seas, low visibility and uncooperative parts? What’s the best part of animals, but the good parts defi nitely

your job? make it worth it.

ANGELA: underwater. TRUMAN: Being So, what are the good Observing marine parts? What’s and the best part of your job? ecosystems gathering information to help encourage sustainable andunderwater. responsible fisheries are very rewarding. Plus, fish ANGELA: Being Observing marine ecosystems and gathering information to help encourage are just cool!

sustainable and responsible fisheries are very rewarding. Plus, fish TRUMAN: What’s your are just cool!

glamorous (I once a summer manatee TRUMAN: When, andspent why, did you first vacuuming become interested in thispoop profession? out of an aquarium!). You also need to really love what you’re doing – a passion forI have the animals that you work as well ANGELA: I am lucky. known that I wanted to be awith biologist sinceas I was environments a kid. But the final career came when I became certithe they livedecision in willprobably keep you motivated.

favorite fish or sea creature?

TRUMAN: What’s your favorite fish or sea creature? ANGELA: My favorite fish

is the hogfish. It is fish a wrasse. ANGELA: My favorite is I also loveIt is thea wrasse. yellowhead the hogfish. I also love thesh. yellowhead jawfish. jawfi

fied to scuba dive (I was 15 years old at that time). The reason that I chose this particularWhen, field is and a complete fascination and TRUMAN: why, did you first infatuation with marine life – the ocean is full of become interested in this profession? surprises, and I am blessed with the opportunity to continue to learn new things every day.

TRUMAN: One of the pictures TRUMAN: of the How shows you withOne a clipboard. shows you with dopictures you write underwater like that? Is it special paper and pena clipboard. How do you cil?

ANGELA: I am lucky. I have known that

you do? Describe a typical ITRUMAN: wanted toWhat be adobiologist since I was a day on the job. kid. But the final career decision probANGELA: am a marine fisheries biologist. I ably came Iwhen I became work on the life history and reef fish. certified to scuba dive (Iecology was 15ofyears Understanding the behavior and biology of these old at thatis time). The thatsustainable I organisms important for reason developing fisheries. There is no “typical” keeps chose this particular field day, is a which complete life exciting! But my field work involves extenfascination and infatuation with marine sive scuba diving to collect data on the fish that life – the ocean is we are researching. full of surprises, Additionally, a lot of time Iisam spent analyzing and blessed data and performing labwith the opportuoratory work. nity to continue to TRUMAN: What’s the learn new things hardest part of your job? every day.

you definitely work long you do? Describe a

The Adventures of Spirit the horse Chapter 2 of 4 By Caleb Blaise

JUNE 2009

underwater.

ANGELA: I use a normal pencil and waterproof paper to TRUMAN: What advice would you give to kids who are interestwrite underwater. ed in this profession?

TRUMAN: What advice would you give to kids who are

ANGELA: Work hard. Don’t get discouraged. If you love what interested in this profession? you do and you believe in yourself, and you’re willing to get dirty and slimy without complaint, you are already a finalist!

ANGELA: Work hard. Don’t get discouraged. If you

love what Thanks you dosoand you yourself, and at TRUMAN: much forbelieve talking toinme! I won’t look fish the same again. I’m planning a trip to the aquarium soon, so you’re willing to get dirty and slimy without complaint, I’ll think of you when I’m there. Angela Collins works as a marine you are already a finalist! biologist for the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. TRUMAN: Thanks so much for talking to me! I won’t look Angela Collins at fish the same again. I’m planning a trip to the aquarium works as a marine biologist for the Fish soon, so I’ll think of you when I’m there.

The male horses and I went over to where my sons were being held captive. My oldest son was just like me. I looked at the medical house and there was the blacksmith all black and blue from my oldest son. We all bit the rope and freed my sons. We were on our way when all of a sudden halters fell on our necks. When I looked there was the captain along with some of his men. He was smiling because he was getting his revenge, but he will not have it for long. I whispered to my sons and the male horses “ you might hear a coyote howl. You have to howl back and then sit back and watch.” As soon as I finished talking we heard a coyote yell or howl, so we howled back. All of a sudden there was yelling and whooping from indians and an old friend came through the gate. My friend cut off the ropes and took the fort. After we said thank you and hello we ran off into the sunset. To be continued...

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

34095

ANGELA: The job is physically demanding TRUMAN: What do–

write underwater like that? Is it special paper andpencil pencil? ANGELA: I use a normal and waterproof paper to write

PAGE 7


Meet Smart and Charming NOAA-19 A brand new, best-yet weather satellite recently took its place in orbit. It will watch over just about every inch of Earth. Its path around Earth takes it over the North and South Pole regions as our planet rotates below. The satellite’s name is NOAA-19 (say it just like the name “Noah”). NOAA-19 is so smart and so capable, it can do just about everything but talk. But what if it could talk? NOAA-19 could tell us what it does and how our planet looks from way up there, 870 kilometers (about 540 miles) high. Listen. “Helloooo down there! The view is terrific from up here. I am still getting checked out after that exciting February 6, 2009, launch and smooth ride to orbit. The engineers designed me to do a lot of hard jobs, and I’m itching to get started. “I will constantly measure temperature and humidity all over Earth and throughout the atmosphere. I plan to take pictures of the clouds and surface features. I will monitor Earth’s protective ozone layer. I will warn of any storms on the Sun that might blast harmful charged particles our way. I will spot volcanoes erupting and monitor crops growing. I will track icebergs. I will pinpoint distress signals from lost hikers or sinking sailors and let search and rescue teams know just where they are. “I will gather lots of information, passing over nearly every spot on Earth twice each day. Scientists will use my data to help them understand what changes are happening to Earth’s environment, weather and climate. This way, they will be better able to predict what is coming next so that people can prepare. “I have so much to do. I can hardly wait to put my 10 instruments to work collecting data!” The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) built NOAA-19. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) now operates it and manages all its data. Find out how NOAA-19’s polar orbit enables it to see the whole planet. Visit spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/goes/goes_poes_orbits. shtml. Also, why should we care about storms on the Sun? Find out at spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/goes/spaceweather. This article was written by Diane K. Fisher. It was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 41385

PAGE 8

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

JUNE 2009


This page brought to you by...

