Page 1

Free!

59

745

*

St. ton ing 05743 4 h s 99 VT W a payment *with e n , 6 9 6 - 9 oom 7 5 1a down m Hav 8s. .cc F a i r e e : 8 8 saauuttoos viis Fr v l a a l d T o w. .eeddd w wwww

it Cred ood G • t edi o Cr t•N redi C d Ba

Vol. 3 No. 30 • August 3, 2011

VERMONT’S TOP GUNS CSJ president to step down Frank Miglorie rose from educator to president

By Lou Varricchio

From Staff & News Reports

newmarketpress@denpubs.com MIDDLEBURY — The rising price of the metal copper during the past two years has seen a big increase in crime in the United States and Canada. And Vermont is not immune to this unusual 21st-century copper crime wave. The Vermont State Police and Vermont Department of Public Service, along with officials from Vermont Electric Cooperative , Green Mountain Power and Central V ermont Public Service, r eleased a new warning about the dangers of copper theft. The latest warning was issued July 29 after a wave of break-ins in Vermont, including recent incidents at two Vermont Electric Cooperative substations and two Green Mountain Power substations. “The person or persons responsible for these thefts do not r ealize the extr eme danger they put themselves into. Cutting a ground wire is not without risk as they carry current and the effect could be deadly ,” said engineer Hans E. Mertens of the Vermont Department of Public Service. “The value of copper stolen can never outweigh the value of a life.” Mertens said several deaths have occurred in the past year as criminals attempted to r emove copper content from electric utility fences and equipment. Copper thieves routinely target vacant business and homes as well as electrical substations, cellular telephone towers and silos, telephone land lines, railroads and water wells, according to Mertens. “These individuals ar e putting their lives at risk, and endangering the public,” Col. T om L’Esperance of the Vermont State Police said. “We urge anyone who sees anything suspic ious near a substation or utility property to call 911 immediately.”

newmarketpress@denpubs.com

Vermont Shooting Sports Team at the recent National 4-H Shooting Sports Invitational in Texas. Front: Lisa Muzzey, 4-H Shooting Sports coordinator, Taylor Waring, Ben Decker, , Jonathan Sanders and Joshua Sanders, Kandy Petty, 4-H Hunting Team coach. Bac: Dani Cochran, Emily Sanders, Naomi Trudeau, Sean Tillotson, Erik Waring, 4-H Muzzleloader Team coach. Photo courtesy of UVM Extension 4-H

4-H teen shooters win awards

By Lisa Muzzey

newmarketpress@denpubs.com MIDDLEBURY — Eight University of V ermont (UVM) Extension 4-H youths participated in the 2011 National 4-H Shooting Sports Invitational at the National Shooting Complex in San Antonio, Texas. They wer e among the 470 4-Hers fr om 30 states invited to compete in six dif ferent disciplines at the June 19-24 event. Dani Cochran, Danville; Emily Sanders, L yndonville; Naomi T rudeau, Danville; and Sean Tillotson, Bradfor d; r epresented Vermont on the

Muzzleloader Team, which was coached by Erik Waring from Kirby. The team competed in 50-yard bull's-eye, 25-yard novelty and silhouette tar gets contests. The Hunting T eam included Ben Decker , St. Johnsbury; Jonathan and Joshua Sanders, Lyndonville; and Taylor Waring, Kirby. Team coaches were Tom Decker and Kandy Petty, both from St. Johnsbury. These competitors wer e r equired to know Texas game laws, identify wild game fr om around the country, make smart hunting decisions and shoot shotgun, archery and .22-caliber rifle. Awards were presented daily on the three days of competition to the top 10 individuals in each See 4-H, page 13

RUTLAND — At the annual meeting of the Boar d of Trustees of the College of St. Joseph, President Frank G. Miglorie announced that he will resign at the end of the 201 1-12 fiscal year. Miglorie came to CSJ in 1970 and Frank G. Migloserved on the facrie ulty for nine years. He was then appointed academic dean, a position he held for four years. In 1983, the board of trustees installed him as the college’s fourth president. Miglorie was the first lay person and the first male to serve in this position at the Roman Catholic college founded by the Sisters of St. Joseph. Now entering his twenty-eighth year as leader of the college, Miglorie is per haps best known for his entre preneurial spirit, expansion of the college’s pr ograms and campus, and his conservative financial management of the college’s resources. During his tenur e, Miglorie intr oduced a number of curricular innovations to better serve the needs of the region and the state. Most significant among the group are two accelerated bachelor degr ee pr ograms for working adults, the Master of Science See MIGLORE, page 13

Students to perform at Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com

MORTH CLARENDON — Mill River Union High School juniors Rachel Montross and Leslie Hixon have been selected to perform with Spirit of America Productions at the annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. The students will spend a week in New York City preparing for a cheer r outine comprised of 600 cheerleaders fr om ar ound the United States. The event will be br oadcast nationwide on television. The young women, varsity cheerleaders for MRU, also cheer on Peak Performance's Senior All-Star Team. Both receive gymnastic instruction at Cobra Gymnastics and the Dance Center. Montross takes gymnastic classes at Head of Heels and Hixon takes dance lessons at Grand Performance All About Dance. Individuals, organizations, or businesses inter ested in sponsoring the pair may send an e-mail message to kristen.hixon@yahoo.com for details.

MRU students and cheerleaders Leslie Hixon (top) and Rachel Montross (bottom) will perform with Spirit of America Productions at the 85th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in November.

THIS WEEK

WE HAVE IT ALL!

Pets of the Week ..........2

ALL MAKES

PARTS

Opinion ........................4

ALL MODELS

ALL PRICES

SALES

SERVICE

Local Flavor ..................5

VERMONT’S USED CAR SUPERSTORE

Dragon Boat Fest ..........6

Route 7 South, Rutland, VT802-773-9168 or 800-906-6065 • Mon. - Fri. 8-7, Sat. 8:30-5, Sun. 10-3

Classifieds....................14 Auto Zone ....................15

P.O. BOX 338 ELIZABETHTOWN, NY 12932 POSTAL CUSTOMER

Take One

Community News, Sports, Arts, Entertainment and Food for Rutland and Southern Vermont

Copper thefts on the rise

ECRWSS PRESORTED STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE PAID DENTON PUBLICATIONS

OPEN SUNDAYS 10-3

Selling and Servicing America’s Best Made Cars, Trucks & SUVs

www.fordvt.com

Visit Us Online at www.gmoutlook.com • Subscribe to our eEdition, simply go to www.denpubs.com/eEditions

74560

Follow us on Facebook


www.gmoutlook.com

2 - Green Mountain Outlook

It's kitten season at the Rutland County Humane Society (RCHS) and we currently have over 30 young felines available for adoption. We've long-haired kittens, short-haired kittens, boy-

JEWETT’S GREEN MOUNTAIN

FURNITURE BARN (802) 483-6844 Pittsford VT, 2128 Route 7

STORECLOSING

AUGUST 14TH AT 5:00PM STILL IN STOCK: NEW MATTRESS AND FOUNDATION VERMONT MADE TABLES FEW NEW CHAIRS NEW FURNITURE USED FURNITURE CHINA WARE PICTURES WOODEN DOG BEDSVT MADE

Setter/Springer Spaniel mix. I have adorable speckles on my face and am as cute as a button. I have beautiful markings all over me, if I do say so myself. I’m a lovely dog—confident, sweet and fun to be ar ound. I know how to Sit but I don’t know any other tricks. Some general manners training and

The Outlook’s TRIVIA Question Of The Week!

EVERYTHING MUST BE SOLD REGARDLESS OF PRICES!

teaching of tricks would be fun for me. I’m a real sweetie who will bring years of joy and happiness to my new family. TINKER BELL Three year old. Spayed female. Domestic Short Hair Dilute Calico. I am a striking young lady with a beautiful harlequin of color. I am here at the shelter looking for the next chapter in my story. I was brought in by my previous owners who had to move and couldn’t bring me with them. I have a roommate in my area here at the shelter and we get along just fine so I think I would do well with your other felines at home. ZULU Two year old. Neuter ed male. Domestic Short Hair Black Tabby.

FOR SALE: 2002 GMC 2500 SERIES PICKUP WITH PLOW • 2008 - 30 ft. storage trailer, like new • 2006 - GMC delivery truck

74557

STORE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8 AM - 5PM

•••Answers Appear On The Puzzle Page ••• 72961

Wow, look at these markings. I’m a one of a kind fella who was found as a stray in Pr octor by a nice citizen who wanted to keep me safe. I don’t especially like being picked up but I

have to say I do love my neck massaged, m y h ead p etted, my chin scratched and I would love for you to r ub my belly. Beth Saradarian Director of Outreach and Special Events Rutland County Humane Society 802-483-9171 ext. 217 www.rchsvt.org

Missing man found in lake FERRISBURGH — V ermont State Police r eported that search crews found the body of Rene Viau, 46, who was reported missing north of Otter Creek July 26. The man's body was located between Kellogg and Porter bays. The search included helicopters, SCUBA divers, and r escue crews in various vessels. Officials of the V ermont State Police Bur eau of Criminal Investigations said that the wakes caused of two passing boats m ay have caused V iau’s 16-foot aluminum boat to pitch him overboard. Viau fellow occupant stayed in the boat and was uninjured. Police said Viau's body was found without a flotation device.

Springfield Humane Society Lucy & Linus are 2 very sweet German Shepherds. Lucy is 6 and Linus is 10 so both qualify for our Grey Whiskers Club. For the right home that takes both of these wonderful dogs there will be no adoption fee! Naturally older pets eventually need more medical attention so this is why we waive their fee. They love to play in a fenced yard or go for walks on a leash. Very loving and outgoing – Lucy and Linus will add years of pleasure to a lucky home. Add years to YOUR life – adopt a companion animal. Call the Shelter at 885-3997 or stop by Wed-Sat noon4:30. Best friends meet at 401 Skitchewaug Trail!

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Ques. 1 Who Was The First Host Of The Today Show? Ques. 2 Those Training For This Sport Are Traditionally Brick-Layers During Their Apprenticeship: Pole Vaulting, Cliff Diving, Rugby, Fencing Or Bullfighting?

STOP TODAY!

802-483-6844

kittens, girl-kittens and all types of colors to choose from. All of our kittens ar e spayed or neuter ed and in need of lifelong homes. Kittens ar e wonderfully entertaining and full of spirit and will keep you company through the years ahead. Please contact RCHS at 483.6700 or visit www.rchsvt.org to learn more about which kittens are available for adoption. JUNIOR Two year old. Neutered male. Terrier mix. I’m a cute guy who enjoys

being with people and chasing tennis balls. I don’t know how to catch them but I sure like to play with them. I know how to Sit and think I’d like to learn some mor e tricks. I’d make a perfect lap dog. I’m a gr eat size friend to take along on walks and other outings. I’m as cute as a button and look forward to meeting you. TROT Three year old. Neutered male. English

August 3, 2011

www.spfldhumane.org 401 Skitchewaug Trail Springfield, VT 05156 Phone: 802-885-3997 FAX: 802-885-1346 Email: Spfldhumane@vermontel.net

Proud Sponsor of the Springfield Humane Society’s Pet of the Week! 24 Hour Heavy Duty Towing & Recovery 24 Hour Truck Road Service Full Service Truck Repair Facility

TRAA & Wreckmaster Certified Drivers

International Truck Dealer

Parts • Sales Service

10 Stratton Road, Rutland, VT • 802-773-8005

AugustSpecia ls

1-800-542-5032 SERVING VERMONT & NEW HAMPSHIRE

287 Washington Street, Claremont, NH 03743 l 603-542-5032 l Fax: 603-542-5779 10 Airport Road, Springfield, VT l 802-885-8700 00039

Vermonter Massage Come take advantage of this amazing deal. Our 50 minute Therapeutic Massage is on special for Vermont residents. $50.00 Regularly $70.00

00045

$

$

The Acupuncture Detox Treatment includes a front acupuncture treatment followed by a cupping treatment on the back and the application of ear seeds based on a detox protocol. This is a great option for someone who has always wanted to try acupuncture or needs to detox from all of the recent summer holiday festivities. $55.00 Regularly $75.00

$

$

Chris Howe

of West Rutland... Winner of the Outlook’s 2011

$1000.00

‘grand prize’! Chris located the hidden certificate on a railroad crossing sign on North Road near the center of Castleton!

$ $

$ $

Detoxification Acupuncture Treatment

$

Ayurveda offers a unique blend of science and philosophy that balances the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual components necessary for holistic health. Ayurveda employs nutritional guidance, herbal remedies, exercise and special rejuvenating and purification therapies. $50.00 Regularly $70.00

$

CONGRATULATIONS

$

Ayurvedic Consultation

$

Shirodhara An ancient Ayurvedic healing practice for reducing stress and soothing your mind and the senses. This is accomplished through a technique in which warm infused oil is poured over your forehead. $70.00 Regularly $90.00

$GRAND PRIZE$ WINNER

TM

$

Abhyanga Garshana For those seeking the most healing, balancing and transformative experience, this ancient classic Ayurvedic treatment is a feast for the mind/ body/ spirit leaving you feeling rejuvenated and your skin vibrant. $65.00 Regularly $85.00

$ 74626


August 3, 2011

www.gmoutlook.com

Green Mountain Outlook - 3

00043


www.gmoutlook.com

4 - Green Mountain Outlook

Opinion

A COMMUNITY SERVICE :This community newspaper and its delivery are made possible by the advertisers you’ll find on the pages inside. Our twenty plus employees and this publishing company would not exist without their generous support of our efforts to gather and distribute your community news and events. Please thank them by supporting them and buying locally. And finally, thanks to you, our loyal readers, for your support and encouragement over the past 16 years from all of us here at The Addison Eagle & Green Mountain Outlook.

