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Dear Kids, NORTHERN NEW YORK’S FUN FAMILY NEWSPAPER Serving Clinton, Essex and Warren Counties PUBLISHER Gayle Alexander gayle@denpubs.com 518-873-6368 Ext. 207 GENERAL MANAGER Allen K. Dunham aldunham@denpubs.com 518-570-7248 TRUMAN ASSISTANT/GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laurie Goff graphics@denpubs.com ILLUSTRATOR Cover & Truman • Dan Nelson MARKETING Brian Gay Brian@denpubs.com 518-873-6368 Ext. 207 NATIONAL EDITOR Joy G. Kirkpatrick kvnews@kidsvillenews.com Kidsville News, Inc. Bill Bowman President For Sponsorship Opportunities Please Call: 518-873-6368 P.O. Box 338, 14 Hand Avenue, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 Published Locally By Denton Publications, Inc. Copyright 2009 Kidsville News! Inc., All Rights Reserved. Truman is a service mark of Kidsville News! Inc. and the Kidsville News! logo is a registered trademark of Kidsville News! Inc. No part of this issue of Kidsville News! may be reproduced in whole or in part in any form without permission of the publisher or the copyright holder. Neither participating advertisers nor the publisher will be responsible or liable for misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors. The publishers reserve the right to edit any submitted material. Kidsville News! Inc. is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork or other material. Children’s submissions should include name, address, telephone number, and permission to publish signed by a parent or guardian.

Email Me,

Autumn is on the way! September 22 is the first I love Mail!!! day of fall in the northern hemisphere. If you Truman@denpubs.com haven’t already started back to school after summer break, you will probably be back in school in September. This month, I met a chancellor of a university. She really loves school and helping students get a college education. In many parts of the country, September is fair time. County fairs and state fairs will have games, rides and agricultural exhibits. You might even get to see some motocross! Check out the “Come Out and Play” article in this issue to learn more about this sport. Don’t forget that Grandparents Day is September 13. Be sure to spend the day with your grandparents if possible, or at least call them. It will make their day! Formore more fun this month, Webat site at www.kidsvillenews.com! For fun this month, visitvisit my my Website www.kidsvillenews.com! Haveaaspectacular spectacular September! Have September! Your friend, Your friend,

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Kidsville News!

The ABCs of Back-to-School It’s September, and school is in! Here are a few tips to help you make the transition back to school! A - Always be prepared. Have your backpack packed the night before and your assignments completed. B - Backpack safely. Choose a backpack with wide, padded shoulder straps and a padded back. Backpacks should never weigh more than 10 to 20 percent of your body weight. C - Choose carefully in the cafeteria. Make healthy food choices in the cafeteria and in your lunchbox. Be sure to eat breakfast and

lunch. Studies show that children who are not hungry learn better. D - Ditch the TV until after your homework is done. Focus on your homework, not the TV show or other distractions. E - Exercise. Your days can get busy with schoolwork, after-school activities and playtime. But be sure to plan time to exercise or free time to ride your bike, run and enjoy the great outdoors. F - Fun! Yes, school — and learning — are fun! Think of it like a new adventure; you get to meet new people, do new things and learn about the world!

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Although Labor Day seems to get the most attention of the September holidays, there’s another really important holiday in September. Grandparent’s Day! Since 1978, the first Sunday after Labor Day has been National Grandparents Day. The idea for Grandparents Day came from a West Virginia housewife named Marian McQuade. In 1970, McQuade began a campaign to set aside a day to commemorate grandparents and all they do for their children and grandchildren. By 1973, the first Grandparents Day was proclaimed in West Virginia. The campaign had also begun to gain a following on a national level. Senator Jennings Randolph (D-WV) introduced a resolution in 1973 on the Senate floor. However, the resolution sat there for several years without moving forward. While Randolph’s resolution sat idle in the Senate, McQuade was busy working to get Grandparents Day recognized nationally. She gained media support while also contacting governors, senators and congressmen in every state. By 1978, McQuade’s hard work paid off when the proclamation for a National Grandparents Day was signed by President Jimmy Carter. McQuade died last September. She was a mother of 15, and had 43 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.

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SEPTEMBER 2009


Platypus

The platypus is a semi-aquatic mammal that is unique to Australia. It has an odd combination of features that give it a distinct appearance, and its other name — the duckbill platypus. In fact, when the platypus was first discovered, some people thought it had the bill of a duck sewn onto a mammal’s body! It has borrowed body parts from other animals, too! Its feet are like otter’s and its tail resembles a beaver Kingdom: Animalia tail. It is specially adapted for its life in the Phylum: Chordata water. It has a flat body, waterproof fur and Class: Mammalia strong front legs used for swimming and Order: Monotremata digging. It has brown fur on its body, except Family: Ornithorhynchidae for white patches under its eyes. The platypus’ ears are set back in a groove with Genus: Ornithorhynchus each eye and are not visible. It lives near the waterways of eastern Australia. It feeds on worms, crayfish and sometimes frogs and insects. The platypus feeds mostly at night and uses electroreceptors to navigate under water and locate prey. The male platypus has a venomous ankle spur on the inner side of each ankle. The venom is not lethal to humans, but can be very painful and can kill smaller animals. The platypus is one of five species of monotremes, which are mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live babies. Females build nursery burrows and usually lay only two small eggs. The baby platypus hatches from its egg with the help of an egg tooth. The platypus can live 20 years. Sources: Encyclopaedia Brittanica Online; Wikipedia; Photograph, Stefan Kraft. Go Online and

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Hi! I’m Digger Mole and I work for NYCO Minerals. Did you know that our mineral, called “Wollastonite”, is shipped all around the world?