KNIGHT AUTOMOTIVE 383 ROUTE 3 • PLATTSBURGH • 563-2000

Father’s Day Crossword

41384

Fatherly Word Find Find the words below that have to do with fathers! COACH DADDY FATHER FRIEND

D D Y E T B H J R W J J P E J

F N V M R N A C G E R E P X S

GRANDPA LEADER MENTOR PADRE

O K E K O P P H R P N E D P V

V I F I S T A Y G A M Y Z W O

L L W A R C P O O P I Q D B W

P A D R E F D A W O F R V X E

S A O V W R S A N R N L T U P

D F A T H E R F D C J G C A X

C G D K R L W U C D X H O Q P

PAPA PATRIARCH PERE POP

V N J D Y E V K L R Y E A W C

C A R I U A H Q D Y Z D C J C

S C U M H D M H C W X K H W O

P V U D Q E E U O Y H J C I E

Q O I H R R A P D N A R G D X

T S P C C O M E N T O R F P A

Let’s Go Hiking! Pick four things that are important to take on a hiking trip: Water bottle Legos Hat Music Player Whistle Snack Toothbrush Duct tape Bug catcher jar

JUNE 2009

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

PAGE 9


PAGE 10 Age 5 Aidan Downs • Peru Primary Kindergarten •

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

Jessica Pelkey • 4th Grade Rouses Point

e Noah Moak • Ag 11 azy 5th Grade • Ch School

Kylie Wilkins • Age 6 1st Grade • Sa ranac Element ary

Kyle Peterson ade Age 9 • 4th Gr iate Peru Intermed

Hayden Reidy Oak Str • 5th Grade eet Sch ool

Marah Chiappa lone • Age 7 2nd Grade • Sa ranac Element ary

Ashlea Provost • 5th Grade AuSable School

Riley Roberts 4th Grade Chazy School

JUNE 2009

Nathan Glenno n 2nd Grade • NA CS

right Ashton W • NACS de ra G 2nd

Ronald Dupee Jr. • Age 8 2nd Grade • Northern Adiro ndack

SEND YOUR EVENTS

JUNE 2009

SUNDAY

MONDAY

1

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

7

Artifact Inquiry • Time: Oscar the11:00am 1-877-ECHOFUN Grouch

Sesame Street Character (BDay)

8

Frank Lloyd Wright Born 1867. Dinoin Tracks 1-877-ECHOFUN, 12:00 pm Everyday til April 26, 2009

TUESDAY

2

Newspaper Radio in Education Week, was Patented March 2-6

In 1896 National Anthem Day

Dr. Seuss' Birthday: Special Art, Reading & FREE Film 3PM Brown Art Studio & H. Froehlich Auditorium The Hyde Collection,

9

DONALD DUCK BORN, 1934

WEDNESDAY

3

First U.S. Space Walk By Ed White in 1965

Get your coins in for the Big Change

THURSDAY

4

Irish•American Heritage Month

Willy Ford WonkaMade Junior First March 5th @ 7p, Henry Ford March 6th @ 7p, made Marchhis 7th first @ 2p operational March 8th @car 2p @ Charles Wood Theater in R. 1896. Glens Falls-NY Call for Tickets

10

Roundup National benefit: Yo-Yo Vermont Day

11

E.T. Movie Premiered In 1982.

FRIDAY Donut Day

5

First Hot Air Balloon Flight By the Montgolfier Pint-Sized brothers in Science 1783.

14

15

16

'Pop Goes the Weasel' Day Sand Paper Invented Invented by I. Fischer Jr. in 1834.

21

Benefit for World Awareness Children’s Museum • 3 pm International Concert Adirondack Community College Science Building

FATHER’S DAY

28

Paul Bunyan

DISCOVERYDay DAY:

PAGE 11

Thomas Chambers Tour/Create Art 1-3 p.m. Louis P. Brown Art Studio The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls-NY

Power of a Smile Day Invented by I. Fischer Jr. in 1834.

Schroon Lake Public Library, Schroon Lake

22

US Department of Justice Established in 1870

29

Camera Day

23

StoryTime with a Twist Typewriter 1-877-ECHOFUN Patented In Tuesdays all 1868. month long at 11 a.m.

30

18

ARTFUL

National 17th Fudge & 31st Day

National Flag Day (U.S.)

17

AFTERNOONS Eat Your 1:30PM-4:30PM Vegetables Day kids 6-12 with adult chaperone World Juggler's Day Louis P. Brown Art Studio The Hyde Collection,

24

U.F.O. Day First documented UFO sighting on this day.

Youth Art Month World Environment Day

Whimsical World Story Hour 10 am Meet the FirstAuthor Drive-in Theater & Movie Illustrator Opens in too! 1933. CraftsIn&New BookJersey Signing

Children 2-7

12

The Baseball was Invented In 1839.

World Egg Day

International Picnic Day

6

1-877-ECHOFUN. National Gingerbread Day

Magic Day Fly a Kite Day Ben Franklin's Kite Experiment in 1752.

SATURDAY

19

Garfield Debuted in 1978.

