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Vol. 3 No. 13 • March 30, 2011

Community News, Sports, Arts, Entertainment and Food for Rutland and Southern Vermont

Officials Science Fair meet for high-speed rail plan

Living with high water

Western Corridor project in Vermont

By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com RUTLAND — U.S. Rep. Peter Welch (D) and Gov. Peter Shumlin (D) were in downtown Rutland March 28 to welcome the nation’s top rail of ficial. The V ermont delegation hosted the top-level meeting at the Franklin Confer ence Center in the Howe Center. The ef fort was a public display of support for the so-called W estern Corridor High-Speed Rail project and or ganized by the two Vermont D emocrats. This multi-million dollar project, if it is built, will be funded entir ely by U.S. taxpayer funds. Joining W elch and Shumlin in Rutland was Deputy Administrator of the Federal Railr oad Administration Kar en Rae. She is r esponsible for managing the Obama administration’s national rail policy. Preliminary to the event at Rutland’s Amtrak station and railyar d was a discussion by W elch, Shumlin and Rae r egarding Vermont’s securing the federal dollars needed for the new rail line that would r un fr om Bennington to Burlington. Welch has spoken out in favor of the pricey project since it was first proposed by Pr esident Obama. He was responsible for inviting Rae to visit Rutland and meeting a gr oup of enthusiastic local rail supporters downtown. After the meeting, Rae joined Welch and Shumlin to visit W estminster Cracker. The Rutland business has become somewhat of a local poster child f or r ail u se i n Vermont. Omya officials also met Rae. Omya, which See RAIL PLAN, page 9

THIS WEEK Pets of the Week ..........2 China visit ....................3 Rusty Dewees ..............4 Event Calendar ..............12 Classifieds....................13,14 Auto Zone ....................15,16

FUTURE SCIENTISTS — Ror y Cuerdon, 7th g rader, and Wyeth Olmsted, 8th g rader, were Upper S chool students of the private Grammar School who had a chance to explore the scientific method last week. The students joined others for the Upper School Science Fair. Students performed experiments on subjects from aviation to the Doppler eff ect. These future scientists w ere under the guidanc e of Head of School Mac Oglesby. Photos by Mary Heller Osgood

Jim Harrison, a Town of Middlebury Public Works Department employee, set out high- water and r oad-closed signs on Cr eek Road, along flooded Otter Creek, last week. Photos by Lou Varricchio

Annual Otter Creek flooding

By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com RUTLAND — News stories about flooding in Vermont are legion. From the infamous Rutland Flood of 1895 to the Great Vermont Flood of 1927, betting on local str eams reaching or surpassing the p revious y ear ’s h igh water mark is somewhat of a local sport. Among Vermont’s most rascally rivers—at least when it comes to spilling its banks—is the 1 2-mile-long, north flowing Otter Creek. See FLOODING, page 9

BRGNS settles into new home

Black River Good Neighbor Services LUDLOW — Over 100 people joined the employees and volunteers for the ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration at Black River Good Neighbor Services on Saturday, March 12. State Sen. Alice Nitka, along with Representatives Denis Devereux and Ernie Shand and Ludlow Selectboar dman Bruce Schmidt joined residents from all of the towns that BRGNS serves. State and local officials celebrated the opening of the new Black River Good Neighbor Services center in Also in attendance were key partners of BRGNS, Ludlow. Photo by Lou Varricchio

See BRGNS, page 12

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2 - Green Mountain Outlook

The Outlook’s TRIVIA Question Of The Week! •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Ques. 1

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In 1988, For The First Time, The Same University Won Both The Men’s & Women’s National Collegiate All Sports Title, Which Combines The Rankings Of The Schools In A Wide Variety Of Sports. Was It Oklahoma, Texas Or UCLA?

•••Answers Appear On The Puzzle Page ••• 72961

PITTSFORD — Animal lovers are invited to come to the 5th annual Rutland County Humane Society (RCHS) “Spring for the Animals” auction on Thursday, April 7, at the Rutland Country Club. Tickets for the 5:30–7:30 event are $25 and include hors d’oeuvres, a beverage and live music by W oodchucks’ Revenge. Over 130 fun and practical items have already been donated including gift certificates, art, jewelry, lift tickets, services and mor e. If you have a new item you would like to donate to help the homeless animals please call 483-9171 today.