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America, South America and the Caribbean. September 15 was chosen as the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18.

Chile In Chile, September is a special month filled with festivities. Spring arrives in Chile in September, and they celebrate a Day of Unity on the first Monday in September. Their Independence Day is

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SEPTEMBER 2009


WHAT’S IT LIKE TO BE... A UNIVERSITY CHANCELLOR? Many of my friends have just started back to school for the new school year. And, one of my very favorite people has just started school at a university. It made me wonder about all the many people who work in education, from bus drivers to teachers, the lunch lady to the principal. It takes a lot of people to help a young person get an education! Who is responsible for running a university? Well, I discovered that that person is called a Chancellor and is basically the president of a University. At the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, N.C., that person is Rosemary DePaolo.

TRUMAN: What does it take to become a Chancellor at a University?

TRUMAN: What was your favorite subject in school?

CHANCELLOR DEPAOLO: Usually, a person goes to school for a quite a while: four years of college, then two or more years to acquire a masters degree, and finally, several more years to obtain a doctorate degree in whatever subject you like best.

CHANCELLOR DEPAOLO: English. TRUMAN: Why do you think a college education is important?

CHANCELLOR DEPAOLO: I was always interested in teaching, and then when I was graduating from college, I became interested in graduate school, which naturally led to college teaching. After many years doing that, I became a college administrator, and then finally a chancellor, which is the president of an entire university.

CHANCELLOR DEPAOLO: A college education gives you the opportunity to explore new subjects and ideas that you normally don’t get to study during your K-12 years. You get to focus on those subjects that really matter most to you. You also get to meet many people who are very different from you Ñ individuals from other states and countries throughout the world. A college degree opens up many more job opportunities for you, and individuals with a college degree earn significantly more during their lifetime (an average of a million dollars more) than most individuals who have only a high school diploma.

TRUMAN: So, what exactly do you do? What’s a typical day on the job?

TRUMAN: What advice would you give to kids who are interested in this profession?

TRUMAN: When, and why, did you first become interested in this profession?

CHANCELLOR DEPAOLO: Study hard, do CHANCELLOR DEPAOLO: Every well and go on to college, and then learn day is different for me. I have meetabout university life and all of its aspects Ñ ings with many departments on our academics and the best ways to teach, campus in which we try to solve probinformation technology, finance, employlems that arise, such as whether we Above: Chancellor DePaolo at UNCW helps a ment issues, public relations, facility manshould offer new courses, how we can freshman student on “move in” day. agement, local and state government and make our campus safer, how we can more. All of these factors impact the univerhelp to solve some of the problems in sity on a daily basis, so having some knowledge or experience in our state or how we can become more “green” as a campus many of these areas helps you to be a chancellor. community. Large universities have thousands of employees, so interviewing people who are looking for jobs is something that I TRUMAN: Thanks for talking to Kidsville News! often do. I also spend quite a bit of time meeting with donors, legislators and other people who can help our university in a variety of ways. TRUMAN: What’s the hardest part of your job? CHANCELLOR DEPAOLO: We have almost 13,000 students at our university, and I don’t get to work with students as much as I would like. TRUMAN: What���s the best part of your job? CHANCELLOR DEPAOLO: I enjoy helping students, as well as the faculty and staff who support those students, making sure they have everything they need to succeed at whatever they are doing. Sometimes that’s a word of encouragement, sometimes it’s helping them find the resources they need and sometimes it’s helping them find ways to do their jobs better or more efficiently. I particularly enjoy seeing people succeed.

SEPTEMBER 2009

G O G REEN W HEN G OING B ACK TO S CHOOL With back-to-school shopping in full swing, think about the environment when you make your school supply shopping list. Here are a few suggestions to make your school supplies more environmentally friendly. • Avoid disposable items. Purchase reusable products. The average American produces 1,000 pounds of trash each year. That amount could be reduced by one-third if people used reusable products. Using refi llable pencils and pens can make a difference. Did you know Americans buy more than six billion pens and pencils per year -- most of which are disposable? • Buy recycled paper products. This action helps save wood, water and energy, while reducing pollution and solid waste. Calendars, notebooks, folders and paper are available with recycled content. • Buy products made from recycled plastic. Look for products that are made from a minimum of 50 percent recycled plastic, such as markers in the Pentel Recycology line. Remember the three Rs - Reduce, Reuse and Recycle!

www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

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A Planet Named Easterbunny

by Dr. Tony Phillips

Far beyond the moon and stars / Twenty light-years south of Mars / Spins the gentle Bunny Planet / And the Bunny Queen is Janet. – Voyage to the Bunny Planet by Rosemary Wells