From the Editor

Go for the gold

T

he ongoing debacle that it is the United States government‘s astronomical spending spree is a perfect example of why we should seriously reconsider a return to the good oldfashioned U.S. Gold Standard. Many r espected financial pr os, such as billionaire former pr esidential candidate Steve Forbes, contend that the only way to stop the expiring dollar is to back our currency with gold. Utah legislators recently passed a common-sense law that makes gold and silver legal te nder, a gain, i n t hat s tate. W hat a smart idea. Without gold or some precious material backing up curr ency, it’s basically worthless. And what has kept our money afloat since the 1970s is nothing more than Alan Greenspan’s “irrational exuberance”, except that the international reservoir of exuberance is fast evaporating under the dawning of a new age of financial rationalism. So, why not pass a law like Utah’s her e in Vermont? Let’s make gold and silver legal tender in the Green Mountain State. Utah’s move was the first shot of a money war that is starting—albeit slowly—to put pressure on the Fed to return to the financial sanity of the Gold Standard. So where will all this gold come from to back up America’s money supply? Red China? No, Red China could car e less about helping the poor USA out of its dollar problems; it is too busy mining its own gold to build up its own r eserves (what does that tell you about the Chinese embracing of a gold standard ?). We must look closer to home and be willing to dig in our own backyard. The Americas—north, south and central—have vast gold deposits that can help regrow our lost wealth and international status. New gold deposits have been discovered in the western U.S. and Canadian arctic. (Even V ermont has some potential for small, commer cial native-gold development.) It’s clearly time to start digging

and stockpiling gold as quickly as we can. For example, take a mining company called Portage Resources, Inc. This firm is deeply invested in Peru’s potentially giant Bonanza Cuerpo gold strike. Some of this gold, found in early Permian-age sediments, could be earmarked for pur chase by Uncle Sam when it is fully developed. But we have to be quick and be on-site before the Chinese. According to the Penny Stock Pillager newsletter, “Initial (Portage) drilling tests prove to be so pr omising that the pr oject has been put on the fast track to pr oduction because not only do they want to take advantage of gold’s unpr ecedented price, but they’d be crazy not to be pr oducing when the U.S. government actually makes the decision to move back to the Gold Standard... it'll be crucial that the government build up a solid stockpile befor e making the announcement.” All the experts say gold is popular at the moment because it is safe and they say it has no other deeper, financial merit. Well, they’re only half-way correct. Gold will always be a valued commodity; it will always be a safe haven in both troubled times and boom times. Gold behind the U.S. dollar is akin to that confident feeling you have when you’re a pilot of one of those fancy new , light sport air craft with a ballistic parachute safety system. Or it’s like taking a long motor trip with a fully inflated spare tire. Or it’s like riding a motorcycle with a helmet. Well, you get the point. “Poor financial decisions, soaring oil prices and pr essure from China’s exploding economy are driving the U.S. dollar to a 41-year low,” Steve Forbes said as a r ecent guest of Neil Cavuto on television’s Fox Business Channel. “Going back to the Gold Standard is a must.” It’s time for America to go for the gold— again. Lou Varricchio

Visit us today at

www.denpubs.com PUBLISHER GENERAL MANAGER MANAGING EDITOR OFFICE MANAGER PRODUCTION DESIGN

EdwardCoats Mark Brady LouVarricchio Jennifer Delmain DentonPublications Production Team EDITORIAL WRITERS Martin Harris John McClaughry LouVarricchio

MARKETING CONSULTANTS Tom Bahre • Roxanna Emilo • Heidi Littlefield Mary Moeykens • Joe Monkofsky • Regina Styles CONTRIBUTORS Angela DeBlasio • Rusty DeWees • Alice Dubenetsky Joe Milliken • Catherine Oliverio • Fred Pockette Beth Schaeffer • Dan Wolfe

B

Members of: CPNE (Community Papers of New England) IFPA (Independent Free Papers of America) • AFCP (Association of Free Community Papers) One of Vermont’s Most Read Weekly Newspapers Winner of 2006 FCPNE and 2008 AFCP News Awards ©2011. New Market Press, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part without written permission of the publisher. Editorial comments, news, press releases, letters to the editor and items of interest are welcome. Please include: name, address and phone number for verification. Subscriptions: All New Market Press publications are available for a subscription $37 per year; $24 six months. First Class Subscription: $200/year. Subscriptions may also be purchased at our web site www.denpubs.com New Market Press, Inc. and its advertisers are not liable for typographical errors, misprints or other misinformation made in a good faith effort to produce an accurate weekly newspaper. The opinions expressed by the editorial page editor and guest columnists are not necessarily those of New Market Press, and New Market Press cannot be held liable for the facts or opinions stated therein. 85186

Tossing Dick and Jane

ecause of reasons at which your Humble Scribe can only guess, he is not included in the high-level policy discussions in the executive suites of the public education industry. Thus, it wasn’t until the r ecent campaign to solve public education’s pr oblems by— yet another—curriculum r edesign came to my attention. If you recall—fondly, I’m sure—such past strategic initiatives as New Math, Ebonics, self-directed learning, whole language, and the supposed teaching of basic letters and numbers within an environmentalist weltanschauung, then you’ll not be surprised by two pr oducts of the latest pedagogical r esearch and innovation. One calls for an end to the present archaic practice of the wholeclass novel; the other calls for an end to the equally primitive practice of the basal reader. Here’s a quote r ecently accorded lead-story status on the web page of Education Week ( EW), an industry stalwart. “We have now r eached a point at which teaching with neither the wholeclass novel nor the basal reader, in which the whole class r eads a selection together, is viable. W e must end these practices. They are not benefitting the students. “On top of that, our test-obsessed culture depletes our students’ energy, leaving them with little time for meaningful, authentic interactions…” and so on, including a pathosdrenched description of a disr uptive student acting goofy when the teacher asked a question on the novel the r est of the class was reading. The pr eferred instr uctional model now advocated by EW on behalf of the industry is that the school select the most appr opriate novel for each student in the class and employ as many aides as needed to help each student “…decode and comprehend…” each one. It’s also interesting to note that 95 percent of schools use basal readers, but not one has the former popularity of Dick and Jane. T oday, we hear, the reader has been exiled for inadequate multi-culturality. Eh? For that argument, read “Losing Our Lan-

Jeter’s 3,000 hit T

he sports news is all about reporting and re-reporting how great a guy the 23-year-old who caught Derek Jeter ’s 3,000 hit ball is for giving Derek back his ballie. And the whole time I’m thinking—yeah, he’s a great guy, but what about Derek Jeter? He’s a great guy, too. Why doesn’t someone ask Derek why he didn’t tell the kid to keep the ball and go cash in? Humans are crazy for junk, man. The ball, the actual one Derek got his 3,000 hit with, isn’t worth anything—nothing, zilch, nada to Derek Jeter or the Hall of Fame. Set th e b all o n De rek’s k itchen t able a nd what happens? It sets ther e. Give the ball to the Lopez kid and boom—it’s a house with no mortgage. D erek g ives t he b all b ack to t he Lopez boy and Babe Ruth hitting a home u r n for the sick kid doesn’t seem like all that great big a deal anymore. Why the heck dose Derek need the actual ball? He’s got a 35,000-square-foot mansion in Tampa, Fla., which he’s more

A tale of two bridges New Market Press, Inc., 16 Creek Rd., Suite 5A, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 Phone: 802-388-6397 • Fax: 802-388-6399 • newmarketpress@denpubs.com

August 3, 2011

Residents and businesses here in our picturesque Town of Chester, Vt., were thoroughly put to the test for patience and perseverance while dealing with planned bridge construction of not just one, but two bridges over the course of three months, right when public schools were wrapping up the year and summer tourism kicks into high gear. Chester is located at the cr ossroads of New England where east-west highway Route 1 1 intersects with north-

guage,” in which author -teacher Sandra Stotsky laid out the sorts of things—such as the use of African or Oriental language bits or the purposeful introduction of story families with all unr elated members—all of which take time to explain and show up in such frequency as to detour the learning of basic E nglish. ( Stotsky’s bo ok w as w ritten 12 years ago, and hasn’t been seriously r ebutted since.) While the Dick and Jane re aders have vanished, the once-basic novels—from “Huckleberry Finn” to “Ivanhoe” haven’t. Of course, they’re now all accused of cultural or colonial insensitivity and ther efore the innovative educational fr ontier now should be, as EW reports, letting each student choose his own. Of course this all will r equire a one to one adult-tostudent ratio to guide a dozen (in Vermont; it would be 22 in Utah) dif ferent r eaders in a given classroom, each digesting a different book. So it’s akinto the crew-to-passenger ratio on a cruise ship, except that all the classr oom aides and assistants now have a vested inter est in the annual school budget vote. A theory that draws on the new management strategies decided in the K-12 executive suites is partially described in “Losing Our Language”: it says that teachers don’t control their classrooms as they did in the Dick and Jane old days. It seems teachers could very well teach basic reading and math if permitted to do so, but they can’t for the same reason that they aren’t permitted to maintain once-accepted levels of discipline in the classroom. The number of letters and digits to be learned (36) r emains unchanged, but ther e are now ideological mandates which trump the teaching of them.

Submit letters to Lou Varricchio at lou@addison-eagle.com.

than earned and should enjoy. Hell, he should enjoy a 60,000square-foot house if he wants to, if you ask me. If you’ve earned your money, paid your bills, and not hurt anyone, frigged if I’m one to car e what you’re spending your money on. If I had riches like a Jeter or Harrison For d, you’re danged right I’d have a mansion. I’d have me a bedr oom bigger than the house I live in now , which is 3,000-square feet—just a shack. So. no, this isn’t a Derek Jeter bashing column. No. I’m a fan. Instead of a Jeter bashing article it’s an article in support of what kind of guy I per ceive Jeter to be—which is a great guy. That’s why I’m curious as to why he didn’t just turn the ball back over to the Lopez boy instead of keeping it and allowing it collect dust in a fancy memorabilia case next to the rest of his career chazzerai (KHA-ze-rye) junk. As cool a guy as Jeter is, he’s seemingly no different from the rest of us crazies. We’ll put value on an object that is worthless over putting all the value on what the worthless object represents. Rusty DeWees tours Vermont and Northern New York with his act “The Logger.” His column appears weekly. Reach him at rustyd@pshift.com.

Guest Viewpoint south Route 103. W ould this major inconvenience divide the town or bring it together? We have been there before. So how has Chester dealt with this dilemma which more than bisected the town, cutting of f access to the high school and businesses south of town from the village gr een in the center with major shops and inns? Early on town officials held special town meetings to explain how the V ermont Department of Transportation planned to replace both key bridges in the same time frame.

Plans for alternate r outes for r esidents, trucks and out-of-town visitors were all outlined. There was the usual discussion and sharing of local concerns, especially why do we have to close both bridges to all traf fic? Of special concern was the impact on the many small businesses along the north-south Route 103 through town that connects to the interstate and cities down country. Additional information meetings were held right up to bridge closings, covering See TWO BRIDGES, page 12


www.gmoutlook.com

August 3, 2011

Green Mountain Outlook - 5

News of the Week

Suspect located in Curtis Auto fire By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com PITTSFORD — The Pittsfor d Fir e Department, along with Proctor and several other fire fighting teams, responded to a fir e alarm at Curtis Auto on U.S. Route 7 in Pittsford at 6:30 a.m., July 29. As fire crews worked to extinguish the fire , the initial investigation and r eport indicated that someone may have broken in to the business, set the pr operty on fire, and stole a vehicle from the lot. The Vermont State Police Arson Unit, as well as several area law enforcement agencies, were dispatched to investigate incident. Investigators have ruled the fire to be a set fire and was done in the course of a bur glary to the building in which keys for vehicle on the lot were stolen. Stolen from the lot was a silver Honda Accord. Through the course of the investigation detectives learned that the a silver Honda sedan was seen speeding away from Curtis Auto driven by an unknown white male. Approximately four hours later , the same vehicle was seen in Rutland City at the People’s United Bank in the city of Rutland. The driver of the vehicle was r eported trying to cash a check fr om Curtis Auto. Troopers wer e alerted, and the suspect, Steven Browne, 26, was apprehended on scene. The vehicle has been confirmed as the vehicle stolen in conjunction with the br eak in, theft and arson at Curtis Auto. State Police subsequently located items within the vehicle that had been stolen from Curtis Auto. Detectives arr ested Br owne for violation of conditions of release. It is expected the multiple additional char ges will be forthcoming against Browne in the near futur e, as the investigation continues. Authorities from both the Vermont State Police and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms have been working to identify the connections between Br owne and the fire at Curtis Auto. Anyone with any information er garding this fire is asked to contact the Vermont Arson Tip Award Program (VATAP) at 1-800-32-ARSON.

Jill Tofferi hands the gavel to Mary Crowley new director of the Ludlow Rotary Club.

Crowley heads up Ludlow Rotary LUDLOW — The Ludlow Rotary Club announced the election of a new president. Outgoing President Jill Tofferi passed the gavel to Mary Crowley at a recent meeting. Tofferi has been a member of the Ludlow Rotary Club since 1992. Crowley joined the club in 1998.

The Ludlow Rotary Club meets Tuesdays at noon at D.J.’s. The club consists of 35 members and is active in local and international projects. The Ludlow club was chartered in 1927 and is celebrating 84 years of service.

Day spa offers new services, Chester plans fall festival products CHESTER — On Saturday, Oct. 1, and Sunday , Oct. 2, the Chester Rotary Club will hold the 37th annual Chester Fall Festival on the town green in Chester. If you ar e a craft person and have not signed up for a space for this fantastic event, you should do so now . There are still a very limited number of spaces available, with or without electricity. The festival will be open from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., both days with setup on Friday afternoon. All spaces are assigned and there will be people there to show you your marked location. Ther e will be vendor parking behind the village green businesses with easy access to the green. There will be an overnight guard for your goods and equipment. If you wish to join the mor e than 60 Vermont and New England craft people and artists, contact tr ombley@ vermontel.net or telephone Kar en Trombley at 802-376-4131 or Pat Budnick at 802-376-6643.

Police Beat

Brandon woman driving with suspended license By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com SALISBURY — Vermont State Police conducted a motor vehicle check July 16 on U.S. Route 7 and stopped a vehicle operated by Rena M. Gero, 28, of Brandon. During the stop it was found that Ger o’s right to drive in Vermont was criminally suspended. Gero was transported to the New Haven Barracks and was pr ocessed for driving while license suspended-criminal. Gero was released with a citation to appear in Addison Court-Criminal Division.

RUTLAND — Five Elements Salon and Day Spa has introduced an expanded off ering of therapeutic treatments and services, including the ancient healing arts of ayurveda and acupuncture. Ayurveda, which in Sanskrit means “Science of Life,” is the oldest holistic and pre ventative oriented health-car e system in the world. It is considered a sister to yoga. Five Elements owner Kelly Sweck is a Kripalu Certified Ayurvedic Consultant. “The practice of yoga has become so popular in r ecent years, and Ayurvedic and yoga practices work hand-in-hand,” she said. "A yurveda appeals to those interested in taking mor e contr ol of all aspects of their physical, mental and spiritual well-being in an incr easingly str essful world.” Introductory consultations for both ayurveda and acupunctur e ar e available by appointment. In addition to the new healing tr eatments, Five Elements is embracing an environmentally concious business philosophy through a number of service practices, as well as their eco-friendly pr oduct lines—Aveda and SpaRitual. Five Elements uses a number of biodegradable products for everyday services, like toe separators used for pedicures and a water filtration system to eliminate the use of bottled water. Live plants have also been part of a gr een-themed décor at Five Elements. The Salon is also intr oducing a line of yoga-inspired jewelry called Satya. Blending spiritual symbols, healing gemstones and sacred meanings, Satya jewelry is created with grace, style and a global consciousness. Five Elements is located at 10 Stratton Rd. in Rutland, and is opened six days a week, closed on Sunday. Call 802-773-8005 or visit the spa’s website at www .fiveelementsdayspa.com.