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Tickets for the “Spring for the Animals” auction can be purchased at RCHS at 765 Stevens Rd. in Pittsfor d or at the Pet Cage at 97 Cr escent St. in Rutland. Space is limited so make your plans, invite your friends to join you and pur chase your tickets soon. An online preview of the items as well as the opportunity to bid online is available at the or ganization’s website, www.rchsvt.org. Online bidding is underway now. All proceeds from the auc-

tion, as well as other fund-raising events, support the animals and pr ograms at the Rutland County Humane Society . Founded in 1959, for over 50 years, the Rutland County Humane Society has been dedicated to advocating for and working towards a responsible and humane community. RCHS pr ovides shelter and adoption opportunities for pets who ar e homeless and pr omotes animal welfar e thr ough community programs that benefit both animals and people.

Rutland Home & Rec Show, April 2 RUTLAND —The Home Builders and Remodelers Association of Southern Vermont returns to the Rutland area for the 14th Annual Home and Recreation Show. This year’s free show will be held on Saturday, April 2, 9 a.m. -3 p.m., at Spartan Arena located behind Diamond Run Mall on U.S. Route7 in Rutland. The arena is accessed through the mall. Organizers will of fer 30-minute workshops during the event: 9 a.m.: “Psychology of Color” pr esented by Ruxana Oosman sponsored by Sherwin Williams Co. Paints. 10 a.m.: “The Decision to Build or Remodel”

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building and r emodeling for optimum enjoyment and r esults pr esented by Linda LaCr oix, PhD, CGP, of Aspen Construction Services. 11 a.m.: “Home Energy Savings” presented by Brian Harrington of Harrington Custom Building. Noon: “Learn About Marvin Replacement Windows” presented by Ethan Foster of Marvin Windows and Doors. 1 p.m.: “Gr owing Your Gar den in a Box” presented by Daryle Thomas, a Master Gardener (EMG, EMC). Admission is free.To be a part of the show, reserve booth space by calling 802-773-0672.

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March 30, 2011

Green Mountain Outlook - 3

www.gmoutlook.com

Chamber executives visits China

Officials representing several New England chambers of c ommerce returned from a recent trade mission t o China. P ictured are Marji Graf of the Okemo Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce in Ludlow, Tricia Cunningham of Greater Mystic, Conn., Chamber of Commerce, Lisa Konicki, of the Greater Westerly Pawcatuck, R.I., Area Chamber of Commerce, and Kelly Clark of the Cambridge, Mass., Chamber of Commerce. Photo courtesy of Okemo Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce

By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com LUDLOW — More than 40 executives fr om several U.S. chambers of

commerce, including Vermont, visited four Chinese cities earlier this month as part of a business mission. Joining the junket was Marji Graf of the Okemo Valley Chamber of Commerce i n L udlow. T he t rip i ncluded

sightseeing and business meetings. “We visited cities on the east coast of China: Beijing, Suzhou, Hangzhou, and Shanghai,” said Graf. “W e saw the high end, middle and very poor low end. We toured a pearl factory, a jade factory, a silk r ug factory and a tea plantation.” According to Graf, chamber executives received an introduction to Chinese cultur e, geography and commerce. “The Hangzhou Municipal Government hosted a banquet dinner for us,” she said. “It was very formal and we met with Janet Zhu, vice pr esident of the Hangzhou Municipal For eign Trade and Economic Cooperation Bureau, (Communist) Party Secr etary Hang Qing Hun, Jonathan Zhang of the Hangzhou Economic and Technological Development Area, Wei Gao, the pr oject dir ector of for eign trade, Hu Liya, pr oject of ficer and T ong Gull, deputy mayor of Hangzhou.” Graf said that she learned that most foreign investment is in coastal China. Residents along the coast are supposedly mor e educated and have a higher standard of living. Unlike America’s declining industrial base, China’s industry is 45 percent of GDP with services at 40 per-

cent—India being stronger. Graf noted that China’s philosophy of customer service is different from America’s. “American: Early bir ds get the worm. Chinese” The first bird in the flock gets shot. Don't stand out in a crowd. Generation Y is different, too. It’s message me on my terms.” Graf said that China is a r elative newcomer to the Internet. It’s earliest online presence was in late. Not unlike the U.S. China also has a growing disparity between rich and poor. “This was a very fast-paced trip, Graf said. “Our first full day was in Beijing where we visited Tiananmen Square and the Palace Museum, also known as the Forbidden City. We had a rickshaw ride thr ough old Bejing and l unch a t a l ocal f amilies h ouse which was delicious. We visited The summer palace, Kumming Lake, Longevity Hill, Seventeen-ar ch bridge and Marble boat.” Graf said one of her favorite highlights of the trip was a visit to the Temple of Heaven built in 1420 A.D. “I climbed the right side of the Great Wall to the end. The wall is 4,000 miles long and 2,000 years old. The steps were uneven with some