13

Whimsical World Story Hour 10 am Meet the First Author & Illustrator Newspaper Cartoon Crafts & Book Signing too! In the USA in 1754. Champlain Valley Transportation Museum Plattsburgh NY Reg 518-324-

20

First Day of Summer

Juneteenth Bald Eagle Day Tasmanian Devil Debuted in 1954.

25

LEON Day - LEON is NOEL spelled backwards. It means six months until Christmas.

26 Bicycle Patented In 1819. Toothbrush Invented In 1498.

Ice Cream Soda Day

27

GEOLOGY Captain Kangaroo (Bob EXPLORATION Keeshan) born 1927 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. 1-877-ECHOFUN, Helen Keller Born in Date: March 28th &1880. 29th, 2009

Meteor Day

Superman's Birthday (1938)

National Organization of Women Founded In 1966.

SEND YOUR EVENTS TO KIDSVILLECALENDAR@DENPUBS.COM


ART GALLERY Diego Velázquez: Painter of Kings Diego Velázquez was a 17th-century Spanish inviting him to come back to Madrid. After looking at his portrait work, painter. A creator of many famous pieces, he is still the king commissioned Diego to paint him! The king so liked the painting known as one of the greatest artists that he asked Diego to become his court painter. He was the world has ever seen. now the official painter to King Philip IV. Over his career, Diego Velázquez was born in he painted 40 portraits of the king, and it has been said Seville, Spain, on June 6, 1599. The that nobody else was ever again allowed to paint the king! oldest of six children, he was born Sponsored by the king, Diego took several trips to into a noble family. Because of his Italy to learn about Italian art from the masters there. family’s standing, Diego received He also met famous artists who traveled to Spain. Over a good education in languages and the years, he developed a unique style and painted many, philosophy. But, he also showed early many portraits of the royal family, other important talent as an artist. So, he was sent Europeans and even commoners. He also painted to study under the painter Francisco important historical, religious, and cultural scenes in a de Herrera when he was 11. A realistic way, with vibrant colors and a lot of light. year later, Diego began apprenticDiego died on August 6, 1660. Although he was very ing under another artist, Francisco famous in Spain, it was not until the 19th century that Pacheco. Pacheco was an excellent most of the outside world saw his work. Since that time, teacher, and Diego learned about he has been cited as an influence on such important artists proportion (capturing the different as Pablo Picasso, Francis Bacon and Edouard Manet. Written by Tamar Burris, a former elementary school sizes of things in your artwork) and perspective (making teacher who now works as a freelance writer and curriculum things look three dimensional in a painting). He studied developer for PBS, the Discovery Channel and other with Pacheco for five years, and his reputation as an artist Philip IV in Brown and Silver, education-related companies. Sources: Diego Rodriguez began growing. 1632, by Diego Velázquez de Silva y Velazquez – The Complete Works, www.dieIn 1622, Diego traveled to Madrid to paint the portrait govelazquez.org; Diego Velazquez on Art in the Picture, of a famous poet. He had hoped to get hired as a painter www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Diego_Velazquez/biography.html; Diego in the king’s court, but it did not work out. However, the king’s favorite Velázquez on Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diego_Velázquez. court painter died at the end of the year, and Diego received a letter

Send It!

Name

P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, NY 12932

Age

School

Grade

Address

City

State

Zip

Your Signature (This is your own work) Parent’s Signature (Permission)

Hint: Send your work in color and on unlined paper!

Phone#

Hey Kids! Truman wants your original artwork, letters, poems, and stories! He may want to print them in an upcoming issue of Kidsville News! or put them up on the website. Just have your parents fill out this form and send it along with your work. In our backyard this month we’re learning about

In Our Backyard..

Fort Ticonderoga, 100 Fort Rd on Rt. 74 East, Ticonderoga, NY 12993 In our backyard this month we are going back in history to visit Fort Ticonderoga. Fort Ti as it’s called is located along the shores of Lake Champlain in the Town Of Ticonderoga, Essex Co, NY. First let me tell you a little history, Fort Ticonderoga, originally Fort Carillon, was built by the French military in1755. The Fort was the site of many battles during both the French & Indian and Revolutionary Wars. Did you know that both Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold were instrumental in capturing the Fort from the British in a surprise raid? I had a great day visiting the Fort; there is so much to do for kids like us! Most of the programs are running daily from July 1st through August 25th. I really enjoyed designing my own wax seal, and trying on clothes from the 1700’s and I really like the chance to design my own fort! While I was there one of the guides called all of us kids to “muster” that means we drilled like real soldiers of the day with wooden muskets! Then in the afternoon I did the self-guided scavenger hunt in the Kings Gardens boy was that fun! But, the neatest, coolest part of my day at Fort Ticonderoga was the “I survived scurvy, small pox and death at Fort Ti” program, and I just had to have the t-shirt to prove it! For more information about the Fort and admission info visit the website at www.fort-ticonderoga.org See you next month! Your Friend, 34098

PAGE 12

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

JUNE 2009


33900

At the Movies

smoking. (Vivendi Entertainment)

Land of the Lost (In Theatres: June 5)

Imagine That (In Theatres: June 12)

Inspired by the popular 1974 Sid & Marty Krofft children’s television series that took kids inside a time-warped alien world inhabited by dinosaurs and monkey-people, Land of the Lost is a fantasy exploration movie with historic television roots that parents and grandparents can appreciate. Will Ferrell plays park ranger Dr. Rick Marshall, a washed-up scientist who gets sucked back in time through a strange vortex, along with a young research assistant named Holly and a survival expert named Will. Together, the team must attempt to escape from a weird land full of dangerous reptiles called Sleestaks and giant dinosaurs, with the help of a friendly monkey-person called Chaka. Will the frightened group ever be able to leave the Land of the Lost? Rated PG. (Universal Pictures) Call of the Wild (In Theatres: June 12)