SOMETHING ODD, SOMETHING NEW — Danielle Lillard of the Okemo Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce welcomed two new businesses to town last week— the Odd Indian and Wilderness Taxidermy, both located on Route 103 in Cavendish. Owner Duane Mate said his Odd Indian store has an assortment of Native American crafts and jewelry. Photo by Don Dill


www.gmoutlook.com

6 - Green Mountain Outlook

August 3, 2011

Dragon Boat Fest launches from the Burlington waterfront Local teams in annual boat race

By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com MIDDLEBURY — Middlebury and Hinesburg are well represented at the annual Dragonheart Vermont’s Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival held at the Burlington waterfront. The boat teams, including Danforth Pewter , Citizens Bank and NRG W ind, r eturn for the watery action again at the 201 1 festival to be held this Sunday, Aug. 7. The Dragon Boat festival has grown in size over the years. This year’s event will draw the largest group of participants with 2,000 r egistered paddlers for the cancer-fighting fundraising event. Teams typically represents businesses (small and lar ge), local clubs, neighbor hood teams, families, and breast-cancer survivor teams. Festival teams are international. Teams from both the U.S. and Canada ar e r egistered and will join Dragonheart Vermont in the day-long community celebration. The 40-foot-long dragon boats need 20 paddlers and a dr ummer to slice thr ough the lake water. The skulling-like action is keen on competition and action; it’s a thrill to watch fr om the shore, too. “Teams compete for fundraising, speed and spirit with outrageous attir e, songs, and chants,” said Linda Dyer of Dragonheart V ermont. “At noon there is the Breast-Cancer Survivor Race followed by a traditional flower ceremony when the br east cancer survivor teams honor those who have died. It all builds up to the Final Five championship races at 4 p.m. to see who will go home with the coveted Citizens Bank Champ Cup.” Admission is free for spectators. In addition to the races, ther e’s summer food, live music, song, dancing, childr en's activities, a raf fles— all to benefit the fight against cancer. “Dragonheart Vermont is pr oud to have so many outstanding sponsors of our Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival,” Dyer said. “No one steps up the plate more than Citizens Bank, which has served as the of ficial and exclusive Presenting Sponsor of this special charity event Middlbeury and Hinesburg dragon-boat teams from Danforth Pewter, Citizens bank and NRG Wind pictured in action at last years’ Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Fesfor the last six years.” tival to benefit cancer. Over 2,000 paddlers have regeistered for this year’s event on the Burlington waterfront to be held Sunday, Aug. 7. The boat festival is a green-minded, alcoholPhoto by Chris Ryan and-tobacco-free event. Donations are welcome and appreciated by event organizers.

Garage Sale Special

WE’RE YOUR HAULING HELPER!!! • Utility Trailers • Cargo Trailers • Dump Trailers • Horse & Stock Trailers • Heavy Equipment Trailers • Snowmobile Trailers • Used Trailers Available

BUSIEST

Boldest

FREE CENTERING & BORDER

&Best

Complete Parts Department

Classifieds in the REGION !

You may also use these other methods to submit your ad: Fax to: 518-873-6360 eMail to: shannonc@denpubs.com

33 Gardner Circle • Hinesburg, VT 05461 Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9-5, Sat. by Appt.

86030

(20 Words $15)

Mail ad to... Attn: Shannon, Classified Dept. Denton Publications 14 Hand Avenue, Elizabethtown, NY 12932

CALL US : 800-989-4237

www.denpubs.com

802-482-2250 • 1-800-533-0504

Toll Free: 1-800-989-4ADS (4237) Local: (518) 873-6368 x201 Your Phone #

DEADLINES:

Name

MONDAY 8AM - ZONE C Green Mountain Outlook The Eagle

Address

City/Town

State

CC#

Zip Exp.

Starting

CID# Run#

thru Classification

Words

Please print your message neatly in the boxes below:

Amex Visa Master Discover Cash Check 83533

00042


www.gmoutlook.com

August 3, 2011

Green Mountain Outlook - 7

Meet another Vermont monster The Main Street Museum “Big Conn” display and a sketch of the 1994 remains found in the Connecticut River in Vermont. The remains were displayed at the Tunbridge World's Fair in 1998. Sketch by Scott Mardis

Maybe part of its reclusive time was spent in the nearly mile long Hog River tunnel under Hartford. The Hog River flows 30 feet under the city in a 30-foot-high by 45-foot-wide tunnel made of r einforced concr ete that is just over a mile long and r uns between the Capitol and Armory buildings to the Connecticut River . Those few brave souls who have canoed the river tunnel say, ''The darkness and the dripping and the echoes -- it's like a chance to go to a kind of alien world.'' We may never know for sur e but it’s possible. Then in 1994, according to an off icial of the Main Str eet Museum in White River Junction, Vt., “in the waters just of f of L yman Point in White River Junction, wher e the White River meets the Connecticut River ... an extraor dinary monster was seen fr olicking. First r eports gave indication that some cousin, or closer r elative of Champ, Lake Champlain’s aquatic apparition, had somehow found its way onto the eastern half of our beautiful state.” The follwoing year , museum of fered the captured monster for display . It has now been classified as Hydrohippokampos athesphatos lymanae. All of the sightings over the past 130 years recorded something that looked like an eel, serpent or r eptile of some kind with a long neck and body or a longer spiked tail. That’s a lot of coincidence since the first sighting in 1878. Maybe ther e is mor e than one Connecticut River monster depending on its taste for salt water? All of the people making the r eports certainly seemed convinced the monster was real. Believe what you will about the Big Conn monster, but that’s my story and I am sticking to it.

and acquaintances is good, and he never drinks.” Then in 1895 theS.S. History of Lordshipreported that cr ew members on the steamer Richard Peck noticed, “a coiling motion and the sea monster, as such it must have been if what they say is true, dove out of sight, first raising its head as if it had not been aware of “Big Conn”, the Connecticut River monster, in its natural habitat—the riparian areas of the Connecticut and the approaching steamer and had been disWhite rivers—based on eyewitness descriptions. The creature has also been sighted in the lower Connectiturbed from peaceful slumber.” cut River. There is something unusual about Lor dReconstruction by Steve Bissette ship because again the History of Lordship reports that in 1896 a sea serpent with pea according to the New York Times, the yacht green whiskers passed down Long Island A.M. Bliss was r eturning fr om a fishing Sound. “He was plowing through the water cruise when the passengers saw a veritable at a 25 knot clip --- and left a wake of foam sea serpent moving slowly along the surface behind him a mile in length. He was easily of the calm water. 200 feet in length and his head was eared r 20 An 1886 New York Times article from Mid- feet above the brine.” newmarketpress@denpubs.com dletown, Conn., reported that, “all along the It seems our Connecticut River monster SPRINGFIELD — Loch Ness has her banks of the Connecticut River people eager- then became bashful for some 100 years. Nessie, Lake Champlain has her Champ, ly watched for a glimpse of the great sea serLake Mephr emegog has her Memphr e and pent.” According to the story: “Out of the the Connecticut River—well, the sting of it froth rose a big black head as large as a flour is that she has her monster , it just hasn’t been barrel and with eyes as big as small plates. named yet. The head kept rising higher and higher unThe Connecticut River, which divides Ver- til 10 feet of the neck appeared. The men didRUTLAND — The Chaffee Art Center is excited to announce the annualAmateur Phomont and New Hampshire, does have a mon- n’t stop to make a long or thor ough examitography Contest and Exhibit opening Saturd ay Aug. 6, 4-7 p.m., at the Chaffee Art Censter (or monsters), that is, if you can believe nation, but they feel sure that the sea serpent ter, 16 South Main St. in Rutland. press stories fr om numer ous historical must have been a clear hundred feet long.” Over 150 photographs have been submitted by amateur photographers on the theme sources including the New York Times. The Hartfor d Haunted Places Examiner of "Special Places: the place we like to go". One of the earliest reports comes from the recounted a story fr om 1894 when Austin This year's exhibit is featuring photographs by professional photographer and juried History of Lor dship in 1878 when an assisRice of East Deerfield... “a plain unimaginaartist Katrina Mojzesz as well as photographs fro m Chaffee Juried Artist Members in the tant engineer on the steamer State of New tive farmer, who for nearly fifty of the sevsecond floor galleries. A special reception has been scheduled for Katrina on Art Hop York said that he witnessed the head of a enty years of his life has resided in his quiet Friday, Aug. 12, 5-8 p.m. monster raised several feet above the waves. home on the banks of the Connecticut River, Grand prizes and popular choice awards will be given away at the Closing Reception The head disappear ed and a portion of the says that nothing on earth can convince him on Saturday, Aug. 27, 5-7 p.m. People's Choice Voting starts Aug. 6 and runs through body formed an ar c “under which it would that he did not see a snake in the river a few Aug. 26. have been easy to drive a team of oxen.” days ago. The report noted that, “Mr. Rice’s In 1881, soon after the Lordship incident, reputation for veracity among his neighbors

Creature claimed to live in the Conn. River

By David Deen

Chaffee photo contest under way

Delivery Always Available

“Building Our Community One Project At A Time”

Try Our LOADED

Rt. 4, Box 217, Whitehall, NY 12887 • 518-499-0213

Chicken Salad or Grilled Chicken Flatbread Panini Sandwiches!

92446

George B. Tucker, Inc. Complete Excavating

Phone: (802) 228-7825 Fax: (802) 228-7612 • gtuckerinc@tds.net

675 Route 100 South • Mailing Address: 551 Town Farm Rd., Ludlow, VT 05149

GUARANTEED LOWEST INSTALLED PRICE OR YOUR At Time Of Sale TIRE IS

FREE

Mart’s Sporting Goods

GOODYEAR • UNIROYAL • FIRESTONE • GENERAL TIRE DUNLOP • MICHELIN • BRIDGESTONE • B.F. GOODRICH • PIRELLI

Hunting & Fishing Supplies

82401

82347

Open 7 Days

90909

274 Quaker Rd. Queensbury, NY (across from Lowe’s) (518) 798-1056

00040

www.JohnnyBoysPancakeHouse.com

Mathews Solocam Bows Fishing& Turkey Hunting Gear

85 Main St., Poultney, VT (802) 287-9022 • Martin VanBuren Jr.

Killington Access Rd, Killington, VT 802-422-4411

00038

WE WE DELIVER DELIVER

182 Route 4 East, Rutland, VT 802-855-8043

Snowplowing &Sanding


8 - Green Mountain Outlook

August 3, 2011

www.gmoutlook.com

Winner Of The Outlook’s 2011 ‘Grand Prize’ •••• $1,000.00 •••• Chris Located The Hidden One Thousand Dollar Certificate On A Railroad Sign On North Road Near Downtown Castleton!

$$

Congratulations To Chris Howe Of West Rutland

$

TM

2011 OUTLOOK $GRAND PRIZE$ CLUE MEANINGS: CLUE # 1

CLUE # 2

CLUE # 3

AS KEEPER OF THE CLUES I’LL PROVIDE ALL YOU NEED TO SECURE MY ‘GRAND PRIZE’ BOUNTY FOR YOU TO BE SUCCESSFUL MY SEARCHING FRIENDS I’D STAY WITHIN THE BOUNDARIES OF RUTLAND COUNTY

IF YOU’RE IN NEED OF SOME DIRECTION NOW MOST LIKELY HORACE GREELY SAID IT BEST IF YOU’RE ON THE ACCESS ROAD IN KILLINGTON GO WEST YOUNG MAN, GO WEST

IF YOU FIND YOURSELF IN CUTTINGSVILLE PLEASE DON’T GET DOWN IN THE MOUTH IT’S A FINE PLACE FOR A VISIT BUT I’M AFRAID YOU’RE TOO FAR SOUTH

I’M HIDDEN SOMEWHERE IN RUTLAND COUNTY

YOU NEED TO BE WEST OF KILLINGTON

THE GRAND PRIZE LOCATION IS NORTH OF CUTTINGSVILLE

CLUE # 4

CLUE # 5

CLUE # 6

FAMOUS RAILROADS INCLUDE THE SANTA FE LIONEL AND B.+O. TOO HEREIN LIES A HELPFUL HINT IF YOU FIGURE OUT THE CLUE

IF YOU’VE CONTRACTED POISON IVY IN YOUR SEARCH YOU MAY WISH TO SWITCH FROM SHORTS TO SLACKS IF IT REQUIRES A VISIT TO RUTLAND REGIONAL YOU’LL NOTE YOU HAVE TO CROSS THE TRACKS

IF YOU’RE CONTEMPLATING THE CLUES IN WHITEHALL BUT YOU HAVEN’T ANY IDEA IN THE LEAST IF IT’S LATE ENOUGH, KEEP THE SUN AT YOUR BACK AND BE CERTAIN YOUR DIRECTION IS EAST

MY LOCATION IS ASSOCIATED WITH A RAILROAD

CROSSING RAILROAD TRACKS IS THE CLUE

MY LOCATION IS EAST OF WHITEHALL

CLUE # 7

CLUE # 8

CLUE # 9

IF YOU’RE SPENDING TIME IN CLARENDON PERHAPS EVEN CHIPPENHOOK AS WELL GETTING YOUR COMPASS HEADING WEST MY FRIEND IS A CLUE YOU SHOULD FIND SWELL

THE YEAR WAS NINETEEN AND SEVENTY ONE AND IT CAN HELP YOU SECURE THE GRAND THIS GROUP HAILED ORIGINALLY FROM OTTAWA DO YOU RECALL THE FIVE MAN ELECTRICAL BAND

TO FIND THE GRAND YOU NEEDN’T DIG OR SWIM OR CLIMB A TREE IF I SAID I’M ON A PAR WITH SUDBURY YOU MIGHT ASK HOW THAT CAN BE

I’M WEST OF CLARENDON AND CHIPPENHOOK

THE CLUE IS ‘SIGNS’ - IN THIS CASE RAILROAD CROSSING SIGNS

MY LOCATION IS BASICALLY DUE SOUTH OF SUDBURY

CLUE # 10

CLUE # 11

CLUE # 12

HENNY YOUNGMAN MADE A CAREER WITH ONE LINERS FOR HIM THE SHORT LINE DID THE TRICK YOU MIGHT EVEN SAY HE HAD A MONOPOLY AS FEW OTHERS COULD MASTER HIS SCHTICK

ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS IN YOUR HAND JUST THINK WHAT YOU COULD DO IT COULD BE YOURS MY SEARCHING FRIEND IF YOU KNOW WHY MICHIGAN STATE’S A CLUE

YOU DON’T HAVE TO BECOME A DOCTOR IT’S JUST THE GRAND PRIZE THAT YOU WANT BUT YOU’LL FEEL BETTER ALREADY IF YOU KNOW THE SITE OF THE FIRST MEDICAL COLLEGE IN VERMONT

SHORT LINE RAILROAD IN MONOPOLY

THE ‘SPARTANS’ MASCOT FOR MICHIGAN STATE AND CASTLETON

IT WAS IN CASTLETON

CLUE # 13

CLUE # 14

CLUE # 15

YOU HAVE MANY GOOD PATHS TO PURSUE BUT WHICH ONE WILL SERVE YOU BEST? IF YOU SPOT THE FAIR HAVEN WILDLIFE MGT. AREA CHANCES ARE YOU’VE VENTURED TOO FAR WEST

YOU’RE LOOKING GOOD IF YOU SEE THE BIRDSEYE UNLESS YOU’RE SEARCHING FOR A BAR THE LAKE HOUSE PUB WOULD BE A GOOD CHOICE BUT THEN I’M AFRAID YOU’VE GONE TOO FAR

IN 1963 WITH THEIR THIRD BIG HIT THE ORLONS HAD ANOTHER MILLION SELLER, THEY KNEW THEY WERE HEADED IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION BUT THE QUESTION IS, ARE YOU?