higher than others. We all got a great workout. We also visited one of the 13 Ming Emporer Tombs,” she said. The remaining days of the chamber junket included visits to Shanghai, Suzhou, Hangzhou with the highlight evening banquet at the Hangzhou World Trade Center. “It was grand,” Graf added. “W e were welcomed and had a power point presentation about investing in Hangzhou. The city has been the fastest growing city over the last 1015 years. The government will bend over backwar ds for for eign investment. I was invited to sit at the head table and made valuable contacts.” Graf said the same trip—without the business meetings— will be r epeated March 26, 2012, for $2,200 all inclusive. Chamber members and other ar ea r esidents ar e welcome to sign up. This May 16, the Okemo Chamber will hold a China orientation for those interested in travelling with chamber staff and members. “You don’t have to be a Chamber member to participate,” Graf said. For more details, visit the Okemo Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce, 57 Pond St., Suite 8, in Ludlow or call the office at 802-228-5830.

Middlebury girl wins state spelling bee By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com

MIDDLEBURY — Sixth-grader Meigan Clark of the Mary Hogan Elementary School in Middlebury became the ermont V state spelling champ on March 16. She successfully spelled the wor d “scurrilous”— making or spreading scandalous claims about someone—at the Vermont State Individual Spelling Bee competition held at the McCarthy Arts Center at St. Michael’s College in Colchester. In the end, Clark outdid her closest competitor Samantha Storz of Kirby, a student at the Stevens School of Peacham, in the 31st round. When Storz stumbled on spelling the wor d “manteau”—a loose cloak or mantle—Clark became the victor. Clark was the winner of a new laptop, a trophy, and the chance to attend the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., held in May. The bee was sponsored by the Vermont Department of Education, Vermont Principals’ Association, Vermont Humanities Council, St. Michael’s College, Burlington Free Press, FairPoint Communications and Dunkin Donuts. Elementary and middle school students (thr ough grade 8) under the age of 16 were eligible to participate in this competition. Students from across Vermont who participated in the bee have already competed in their regional bees this winter. All of the 42 students who compete in the national spelling bee will receive cash prizes ranging fr om $50 to the $12,000 championship prize.

Following her Vermont victory, Clark began pr eparing for the national b ee i n Washington. T he b ig e vent w ill i nclude a m uch longer and more complex list of words. Can you spell s-t-r-e-s-s-e-d?

2011 Vermont State Spelling Bee Participants Albany Community School — Gratia Rowell Albert D Lawton Intermediate School — Kathleen Young Barnard Academy — Julia Gouvin-Moffat Blue Mountain Union School — Lauren Lamberton Bridport Central School — Joanna Barrett Brighton Elementary School — Coopere Densmore Camels Hump Middle School — Jonathan Fisher Charlotte Central School — Abigail Postlewaite Christ The King School — Sophia Moore-Smith Craftsbury Academy — Mael Lescouezec Crossett Brook Middle School — Evan Ostler Danville School — Merlin Gil Edmunds Middle School — Isaiah Mindich Flood Brook Union 20 Elementary School — Raye Cleary Hartland Elementary School — Georgia Sparks Harwood Union Middle/high School — Nina Sklar Lyndon Town School — Lucinda Storz Main Street Middle School — Laura Cassetty Mary Hogan School — Meigan Clark Mater Christi School — Marisa Sylvester Mill River Union High School — Elijah Burch