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Kids of all ages love the Bunny Planet books by Rosemary Wells. Maybe you failed a test, or ate a bad hot dog, or got in trouble for making rude noises on the school bus. No problem! Janet the Bunny Queen will make you feel better. If only the Bunny Planet were real. It almost was. A few years ago, astronomer Mike Brown of Caltech discovered a small planet. It was even farther from Earth than Pluto is. He found it a few days after Easter, so he decided to call it Easterbunny. The solar system finally had This is an artist’s idea of dwarf plan- a bunny planet! Mike Brown has et MakeMake, formerly known by its discovered a number of discoverers as Easterbunny. small planets. Most of them are smaller than Pluto, so astronomers say they are “dwarf planets.” Brown loves to give them nicknames. He named one Santa, because he found it around Christmastime, and another one Xena, the Warrior Princess. But these fun names didn’t stick. Astronomers around the world belong to the International Astronomical Union, and it is this group that has the final say on naming things in the solar system. They told Mike that dwarf planets beyond Pluto must be named after mythological gods of creation. It’s a rule! So Mike and his team put on their thinking caps. They renamed Santa as “Haumea,” a Hawaiian goddess of childbirth. They renamed Xena as Greek goddess “Eris.” And they renamed Easterbunny as “Makemake” (MAH-kay MAH-kay), a creation god of Easter Island. These names aren’t as much fun as Santa and Easterbunny, but they’re not so bad once you get used to them. As for Mike, he says “I take the naming of these planets seriously, and I probably spend way too much time on it.” Sounds like someone could use a trip to the Bunny Planet. Patterns of stars in the sky, called constellations, are also named for ancient gods, as well as animals and humans. Learn some of their names by making a Star Finder. Visit spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/ kids/st6starfinder/st6starfinder.shtml. This article was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

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SEPTEMBER 2009


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September is National Chicken Month!

SEPTEMBER 2009

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PAGE 10 www.kidsvillenews.com/northernny

ek Elizabeth Shum Kindergarten Age 5 1/2 • Warresnburg

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SEND YOUR EVENTS TO KIDSVILLECALENDAR@DENPUBS.COM

SEPTEMBER 2009

SEPTEMBER SUNDAY

MONDAY Artifact Inquiry • Time: 11:00am 1-877-ECHOFUN

TUESDAY

1

Newspaper Mary Had A in Education Week, Little March 2-6Lamb

Published National Anthem Dayin 1830.Special Dr. Seuss' Birthday:

Art, Reading & FREE Film 3PM Brown Art Studio & Word War II H. Froehlich Auditorium began, 1939 The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls-NY

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Pilgrims set sail from Plymouth, England, 1620

Read a Book Day

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National Grandparents Day National Peanut Day

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Labor Day Grandma Moses painter, 1860

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Francis Scott Key wrote the 'Star Spangled Banner' in 1814

Awareness Children’s

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Museum • 3 pm

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Good Neighbor Day

(4th Sunday) DISCOVERY DAY:

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Thomas Chambers FirstTour/Create Steam Locomotive Art The first1-3 public p.m.railway was the Stockton and Louis P. Brown Art Studio Darlington Railway, The Hyde whose firstCollection, run took Glens place onFalls-NY Tuesday, September 27, 1825.

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National Hispanic Heritage Month Begins 17th & 31st September 15 Schroon Lake Public and ends Library, Schroon Lake October Math/Science Club15

2

Miniature Golf Day World Gratitude Day International Peace Day

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First Airport Opened

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Elephant Appreciation

Day StoryTime Ice Cream Cone with a Twist Invented In 1903. 1-877-ECHOFUN U.S. Post Office Opened Tuesdays all month In 1789. long at 11 a.m.

National Blueberry Popsicle Day

U.S. Treasury Get your coins inDept. for the Established, 1789 Big Change Roundup benefit: Vermont Children’s Hospital ONE WEEK LEFT!!!

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Teddy Bear Day

California became the 31st state in 1850

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Ages 3-6 10:00-10:45 a.m.

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First Railroad Station Benefit forOpened World

International Literacy Day

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Positive Thinking Day

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WEDNESDAY

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ARTFUL AFTERNOONS National 1:30PM-4:30PM Play-Doh Day kids 6-12 Mayflower with adult chaperone Day Louis P. Brown Art Studio

Rosh Hashanah The U.S. Army was established in 1789

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Irish•American Skyscraper Heritage Month

Day

Willy Wonka Junior 5th @ 7p, UncleMarch Sam's Birthday March 6th @ 7p, UncleMarch Sam's7th image @ 2p was first use on this March 8th @ day 2p in @ Charles1813. R. Wood Theater Glens Falls-NY Call for Tickets

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Swap Ideas Day

Citizenship Day National Apple Dumpling Day

First Toy Store Opened

The Supreme Court was established in 1789.

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Safety Pin Invented

FRIDAY

4

Newspaper Carrier Day

Pint-Sized Science Children 2-7 1-877-ECHOFUN. 11:00 am

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Make Your Bed Day World Trade Center attack in 2001

The New York Times was first published in 1851

SATURDAY

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Youth Month FirstArt Continental

Congress

Whimsical Convened, World Story 1774 Hour 10 am Meet the National Author & Illustrator Crafts & Book Cheese Signing too! ChamplainPizza Valley Transportation Day Museum Plattsburgh NY Reg 518-324-6666

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National Chocolate

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International Talk Like a Pirate Day

Milk Shake Day Whimsical World Story Hour 10 am Meet the Author & Illustrator Crafts & Book Signing too! Champlain

In 1787, the U.S. Constitution was signed.