A short story from famous adventure writer Jack London sets the stage for this kid’s adventure movie. A recently widowed Montana man named Bill takes care of his little granddaughter Ryann while her parents travel outside of the country. On a cold snowy night, a wild dog shows up at Bob’s house injured, and Ryann wants to nurse it back to health and take the dog with her when she goes home to Boston. Grandpa Bill begins to read Jack London’s story to Ryann to help her understand the nature of wild animals, but the future of the dog becomes more complicated when Ryann and a local boy train it to lead a dogsled team, even as a local man tries to claim the dog as his own. Call of the Wild will be shown in live-action 3-D. Rated PG for some violence, language and brief

?

?

?

Movies on DVD Tom and Jerry: The Chuck Jones Collection (DVD Release: May 26)

That famous black-and-white cat Tom and his rival/pal Jerry, the feisty little gray mouse that Tom can never seem to catch, are commemorated in this complete collection of all 34 of their cartoons created by the celebrated animator Chuck Jones. “Is There a Doctor in the Mouse,” “Jerry-Go-Round,” “Purr-Chance to Dream” and “Surf-Bored Cat” are just some of the ‘60s-era episodes included here featuring complex musical scores by the great musical director Scott Bradley. The DVD also features two making-of documentaries about Chuck Jones. Not Rated. (Warner Home Video) Cole Smithey, also known as “the smartest film critic in the world,” has been a film critic for 11 years and writes for over 50 publications, in print and on-line. Truman loves to watch movies and has the highest appreciation for great popcorn.

Father’s Day Crossword

Answer ?? Corner ? ?

JUNE 2009

Eddie Murphy (Meet Dave) plays Evan Danielson, a hard-working office executive whose imaginative sevenyear-old daughter Olivia (played by Yara Shahidi) brings him around to his senses about spending more time with her. Olivia believes that her special blanket has magical powers, and when her crayon drawings predict things that help get Evan’s career back on track, her dad becomes her biggest fan and her newest best friend. Rated PG for some mild language and brief questionable behavior. (Paramount Pictures)

F A

R

I

E

T

A

K E

H

L O

E

V

I

R

E

F T

S

N D A D

S

COACH DADDY FATHER FRIEND GRANDPA LEADER MENTOR PADRE PAPA PATRIARCH PERE POP

S G

P

O R

??

Fatherly Word Find

Let’s Go Hiking!

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

D D Y E T B H J R W J J P E J

F N V M R N A C G E R E P X S

O K E K O P P H R P N E D P V

V I F I S T A Y G A M Y Z W O

L L W A R C P O O P I Q D B W

P A D R E F D A W O F R V X E

S A O V W R S A N R N L T U P

D F A T H E R F D C J G C A X

C G D K R L W U C D X H O Q P

V N J D Y E V K L R Y E A W C

C A R I U A H Q D Y Z D C J C

S C U M H D M H C W X K H W O

P V U D Q E E U O Y H J C I E

Q O I H R R A P D N A R G D X

T S P C C O M E N T O R F P A

? ? ??

Four things that are important to take on a hiking trip: Water bottle Whistle

Hat Snack

PAGE 13


cc

Port Henry - 546-3008 • Tri-Lakes - 891-5567 • Malone - 483-9366

ited Affi red li a

Supported by:

te

Literacy Volunteers of Essex/Franklin Counties

A

This story page sponsored by:

ProLiteracy A m e r i c a

21836

Story Time with Truman The Sea Turtle Story

Chapter Six - Pancake Returns!

A Quality Serials Story By Mary Maden Illustrated by Vicki Wallace

THE STORY SO FAR… Pancake, a hurt loggerhead turtle, is rescued, treated and sent to a sea turtle hospital. At the hospital, a young girl named Lolly helps take care of Pancake. The young girl bonds with the sea turtle. After the turtle is totally rehabilitated, (including regaining the use of a flipper), she is well enough to be released. Finally, the big day arrives! Pancake is released back to her ocean home. But, how will the sea turtle fare? Time passed. School was out for the summer, and Lolly worked more hours at the hospital. The place seemed a little empty without Pancake. But not for long! Three new patients arrived. A loggerhead turtle came in with a fishing hook stuck in its throat. Another had eaten a plastic bag, mistaking it for a jellyfish. A green turtle named Emerald had tangled both of her front flippers and one back flipper in the webbing of an old beach chair that had washed into the ocean. Her back flipper was so damaged that it had to be amputated. Happily, Emerald was able to swim with only three flippers. Even though weeks had passed and Lolly was busy helping with the new patients at the turtle hospital, she still thought about Pancake. She wondered how the turtle was doing. But there was no time to brood! It was sea turtle nesting season. Lolly and her friend Zack had signed up with the local sea turtle program. They walked the beaches looking for turtle tracks and other signs of turtle activity. Lolly loved turtle patrol! One evening, Lolly and Zack were busy patrolling. Just up the beach, a loggerhead turtle made her way to the shore. The mother sea turtle had come back to the very same beach where she was born. Like her mother before her, she would make her nest here and lay her eggs. The turtle looked for a suitable spot for her nest — a place where the tide couldn’t reach. Finally, she found a good spot and began making her nest. With her front flippers, the turtle dug out a “body pit.” She used her back flippers to dig a hole. Then the mother sea turtle deposited her eggs — 120 in all! The eggs dropped into the hole or “egg cavity.” The turtle eggs were white and soft-shelled. They were a little like rubbery ping-pong balls. After the mother turtle had finished laying her eggs, she used her hind flippers to cover the nest with sand. The turtle buried her eggs to protect them. Covering the nest would also keep the eggs moist and at the right temperature. The mother turtle covered her nest so well that it was barely visible! Her task completed, the mother turtle crawled toward the water. She would not return. The eggs would hatch into baby sea turtles without any more help from their mother. As Lolly and Zack walked the beach, they spotted some turtle tracks