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4 - Green Mountain Outlook

March 30, 2011

www.gmoutlook.com

Opinion Viewpoint

From the Editor

A local tragedy

L

ast week, horrible news hit the towns of Starksboro and Bristol, Vt., like the proverbial ton of bricks. It was reported that a young music teacher at both the Robinson and Bristol elementary schools, has been charged by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation with allegedly distributing child pornography. In both towns, we understand, parents and others are understandably disturbed, angry and worried, about the safety of their children in these communities. Public school teacher Will Parini, 28, has been charged by the FBI with allegedly distributing digital child pornography images on the Internet. Federal agents allege that Mr. Parini’s e-mails included nude images of boys and girls, as well as others showing children in sex acts with adults. Mr. Parini was suspended from school after the FBI news broke last week. He is now free and living in the area until his court date. Child pornography is a big business these days. It is a slithering, shadowy Hydra that is simply not going away any time soon. According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, child pornography is a multi-billion dollar industry in the U.S. alone. It was among the fastest growing criminal segments on the Internet in 2010. The FBI report alleges that Mr. Parini used an online alias, “Bill Monday,” in online exchanges. He allegedly posted an online comment remarking—”Beautiful photos! If I find any more good stuff I will send it... do you like girls too?” If this is found to be true in court, it’s certainly damning evidence. Yet there’s some good news to come out of the FBI investigation: none of the children in the seized photographs appear to be Vermont youngsters. But let’s be fair—before there’s a rush to judge this teacher, let’s remember that he is innocent until proven guilty. We heard a parent ask, “what lessons are we teaching our kids here?” Well, how about the presumption of innocence? This should be among the lessons that can be taught to the children of Starksboro and Bristol

We don’t need no stinkin’ payback

when they wonder what happened to their music instructor. In America, a person is innocent until proven guilty. Awaiting trail, Mr. Parini is still a part of our community under the rule of law. And that’s why he needs to be treated, first, as an innocent man. In America’s legal system, the presumption of innocence must be foremost. It is the first legal right of the accused in any criminal trial. Without it, the law breaks down and we become a mob. The burden of proof is now with the FBI. Government prosecutors will have to present compelling evidence to convince the jury. What that said, this is also not the time to point fingers at school administrators or other teachers for any perceived failures. Yes, parents in Starksboro of Bristol feel violated, but they need to learn more about the FBI’s claims. That is why the court will decide this matter. Since first viewing Alfred Hitchcock’s 1957 film “The Wrong Man”—based on a true episode of an innocent man charged for a crime he did not commit—I have found myself being thankful for ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat, the legal idea that you and me are considered innocent until proven guilty. How this case unfolds will be painful for everyone. If convicted, Mr. Parini could face up to 25 years in prison. If found innocent, he would likely have to endure the side glances and gossip of community members for years to come. It’s worth pausing and extracting what wisdom there is in an ancient and often overlooked Jewish poem, Psalm 109. This psalm has been read for centuries by both the guilty and the innocent. In it can be heard the anguish of victims and the heartbreak of the accused. Lou Varricchio

Submit letters to Lou Varricchio at lou@addison-eagle.com.

ONTHEWEB View articles past and present, or place an ad! Visit our Web site at www.gmoutlook.com.

L

ong before credentialing became a recognized economic profit center (a non-productivity-based benefit for those who persuade government to license their own activity while preventing competition from the — ugh — unregulated) there were all sorts of activities which were profitable to their practitioners on the basis of supply and demand and value received. Think back to our IceAge ancestors, some of whom made a living by bringing home venison chunks or fish steaks, both of which activities ar e now practiced as much (or more ) for expensive fun as for survival and pr ofit, and, of course, ar e now permitted by government only when a credential is issued. Over the years, taxi drivers and ar chitects, hair dressers and attorneys, landscapers and doctors, have all used cr edentialing for their guild members’ own economic benefit, while declaring piously, of course, that it’s all for the public good. In the once-famous Bogart movie, Treasure of the Sierra Madr e, the r emembered line comes from the bandits posing as State Police who, when asked to display their badges, r eplied with the “we don’t need to show you no stinkin’ badges” line while seeking to enforce their brand of taxation (profit-sharing, if you pr efer) by pr etension to governmental lethal force. Sixtythree years later , the pr evalence of cr edentialing, badges, and regulation is a lot more accepted and visible, while the nowdeemed-archaic-and-unworthy pursuit of profit (or payback, if you disdain the original P-word) is a lot less so. Minor case in point: the new effort by Vermont’s Golden-Domers to tax e-bookseller Amazon, not because it would raise government revenues noticeably (its sponsors concede that point), but because it would advance r egulatory r each and the pursuit of “fairness.” The notion of achieving r e-distributive fairness by removing the sales tax on in-state book vendors wasn’t even contemplated — maybe the Golden Domers aren’t as dismissive of income as they pr etend. There’s a pair of major cases-in-point as well, and they have a mutually share d (a little sensitivity lingo, ther e) commonality of