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First Day of Autumn

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THURSDAY

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Native American Day (4th Friday)

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Johnny Appleseed GEOLOGY John Chapman born in 1774.


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At the Movies Bright Star (In Theaters: September 18) Celebrated New Zealand writer/director Jane Campion (she won three Academy Awards for her movie The Piano in 1994) makes a graceful 19th-century British costume drama about John Keats (played by Ben Whishaw), a gifted poet, and the pretty young woman that inspires him to write wonderful poetry. Abbie Cornish plays 23-year-old Fanny Brawne, the “bright star” that is the secret object of Keats’ romantic inspiration in an old-fashioned movie filled with powerful emotions and tragedy. Bright Star should charm starry-eyed teens who dream of Victorian-era romance when people wrote poetry and didn’t have computers or cell phones. Rated PG for thematic elements, some sensuality, brief language and incidental smoking. (Apparition) Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs (In Theaters: September 18) Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader, Night of the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian) is a goofy young inventor anxious to create something “awesome” in this animated children’s comedy. Tough economic times prompt Flint to concoct a machine that will magically “convert water into food.” However, disaster strikes when Flint’s big invention goes out of control, causing it to rain down giant food all over the world. We’re talking giant pizzas, corn cobs, fortune cookies and oh yeah — spaghetti and meatballs. It will take more than a little fast thinking for Flint to find a way to stop his contraption. Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is based on the popular children’s book by Judi Barrett, and illustrated by Ron Barrett, and will appear in 3D animation in select theaters and on IMAX screens. Not Yet Rated. (Columbia Pictures/Sony Pictures Animation)

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Fame (In Theaters: September 25) This fast-paced remake of the popular Oscar-winning 1980 movie of the same title features a bunch of talented young newcomers playing ambitious students at the New York City High School of Performing Arts, where they dance, sing and play musical instruments in search of fame. The moral of the story is that talent, hard work and dedication pay off for those willing to put in the long hours to meet their artistic goals. The cast includes Asher Book as Marco, Kristy Flores as Rosie, Paul Iacono as Neil, Paul McGill as Kevin, Naturi Naughton as Denise, Kay Panabaker as Jenny, Kherington Payne as Alice, Collins Pennie as Malik, Walter Perez as Victor and Anna Maria Perez de Tagle as Joy. Broadway legend Bebe Neuwirth (the Broadway production of Chicago) stars as Lynn Kraft. “How big you make it is all about how far you take it.” Rated PG for thematic material, including teen drinking and language. (MGM) Movies on DVD Bob the Builder: Call in the Crew (DVD Release: August 25) Bob the Builder has become a staple of high quality educational entertainment for little ones with big imaginations. The friendly little animated guy in the yellow hard hat takes on big construction jobs in the real world to teach and inspire kids about how the world around them is built. In Call in the Crew, Bob and his crew build a house, open a cafe and repair an old gate with the care and teamwork of a well-oiled machine. There are five episodes here, and the DVD package comes with a free toy. This is the kind of children’s DVD that stands up to many repeated viewings. Cole Smithey, also known as “the smartest film critic in the world,” has been a film critic for 11 years and writes for over 50 publications, in print and on-line. Truman loves to watch movies and has the highest appreciation for great popcorn.

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Let’s Go Back to School! Can you help Truman find his way to the bus stop?

Fair Word Find AGRICULTURE BLUE RIBBON CARNIVAL COTTON CANDY FAIR FERRIS WHEEL FOOD GAMES HOTDOGS MUSIC RIDES ROLLER COASTER

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E L V H O C H T M P Z B R D N

F R D U O B L L E B W E F D J

J N U O V T Y R O R T V I E W

Z M J T S O D N S S C U G Q B

G E W E L L N O A R A K P L X

W Z M D R U A O G F Y M U C C

R A Y O I P C B I S C E L A S

G P P N E R N I L O R D P R M

R P R B E Z O J R I B R U N C

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P N X A L E E H W S I R R E F

K Q Q S T R I D E S X D O O F

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Red, White & True Mysteries Texas Political Wife Made History as Broadcasting Pioneer Claudia Taylor (1912 – 2007) was one of three children born to Minnie Pattillo Taylor and Thomas Jefferson Taylor in a country mansion near the rural town of Karnack in east Texas. The mansion was known to locals as “The Brick House.” I suppose they didn’t have too many brick houses in Texas back then. I’ve always found names like that of her father to be interesting; other “presidential” names that come to mind are George Washington Carver and George Washington Ferris, inventor of the Ferris Wheel. Claudia’s mother died when she was five, so she was raised by her father, her aunt and family servants. As a child, Claudia had a nickname that reflected her love of nature. It was a nickname which she carried with her for a lifetime. When she graduated from the University of Texas in 1934, she planned on becoming a newspaper reporter. Soon after, she met a congressional aide whom she would soon marry. He proposed to her only seven weeks after their first date, and they were married just three weeks later. Her congressional aide husband continued to climb the political ranks. He won a congressional election in 1937, but vacated the office to join the Navy during World War II. Claudia took over his office. When he returned, he ran for and lost his first bid for the U.S. Senate, but he became a U.S. senator when he won his next election. In the meantime, Claudia bought the failing KTBC-AM radio station in 1942, which was later re-named KLBJ-AM, and turned it into a media empire. She became the first person to broadcast a TV signal in Texas when she opened KTBC-TV on Thanksgiving Day in 1952. The Texas Association of Broadcasters honored her this year with the prestigious Pioneer Broadcaster of the Year award. Yet you probably have never heard of Claudia Taylor. By the way, in case you’ve never noticed, all radio and TV