in the sand. The tracks looked like tractor tire tracks, but they recognized them for what they were––loggerhead turtle tracks! “Look over there,” Zack said. “A turtle’s heading for the water. I bet she laid some eggs!” Lolly looked at the turtle. She couldn’t believe her eyes. It was Pancake! “I don’t believe it!” Lolly said, then added softly, “she’s all right.” “More than all right, I’d say!” Zack commented. Quietly, without disturbing Pancake, Lolly watched her special friend return to the ocean. She knew in her heart that the sea turtle was happy. Lolly felt very proud. Silently, Lolly made Pancake a promise. “I’ll protect your nest,” Lolly said to herself. “I promise!” Lolly and Zack searched for Pancake’s nest. When they finally found it, they carefully marked the spot. Lolly kept her promise. For two months, she checked on the nest to make sure nothing disturbed it. Soon the eggs would hatch into baby sea turtles. Lolly planned to be there when it happened! Many evenings, Lolly would go down to the beach to check on Pancake’s nest. She sat and waited for the eggs to hatch. Suddenly one evening, Zack showed up and plopped down beside her. “What are you doing here?” Lolly said, surprised to see Zack. “Your mom sent me to tell you to come home soon,” Zack answered. “Nothing happening yet, huh?” “Nope, not yet,” Lolly sighed, “but I have a feeling tonight’s the night.” “I think you should give up,” Zack advised. “You can’t stay here all night!” Just then something moved in the sand. Pancake’s nest began to “boil” and baby hatchlings poured out! The helpless hatchlings raced toward the ocean. Lolly and Zack helped by keeping away the ghost crabs. When a hatchling went the wrong way, the two young people guided it back on course. As soon as the baby turtles reached the water, they started swimming. They would not stop until they reached a safer place where they could find food. Lolly knew that most of the sea turtles wouldn’t survive long enough to grow up. The world is a dangerous place for sea turtles! But the females that survived would grow up and return to this same beach to nest. And Lolly knew that when they returned, she and her children would always be there to help! The End. A Teacher’s Guide to accompany this six-chapter story is available on the Kidsville News! Web site at www.KidsvilleNews.com. Copyright 2001 by Mary Maden. All rights reserved. Mary Maden is an award-winning author. Visit her on the Web at www.marymaden.com.

Meet Truman’s Friend

Roo the Reader She likes to talk to K-1 kids about reading! Roo gives away free books!

Literacy Volunteers of Essex/Franklin Counties

PAGE 14

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

cc

ited Affi red li a te

Literacy Volunteers of Essex/Franklin works with people who want to learn to read. Our primary mission is to help adults who need to upgrade literacy skills, learn English as a Second Language, or work on their GEDs. Literacy Volunteers provides free instruction by trained volunteers to these adults to help them acquire self-esteem and achieve aims in the areas of education, family, employment, and the community. During summer, read a book in your favorite nature spot. Crack open a field guide! Learn about nature and the environment by reading! Raise your GREEN IQ!

A

Port Henry - 546-3008 • Tri-Lakes - 891-5567 • Malone - 483-9366

ProLiteracy A m e r i c a

20527

JUNE 2009


COME OUT AND PLAY! Get Outdoors & Hike!

In the summer, you probably spend a lot more time outside. It’s the perfect time to try hiking or backpacking. Hiking simply means going on an extended walk for pleasure or exercise. It can be as simple as exploring your neighborhood or wooded areas in a neighborhood park, or it could be a longer weekend camping trip Where can you hike? Anywhere really, as long as it’s not private property! Try hiking at a park. National Parks are special places set aside by the American people to conserve the scenery, preserve natural and historic objects and protect wildlife. You can even become a junior ranger! The U.S. National Park System has a Junior Ranger Program for kids ages 4 to 14. You sign up at the park, and they give you special activities to do while you are there. They also have a WebRanger program (www.nps.gov/webrangers) to have fun with when you are not on the trail! It doesn’t take any special talent to participate in hiking — it’s really just walking! But there are a few rules that everyone should following when going on a long hike: 1. Be smart. Know your limits. Kids under age 10 shouldn’t hike more than five miles in one day. Two- to four-year-olds will probably only be able to hike a mile or two. Be sure to take plenty of breaks! If you are carrying a backpack, you also need to make sure that it is not too heavy. For every five pounds of body weight, the average child can carry one pound. For example, if you weigh 80 pounds, divide that by five, which equals 16 pounds of gear. Hiking is a great family activity. If you and a friend are hiking in a neighborhood or park trail, make sure you have your parents’