YOU NEED TO BE EAST OF THE FAIR HAVEN WILDLIFE MGT. AREA

YOU’RE CLOSER TO THE BIRDSEYE DINER IN CASTLETON

SOUTH ST. AS IN CASTLETON

CLUE # 16

CLUE # 17

CLUE # 18

THE NORTH STAR CAN GUIDE YOU NOW AS YOU TOTE YOUR SEARCHING LOAD IF YOU’RE HEADING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION JUST LIKE THAT, YOUR STREET BECOMES A ROAD

THE KEEPER WANTS TO PROVIDE YOU NOW WITH ONE MORE CLUE THAT YOU’LL HOLD DEAR YOU’LL WANT TO KNOW THAT WHERE I AM YOU CAN SEE ROUTE 4A FROM HERE

THE GRAND IS YOURS TO GRASP MY FRIEND AND SO YOU WON’T THINK I’M A CHUM BE ALERT FOR THE CLARENDON AND PITTSFORD RAIL WELL, DEPENDING ON HOW YOU COME

SOUTH STREET TURNS INTO NORTH ROAD IN CASTLETON

YOU CAN SEE ROUTE 4A IN CASTLETON FROM MY LOCATION

THE GRAND PRIZE IS ON A SIGN POST ALERTING YOU TO THE CLARENDON & PITTSFORD RAIL CROSSING NORTH ST. - CASTLETON

CLUE # 20

YOU’RE SO HOT NOW YOU MIGHT IGNITE YOU SHOULDN’T NEED ANOTHER CLUE IT’S GOOD YOU’RE IN CASTLETON FIRE DISTRICT #1 AND SO CLOSE TO WELL #2

KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR VERTICAL DOUBLE 6’S IF YOU REALLY INTEND TO WIN TO SECURE THE ELUSIVE $1,000.00 PRIZE I’D RETRACE WHERE YOU’VE ALREADY BEEN

CLOSE TO WELL #2 IN CASTLETON FIRE DISTRICT #1

VERTICAL DOUBLE 6’S ON NEARBY TELEPHONE POLES

$$

$ $

$

CLUE # 19

$

Now You Can Play The $GRANDP RIZE$ All Year Long! Go To: www.keeperoftheclues.com


August 3, 2011

www.gmoutlook.com

Green Mountain Outlook - 9

Experts give tips on harvesting herbs in Vermont By Charlie Nardozzi & Leonard Perry

a plant sitter. Go over all that needs watering with them. Gr ouping pots together , if Vermont Horticulturists you have many , or moving them into the shade, will make their job easier. SOUTH BURLINGTON — Herbs ar e best If you have raspberries that fr uited in harvested just as they are beginning to mid-summer, cut back the fr uiting canes flower in the morning. That’s when they from this year. These wont fr uit again, but have the highest concentration of essential rather next year’s fruit will be borne on new oils and flavor in their leaves. canes that gr ew this year . Of course don’t Harvest entire branches back to within a cut back fall-fruiting raspberries if you want few inches of the main stem to encourage fruit later. new, bushy growth. Begin harvesting onions when about half If you have some bare spots in the garden, to thr ee quarters of the leaves have died sow some carr ots, beets, kale, and fall letback. Then gently dig or pull the onions and tuce. You can even start snow peas and store them in a dry , shady place with good beans for a modest fall cr op. Soak the pea ventilation, such as an outdoor shed or barn, seeds overnight to hasten germination. for 10 days to 2 weeks.After the onions have As you r emove spent plants fr om your cured, p ut t hem i n s latted cr ates o r m esh garden beds, if you’r e not planting a fall bags and stor e them indoors in a basement crop, sow a cover cr op such as winter rye. This will help reduce weed infestation, min- with low humidity and temperatur es between 33 and 45 degrees F over fall and winimize er osion and compaction fr om fall rains, and will add nutrients and or ganic ter. Keep up with harvest of all your pro duce, matter to the soil when it is tilled under next giving excess to friends or local food shelf. spring. Keep up especially with squash and zucchiWhen Oriental poppies have died down, ni. If your pickling cucumbers do get too check around the clump for new seedlings. large, consider making watermelon-type These can be transplanted to new locations pickles with them instead of the traditional if you give them a weed-free spot and keep dill pickles. them moist. If you haven’t divided bear ded iris in a few years, and the clumps ar e lar ge or no longer flowering well, you should divide them. Lift carefully with a spading fork, dividing by hand or sharp pru ners. Leave sevKILLINGTON — Getting a ‘higher educaeral fans of leaves for each division. Check tion’ in Vermont takes a deeper meaning tothe tubers for holes and mushy areas—signs day as the Consortium of Vermont Colleges of the iris bor er—discarding these in the and Ski Vermont announce a partnership extrash, not the compost. Replant, making pected to boost both tourism and enro llment sure the top of the tuber is at the surface of at Vermont’s many public and private instithe soil. tutions of higher education. Check out dates for local fairs. These are CVC and Ski Vermont share a passion for a great place to get ideas on new flowers and providing high quality, transformative expearranging them. riences, whether on campus or in Vermont’s Try entering some of your own—you may mountains, said Nate Ball of Vermont Techjust be surprised that you have mor e talent nical College and chairman of the council’s promotions committee. than you think! “Vermont’s mountain r esorts, like its inIf going on vacation, make sure you have

Ski Vermont partners with colleges to boost enrollment stitutions of higher education, play vital roles in V ermont’s economy, envir onment and communities,” said Ski V ermont Pr esident Parker Riehle. “Our p artnership w ith Vermont’s h igher education institutions cr eates a powerful alignment of brands and reinforces that Vermont, and learning, skiing and snowboar ding here, is as much a state of mind—a lifestyle—as a physical place,” Riehle continued. “These lasting connections ultimately have the potential to inspir e graduates and pr ospective students alike to support the state’s economic, social and envir onmen-

tal initiatives.” Affiliation with Ski Vermont provides CVC with the potential to target millions of winter enthusiasts from around the globe— many with childr en—who visit V ermont to experience all that winter offers. Ski Vermont and CVC will coor dinate Internet, digital and social marketing ef forts, work collaboratively to generate earned media, cross promote in printed material, and share access to consumer events and trade shows throughout the northeast and in key international markets.

00041

from Dr. Nicholas Cannon • Dr. Patrick Cooley Dr. Maurice Cyr • Dr. Joseph Donahue Dr. Charles Foster • Dr. Renee Thompson Dr. James McDaniel • Dr. Katie Pinkus Dr. Mark Woodbury • Dr. Dean Harrison Dr. Jared Galster


www.gmoutlook.com

10 - Green Mountain Outlook • Sports

August 3, 2011

Shortage looms for H.S. refs By Joe Milliken

newmarketpress@denpubs.com

86032

15 $ 9

$

/wk per zone

BUSINESS CLASSIFIEDS /wk per zone PERSONAL CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3 PM

Up to 20 words, 25¢ per word over

Up to 20 words, 25¢ per word over

To place a classified ad, simply mail or fax this coupon. Or contact us by phone, email or online at denpubs.com MailT o: Denton Publications: PO Box 388, 14 Hand Avenue, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 FaxT o: 518-873-6360 • Phone: 518-873-6368 • Email:s hannonc@denpubs.com

ZONE A Name Address

ZONE B Phone

AmountE nclosed

Card# Exp.D ate

ZONE C Signature

83557

RUTLAND — They often go without fanfar e or praise, and are usually thr ust in the spotlight only after making a human error. But let's not forget that yes, umpires, referees and game of ficials are people too! All kidding aside, however, there is a growing concern over a potential shortage of high school game officials throughout Vermont. Having c overed l ocal s ports i n S outhern Vermont a nd New Hampshire since 2004, this sports writer has certainly started to notice not only the rising average ages of current officials, but also the fewer number of younger folks officiating games. From year to year, I see many of the same "experienced" of ficials at games, while not too many "fr esh faces" appear to be obtaining that valuable game experience. Currently, there seems to be many mor e officials in their 40s, 50s, 60s and even their 70s, then there are officials under the age of 40, which could become an alarming situation as the decade moves forward. Richard Long is a North Walpole, N.H.-native and has been calling games for many years. Long has been officiating various varsity athletics since 1982 in both V ermont and New Hampshir e. Since 1984, he has been a member of the IAABO Vermont Bd 105 (International Association of Approved Basketball Of ficials) and past member of IAABO NH Bd 32 and a NH women's basketball official. He has also since 1981, been a member , of the Southern Vermont Baseball Umpir es Association and two-time, past President of the group. Long is also a of the Vermont High School Softball Umpires Association, and President-elect of that group. He also referees middle school and junior varsity soccer. "I have been an umpire and referee since I was a kid," Long said in a recent interview."I volunteered to help umpire Little League games in Bellows Falls, when I was a 13-year-old Babe Ruth League player. I liked it so much that I kept going back time and time again until I was a 'r egular. Then I started refereeing biddy-boy basketball games, and eventually junior high, fr eshman, junior varsity and varsity high school games after college in the late 1970s." Long, like many officials in previous decades, gave their time to the games because of their love of sports… it certainly wasn't for the money . "I may have gotten into it out of chance," Long said. "But also for a desire to stay in the game after my playing days and because I was brought up by my parents to believe that we need to give back to our community." So why does there seem to be less and less young men and women becoming of ficials? "I think you pr obably have to look at our society. We all seem to be living busier and busier lives," Long suggested. "Off iciating takes a very stro ng commitment to the game, you don't just wake up one day and decide to become an official. "You need to learn the mechanics, know the rules, commit to your fellow officials, the teams and leagues you are associated with. It also takes a very big sacrifice fr om not only you, but also your family and your employer as well." Another reason for the shortage of umpir es and officials is simply the fact that are more sports and leagues than ever before. Therefore, more sports means there are more parents that are coaching and more travelling commitments as a parent, which leaves less time for people to become umpir es and referees. "There was a time when most of the officials were teachers or folks who wer e self-employed, folks who got out of work by 3 p.m. and were willing to travel to officiate. This is no longer the case. Also, when it comes to your work, at one time you wouldn't hesitate to ask the boss to let you out of work early to go work a game," Long added. "But with the economy the way it is today, you simply can't afford to ask for the time of f because ther e ar e a lot of people that need jobs and few of us can afford to be unemployed." Additionally, fewer people ar e willing to travel 45 minutes to an hour to go work a game, spend some three hours at the game then travel home, all for a $75 game fee. Never mind the simple fact that an of ficial must have thicker skin than most, as fans, parents, players and coaches for the most part are great but not always. As a result of all these factors, we have fewer and fewer folks getting into of ficiating, especially at the high school level. However, the hope here is that moving forward, more people will begin to r e-discover their love for sports and want to find a way to be involved in their favorite games, after they're playing days are over. In this r egard, of ficiating is the perfect way to not only stay connected to sports, but to also get more physically fit and of course, give back to the community.


www.gmoutlook.com

11 - Green Mountain Outlook

August 3, 2011 ter. There is a suggested donation of $2 for blood pressure and $5 for foot care. IRA — The Rutland Ar ea Visiting Nurse A ssociation & Hospice is off ering a Blood Pressure and Foot Care Clinic, 12:30 p.m., at Ira Town Hall. There is a suggested donation of $2 for blood pressure and $5 for foot care. RUTLAND TOWN — Market Fair of Rutland Town/Killington, 3-8 p.m., at Home Depot Plaza.

Saturday, Aug. 6 Wednesday, Aug. 3 TICONDEROGA, N.Y. — Free Pokemon League, 5 p.m., at Off The Top Games, 84 Montcalm Street. For more information, call 518-585-7500. WALLINGFORD — The Rutland Ar ea Visiting Nurse A ssociation & Hospice is offering a Blood Pressure and Foot Care Clinic, 11:30 a.m. at Wallingford House. There is a suggested donation of $2 for blood pressure and $5 for foot care. For more information, call 802=775-0568. CAVENDISH- Annual summer music series on the Proctorsville Green presents Gypsy Reel, 6 p.m. Free. RUTLAND- The Rutland Area Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice is offering comprehensive cardiovascular-cholesterol health risk screening, including total lipid profile and blood glucose at the RA VNAH office on 7 Alber t Cree Dr., 8:30 AM. Call 802-775-0568 in advance for an appointment. The cost for a complete lipid profile and glucose is $30.

Thursday, Aug. 4 RUTLAND — The Rutland Area Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice is off ering a Blood Pressure and Foot Care Clinic, 10 a.m., at Parker House. There is a suggested donation of $2 for blood pressure and $5 for foot care. For more informa-

tion, call 802-775-0568. RUTLAND- The Rutland Area Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice is offering a Blood Pressure and Foot Care Clinic, 12:30 p.m., at Bardwell House. There is a suggested donation of $2 f or blood pressure and $5 for foot care. For more information, call 802-775-0568. FAIR HAVEN — Fair Haven Summer Concerts in the Park presents EnerJazz Big Band. EnerJazz is “Vermont’s high energy big band” playing tunes made famous during the big band era as w ell as char ts by cont emporary ar tists, 7 p .m., free admission. Rain site: Fair Haven Baptist Church. LUDLOW — The Friends of Fletcher Memorial Library will present the feature film version of “To Kill a Mockingbird” in celebration of its half century as part of the American and International Literary scene at the Ludlow Town Hall Auditorium, 7 p.m.

PAWLET — Roast Pork Dinner at the Pawlet Community Church. The Ladies and Gentlemen's Supper Club in vite you to dinner, 5 p.m. Call Doreen Mach at 802-325-3428 or Judy Coolidge at 802-325-3073. BELMONT — The Odd Fellows invites the community to enjoy a home-style Roast Pork supper, 5 p.m., at the Odd Fellows Hall. This is a Benefit for Colfax Lodge 21, the Mt. Holly Odd Fellows. Prices” $10 for adults and $5 for children 11 and under. For more info call 802-259-2205. KILLINGTON — “Cooler in the M ountains”: Free concert ceries presents Badfish (Sublime Tribute Band), 3:30 p.m., at K-1 Base Lodge at Killington Resort. Sunday, Aug. 7 TICONDEROGA, N.Y. — Free Pokemon League, 5 p.m., at Off The Top Games, 84 Montcalm Street. For more information, call 518-585-7500. POULTNEY — The Southwest Freedom Riders will host the Annual Peaches 'n Cream Ladies Lead Poker Run. Sign--n, 9 -10:30 a.m., at Shaw's Supermarket.

Friday, Aug. 5

Tuesday, Aug. 9

TICONDEROGA, N.Y. — Free Pokemon League, 5 p.m., at Off The Top Games, 84 Montcalm Street. For more information, call 518-585-7500. POULTNEY — The Rutland Area Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice is offering a Blood Pressure and Foot Care Clinic, 9:30 a.m., atYoung at Heart Senior Cen-

RUTLAND — MSJ Summer Open House/C ookout at Saint P eter's Field, 6-8 p.m. Hamburgers, hot dogs, and salads will be ser ved. Some faculty members, coaches, and cur rent families will be on hand t o answer questions. No RSVP is required, but you may call the school at 802-775-0151 for more details.