stations east of the Mississippi River have call letters beginning with the letter W, while all stations west of the Mississippi River have call letters beginning with the letter K. Claudia was a leader in both business and in community service. She served as honorary chairman of the national Head Start Program to give pre-school training to disadvantaged children. She was well known for her environmental work, too. Her national campaign for beautification resulted in the Highway Beautification Act of 1965, and four years later, she founded the Texas Highway Beautification Award. Some of he work involved her close connection to politics, and there’s a reason for that. She also received awards such as the Eleanor Roosevelt Candlestick Award (from the Women’s National Press Club in 1968), the Medal of Freedom (from President Gerald Ford in 1977), the Congressional Gold Medal and the Theodore Roosevelt National Park Medal of Honor in 2000. During Claudia’s time, it was unheard of for a woman to run for President. There was nothing to prevent her from being married to a president, though, which is exactly what she did when her husband went on to become our nation’s 36th president. There’s one other thing that I forgot to tell you earlier about Claudia Taylor: As a young girl growing up in Texas, she had a nickname which she carried with her for a lifetime: “Lady Bird.” When she married Lyndon Johnson, she became Lady Bird Johnson. The girl who was born in “The Brick House” later lived in The White House. But you knew that all along, didn’t you? © 2009 Paul Niemann. This story is part of the Red, White & True Mysteries series by Author Paul Niemann. For more information, please visit www.InventionMysteries.com.

Meet Truman’s Friend

Roo the Reader She likes to talk to K-1 kids about reading! Roo gives away free books!

Literacy Volunteers of Essex/Franklin Counties

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ited Affi red li a te

Literacy Volunteers of Essex/Franklin works with people who want to learn to read. Our primary mission is to help adults who need to upgrade literacy skills, learn English as a Second Language, or work on their GEDs. Literacy Volunteers provides free instruction by trained volunteers to these adults to help them acquire self-esteem and achieve aims in the areas of education, family, employment, and the community. During summer, read a book in your favorite nature spot. Crack open a field guide! Learn about nature and the environment by reading! Raise your GREEN IQ!

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Port Henry - 546-3008 • Tri-Lakes - 891-5567 • Malone - 483-9366

ProLiteracy A m e r i c a

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COME OUT AND PLAY!

Motocross — or How to Get Really Dirty on a Bike! Motocross, which comes from the French word combining crosscountry and motorcycling, was first known as scrambling, a British off-road event. It is one of the most popular forms of motorcycle racing. Using motorcycles with engines of 50 to 500 cc, racers compete according to engine size. They zip and zoom over muddy tracks and turns, bumpy hills and dusty dirt roads, and depending on the size of the racecourse, up to 40 riders may ride at the same time. Races may be timed, as with professional races that usually last 30 minutes, or riders may race one another for a specific number of laps around the track; the first three riders to finish all the laps, called podium riders, win first, second and third place. Riders as young as four years old may race using 50 cc bikes. The bikes used in motocross are a bit different from regular motorcycles. They are lighter, using aluminum, and instead of fixed frames, they have suspensions or shock absorbers to make it easier and more comfortable to go over the bumpy track. Many people customize their bikes to get them just the way they want. The riders also wear special equipment to protect them from potential falls and all the dirt and mud they will ride through. This safety equipment includes a full-face helmet; goggles; gloves; chest protector (preferably one with full torso, back, shoulder, elbow and

kidney protection); a kidney belt, an elasticized belt that fits like a girdle and keeps kidneys from jarring; leathers, or pants; knee pads and hip pads, hard plastic that fit inside leathers and a good pair of tall boots that come almost to your knees. To ride motocross, racers must also be very physically fit since they make such exciting turns and jumps and have to control the bike on very rough terrain, often spraying mud up in the air. A rider’s arms, legs, shoulders and glutes get a good workout! Motocross is very exciting to watch, too. Each year in early May, riders and spectators attend the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) Championship Motocross Series –– 24 races on 12 tracks across the United States. Other types of popular motocross competition include stadium events, like Supercross and Arenacross, which take place in indoor arenas, and Freestyle Motocross (FMX) events, where judges rate riders on their jumping and acrobatic skills in the air. Sources: “Motocross,” en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motocross; www.ehow. com/how_10500_buy-motorcross-gear.html; thehelmetfolks.blogspot. com/2009/01/what-equipment-do-i-need-for-motocross.html; www.wisegeek.com/what-is-motocross.htm, What is Motocross?

Gee Thanks!

We would like to thank all of our Kidsville News! in Education Program Sponsors for helping to provide Kidsville News! to Northern NY schools and all area children K-5.