permission and that they know where you are heading. Use the buddy system and never hike alone. 2. Be, and stay, comfortable. It might be cool in the morning but warm up very quickly later in the day. It’s a good idea to wear layers so that as you get warm you can shed layers. Pants with zip-off legs that convert into shorts are a good idea. Be sure to wear a hat — it will keep your head warm in the cooler part of the day and protect you from the sun later. Wear sunscreen and sunglasses. 3. Be prepared. Some things you’ll want to bring along are a water bottle, trail snacks, a map, a compass, a pocket knife (if your parents let you have one), first aid kit, rain gear, a whistle and a trash bag (be sure to clean up after yourself!). You might want to bring a notebook, sketch pad or camera to make notes and pictures of the things you see on your hike. 4. Be alert for wildlife. Stay on the trails, and watch where you step. You might encounter wildlife on your hike, including snakes. If you are lucky, you might also get to see deer, swans and other wonderful wildlife. But please, never approach or feed wildlife. Take time to notice your surroundings. Enjoy the changing leaves, a beautiful view, insects and wildlife. Let others enjoy it, too — let nature’s sounds be heard, so don’t be loud when you’re on the trail. 5. Be kind. Leave the area as you find it. Examine, but do not touch, cultural or historic structures and artifacts. Leave rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find them. If you have the opportunity to improve the area by picking up litter, please do! 6. Be happy! Hiking is best done with other people, so bring a friend along and enjoy the trip together. It’s also a great chance to spend some time with your parents! Happy hiking! Sources: National Park Service, www.webrangers.us; Washington Trails Association, www.wta.org.

Gee Thanks!

We would like to thank all of our Kidsville News! in Education Program Sponsors for helping to provide Kidsville News! to Northern NY schools and all area children K-5.

Literacy Volunteers of Essex/Franklin Counties

Pediatric Dentistry of Glens Falls (518) 798-9966 Farzad Sani, DDS

Smith House Health Care Center Our mission is to create a fun, engaging, educational newspaper and web site for all elementary age children, their parents & teachers, that encourages reading as a lifelong habit and promotes literacy & education. When it comes to literacy & child development, if we are to help develop a child’s habits, truly affect the way they think and act, to help develop their minds, we must start at a young age. We hope that you will consider partnering with us too! Together we can take childhood learning to the next level and have a positive impact on our community and our future leaders. 34107

JUNE 2009

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

PAGE 15


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S HAPE

Plan A Great Vacation for Less Believe it or not, it’s still possible to have a great vacation without spending a lot of money. These tips will help you plan that much-needed getaway for a lot less. Save on Airfare • Airlines list new specials on Monday nights, so check fares on Tuesdays. • Taxes and fees can add a lot to so-called “low” fares. Use sites such as Kayak.com and LowestFare.com, which compare flight prices that include fees and taxes. • Consider flying alternate routes, adding stop-overs or having a flexible schedule – they can all keep prices down. • Sign up for email alerts from travel sites such as Travelocity.com or Farecompare.com. You’ll find out quickly when a fare changes. Take a Road Trip • Just where will a tank of gas take you? Find out with TripAdvisor.com’s “Tank of Gas” tool. Type in your zip code and how much gas you want to use – quarter tank, half tank or full tank. You’ll get a list of destinations in your area. • Find a national park within driving distance. Nps.gov and discoveramerica.com give you the scoop on some nearby national treasures. • For a themed trip, try Lonely Planet’s Trips guidebooks. They list itineraries for six different regions which are organized by interests, such as food or history. They even suggest a road trip music playlist for the journey. Hotel Discounts • Many hotels have rewards programs which award points for each stay. They can add up to free nights and other perks. • Alumni associations sometimes have discounts for certain hotel properties (and sometimes car rentals.) • If you belong to AAA, AARP or the military, ask the hotel

about available discounts. Package Deals • Packages are popular, but they don’t all add up to savings. Do some legwork and find out how much each component would cost on its own, and then compare the prices. • Dealbase.com is a Web site that does cost comparisons for you. It lists package deals from all over the world and shows you exactly how much you’ll save — or overpay. Food Savings • Get a hotel room with a refrigerator. Stop by a local grocery store and get drinks, snacks and sandwich makings. Pick up some picnic lunch food as well – picnics are a fun and inexpensive way to enjoy a meal. • Choose restaurants where kids can eat for free. Mykidseatfree.com lets you search kid-friendly establishments by state. • Restaurants.com sells discounted gift certificates. It’s possible to buy a $25 gift certificate for only $10. Other Money Savers • Set a daily spending allowance. Put each day’s cash in an envelope and take only that envelope with you that day. You can’t spend what you don’t have. • Schedule museum visits on free or discount days. • Instead of pricey souvenirs, look for local treasures. Budget Travel recommends chocolate-covered macadamia nuts from a Hawaiian grocery store, or tea from a store in Britain. • Use alternative transportation. Many cities have excellent mass transit systems that can save a bundle on car rentals. Look into renting bikes, riding a train and just walking. Clear the calendar and get ready to have some fun. With these savings tips, a great vacation is within reach. Information courtesy of Family Features.

Congratulations!

Congratulations again to

Jaynie Ellis, 10 - 5th Grade Stuart M. Townsend M.S., Lake Luzerne, New York Teacher: Mrs. Berrigan

Tara Rickert,

Jaynie Ellis was chosen as a finalist in the Scholastic Magazine, Storyworks, create a character contest. She was in the top 5 out of over 9,000 entries nationwide, and was the only New York State student chosen as a finalist.

winner of the

Character: Julia 11-year-old Julia is upset when her grandma moves into the attic where her art studio was supposed to be. But when Julia decides to be nice to her grandmother instead of being resentful, her father surprises Julia with something wonderfully unexpected in return.