Death Notices Editor’s note: Death Notices are brief accounts of the passings of community members within the Addison Eagle and Green Mountain Outlook circulation areas. There is a modest charge for publishing full obituaries by calling 518-873-6368. Mary L. Bisson SPRINGFIELD — Mary L. Bisson, 81, died July 3, 2011, at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. She was born Sept. 5, 1929, the daughter of Edwar d H. and Hilda (Reid) Labonta, in Springfield. In 1965, she married Arthur M. Bisson in Springfield. He predeceased her in 1993. Memorial contributions may be made to Springfield Humane Society , 401 Skitchewaug Trail, Springfield 05156. Bonita Kay “Bonnie” Gale BENNINGTON — Bonita Kay “Bonnie” Gale, 66, died July 26, 201 1, at the Vermont Veterans Home in Bennington. She was born in Rutland Dec. 14, 1944. She was the daughter of Bernard C. and Kathryn (Scarborough) Gale. She grew up in Salisbury. She was graduated from Middlebury Union High School, class of 1963. Following graduation she joined the United States Army and served until her Honorable Discharge in 1966. Julie S. Keeler MIDDLEBURY — On Saturday, Julie Sofia Kolbus Keeler died July 2, 2011, at the ARCH Room at Helen Porter Nursing Home. She was born Feb. 16, 1920. She married Donald Martin Keeler in Bristol in 1941 who predeceased her in March 1983. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. Mary's Church, College Street, Middlebury, to Sisters of Mercy, 100 Mansfield Ave., Burlington, 05401, or to the Middlebury Fire Department Severy Scholarship Fund, 5 Seymour St., Middlebury 05753. Cathaleen S. FitzGerald KILLINGTON — Cathaleen S. FitzGerald, 70, of Killington, died July 1, 2011, at Rutland Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center. She was born Nov. 20, 1940, in Pleasantville, N.J.Mrs. FitzGerald was past president of the Rutland Garden Club, on the board of directors of the Vermont Achievement Center, and a member of Friends in Council.A memorial service will be held at a later date. Angelina Krupinsky SPRINGFIELD — Angelina Krupinsky, 91, of Springfield, and Jensen Beach, Fla., died July 1, 2011, at Treasure Coast Hospice House. She was born Aug. 10, 1919, in Ludlow, Vermont, the daughter of the late Joseph and Mary (Ciufo) Albano. She was preceded in death by her husband Walter, of more than 50 years. Memorial services are pending. Donations may be made in her name to Treasure Coast Hospice, 1201 NE Indian Street, Stuart, Fla., 34997. Dr. Eugene F. O'Riordan LA PAZ, Mexico — Eugene F. “Eoghan” O'Riordan, M.D., 82, died Aug. 23, 2010, at his retirement home in La Paz. He was born in Cork, Ireland, Sept. 4, 1927. An anesthesiologist, he practiced at Rutland Hospital from 1974 to 1982. He was predeceased by a son, Stephen O'Riordan. Burial will take place at a later date. Della Grace Trombley LEICESTER — Della Grace Trombley died July 26, 2011, at Mountain View Center in Rutland. She was born on October 20, 1909 in West Lebanon, N.H., the daughter of Berton A. and Grace L. (Rowe) Jenks. She was raised by a grandmother, Sadie Sanborn Rowe.

SOLO RIDER—An unidentified cyclist prepares for the upcoming Solo Tour de Farms scenic bike tour through the Champlain Valley on a back road near Shoreham. The event will be held Sept. 18. Rural Vermont, Addison County Relocalization Network and the Vermont Bicycle & Pedestrian Coalition will again partner to host the tour. For details on how to participate, call 802-223-7222 Photo by Jamie Seiffer

Service Directory Serving the Rutland Region & Southern Vermont

NewC onstruction ServiceU pgrades Renovations GeneratorH ookups Phone&C able

82405

L a ke s i d e E Electric lectric

518-645-0446

Shavings & Bedding 10 Yard Truck Load Available For Delivery JUMBO BAGS 30 GAL PAPER BAGS $3.00 each BRING YOUR OWN BAG $2.00 BARK MULCH AVAILABLE! Call Norman for more details 247-3144

82044

Garth Pecor, Owner 1 Maecliff Drive, Middlebury, VT 802-388-1081 maecliffcomputer@hotmail.com

Randy D. MayoP ainting

PRECISION AUTOB ODY

INTERIOR / EXTERIOR

SteveB etit Owner

(Clapboard& TrimRe placement) Estimates Available 15 Years Experience

802-349-2776 randy9859@ hotmail.com

82045

78501

Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Bob Stiles

Networking Virus Removal CompleteTune-ups Custom Builds • Upgrades All work done by a certified technician with 15+ years experience! Many references available. Very good rates.

York Coach Works, Inc.

West Central VTLocally Lumber Made

82572

To Place Your Service Directory Ad Call 1-802388-6397

1529 Main Street P.O. Box 477 Castleton, VT 05735 (802)4 68-0327 Fax # (802) 468-0328

Quality Collision Repairs Since 1978 Servicing the Lakes Region 1075 Vermont Route 30 North, Poultney, Vermont 05764 802-287-9897 • Fax: 802-287-9230 • 1-800-974-9877

92441

Four Wheel Drive Compact Tractors at REALISTIC PRICES! Check with us BEFORE you buy elsewhere! Moore’s Corners

Sales & Service

Jct Routes 22 & 149, 8626 State Rt. 22 Granville NY 518-642-1720

92451

Bradley Berryhill, MD H. Peter Diercksen, MD Julie Foster, MD Stephen Rosmus, MD Stephen Kornbluth, MD James Jordan, MD Colleen Mitchell, MSN-FNP

J. Andrew Gorton, PA-C Jill Read, PNP Mark Mueller, MD Judith Ellwood, NP Luis Bauzo, MD Jeffrey R. Stall, MD

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS OF

THE

RUTLAND

REGION

Castleton Family Health Center 275 Route 30 North, Bomoseen, VT 05732 802.468.5641 • 802-468-2923 fax • chcrr.org We accept VT & NY Medicaid Patients!

CALL ON THESE AREA SERVICE BUSINESSES, HERE TO HELP YOU!

92143


www.gmoutlook.com

Two bridges

a display case in the Guilford Welcome Center to showcase Chester businesses. from page 4 Another strategy to help local businesses was the creation of a special website with matruck hi ghway d etours a s w ell a s r esidential jor funding fr om the USDA Rural Developstreet detours, and even handling emer gency ment complete with calendar of events and services with police and fire officials. how to navigate the detours. As the first southern most bridge was closed Cynthia Prairie and Brian Cunningham’s on May 16 the impact hit home.Avoid the con- Chester United next partner ed with the V erstruction areas during rush hours, especially as mont Country Store on Route 103S in Rockingbig school buses navigate their way between ham to print and distribute a br ochure “You the high school and the elementary schools Can Get Here from There”. along the narrow streets of the designated resElise and Payne Junker at Gallery 103 creatidential detours. As one old timer said, “I don’t ed the Route 103 Scavenger Hunt complete go for my usual cof fee and newspaper at the with brochures, prizes and specially fabricated Jiffy Mart between 7:30 and 8:30 a.m. If I do, it green triangle metal signs for display. takes a half an hour to go less than a half a Beginning in May with the state-wide Open mile.” Imagine a traffic jam in a r ural town of Studio Tour on Memorial weekend, special dis3,000. play cases were set up at the key Vermont WelSo the first lesson was avoid the construc- come Centers, in Guilford and Fair Haven. tion, but what about the local food market that Visitors could see Bonnie’s Bundles Dolls, sells fresh quality meats and pr oduce as well Tsuga Studios, Conrad Delia’s Windsor chairs, as beer, wine, soda? and Bob Sydorowich’s paintings. Lew and Lonnie Lisai cr eated explicit dir ectional Bonnie Watters cr eated special studio detour handouts for his grocery customers and deliv- maps with gallery locations and posted them ery drivers. on their web sites. Many of the businesses simply cut back on Craft Council Open Studio yellow directionhelp, or hours or pr oduction in full anticipaal signs could be seen all around town. In June tion of decr eased traf fic in their doors. The another Welcome Center display went up celHeritage Deli temporarily closed and moved ebrating the anniversary of Chester ’s Big Litfurther south on r oute 103 to the V ermont tle Wedding between a cloth doll fr om Bonnie’s Country Store. Bundles Dolls and a bear fr om the Hugging The Okemo V alley Regional Chamber of Bear Inn and Shoppe. Community art teachers, Commerce had detour maps on their website book author and illustrator W illow Bascom, a and mobile application letting the visitors quilter fr om Country T reasures and Respect know the detour routes. The Chamber also had Club student volunteers helped youngsters

ReligiousSer vices RUTLAND All Saints Anglican Church - An orthodox Anglo-Catholic Christian Community. Sunday Mass 10a.m. & Evening Prayer 5p.m. Childcare available. Handicap Accessible. Christian Education. 42 Woodstock Ave., Rutland (Services at Messiah Lutheran Church) 802-282-8098. Email: AllCelticStaintsRutland@comcast.net Alliance Community Fellowship - Howe Center, Sunday Worship 10:30a.m. Phone: 773-3613 Calvary Bible Church - 2 Meadow Lane, Rutland, VT 802775-0358. (2 blocks south of the Rutland Country Club) Sunday Worship Service 9:30a.m. Nursery care available. www.cbcvt.org Christ the King - 66 South Mail St. - Saturday Mass 5:15p.m., Sunday Masses 7:30, 9:30 & 11a.m. Church of the Nazarene - 144 Woodstock Ave., Pastor Gary Blowers 483-6153. Sunday School for all ages at 9:30a.m. Morning Worship at 10:30a.m., Evening Worship at 6:00p.m. & Wednesday Prayer at 7:00p.m., Children’s Church available during Worship Service. Church of Christ - 67 Dorr Dr., Sunday Worship 10:30a.m. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints - North Strewsbury Rd., 773-8346. Sacrament 10a.m. Church of the Redeemer - Cheeney Hill Center, Cedar Ave., Sunday Service 10a.m. First Baptist Church - 81 Center St., 773-8010 - The Rev. Mark E. Heiner, Pastor. Sunday worship 10:30a.m., Sunday school 9:00a.m. Good Shepherd Lutheran - Hillside Rd. - Saturday Worship 5:30p.m., Sunday Worship 9:30a.m. Grace Congregational United Church of Christ - 8 Court St., 775-4301. Sunday Chapel Service 8:30a.m., Worship 10a.m. Green Mountain Baptist Church - 50 Barrett Hill Rd. , 747-7712. Sunday Worship 11a.m., Evening service 6p.m. Green Mountain Missionary Baptist Church 98 Killington Ave., 775-1482 Sunday Worship 11a.m. & 6p.m. Immaculate Heart of Mary - Lincoln Ave. Saturday Mass 4:30p.m., Sunday Mass 8 & 10:15a.m. Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses Gleason Rd. - Public Meeting 10a.m. Messiah Lutheran Church - 42 Woodstock Ave., 7750231. Sunday Worship 10a.m. New Hope in Christ Fellowship - 15 Spellman Terrace, 773-2725. Sunday Worship 10:15a.m. Pentacostals of Rutland County - Corner of Rt. 4 and Depot Lane, 747-0727. Evangelistic Service 6p.m. Roadside Chapel Assembly of God - Town Line Rd., 775-5805. Sunday Worship 10:25a.m. Rutland Jewish Center - 96 Grove St., 773-3455. Fri. Shabbat Service 7:30p.m., Sat. Shabbat Service 9:30a.m. Salvation Army - 22 Wales St. Sunday Worship 11a.m., Praise Service 1:30 p.m. Seventh-Day Adventist - 158 Stratton Rd., 775-3178. Saturday Worship 11a.m. St. Nicholas Orthodox Church - 8 Cottage St. Sunday Service 10a.m. St. Peter Church - Convent Ave. - Saturday Mass 5:15p.m., Sunday Masses 7:30 and 11:30a.m. Trinity Episcopal Church - 85 West St., 775-4368. Sunday Eucharist 8, 9 & 10a.m., Wed. 12:05p.m., Thurs. 9a.m., Morning Prayer Mon.-Sat. at 8:45a.m. True Vine Church of God - 78 Meadow St., 775-8880 or 438-4443. Sunday Worship 10:30a.m. • Training for Reigning, Wednesdays at 7p.m. Nursery available during Sun. & Wed. services. J.A.M. Sessions for teens bi-weekly Fridays at 7p.m. Women’s Bible Study Tuesdays at 10:30a.m.

775-4221 the

Seward Family 224 No. Main St. (Rt. 7N), Rutland

Voted

“Best Family Restaurant”

create their vision of that magical June wedding from a year ago. Donated $1 hot dogs and a photo op on an antique F armall C ub Tractor f ed t he h ungry and curious. The Big Little Wedding Anniversary activities ended at Inn V ictoria for afternoon high tea. Meanwhile, Chester continues to prod locals to visit the town’s many friendly and surprising shops via a stunning wide angle photo slide show of owners inside their establishments. Local residents along back road detour routes h ad t heir f un o vercoming th e f rustrations of neighbors on muddy r oads, lost city drivers, and even those who ignor ed all pr ecautions including specially installed timed stop lights controlling one way traffic on Missing Link Road. If you remember Burma Shave road signs of the last century, you would love some of our local poetry: “Found the shortcut? Way to go. Keep it right, take it slow”. Or this one: “Easy

Women’s Chorus of Rutland in search of singers RUTLAND — Ladies’ Night Out Women’s Chorus of Rutland is in search of new singers. The group is preparing for the fall season of rehearsals int he Rutland area. The 2011 performances are Nov. 26 at Rutland’s Trinity Episcopal Church and Nov. 27 at St. Bridget’s Church in West Rutland. Rehearsals start Tuesday, Sept. 20, including a dress rehearsal on the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. The group practices 7-9 p.m. at the Rutland Middle School Music Room. Skilled women singers are invited to join LNO for choral work. Call Director Lucy Allen Tenenbaum at 802-775-8004 or e-mail lucytune@sover.net if you want to sing in either of the groups or in the winter of 2012. No audition is required.