Literacy Volunteers of Essex/Franklin Counties

Pediatric Dentistry of Glens Falls (518) 798-9966 Farzad Sani, DDS

Smith House Health Care Center Our mission is to create a fun, engaging, educational newspaper and web site for all elementary age children, their parents & teachers, that encourages reading as a lifelong habit and promotes literacy & education. When it comes to literacy & child development, if we are to help develop a child’s habits, truly affect the way they think and act, to help develop their minds, we must start at a young age. We hope that you will consider partnering with us too! Together we can take childhood learning to the next level and have a positive impact on our community and our future leaders. 34107

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PARENTOWN’S KIDSMART Teaching Kids about Money and Budgeting Teaching children and teens how to stick to a budget not only can save you some green in the short-run, but can prove valuable in the long term. “It’s a smart idea to teach kids responsible moneymanagement skills while they’re young and their finances are simple,” says Aaron Patzer, CEO of online personal finance service Mint.com. “With a solid foundation, they’ll be able to manage successfully as their money lives become more complex, adding rent and mortgage, insurance, taxes and other life expenses.” Before leaving home, kids should be able to manage their own bank accounts and use credit cards responsibly. They should have experience tracking their spending and in setting and keeping to simple budgets. There are easy ways to introduce these concepts at any age: * Start Early with Young Children: Small children should be taught to identify different bills and coins and their values. Teach them to count money and make change. Have them accompany you to the store, help pay the cashier and count change. * Teach Grade Schoolers Money Responsibility: An allowance is a step toward teaching kids to be responsible with money. Grade school children should receive a regular allowance and pay for some of their own luxuries. This teaches them to prioritize and save money for goals — whether in piggy banks or their first bank accounts. * Have Kids Participate in Family Budgeting: Teach kids what a budget is, how much the family has to spend monthly and how to allocate money for those expenses, while saving for longer-term goals. New tools now can make budgeting more interesting. Track the family’s budget using a free online budgeting service like Mint.com, which looks and works more like Facebook than Quicken or Microsoft Money software. These services automatically categorize your household expenses, presenting them in family-friendly charts and graphs. Set individual budgets for everything for which you spend: groceries, gas, even vacations. Mint.com also provides suggestions on how to save money by switching from high-interest credit cards, or putting your cash into a savings account or CD paying higher interest. For older children, the beginning of the school semester is a great time to get started, involving them in the decision-making processes for purchasing school supplies. * Teens Should Master Basic Banking Skills: During their adolescent years, kids should learn banking skills, such as opening checking and savings accounts, making deposits and withdrawals, and spending within their limits. Work with your teenager to create a basic budget that includes leisure activities, clothes, music, etc. Teach teens about credit cards by having them help you make a credit card purchase. Then involve them when it’s time to pay the bill. * Have College Kids Formalize Their Own Budgets: The typical student spends over ten thousand dollars yearly on tuition, room and board at a public college and more at private schools. Several thousand more goes to textbooks, supplies and entertainment. So how to keep them from emptying bank accounts within weeks of starting college? Help them set up budgets online on a service like Mint.com, which will send them text messages alerting them of bills due, credit limits and bank fees. Some services even offer iPhone applications, so college students can stay in touch with their money wherever they may be. “You don’t have to be a financial whiz to teach children to make smart money,” says Patzer. “And the good news is, there are lots of new tools to help you teach them, and that can even make money management more fun.” Information provided by StatePoint Media.

Autumn begins on September 22. In the Northern Hemisphere, where the United States is, autumn begins at 5:18 p.m. with the autumnal equinox. In the Southern Hemisphere, this is the beginning of Spring.

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Look What I Did This Summer...

I visited the Warrensburg Summer Program

We had so much fun and they gave me a really fun ‘Thank You’ book they made themselves!

Dragon Visits Dodge Memorial Library!!!!

2009 Warren County Youth Fair Here I am with Dianne Curtis Can I come to your next event? 518-873-6368 X207

September is National Library Card Sign-up Month. To get your library card, just visit your local library and ask for help at the front desk! September is a time for fall festivals and county fairs. Did you know that agricultural fairs were first created to educate farmers about new farming procedures and to showcase agricultural products from across the state?

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SEPTEMBER 2009


PROVIDING ESSENTIAL PEOPLE

This page is brought to you by

307 West Bay Plaza, Plattsburgh, NY 12901 • Tel: 518.566.6061 • www.westaff.com

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A SECTION ESPECIALLY FOR PARENTS

BOOKSHELF The Truly Terribly Horrible Sweater... That Grandma Knit Author/Illustrator: Debbie Macomber, Mary Lou Carney, Vincent Nguyen (Illustrator) Publisher: HarperCollins Age Range: 5 to 7 From the Publisher: Cameron loves his grandmother. She knows just what makes him tick. That’s why he can’t figure out why Grandma would send him a sweater — a truly terribly horrible sweater — for his birthday. Cameron pours mustard on his sweater. He puts it on his dog (in the rain). He even tries to send it to the thrift shop. But nothing works. Now Grandma is coming for the holidays, and Cameron has to wear her gift to him. But what’s he going to say when she asks what he thinks about the sweater she made? With a sure hand and a light touch, worldwide bestseller Debbie Macomber and her new writing partner, Mary Lou Carney, reveal that what Grandma knit into Cameron’s sweater is the greatest gift of all. Debbie and Mary Lou have included simple knitting instructions and an original knitting pattern for Cameron’s sweater. You can find them at the back of this book.

plan. Planting an acorn from the oak tree, he knows that one day a large oak will stand in the backyard, and he can create a new treehouse for his own children. A nice gentle story that touches on childhood memories, and on surviving a natural disaster. —JK

Winnie Finn, Worm Farmer Author/Illustrator: Carol Brendler, Ard Hoyt (Illustrator) Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux Age Range: 4 to 8 From the Publisher: Winnie Finn is crazy about earthworms and knows everything about them. When spring arrives in Quincy County, all she can think about is the county fair coming up. This year, she would like nothing more than to win a prize for her worms so that she might buy a shiny new wagon for transporting them around. Trouble is, there’s no prize at the fair for worms... Bright, energetic illustrations accompany this jaunty tale about a young girl’s creativity that will inspire readers of all interests — but especially those with a love for something wiggly.