“I Drew My Mom” Contest! 34100

PAGE 16

34099 Pictured from left are Tara, Alexis, Truman & Dylan

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

JUNE 2009


PROVIDING ESSENTIAL PEOPLE

This page is brought to you by

307 West Bay Plaza, Plattsburgh, NY 12901 • Tel: 518.566.6061 • www.westaff.com

41230

TM

A SECTION ESPECIALLY FOR PARENTS

BOOKSHELF I Spy A to Z: A Book of Picture Riddles

The Little Green Pea

Author/Illustrator: Jean Marzollo, Walter Wick (photographer) Publisher: Scholastic, Inc. Publication Date: June 2009 Age Range: 3 and up With more than 30 million I Spy books in print, the bestselling team has now created a fun new way for children to learn the ABCs. I Spy A to Z includes a note from the author with tips for parents on how to use the newest book to help children learn to read. From preschoolers to adults, this I Spy book is fun for all ages. The four steps that are emphasized are picture clues, repetition clues, rhyming clues and phonics clues. The colorful and engaging photos, paired with the rhythm and rhyme, make this book F-U-N! —JK

The Old Blue Pickup Truck Author: Candice F. Ransom, Jenny Mattheson (Illustrator) Publisher: Walker & Company Publication Date: June 2009 Age Range: 4 to 8 From the Publisher: For a little girl, there’s nothing better than running errands with Daddy in a trusty old blue pickup truck. When they go to the bakery, Old Blue is a restaurant. When they go to the hardware store, Old Blue is a toolshed. And when they go out to a neighboring farm, Old Blue is a barnyard! A little rain won’t stop their fun — or stop them from getting back home to Mommy safe and sound.

Author/Illustrator: Alison Barber, Paige Susan Keiser (Illustrator) Publisher: Sleeping Bear Press Publication Date: April 2009 Age Range: 10 and up From the Publisher: The Little Green Pea lives in row 53 and dreams of big things beyond the pea patch. But will a wiggly worm get in his way? Beautifully illustrated in soft watercolors, this “eco” fable will have young children laughing, while at the same time learning a little something about the nature of recycling.

Garbage, Waste, Dumps, and You: The Disgusting Story Behind What We Leave Behind Author/Illustrator: Conni Colwell Miller Publisher: Capstone Press Age Range: 8 to 12 Are you ready to go behind the scenes of our amazing sanitation system? This Sanitation Investigation book reveals what goes on after the trash has been taken out. You’ll never look at garbage, toilets and waste the same way again! Using “Edge Facts,” the author conveys all sorts of interesting facts. Did you know that about one third of the garbage that Americans throw away is packaging? Or that the average U.S. citizen uses seven trees’ worth of paper products every year? Not only does this book lay out the facts, but it also teaches readers what they can do about it. It features a glossary of terms in the back of the book, along with suggestions for further reading and Internet sites where you can learn more on the subject. — JK

P ARENTOWN

JUNE 2009

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

PAGE 17


Well, almost! But in July and August you can find

at any of our sponsors’ locations! Also, watch your local papers for more locations. 34108

Go online and

Write to Win a Prize!

Visit boomerandhalley.com for the answer!

Paws for a lesson in SPORTSMANSHIP.

Poor Harold and Edna! The kids nearly knock them over racing to breakfast. “Bet I can beat you to the kitchen,” says Halley’s Comet. “No way!” challenges Boomerang. The Australian Shepherd dog and the silver streak of a cat are a blur. “Ha! You had a head start, but I got here first,” Series by Mary Jane McKittrick Illustrations by Bob Ostrom pants Boomer. Halley is out of breath. “That was luck.”” Boomer squints. “Don’t be a sore loser.””

How was Halley a sore loser? a. She lost the race. b. She didn’t give Boomer credit for winning. c. She quit before the race started.

20519

PAGE 18

For the answer and a chance to win a prize, go to the FUN STUFF page at boomerandhalley.com!

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

JUNE 2009


Smith House Health Care Center

39 Farrell Road Willsboro, NY 12996 • (518) 963-4275

Healthy

Hearts & Bodies

Playing sports is a lot of fun. Getting hurt is not. Take these five steps to prevent injuries so you can stay in the game: 1. Wear protective gear, such as helmets, protective pads, and other gear. 2. Warm up and cool down. The Secret of RICE 3. Know the rules of the game. RICE is a way of remembering how to treat a sports injury. 4. Watch out for others. Take these steps to keep down the swelling, feel less pain, and 5. Don’t play when you’re injured. speed healing: Rest whatever body part is hurt. Ice Use it where it hurts. Compression - Wrap the body part with a bandage. Elevate the injured part. In other words, raise it up on a pillow.

Let’s find out more about each of these.

WEAR PROTECTIVE GEAR

Protective gear is anything you wear that helps keep you from getting hurt. The gear you wear depends on the sport you play. Helmets protect your head while you’re playing football, hockey, baseball, softball, skateboarding, and inline skating, just to name a few! Make sure you’re wearing the right helmet for your sport. Your helmet should fit snugly but comfortably, and if it has a strap — like a bike helmet does —you need to fasten it. Otherwise, it will fall off when you need it most. Other sports require eye protection, mouthguards, pads, wrist, elbow, and knee guards, and a protective cup (for boys only). And don’t forget your feet. Cleats are worn in football, baseball, softball, and soccer. Talk with your parents or your coach to know what gear you need. Then wear that gear whenever you’re practicing or playing.

WARM UP It’s not a good idea to just bolt on to the field and start playing. You shouldn’t even start stretching until you’re a little warmed up. So take a light jog to get loosened up and ready to play. Doing some stretching also can get you prepared to hit the field. By warming up, you get yourself ready to play. Warming up and practicing a sport helps keep you safe, too. Warm-ups that last 15 to 30 minutes and include slow, gradual stretching help lengthen your muscles and increase your blood flow and muscle temperature. That way, your muscles are ready to go and are much less likely to get hurt.

KNOW THE RULES OF THE GAME When players know the rules of the game — what’s legal and what’s not — fewer injuries happen. You and the other players know what to expect from each other. For instance, you know that in soccer you can’t come from behind, crash into a player’s legs, and steal the ball. It’s legal — and safer — to go after the ball rather than the player.