CLARENDON The Brick Church - 298 Middle Rd. 773-3873. Sunday Worship 10a.m. Nursery Care Available. www.brickchruchvt.com Reformed Bible Church - Clarendon Springs, 483-6975. Sunday Worship 9:30a.m. FAIR HAVEN First Baptist Church - South Park Place, Sunday Worship 11a.m. First Congregational Church - Rt. 22A Sunday Worship 10a.m. Our Lady of Seven Dolors - 10 Washington St. Saturday Mass 4:30p.m., Sunday 9a.m. St. Luke’s - St. Mark’s Episcopal Church Sunday Worship 10:45a.m. United Methodist Church - West St., Sun. Service 8:30a.m. FORESTDALE Forestdale Wesleyan Church - Rt. 73 Sunday Worship 11a.m. St. Thomas & Grace Episcopal Church - Rt. 7, Brandon village: 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite 1 (traditional language). 9:30 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite 2 (contemporary language), with music. “Sunday Morning Program” for children preschool and older (during school year). Telephone: 247-6759, The Rev. Margaret (Margo) Fletcher, Priest-in-Partnership Grace Church - Rt. 73, Forestdale - part of St. Thomas & Grace Episcopal Church: May-July services held at St. Thomas, Brandon village (corner of Rt. 7 and Prospect): a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite 1 (traditional language.) 9:30 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite 2 (contemporary language), with music. “Sunday Morning Program” for children preshcool and older (during shcool year.) Telephone: 247-6759, The Rev. Margaret (Margo) Fletcher, Priest-in-Partnership. Living Water Assembly of God - 76 North Street (Route 53), Office Phone: 247-4542. Email: LivingWaterAssembly@gmail.com. Website: www.LivingWaterAOG.org. Sunday Service 10a.m. Wednesday Service 7p.m. Youth Meeting (For Teens) Saturday 7p.m. HUBBARDTON Hubbardton Congregational Church - Sunday Worship 10a.m. • 273-3303. East Hubbardton Baptist Church - The Battle Abbey, 483-6266 Worship Hour 10:30a.m. IRA Ira Baptist Church - Rt. 133, 235-2239. Worship 11a.m. & 6p.m. LEICESTER Community Church of the Nazarene - 39 Windy Knoll Lane • 9:30a.m. Worship Service, 11:00 a.m. Bible School, 6:00p.m. Evening Service. Wed. Evening 7:00p.m. Dare to care and Prayer. 3rd Sat. of the month (Sept.-May) 8a.m. Men’s breakfast St. Agnes’ Parish - Leicester Whiting Rd, 247-6351, Sunday Mass 8a.m. MENDON Mendon Community Church - Rt. 4 East, Rev. Ronald Sherwin, 459-2070. Worship 9:30a.m., Sunday School 11:00a.m. NORTH SPRINGFIELD North Springfield Baptist Church - 69 Main St., N. Springfield, VT • (802) 886-8107 Worship Services Sunday 10a.m.; Faith Cafe (discussion group) Sundays 11:15a.m.-12p.m.; Sunday School for children K-4; Bible Study Fridays 9:30a.m. Call us about our youth ministry program

Clifford Funeral Home 77187

60 YEARS! 77185

Phone: 802-388-6397 - Fax: 802-388-6399 - E-Mail: newmarketpress@denpubs.com

Aldous Funeral & Cremation Service

B REAKFAST - L UNCH - D INNER S PECIALS D AILY

Area’s Largest Selection of Ice Cream Dairy Treats

PAWLET Pawlet Community Church - 325-3716. Sunday Worship 9:30a.m. St. Francis Xavier Cabrini Church - West Pawlet. Sunday Mass 9:30a.m. The United Church of West Pawlet - 645-0767. Sunday Worship 10a.m. PITTSFORD Pittsford Congregational Church - Rt. 7, 4836408. Worship 10:15a.m. St. Alphonsus Church - Sunday Mass 9a.m. POULTNEY Christian Science Society - 56 York St., 287-2052. Service 10a.m. St. David’s Anglican Church - Meet at Young at Heart Senior Center on Furnace St., 645-1962. 1st Sun. of every month, Holy Eucharist 9:30a.m. Poultney United Methodist Church - Main St., 287-5710. Worship 10:00a.m. St. Raphael Church - Main St. Saturday Mass 4p.m., Sunday Mass 10a.m. Sovereign Redeemer Assembly sovredeemer@gmail.com • Sunday Worship 10a.m. Trinity Episcopal Church - Church St., 287-2252. Sunday Holy Eucharist 10:45a.m. United Baptist Church - On the Green, East Poultney. 287-5811, 287-5577. Sunday Worship 10a.m. Welsh Presbyterian Church - Sunday Worship 10a.m. PROCTOR St. Dominic Catholic Church - 45 South St. Sunday Mass 9:15a.m. St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church - Gibbs St. Sunday Worship 9a.m. Union Church of Proctor - Church St., Sun. Worship 10a.m. SHREWSBURY Shrewsbury Community Church - Sun. Service 10:30a.m. SUDBURY Sudbury Congregational Church - On the Green, Rt. 30, 623-7295 Open May 30-Oct. 10, for Worship (No winter services) & Sun. School 10:30a.m. WALLINGFORD East Wallingford Baptist Church - Rt. 140, 2592831. Worship 11a.m. First Baptist Church - School St., 446-2020. Worship 11a.m. First Congregational Church - 446-2817. Worship 10a.m. St. Patrick’s Church - Sat. Mass 5p.m., Sun. 10:30a.m. Society of Friends (Quaker) - Rotary Bldg., Rt. 7 Sunday meeting for worship 10a.m. South Wallingford Union Congregational Church - Sunday Worship 9a.m. WEST RUTLAND First Church of Christ, Scientist - 71 Marble St., Sunday School & Service 10a.m., Wednesday Evening Service 7:30p.m. St. Bridget Church - Pleasant & Church Streets Saturday Mass 5p.m., Sunday 9a.m. St. Stanislaus Kostka Church - Barnes & Main Streets, Saturday Mass 4:30p.m., Sunday 9a.m. United Church of West Rutland - Chapel St., Worship 10a.m. 6-25-2011 • 77182

Since 1875

G. Joseph Clifford Gary H. Clifford James J. Clifford

CELEBRATING

does it, take it slow, don’t bump into folks you know”. On July 10 when the good news came that the bridges were open to traffic, it was a week and a day earlier than pr omised by the har d working crew from Cold River Bridges. Now Chester is going all out to celebrate on Friday, July 22. beginning at 4 p.m. at the Gr een Mountain Banquet & Conference Center at the American Legion Complex on Route 103 in Chester. There will be children’s games, along with a barbeque and potluck. At 5:30 p.m. V ermont Governor Peter Shumlin will arrive for a Ribbon Cutting on the Legion grounds. Oh yes, the Scavenger Hunt winner will be chosen along with, music by the Andy Lisai Band, a kazoo contest and other entertaining signing events. Our safe new bridges are open, so come see how Chester r emains “The V ermont you’ve been hoping to find.” Lew Watters

Special Thanks To These Fine Local Businesses For Supporting The Religious Services Page

Unitarian Universalist Church - 117 West Street. Sunday Services through August 22 begin at 9:30a.m. No service on Sept. 5. Rev. Erica Baron. For further info call 802-775-0850. United Methodist Church - 71 Williams St., 773-2460. Sunday Service in the Chapel 8 and 10a.m. United Pentecostal Church - Corner of Rt. 4, Depot Lane, 773-4255. Sunday Services 9:30a.m. and 6p.m., Evangelical Service 5p.m. Wellspring of Life Christian Center - 18 Chaplin Ave., 773-5991. Sunday Worship 11a.m. BRANDON Brandon Congregational Church - Rt. 7 Sunday Worship 10a.m. Brandon Baptist Church - Corner of Rt. 7 & Rt. 73W (Champlain St.) Brandon, VT 802-247-6770. Sunday Services: 10a.m. Adult Bible Study, Sunday School ages 5 & up, Nursery provided ages 4 & under. Worship Service 11a.m. *Lords supper observed on the 1st Sunday of each month. *Pot luck luncheon 3rd Sunday of each month. Wednesdays 6:30p.m., Adult prayer & Bible study, Youth groups for ages 5 and up Grace Episcopal Church - Rt. 73, Forestdale February-April: 9am, Holy Eucharist; 9a.m. Sunday Morning Program for children preschool and older. 247-6759, The Rev. Margaret (Margo) Fletcher, Priest-in-Partnership LifeBridge Christian Church - 141 Mulcahy Drive, 247-LIFE (5433). Sunday Worship 9a.m., www.lifebridgevt.com, LifeGroups meet weekly (call for times and locations) Living Water Assembly of God - 76 North Street (Route 53), Office Phone: 247-4542. Email: LivingWaterAssembly@gmail.com. Website: www.LivingWaterAOG.org. Sunday Service 10a.m. Wednesday Service 7p.m. Youth Meeting (For Teens) Saturday 7p.m. St. Mary’s Parish - 38 Carver St., 247-6351, Saturday Mass 4p.m., Sunday Mass 9:30a.m. St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church - Rt. 7, Brandon Village. February-April services will be held at Grace Church, Rt. 73 Forestdale: 9a.m., Holy Eucharist; 9a.m. Sunday Morning Program for children preschool and older. 247-6759, The Rev. Margaret (Margo) Fletcher, Priest-in-Partnership United Methodist Church - Main St., 247-6524. Sunday Worship 10a.m. CASTLETON Castleton Federated Church - Rt. 4A - 468-5725. Sunday Worship 10:30a.m. Church of Christ - Bible study & services Sunday 10:00a.m. All are cordially welcome. Contact Mike Adaman 273-3379. Faith Community Church - Mechanic St., 468-2521. Sunday Worship 10:45a.m. Fellowship Bible Church - Rt. 30 North, 468-5122. Sunday Worship 10:45a.m. & 6p.m. Hydeville Baptist Church - Hydeville, Rt. 4A Sunday Worship 9:30a.m. 265-4047. St. John the Baptist Catholic Church Saturday Mass 4p.m., Sunday 8:30a.m. St. Mark’s Episcopal Church - Main St. Sunday Worship 10:45a.m. third Sunday of the month. CHITTENDEN Church of the Wildwood United Methodist Holden Rd., 483-2909. Sunday Service 10:30a.m. Mt. Carmel Community Church - South Chittenden Town Hall, 483-2298. Sun. Worship 5:30p.m. St. Robert Bellarmine Roman Catholic Church - Saturday Mass 4p.m. Wesleyan Church - North Chittenden, 483-6696. Sunday Worship 10a.m.

Give Us A Call To Advertise Your Business Here!

August 3, 2011

77183

12 - Green Mountain Outlook

289 Randbury Rd., Rutland, VT • (802) 775-2357 2242 Vt Route 7 South, Middlebury, VT • (802) 388-7212 www.suburbanenergy.com 77184

Rutland (802) 773-6252 Wallingford www.aldousfuneralhome.com Joseph Barnhart ~ Christopher Book ~ George Hopp Jr. 77186


www.gmoutlook.com

August 3, 2011

Miglorie from page 1 (psychology) degree with a variety of tracks leading to pr ofessional licensur e, and the Master of Business Administration degr ee. The initiative of which Miglorie is most proud is the development of the STEPS program, a special pr ogram for Vermont foster youth that enables them to secur e a college education at CSJ. The pr ogram is unique in New England. Over the course of Miglorie’s pr esidency, he has radically transformed CSJ’s campus. He oversaw the construction of a second-story addition to St. Joseph Hall which added an additional 15,000 sq. ft. to the academic building. He added a new athletic center, a new student center and a new library to the campus as part of a major building campaign. Most r ecently, Miglor e dir ected a major renovated the college’s two r esidence halls to improve their energy efficiency. Miglorie negotiated the acquisition of the Clementwood estate fr om the Sisters of St. Joseph. This purchase added 27 acres to the campus along with six buildings, the most notable of which is “Clementwood”, a mansion built by Charles Clement in 1863 which

is now listed on the national historic r egister. Under Miglorie’s dir ection Clementwoodwas completely r enovated and brought back to its 19th-century era appearance. Miglorie operated the college with a balanced budget. He has built an institutional advancement pr ogram that has r esulted in two capital campaigns and an annual fund program that has grown over the years. He established an endowment fund which is now approaching $5 million. The college’s long-term debt has been r educed to $2.6 million and is secur ed at the rate of 2.58 per cent for the r emainder of its term. Miglorie is unique among Vermont college presidents on two counts: He is one of the longest seated presidents of a college in Vermont, New England, and the United States. Throughout his long tenur e as an administrator, he has continued to teach at the undergraduate and graduate level. On June 30, 2012, Miglorie will have served the college in various capacities for 41 years. The college will launch a national sear ch to find Miglorie’s successor with a goal of installing a new pr esident by the end of June 2012.

Green Mountain Outlook - 13

4-H

overall and was awarded the bronze medal. Jonathan Sanders placed fifth in the hunter from page 1 skills, safety and live fire competition that included 3D ar chery, small-bor e rifle and discipline and the top five teams overall. In sporting clays. addition, at the end of the competition, In the overall standings, based on comawards w ere g iven to th e t op 1 0 h ighestpilation of scores for the week, the Muzzlescoring individuals and the top five teams. loader T eam placed fourth with Naomi On the first day of competition, June 21, Trudeau being named sixth highest-scoring the Muzzleloader Team placed thir d overindividual. The Hunting T eam also scor ed all, earning a bronze medal. Team member high, earning the thir d-place overall Naomi T rudeau r eceived a thir d-place bronze team medal. Joshua Sanders placed bronze medal in the 25-yar d novelty conninth overall. test. The Hunting Team came in third overThe 4-H Shooting Sports project is one of all for a br onze medal. Joshua Sanders many 4-H youth development pr ojects ofplaced fifth and Taylor Waring placed tenth fered through UVM Extension for kidsages in the wildlife identification category. eight to 18. Although competition is not the The second day , June 22, br ought addiprimary focus, selection for the national intional honors to the Muzzleloader T eam, vitational pr ovides the opportunity for which took third place overall and a bro nze kids to master life skills including goal setmedal. Individuals earning awar ds wer e ting and pr oblem solving, meet 4-H'ers Naomi Trudeau with a second-place silver from other parts of the country and achieve medal and Sean T illotson who took ninth excellence in various shooting sports disciplace, both in the 50-yar d bull's-eye conplines. test. For many, it is their first opportunity to The Vermont 4-Hers also earned several travel outside of Vermont. Total attendance awards on June 23, the final day of compe- for the 2011 event was 1,800, which includtition. The Muzzleloader T eam came in ed competitors, coaches and family memfifth in silhouette tar gets. The Hunting bers. Team was recognized as the third top team

PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE

OOHA AND AAHS By Mike Peluso ACROSS 1 Look up to 7 “Zen and the __ Motorcycle Maintenance”: 1974 best-seller 12 Tournament slots 18 Gradually removed (from) 19 When Lear banishes Cordelia 20 University of Delaware mascot 21 Charity that rewards golf talent? 23 Jockey Angel 24 __ Rebellion: 1786-’87 insurrection 25 Liqueur flavoring 26 Rim 27 Overly 28 Stitching on Li’l Abner’s towel? 29 Enemy 30 Feeds amply 32 Phenom 33 Treat a Saudi king with TLC? 38 Travesty 39 “Hang on a sec,” online 42 Off 43 Forearm bones 44 More than just worry 45 ’70s Struthers co-star 47 Tiffs 48 “Go fly __!” 49 Sitting still 50 Terrible twos, one hopes 51 Coach Parseghian 52 Big petrol seller 55 Danish explorer Bering 56 Timid officer? 58 Hoosegow 59 Durham sch. 60 All-time RBI leader

62 64 65 67 71 73 74 75 76 77 79 80 81 83 84 86 87 88 91 92 94 95 99 100 101 103 104 106 109 110 111 112 113 114

1 2 3 4 5

Diarist Nin Medical suffix Crucifix Miniature B-17? Army doc __ Romeo Spider NYC-based securities gp. After-school treats Player with an orange and black-striped helmet Junk Did well on the quiz “What’s My Line?” regular Francis Pennsylvania university Like some casks Aromatherapist’s supply Sound after a pop Alaskan native Hall of Famer Warren after garage work? Lobster house freebies Wicked one Hall of Fame pool player __ Mataya Laurance West Coast sch. Handy communication syst.? Allure rival When repeated, “Hungry Like the Wolf” band Greek promenades Noxious fumes Padding in an Easter basket? Artsy district Run roughshod over 2009 aviation biopic Comeback Little silvery fish Words on some Montana license plates DOWN Overrun (with) City NE of Jodhpur Words from dolls On the same page They sometimes count to

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 22 26 30 31 32 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 44 46 47 48 50 51 53 54 56 57 61 63 66 68

10 Shogun’s capital More uncomfortable AAA suggestions Reach for the Skyy, excessively __ roll: winning Backin’ Promotes oneself online Chartres’s river The color of money owed? Stuffy trio? Daring rescue, say Grabs some shuteye When many a whistle blows A train? “Bananaphone” singer SFO listings South Carolina river Clicking sounds? Fails to recycle Black Sea port Cartoonist Walker Rapper __ Shakur Lab container “Most Wanted” org. Dazzling performance Vitamin A Onset of boredom? Giraffe relative Fresh out of the box, in Berlin Freshly minted Like a loud crowd Suffix for techno Dermatologist’s cases Monkeys, e.g. They have all the answers Computer problem Big cheese Bring shame to Bond nemesis Persian king, 522-486 B.C. Unavailable, as for appointments

69 70 72 76 78 79

“Coffee __?” Wherewithal Like mil. volunteers __ Cynwyd, Pa. 38-Down employee Former Utah senator Jake who flew aboard Discovery in 1985 81 Ritchie Valens biopic 82 Apostrophe’s purpose, often 83 Curved molding

84 Role in Stone’s “JFK” 85 “Brusha, brusha, brusha” toothpaste 89 Ump’s call 90 Eggnog topping 92 Distinctive style 93 “Casablanca” heroine 96 Becomes safe to eat, in a way 97 Cornea-reshaping surgery 98 Test for purity

100 Former “Fashion Emergency” host 101 19th-century French book illustrator 102 West Coast sch. 103 Cargo hauler 105 Embroider, e.g. 106 Ruler amts. 107 Breakfast side 108 Folder user’s aid

Trivia Answers! •••••••• From Page 2 ••••••••

ANs. 1 DAVE GARROWAY ANs. 2 BULLFIGHTING 72960

SOLUTIONS TO LAST WEEK ’ S PUZZLES !