Platypus: A Century-long Mystery

Tree House in a Storm Author: Rachelle Burk, Rec Schneider (Illustrator) Publisher: Stemmer House Age Range: 4 to 8 Kenny loved climbing trees, and as soon as he was big enough, he built himself a tree house in a big oak tree in the backyard. He and his sister spent afternoons enjoying childhood until one day, they were confronted with a monster — a monster of a storm. Hurricane Betsy hit their neighborhood in New Orleans, leaving some neighbors without a home to return to. Kenny discovers that his tree house did not survive the storm, but realizes also how lucky his family was. And, he has a long range

Author/Illustrator: William Caper Publisher: Bearport Publishing Age Range: 9 to 12 From the Publisher: In 1798, the Governor of Australia came across an odd-looking animal. It had a bill like a duck, a tail like a beaver and webbed feet with claws. He shipped the mysterious creature to scientists in England. Perhaps they could figure out what it was. Little did the Governor of Australia know that it would take scientists almost 100 years to fully unravel the mystery of what this rare creature was and how it lived.

P ARENTOWN

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WHERE IN THE WORLD IS... GUATEMALA?

It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world! Get out your globe, and find longitude 90º W and latitude 15º N to locate Guatemala, a country that celebrates its independence day in September, along with many other Hispanic countries. Guatemala is located in Central America, bordering the North Pacific Ocean between El Salvador and Mexico. It also borders the Gulf of Honduras or the Caribbean Sea, between Honduras and Belize. Guatemala has a tropical climate that is hot and humid. Its terrain is mountainous, with coastal plains and limestone plateaus. There are many volcanoes in the mountains of Guatemala. They also have occasional earthquakes. Its coast is a prime target for hurricanes and other tropical storms. The Mayan civilization once flourished in Guatemala and surrounding regions. Then, Guatemala was nearly devastated by visits from the Spanish conquistadores, who brought with them an epidemic. Many of the native Guatemalan populations were killed by disease. After almost three centuries as a Spanish colony, Guatemala won its Where in the independence in 1821. During the second half of the 20th century, it World Word experienced a variety of military and civilian governments. There was plateau [pla-toh], an elevated land area, with also a 36-year guerrilla war. In 1996, the government signed a peace a relatively level surface, agreement formally ending the conflict. raised above adjoining Sources: “Guatemala,” The World Factbook, Central Intelligence land on at least one side. Agency; Metro Creative Graphics. Kno ck Kn ock Kno ck Kno ck W h o’s t h ? e r e h e r e? t W h o’s A b b ot t ! ! k r a A a rd v ? A b b ot t w rk who h o? A a rd v a n d r e d m i l e s A b b o t t u t i m e yo u rk a h s! ans we re d t h A a rd v a o f y o u r s m i l e e do or! fo r o n e

k Kno ck Kno c ? W h o’s t h e r e Abe! A b e w h o? G H. . . ! Abe C D E F

Kno ck Kno ck W h o’s t h e r e? A lp a c a ! A lp a c a w h o? A lp a c a t h e t r u n k, yo u p a c k t he s u it c a s e !

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Smith House Health Care Center

39 Farrell Road Willsboro, NY 12996 • (518) 963-4275

Healthy Healthy

Hearts Hearts & Bodies Bodies

Families Must Make Safety a Priority While Hiking Hiking boots? Check. Water? Check. Safety guidelines? A must! Fall is a great time for the family to get out and go for a hike, the cooler temperatures and beautiful changing foliage beckons. While the preparations for a family hiking trip usually include a review of the necessary gear, parents should also review safety guidelines with their children, paying special attention to potential hazards specific to camping, hiking, outdoor recreation, and falls. “Going camping or hiking can be wonderful activities for parents to do with their children, but it is essential to remember key safety guidelines as you’ll be leaving the daily environment your kids are used to,” says Kerry Haley, Safe Kids Adirondack cocoordinator. “A campfire is a serious responsibility because it’s the only situation where a family is purposely starting a fire outdoors and a long way from a pressurized water supply or the nearest fire engine.”

Keep these guidelines in mind while camping and hiking: * Keep matches and lighters out of the reach of children. * Always actively supervise children near a campfire or portable stove. Follow posted rules about campfires, and do not light fires in windy or excessively dry conditions. * Keep a bucket of water and a shovel near the fire at all times, and extinguish the fire completely before going to sleep or leaving the site.

hypothermia. A child’s body temperature changes faster than an adult’s. * Do not push kids to go on a longer or more strenuous hike than they can handle. Exhausted children are more likely to fall, wander off or otherwise get injured. * Bring plenty of drinking water or sports drinks and highenergy snacks like the Caramel, Peanut Butter, Apple snack in the Kidsville Kitchen Recipe. * Kids should wear hiking boots and clothing that offers protection from scrapes, bites and poisonous plants. Following the manufacturer’s instructions, apply insect repellent to a child’s clothing and exposed skin. *Apply sunscreen rated SPF 15 or higher to your child’s exposed skin 15 to 30 minutes before going out, and reapply frequently. It is possible to get a sunburn in the Fall even in cloudy conditions.