WATCH OUT FOR OTHERS Some rules don’t have anything to do with scoring points or penalties. Some rules are just about protecting other people and being courteous. One way you can watch out for others is to communicate on the field. For instance, a baseball player in the outfield might yell “I got it” to avoid a collision with another outfielder. Listening to your coach during a game also can help keep you safe. It’s also good to just be courteous, like telling someone his or her shoe is untied. Check your shoes, too!

DON’T PLAY WHEN YOU’RE INJURED This is a really important one. If you love sports, it’s tempting to get right back in the game, even after an injury. But playing when you’re hurt — or before an injury has had a chance to fully heal —is a bad idea. It can lead to an even worse injury, one that might sideline you for a long time. Be honest with parents and coaches if you’ve been hurt. See a doctor for your injuries, when necessary, and follow his or her advice about how and when to return to practice and play.

Ask about our sliding fee program for the uninsured. 21859

KIDSVILLE KITCHEN Together Time — Ask an adult for help with projects!

One Potato, Two Potato... Fresh produce is a key ingredient in eating well. At about 25 cents per serving, potatoes are one of the best values in the entire produce department. One medium-sized potato provides 45 percent of your daily value of vitamin C, more potassium than a banana, zero fat and only 110 calories. Heart-smart cooking also calls for healthy fats to give energy, help in the absorption of fatsoluble vitamins and beta-carotene, and slow digestion. One of the healthiest cooking oils is canola oil. It has the lowest amount of saturated fat of any common culinary oil (half that of olive oil) and is free of trans fat and cholesterol. With Father’s Day coming up this month, take a chance and make these potato pancakes for your dad. They’re sure to be a hit for breakfast or dinner! And this recipe only costs about 64¢ per serving.

POTATO PANCAKES

WHAT YOU NEED: • 4 medium Yukon Gold potatoes • 1/4 cup hot milk • 2 tablespoons canola oil, margarine or canola oilbutter blend • Salt and pepper to taste • 1/2 cup grated carrots • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion • 1/4 cup chopped green onions • 2 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour • 1 teaspoon salt • 1/4 teaspoon pepper • 2 to 3 tablespoons canola oil HOW TO MAKE IT (makes 8 pancakes): 1. Quick and easy microwave mashed potatoes: Place whole potatoes (do not poke) into microwave-safe dish. Cover dish. (If covering dish with plastic wrap, poke small hole in plastic.) Microwave on high for 9 minutes or until potatoes are done. With an adult, use oven mitts to remove dish from microwave; carefully remove cover from dish due to steam build-up. Add milk, canola oil, margarine or butter blend and salt and pepper to taste. Using a potato masher, mash potatoes to desired consistency. 2. To prepare pancakes: In large mixing bowl, combine mashed potatoes, carrots, onions, parsley, flour, salt and pepper. Mix well. 3. In large frying pan, heat canola oil. Spoon vegetable mixture, about 1/3 cup at a time, to form pancakes. Cook pancakes over medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes per side, or until cooked through and golden brown. Add additional canola oil as needed to cook remaining pancakes. Nutritional Analysis (per pancake): Calories, 120; Fat, 6 g; Saturated Fat, 1 g; Cholesterol, 0 mg; Sodium, 180 mg; Carbohydrates, 15 g; Fiber, 1 g; Protein, 2 g; Vitamin C, 16 mg; Potassium, 57 mg. For more healthy recipes using potatoes and canola oil, visit www.potatogoodness.com and www.canolainfo.org.

When a kiss and a bandaid aren’t enough…

24-HOUR EMERGENCY CARE 75 Park Street P.O. Box 277 Elizabethtown, NY 12932 873-6377 www.ech.org

The Heart of Your Community JUNE 2009

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

33881

PAGE 19


Caring for the most important people in the world…

…your children Pediatric of Dentistry s ll Glens (F51a8) 798-9966

ani, DDS

Farzad S

Dr. Sani Accepting New Patients!

Did you know? • 1st dental visit is recommended by 1st birthday • If your local water supply does not contain fluoride, you should speak with your dentist or pediatrician about the possibility of a fluoride supplement • Your child should be assisted with brushing and flossing at least one time daily until over the age of eight • Snacking or drinking juice or soda frequently can raise your child’s risk of tooth decay

… caring for the most important people in the world, your children. At Pediatric Dentistry of Glens Falls our doctor and staff are dedicated to helping assist you in making your child’s smile a happy and healthy one. We specialize in pediatric dentistry in an environment where your child feels safe and comfortable. We participate with many insurances including GHI. We offer a wide variety of comfort options: laughing gas, mild sedatives, general anesthesia

Directions to: 88 Broad Street, Glens Falls • (518) 798-9966 From South: Take I-87 North to Exit 18. Make a right off exit onto Main Street. At 4th traffic signal there will be a fork in the road. Continue going straight, Stewarts will be on your right. 88 Broad Street will be 11⁄2 blocks on your right. We are a 2 story brick building.

From North: Take I-87 South to Exit 18. Make a left off exit onto Main Street. At 5th traffic signal there will be a fork in the road. Continue going straight, Stewarts will be on your right. 88 Broad Street will be 11⁄2 blocks on your right. We are a 2 story brick building.

Pediatric Dentistry of Glens Falls Saturday appointments available!

798-9966 • Fax: 798-0616 88 Broad Street, Glens Falls www.pediatricdentistryofglensfalls.com 34105

PAGE 20

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

JUNE 2009

Kidsville News! 06-06-09  

Kidsville News!, a Denton Publication. Denton Publications produces nine community weekly publications in northern New York state and Vermon...