(Answers Next Week)


14 - Green Mountain Outlook

August 3, 2011

www.gmoutlook.com

PLACE A CLASSIFIED ANYTIME DAY OR NIGHT, EVEN WEEKENDS AT WWW.DENPUBS.COM

THE CLASSIFIED

(802) 388-6397 FAX: 802-388-6399 • EMAIL: GAIL@DENPUBS.COM DIRECTV LOWEST Price! ALL FREE: HBO|Cinemax|Starz|Showtime for 3mo + FREE NFL Sunday Ticket w/Choice Ultimate + HD/DVR Upgrade! From $29.99/mo 800705-0799

DIRECTV SUMMER Special! 1Year FREE Showtime! 3 mos FREE HBO|Starz|Cinemax! NFL SUNDAY TICKET PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Free Choice Ultimate|Premier Pkgs from You choose from families nationwide. LIV- $29.99/mo. 800-906-9155 ING EXPENSES PAID. Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6292, 24/7 Void/Illinois

ADOPTION

FINANCIAL SERVICES

ANTIQUES ANTIQUE FAIR AND FLEA MARKET August 6th & 7th at the Washington County Fairgrounds, Rte. 29, Greenwich NY. $2 admission. (Sat. 8a-6p, Sun 9a-4p) Featuring over 200 dealers. GREAT FOOD. Early-Bird Friday (8/5 - 6a-6p - $10). RAIN or SHINE. Call (518) 331-5004

APPLIANCES FOR SALE - used GE refrigerator 24w x 24d x 57h, clean, $90. Lake Clear. Rieman 518891-7662.

ELECTRONICS *FACTORY DIRECT SATELLITE TV! Why pay retail when you can buy at factory DIRECT pricing! Lowest monthly service plans available. New Callers get FREE setup! Call NOW 1-800-935-8195 AT&T U-Verse for just $29.99/mo! SAVE when you bundle Internet+Phone+TV and get up to $300 BACK! (Select plans). Limited Time Call NOW! 1-866-944-0906 DIRECT TO HOME Satellite TV $24.99/mo. FREE installation, FREE HD/DVR upgrade. New customers - NO ACTIVATION FEE! Credit/Debit Card Req. Call 1-800-795-3579

ACCIDENT VICTIMS. Cash Advances for personal injury cases. CASH NOW before you settle. No payment until you win. Fast Approval. Cash Next Day! www.Cash-NOWFor-Accident-Victims.com 1-888-522-8360

FOR SALE - like new, Minn Koto 35 electric trolling motor with interstate battery, $99. Lake Clear 518-891-7662. MAINE OCEANFRONT BARGAIN! 770 FT WATERFRONT - Only $89,900 (Bar Harbor Region) Prime 6+ acre coastal building Lot. Over 770 FT shoreline. Nicely wooded, private, soil tested, survey, power, new paved roads. Great owner financing. L&S Realty 207-781-3294

1/2 price insulation, 4x8 sheets, high R, up to 4” thick, Blue Dow, 1/2” insul board. 518-597-3876 or Cell 518-812-4815

MEMORY FOAM THERAPEUTIC NASA VISCO MATTRESSES WHOLESALE! T$299 F-$349 Q-$399 K-$499 ADJUSTABLES - $799 FREE DELIVERY 25 YEAR WARRANTY 90 NIGHT TRIAL 1-800ATSLEEP 1-800-287-5337 WWW.MATTRESSDR.COM

27” ZENITH TV works great, $30.00. Call 518-873-6320 ACR METAL ROOFING/SIDING DIST. Quality Products, Low Prices, Metal Roofing and Trims. Complete Garage & Barn Packages, Lumber, Trusses. Delivery available. Free literature. 1-800-325-1247, www.acrmetal.com

SEARS KENMORE Sewing Machine, Wood Cabinet, Includes Portable Case, Manual, Attachments, Excellent Condition, $99. 518338-3258.

COMPLETE SERVICE for 8, Johnson Bros. English stoneware dishes includes serving pieces, white with Madison pattern, excellent condition, $99. 518-623-0622. COORS EXTRA Gold Neon Sign, 1988, in original box, $95. 518-668-5819.

THOR T-30 Ratchet Boots for Motocross ATV, Black, Size 11, Calf Guard, Shin Ankle Plates, Good Condition, $40 (reg. $169). 518-546-7285.

FOR SALE pint canning jars, twelve dozen for $2.50 a dozen. Call for more information. 518-494-3348.

WENZEL 9X14’ Tent + Coleman Camp Stove both for @ $25.00 Call Mike Shepard @ 518-578-5500

The Super Store offers FREE CLASSIFIED ADS!

Now Take the time to sell those no longer needed items!

Shannonc@denpubs.com

Rules: • Merchandise ads only • Private ads only. No business ads accepted • Limit one item per ad. Maximum 15 words per ad. • Item price must be under $99 and clearly stated in ad. • Denton Publications reserves the right to reject any advertising. • Ad Runs for 3 weeks • Limited 1 ad per household. • No Animals PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT

FISHING PLANNER Boards and Mast Stainless Steel, $98. 518-546-8614.

FOR SALE

ON LINE: denpubs.com EMAIL:

Attn: Classified

EUREKA CONPACT vacuum cleaner with beater bars, $99.00. 518-523-9456.

LAWSUIT CASH Auto Accident? Worker Compensation? Get CASH before your case settles! Fast Approval. Low Fees. (866) 7091100 or www.glofin.com

FREE ADS! Mail To: Denton Publications, Inc. PO Box 338 Elizabethtown, NY 12932

DISH NETWORK delivers more for less! Packages starting at $24.99/mo. Local channels included! FREE HD for life! Free BLOCKBUSTER\’ae movies for 3 months. 1-888-459-3929

Fax To: 518-873-6360

*NO ADS TAKEN BY PHONE. ALL ADS MUST CONTAIN A PHONE NUMBER & A PRICE, NO EMAIL ADDRESSES.

Name

CORNER COMPUTER Desk with 2 speaker shelves, keyboard pullout, 2 additional shelves, excellent condition, light color wood, $50. 518-623-0622 nights. TV CABINET, large, oak, 5’ x 5’, accomodates 36” wide TV, excellent condition, $99. 518-597-3932.

GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALE - August 12th 13th & 14th, 9am-5pm. Clothing various women’s sizes, shoes, books, dolls, comic books, toys & miscellaneous items. Zawistowski 200 Terrace Heights off Sheeps Farm Road, Weybridge.

GENERAL **OLD GUITARS WANTED!** Fender, Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, Prairie State, Euphonon, Larson, D’Angelico, Stromberg, Rickenbacker, and Mosrite. Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1930’s thru 1970’s TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401-0440 *REDUCE YOUR SATELLITE or CABLE BILL! Confused by all these other ads, buy DIRECT at FACTORY DIRECT Pricing. Lowest monthly prices available. FREE to new callers! CALL NOW. 1-800-795-1315 ACCIDENT VICTIMS. Need Cash? Get a cash advance for your personal injury case. Pay nothing until you win. Fast Approval. Cash Next Day! www.Cash-NOW-ForAccident-Cases.com 1-888-544-2154 AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)453-6204. AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 686-1704 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com

BUY THE BLUE PILL! Viagra 100mg, Cialis 20mg. 40 pills+ 4 FREE, only $99.00. #1 Male Enhancement, Save $500. Discreet shipping. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 1-888797-9013

Phone

UNDER 99 FREE

FURNITURE

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. Medical, Business, Paralegal, Accounting, Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. Call 800-494-3586 www.CenturaOnline.com

Address

$

METAL FRAME Futon , $75. Call 518-5633406 or 518-248-9310.

20 WORDS MAXIMUM

CASH FOR CARS: All Cars/Trucks Wanted. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Any Make/Model. Call For Instant Offer: 1-800-864-5960 CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS - up to $17/Box! Most brands. Shipping Prepaid. FAST payment. Ask for Emma 1-888-776-7771 www.cash4diabeticsupplies.com Call us at 1-800-989-4237

DIRECTV $0 Start Costs! ALL FREE: HBO/Showtime/Starz/Cinemax 3 Months + NFL Sunday Ticket w/Choice Ultimate + HD/DVR Upgrade! From $29.99/month! $0 Start! (800)329-6061 DISH NETWORK delivers more for less! Packages starting at $24.99/ mo. Local channels included! FREE HD for life! Free BLOCKBUSTER movies for 3 months. 1-800-727-0305 DISH NETWORK PACKAGES start $24.99/mo FREE HD for life! FREE BLOCKBUSTER\’c2\’ae movies (3 months.) Call1800-915-9514

85187

SPORTING GOODS EUREKA CANVAS Tent: 2 rooms, 10’x16’, perfect condition, used about 10 times, zippered separation privacy panel, already to set up. Sleeps minimum of 6, perfect for family camping trip. Stored inside in original vinyl bag. Paid $500 new. Best offer. Call 802-5246275 9am-9pm. FOOTBALL CLEATS “Under Armour”, size 8 1/2 (like new), $15. Call 802-459-2987.

WANTED

DISH NETWORK, more for less! Packages starting at $24.99/mo. Local channels included! FREE HD for life! Free BLOCKBUSTER\’ae movies for 3 months. 1-888-679-4993

AAAA** DONATION Donate your Car, Boat or Real Estate, IRS Tax Deductible. Free Pick-up/ Tow Any Model/Condition. Help Under Privileged Children Outreach Center, 1-800-883-6399.

DONATE A CAR Help Disabled Kids. Free Next Day Pick-Up Receive 3 Free Vacation Certificates. Tax Deductible. Call Special Kids Fund 7 days/week 1-866-448-3865

BUYING EVERYTHING! Furs, Coins, Gold, Antiques, Watches, Silver, Art, Diamonds. “The Jewelers Jeweler Jack” 1-917-696-2024 By Appointment. LicBonded

GET TV & Internet for UNDER $50/mo. For 6 mos. PLUS Get $300 Back!-select plans. Limited Time ONLY Call NOW! 1-866-9440906 GET YOUR DEGREE ONLINE *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com REACH OVER 28 million homes with one ad buy! Only $2,795 per week! For more information, contact this publication or go to www.naninetwork.com T-SHIRTS Custom Printed. $5.50 heavyweight. “Gildan” Min. order of 36 pcs. HATS Embroidered $6.00. Free catalog. 1-800-242-2374. Berg Sportswear. 40. THE OCEAN Corp.10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a New Career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid available for those who qualify. 1-800-321-0298.

DONATE A CAR Free Next Day Pick-Up Help Disabled Kids. Best Tax Deduction. Receive 3 Free Vacation Certificates. Call Special Kids Fund 7 days/week 1-866-4483865 FAST PAYMENT for sealed, unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS-up to $17/Box! Most brands. Shipping Prepaid. Call today & ask for Emma 1-888-776-7771 www.cash4diabeticsupplies.com SCRAP METAL - We will pick-up. 518-5866943. TOP CASH FOR CARS, Any Car/Truck, Running or Not. Call for INSTANT offer: 1-800-454-6951 WANTED DIABETES TEST STRIPS Any kind/brand. Unexpired up to $18.00. Shipping Paid Hablamos espanol 1-800-2660702 www.selldiabeticstrips.com

HEALTH

WANT TO SAVE $500.00 on Viagra/Cialis? Get 40 100mg/20mg Pills, for only $99! No office visit. Money Back Guarantee. 4 BONUS Pills FREE! CALL 1-888-757-8646

GENERIC VIAGRA 50mg 100mg 60 pills only $149 6 free pills Generic CIALIS (Tedalafil) 20 mg 40mg 90 pills only $199 15 free pills 888-225-2146

LAWN & GARDEN

TAKE VIAGRA/CIALIS? SAVE $500.00! Get 40 100mg/20mg Pills, for only $99! Call now and Get 4 BONUS Pills FREE! Your Satisfaction or Money Refunded! 1-888-7578646

UTILITY TRAILER 10’ USED TO HAUL 2 BIKES, HAS RAMP AND TIE DOWNS, LIKE NEW $1000.00 919-271-9819 LOCATED IN CHESTERTOWN

MUSIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS CLARINET /FLUTE/ VIOLIN/TRUMPET/Trombone/ Amplifier/Fender Guitar, $69 each. Cello/Upright Bass/Saxophone/French Horn/Drums, $185 ea. Tuba/Baritone Horn/Hammond Organ, Others 4 sale.1-516377-7907

PETS & SUPPLIES AQUARIUM 29 gallon with accessories $45.00; 46 gallon Reptile tank with light and hot rock $25. 518-962-2969 after 5:00PM. GOLDEN DOODLE Puppies, Family Raised, Vet Checked, 1st Shots, Ready Now. mcroblee83@aol.com, 518-335-5768.

EDUCATION AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-803-8630 ATTEND COLLEGE Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-692-9599 www.Centura.us.com AVIATION MAINTENANCE/AVIONICS Graduate in 15 months. FAA approved; financial aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call National Aviation Academy Today! 1-800-292-3228 or NAA.edu

EQUIPMENT JOHN DEERE Bulldozer 350B has a 6 way blade and winch 3pt. hitch / long backhoe 14ft reach with the pump call 518-643-9977 if no answer leave message

YOUR AD WILL APPEAR

ONLINE FREE

FREEITEMS!

DEADLINE ZONE A: MONDAY @ 8AM Addison Eagle, Green Mt. Outlook

FREE OLD Upright Piano, needs work, come and get it. 518-547-8383.

DEADLINE ZONE B: MONDAY @ 3PM

FREE SKIS, 12 pairs, outmoded but usable for skiing or making Adirondack style furniture, Minerva. 518-251-4622.

North Countryman, Valley News, The Burgh

83704

FREE TO Good Home - 3 Outdoor Dogs, 1 Indoor Dog. All up-to-date on shots. 518-5973856.

83554

“We’re more than a newspaper...We’re a community service!

Help Wanted

Need a job? Looking for that “right fit” for your company?

Find what you’re looking for here!