Safe Kids Adirondack works to prevent unintentional childhood injury, the leading cause of death and disability to children ages 1 to 14. Its members include the Foundation of CVPH Medical Center, Elizabethtown Community Hospital, Clinton & Essex County Public Health and Sheriff Departments, * Let friends and relatives know where you are going ACAP, NYS Police, and JCEO. Safe Kids and when you are coming home. For more Adirondack is a member of Safe Kids Worldwide, a global network * Never let children hike alone. information about outdoor of organizations dedicated recreation safety, visit to preventing * Dress children in layers of clothing to www.usa.safekids.org. unintentional injury. help prevent heat-related illness and * Keep first aid supplies and emergency phone numbers handy, and know where the nearest phone is located. Cell phones might not work in remote areas.

Ask about our sliding fee program for the uninsured. 21859

KIDSVILLE KITCHEN Together Time — Ask an adult for help with projects!

Learn to Love Healthy Eating! According to the 2007 Produce for Kids study, 96 percent of children don’t get the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables every day. That won’t surprise a lot of parents. Getting children to eat any fruits or vegetables at all can be a big challenge. With 39 percent of all U.S. children overweight or obese, getting kids to make better food choices is more important than ever. How can a parent get fruit-phobic or veggie-avoiding kids to eat more of what they really need? Mypyramid.gov, a Web site dedicated to helping people make smart food choices, has some tips for coping with picky eaters. • Let your kids be “produce pickers.” Let them help pick out fruits and veggies at the store. • Kids like to try foods they help make. All of that mixing, mashing and measuring makes them want to taste what they are creating. • Make meals a stress-free time. If meals are times for family arguments, your child may learn unhealthy attitudes toward food. • Offer choices. Rather than ask “Do you want broccoli for dinner?” ask, “Which would you like for dinner: broccoli or cauliflower?” Another suggestion, from The Produce for Kids study, is to use dips to get kids to eat more fruits and vegetables. Sixty-eight percent of the moms surveyed said that their children ate more fruit and vegetables when they were served with dip. Pre-packaged portion-controlled dips are easy to send to school in lunch boxes.

OPEN FACE CARAMEL PEANUT BUTTER SANDWICH WHAT YOU NEED:

• 2 tablespoons Marzetti Disney Cinnamon Caramel Apple Dip (or other brand caramel dip) • 2 tablespoons peanut butter • 2 slices whole grain bread • Sliced apples, peanuts, dried cranberries or raisins HOW TO MAKE IT (makes 8 servings): • In a small bowl, mix together dip and peanut butter until smooth. • Spread two tablesppons of caramel mixture on each slice of bread. • Arrange sliced apples, peanuts and dried fruit atop each sandwich and serve. All materials courtesy of Family Features and Marzetti Disney Dips, a line of fruit and veggie dips for children that makes eating produce fun and nutritious.

When a kiss and a bandaid aren’t enough…

24-HOUR EMERGENCY CARE 75 Park Street P.O. Box 277 Elizabethtown, NY 12932 873-6377 www.ech.org

The Heart of Your Community SEPTEMBER 2009

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Caring for the most important people in the world…

…your children Pediatric of Dentistry s ll Glens Fa) 798-9966 (518

ani, DDS

Farzad S

Dr. Sani Accepting New Patients!

Did you know? • 1st dental visit is recommended by 1st birthday • If your local water supply does not contain fluoride, you should speak with your dentist or pediatrician about the possibility of a fluoride supplement • Your child should be assisted with brushing and flossing at least one time daily until over the age of eight • Snacking or drinking juice or soda frequently can raise your child’s risk of tooth decay

… caring for the most important people in the world, your children. At Pediatric Dentistry of Glens Falls our doctor and staff are dedicated to helping assist you in making your child’s smile a happy and healthy one. We specialize in pediatric dentistry in an environment where your child feels safe and comfortable. We participate with many insurances including GHI. We offer a wide variety of comfort options: laughing gas, mild sedatives, general anesthesia

Directions to: 88 Broad Street, Glens Falls • (518) 798-9966 From South: Take I-87 North to Exit 18. Make a right off exit onto Main Street. At 4th traffic signal there will be a fork in the road. Continue going straight, Stewarts will be on your right. 88 Broad Street will be 11⁄2 blocks on your right. We are a 2 story brick building.

From North: Take I-87 South to Exit 18. Make a left off exit onto Main Street. At 5th traffic signal there will be a fork in the road. Continue going straight, Stewarts will be on your right. 88 Broad Street will be 11⁄2 blocks on your right. We are a 2 story brick building.

Pediatric Dentistry of Glens Falls Saturday appointments available!

798-9966 • Fax: 798-0616 88 Broad Street, Glens Falls www.pediatricdentistryofglensfalls.com 34105

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Kidsville News! 09-05-09