85227

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES INVESTORS - OUTSTANDING and immediate returns in equipment leasing for frac industry. Immediate lease out. Tax benefits and high returns. We need more equipment! 817-926-3535

EMPLOYMENT WANTED 1000 ENVELOPES=$5000. Receive $3-$5 each envelope stuffed with our sales material. Free information 24 hour recorded message. 800-471-9524

HELP WANTED ** ABLE TO TRAVEL ** Hiring 10 people, Free to travel all states, resort areas. No experience necessary. Paid training & Transportation. OVER 18. Start ASAP. 1-888-853-8411 2011 POSTAL Positions $13.00-$36.50+/hr., Federal hire/full benefits. Call Today! 1-866-477-4953 Ext. 150 BLUE JEAN Job!! Hiring Sharp/Fun People! Free to travel entire United States. Company paid Lodging/Transportation. Great pay + Bonuses. Get Hired Today. Work Tomorrow! 1-888-853-8411

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS - $150-$300/Day depending on job. No experience. All looks needed. 1-800-281-5185-A103 ATTENTION! UP TO $2,143 TO $4,286/MONTH Part/Full-Time Simply Processing Refunds of Unclaimed Money for Our Company. No Experience & No Special Computer Skills Required! www.UnclaimedMoneyProcessors.com EARN $1000’S WEEKLY Receive $12 every envelope Stuffed with sales materials. 24-hr. Information 1-800-682-5439 code 14 LOCAL DATA entry/typists needed immediately. $400PT - $800FT weekly. Flex-ible schedule, work from own PC. 1-800-5162588

FEDERAL POSTAL JOBS! Earn $12 - $48 per hour/No Experience. Full Benefits/Paid Training. 1-866-477-4953, Ext. 131. NOW HIRING!!

HELP WANTED/LOCAL

MAKE $1,500 WEEKLY* NOW ACCEPTING!!! AT HOME computer work. Start making money today by simply entering data for our company. No Experience Needed, training provided. www.MyDataEntryJob.com

MARINE AND outdoor products manufacturer is seeking an experienced individual to establish a complete marketing plan for multiple products in a variety of markets. This would include establishing dealers, setting up trade shows, planning web sites and catalogs, and more. Marketing to be direct and targeted methods - not general public. Only a self motivated, organized, team oriented individual with creative skills need apply. We need your expertise to promote our established marine product line along with new

MYSTERY SHOPPERS! Earn up to $150 daily. Get paid to shop pt/ft. Call now 800690-1272. PROCESS MAIL! Pay Weekly! FREE Supplies! Bonuses! Genuine! Helping Homeworkers since 1992! Call 1-888-3021522 www.howtowork-fromhome.com

products for the canoe and kayak industry. Competitive pay, benefits. Send resume to The Dock Doctors, 19 Little Otter Lane, Ferrisburg, VT 05456 or email to lynn@thedockdoctors.com.

5 pictures even video is FREE !

Classified Superstore

Your Free ADs Appear online. www.denpubs.com


August 3, 2011

Green Mountain Outlook - 15

www.gmoutlook.com

Real Estate

Need a home? Looking for someone to fill that vacancy?

Find what you’re looking for here!

85226

APARTMENT FOR RENT 2 BEDROOM Apartment in Port Henry, $450$500, plus heat and utilities. Call 802-363— 3341 or 518-942-8038.

HOME IMPROVEMENT VINYL DECK rails, no end post enough for 6 ft. $10 for all. call 518-594-7746

HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED? Contact Woodford Bros., Inc. for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1800-OLD-BARN, www.woodfordbros.com, MAHIC#155877; CTHIC#571557; RICRB#22078

MOBILE HOME FOR RENT FOR RENT, Two BR Mobile Home, Bristol Notch. $700 per month. 802-377-8290.

REAL ESTATE ***FREE FORECLOSURE Listings*** OVER 400,000 properties nationwide. Low down payment. Call now 800-250-2043. 20 ACRE LAND FORECLOSURES. $0 Down, Take Over $99/mo. Was $16,900 Now $12,900! Near Growing El Paso Texas. Beautiful Views, Owner Financing, Money Back Guarantee. Free Color Brochure 1-800-843-7537

20 ACRE Ranch FORECLOSURES! Near Booming El Paso, TX. Was $16,900. Now $12,900. $0 Down, take over payments $99/mo. Beautiful views, owner financing. FREE map/pictures. 1-800-755-8953

TENNESSEE CLOSEOUT SALE- Smoky Mtn/Cherokee Lake properties. 1/2acre1.18acre. Preview 8/13-8/14. Sale 8/208/21. Financing. 1-877-644-4647; 865-5996550

AVAILABLE NOW!!! 2-4 Bedroom homes Take Over Payments No Money Down/No Credit Check Call 1-888-269-9192

TIMESHARES

STOP RENTING Lease option to buy. Rent to own No money down No credit check. 1877-395-0321

ASK YOURSELF, what is your TIMESHARE worth? We will find a buyer/renter for CA$H. NO GIMMICKS JUST RESULTS! www.BuyATimeshare.com Call 888-8797165

VACATION/ RECREATIONAL RENTALS FOR RENT: One week at the largest timeshare in the world. Orange Lake is right next to Disney and has many amenities including golf, tennis, and a water park. Weeks available are in March and April 2012. $850 inclusive. Call Carol at 978-371-2442 or email: carolaction@aol.com

Automotive

Need an auto? Need someone to take that auto off your hands?

Find what you’re looking for here!

85228

AUTO ACCESSORIES

FARM EQUIPMENT

TONNEAU COVER for a small truck $99. 518-523-9456

1964 FORD 4000 4cyl., gas. Industrial loader & Industrial Front End, 12 spd. Sherman Transmission, pie weights, 3 pt. hitch & PTO. $5600. 518-962-2376

$500-$1000/DAY For answering the phone? You bet. No selling, no MLM, no products to buy, no kidding! Call 800-658-5821. IRS approved. 13’ FIBERGLASS St-Maurice Boat, one dent- still serviceable, $50. Piercefield 518359-2558. SUNFISH COMPONENTS - Mast, Sale & Rudder, excellent condition, $35. 518-5478383. Leave Telephone # Clearly.

UTILITY TRAILER 10’ USED TO HAUL 2 BIKES, HAS RAMP AND TIE DOWNS, LIKE NEW $1000.00 919-271-9819 LOCATED IN CHESTERTOWN

AUTO DONATIONS

MOTORCYCLE/ ATV WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLES KAWASAKI 1970-1980 Z1-900, KZ900, KZ 1000, H2-750, H1-500, S1-250, S2-250, S2350, S3-400 CASH. 1-800-772-1142, 1310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com 1998 HD Road King Classic FLHRC1

(518) 642-3167 Fax (518) 642-3039

Used Auto Parts • Free Nationwide Parts Locating Service Always Buying Cars & Trucks • Call for Pricing (Free Towing) Free Estimates • PPG Paint Mixing On Site • Frame Repairs Auto Glass Replacement • 100% Warranty • Free Body Estimates

WHEELZ

OVER 2000

NEW TIRES TOO!!!

CALL US : 800-989-4237

I-91, Exit 8, Ascutney, VT 00036

802-674-5600

L OANS A VAILABLE NO CREDIT? BAD CREDIT? BANKRUPTCY?

Boldest

&Best

www.denpubs.com

Broken-in Tires

MANY SETS OF 4

Classifieds in the REGION !

7311 State Route 22 Granville, NY 12832 6 Miles South of Granville on Route 22

Autobody Repairs • Mechanical Services

CANON TIRE

BUSIEST

alley A utomoti ve eV L t a

Sl

Servicing All Makes and Models with Honesty & Integrity

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE LOVE IN THE NAME OF CHRIST. Free Towing & NonRunners Accepted. 800-549-2791 Help Us Transform Lives In The Name Of Christ.

DONATE YOUR CAR. FREE TOWING. “Cars for Kids”. Any condition. Tax deductible outreachcenter.com, 1-800-597-9411

LC

FREE ESTIMATES ON COLLISION REPAIRS WE CAN SAVE ALL OR PART OF YOUR DEDUCTIBLE!

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We’re Local! 7 Days/Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-416-2330

DONATE A CAR To Help Children and Their Families Suffering From Cancer. Free Towing. Tax Deductible. Children’s Cancer Fund Of America, Inc. www.ccfoa.org 1-800469-8593

78504

BOATS

Anniversary Edition, Low Mileage, HD Jack, Traveling Bags, Lots of extra’s. $8500 OBO. 518-834-5439

Hometown Chevrolet Oldsmobile 152 Broadway Whitehall, NY • (518) 499-288 6• Ask for Joe

92450

Nutting’s

Wholesale WholesaleInc.

542 SOLD SO FAR!

THESE QUALITY PRE-OWNED BEAUTIES ARE HERE NOW!!!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9 - 6, Sat. 9 - 4, Closed Sun.

Used Cars and Trucks at Wholesale Prices

363 West St., Rutland, VT • 802-775-0091

2000 VW Jetta............................................$3,295 2005 Subaru Impreza RS.........................$3,495 2001 Ford Escape AWD............................$3,995 1988 Dodge 3/4 Ton Pickup 4x4.............$1,395 2000 Dodge Durango 4x4........................$2,995 1999 Ford Explorer 4x4...........................$2,495 1997 Ford Ranger 4x4 Ext. Cab..............$3,695 2000 Dodge Ram Pickup 4x4 Ext. Cab. .$3,995 1999 Ford F150 4x4.................................$2,495 1992 BMW 321i........................................$1,995 2000 Jeep Cherokee 4x4..........................$2,995 1997 Volvo..................................................$1,695 2002 Mercury Cougar V6, Auto................$2,495 2001 Dodge Ram 4x4 Pickup..................$2,795 2000 Dodge Durango 4x4 Pewter............$1,995 2007 Ford F150 4x4 V8, Auto................$13,995 2002 Chevy 4x4 Ext. Cab Green..............$5,995 2002 Saturn SC2 Red...............................$2,995 2000 Honda Civic Green...........................$1,995 1998 Subaru Legacy Wagon Red.............$2,495 2000 Chevy S10 Blazer 4x4 Pewter. . . . . . . .$2,995 1999 Volvo V70 AWD Wagon Green........$1,995 2000 Mercedes E-Class Wagon...............$2,995 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee Black, Nice. . .$2,795 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee Black............$3,995 2001 Ford F150 4x4 4 Door, V8, Auto, Blue. .$4,995 1998 Ford F150 4x4 Maroon....................$2,695 1997 Chrysler Concord V6, Auto, Blue.....$1,995 2002 Ford Taurus Wagon.........................$2,495 1999 Ford Explorer 4x4...........................$2,495 2000 Pontiac Grand Am GT.....................$2,995 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4x4..............$1,695 2001 Ford Focus........................................$2,495 2002 Mercury Sable..................................$2,495 2002 Vovlvo XC70 AWD............................$4,995 1999 Chrysler 300M.................................$1,995 1998 Ford F150 Extra Cab 4x2...............$2,495 2002 Dodge Caravan V6, Auto, Gold........$2,995 2002 Isuzu Rodeo 70,000 Miles, Custom Paint. $2,995 1999 Subaru Legacy Wagon AWD...........$1,795 1998 Subaru Legacy AWD Wagon...........$2,495 2003 Subaru Baja 4 Door, AWD, Pickup...$5,995 1999 Ford F150 Extra Cab 4x4 Green. . .$3,495 2002 Chevy S10 Blazer 4x4 Pewter........$2,995 1996 Ford Aspire 78,000 Miles.....................$995 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Purple, 4x4.............................................................$1,795

15,995

$

Luxury Cruising with 30 MPG!!! Only 23,000 Miles

Sold & Serviced Here, Only 56,000 Miles

11,995

$

SOLDseating, only 7,000 miles. .$18,995 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan - Sto-N-Go SOLD 2010 Dodge Caliber SXT - Full power, only 16,000 miles..............$16,995 2002 Jeep Liberty Sport - 4WD, 4 Cyl., Auto...................................$6,995 2009 Dodge Journey SXT - Full power, 19,000 miles....................$18,995 2008 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT - Quad cab, 4WD, 50,000 miles.......$21,995 2007 Jeep Liberty Sport - 4WD, auto, 43,000 miles.....................$15,995 2006 Chrysler Town & Country Touring - 1-owner......................$10,995 2005 Chrysler Town & Country LX - 62,000 miles..........................$9,995 SOLD 2008 Chrysler Town & Country Touring - 1-owner, rear DVD, has it all!.....$17,995 2007 Chrysler Sebring - 30 MPG, pretty blue..................................$8,995 SOLDmiles................................$14,995 2006 Jeep Liberty Sport - Only 34,000 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee - Rust free, nice...................................$8,450 2004 Jeep Liberty - Super value here!..............................................$7,995 2007 Chrysler Sebring LX - Only 49,000 miles!............................$10,995 2008 Dodge Ram 1500 - 2WD, reg. cab, work truck, 6 cyl., just 15,000 miles......................................................................................$14,995

74561

See our new web site...www.wheelzwholesaleinc.com

2008 Chrysler Sebring Convertible 2003 Dodge Ram 2500 HD SLT

74558

2000 Ford Windstar Van V6, Loaded, Blue...........................................................$2,695 2002 Ford Windstar Van...........................$3,295 2001 VW Jetta 1 Owner.............................$4,995 1998 Nissan Altima...................................$2,995 2002 Chrysler Sebring Convertible...........$3,495 2001 Ford Windstar Van 1 Owner............$2,495 2002 Nissan Sentra...................................$2,495 2002 Pontiac Grand Am GT.....................$2,995 2000 Daewoo 4 Door, Black.......................$2,495 1998 Chevrolet Lumina............................$1,995 1999 Mazda 626 Green, Automatic..........$2,495 2001 Pontiac Grand Am GT Silver...........$2,495 1993 GMC Conversion Van.......................$2,495 1998 BMW 740iA Leather, Top of the Line............................$3,995 2001 Subaru Forester AWD.....................$3,495 1999 Dodge Durango Blue, 4x4................$1,995 1998 Dodge Neon Like New, Automatic. . . .$2,495 1998 GMC Cargo Van Extra Long.............$2,195 1992 Volvo Station Wagon.......................$1,995 1997 Dodge Caravan Maroon...................$2,995 1999 VW Passat........................................$2,995 2005 Pontiac Montana Van......................$3,495 2003 Dodge Conversion Van Maroon.......$3,995 1988 Jeep Cherokee Red, Auto, 4x4............$895 2005 Chevy Impala....................................$4,995 2001 Mercury Mountaineer 4x4..............$2,995 2001 Subaru Legacy Wagon AWD...........$2,995 2003 Chevy Trailblazer 4x4......................$6,995 1998 Pontiac Grand Am 2 Door, Auto......$1,895 1997 Buick Skylark 63,000 Miles.................$995 2003 Chevy Malibu....................................$3,995 1999 Chevy S-10 Blazer 4x4...................$1,995 2004 Volvo S-80 4-Door............................$4,995 1997 Toyota Celica....................................$2,995 1998 Dodge Ext. Cab 4x4........................$2,995 2001 Dodge Ext. Cab 4x4 Red.................$2,995 1996 Dodge Ram 4x4 Pickup 60,000 Miles..............................................$2,995 2001 Chevy S-10 Ext. Cab 4x4 Blue. . . . . . .$3.495 2002 Subaru Forester...............................$2,995 2002 Buick Rendezvous...........................$4,995 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee......................$2,695 1994 Jeep Grand Cherokee......................$1,695 2003 Ford Escape AWD............................$4,995 1997 Plymouth Breeze..............................$1,995


www.gmoutlook.com

August 3, 2011

86028

16 - Green Mountain Outlook

GM_08-06-2011_Edition  

Frank G. Miglo- rie PARTS SALES SERVICE Visit Us Online at www.gmoutlook.com • Subscribe to our eEdition, simply go to www.denpubs.com/eEdit...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you