interest: one is the enviro nmentalist fascination with green roofs and energy conservation, and the other is the suburbanite fascination with gr ow-your-own and farmers’ markets. The former is mostly advocated for large-scale, flat-roof big-box construction of retail, industrial, commer cial, or academic purpose, and has long been argued on energy-cost-reduction (payback) gr ounds; the latter is mostly advocated for small-scale growers (indeed, in some cir cles it’s called the lawns-to-gar dens movement) and has long been ar gued on envir onmental-purity, product-quality and localloyalty gr ounds. Indeed, its enthusiasts generally concede the economic pr ofitability gr ounds (except for that barely 20 per cent of the consumer market which cheerfully pays top price for organic gr een beans) to the mor e cost-effective lar ge-scale growers and retailers. Now, it turns out, the green-roofs argument is shifting away from payback in any economic sense of return-on-investment and towards the same sets of supposedly higher -morality objectives long identified by the local-vor e argument. I heard the more polite version of “we don’t need to show you no stinkin’ payback” ar gument while attending a r ecent week-long series of engineering-r elated seminars at the Baltimore Convention Center, itself the mar ginally profitable municipal investment counterpart to the mor e expensive (but mostly federally-funded) har bor re-development, which has gentrified a one-time wharves-and-slums water -front with such esthetic attractions as the USS Constellation (historical and unpr ofitable) and the Hooters’ restaurant concession (uplifting and profitable). At the gr een-roofs/vertical-gardens classes, the instructor emphasis once aimed at payback-calculations based on ener gyuse reductions was now aimed at the intangibles of reducing the carbon footprint and using the ar chitecture to convey a suitably enviro-sensitive owner image. It was a long-awaited concession that green-roof constr uction is substantially more str uctural demanding (and ther efore expensive) than non-gr een-roof constr uction, and that growing foodstuffs on a raised acre where hand-labor-replacing tractors see MARTIN HARRIS, page 8

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I

The dinner party

could scrawl about America’s newest war, rising gas prices, Japanese suffering, sugaring, but I know you haven’t been reading enough about sugaring already, mud, spring, and blah, blah. All stuff you’d expect, right? Instead, I’m going to write about something that is much less topical. How excited I am to be going to a dinner party tonight! Why am I excited about the dinner party? Because I rarely get asked to attend them. When I was a youngster, my parents had people over a lot. Let’s say, a couple times a month. Is that a lot? I don’t know. It would be a lot for me. The number of parties I’ve had this year to date, and adding what I’ll have through the end of the year, comes to eight. That’s less than one per month. Of the eight or so parties I’ll throw, the approximate total of folks attending will be somewhere at 50. If we’re getting close to being a third of the way through the year, my invite total at the end of 2011 will stand at three. That leaves 47 folks who attended one of my parties who aren’t hitting me back with a return invite. Eight parties might not be much entertaining, but gauging myself against my close friends, I’m a regular Martha, rather, Marty Stewart. It’s hard to know if there are lots of dinner parties going on and I’m just not being invited, or if it’s just that there aren’t many dinner parties being held. It’s said that if you want to get a letter, you have to send a letter. I agree. But jeez, the percentage of return invites, to invites, is paltry in my case. That’s why I’m excited about tonight. I’m also excited ‘cause the husband of the couple’s house I’m invited to is reportedly a great cook. And when

I’m lucky enough to be invited to a dinner, I take it very seriously. I had a tiny lunch, I didn’t have breakfast, and will walk with extra vigor later to make sure I’m extra hungry. I’m a good guest. You have me over and keep asking, “Would you like some more?” I’ll answer, “Why yes, thank you.” Maybe I just stumbled upon the reason I don’t get invited often. Nah, generally we Americans lean toward over doing, and in the case of eating a meal made with great care at your house, I’ll oblige to over do. Am I cheap and trying to be a mooch? Nope. I’m just wanting to make sure you know I’m very happy to be a guest. If you need help cleaning up, I’ll help, if you ask. I’m not going to offer. That’s just a joke, I’ll offer, I was brought up well. But I assume you want me to sit around, relax, and chat, the same as I’d want you to do at a party of mine. So I’ve little fear my offer to help will be accepted anyway. Odd topic for a column, but last night I was thinking about the imbalance of my personal statistics on party throwing, to invites, and wondered if in-home social get togethers are things of the past. I came to the conclusion that I can’t conclude, because who knows if there aren’t many parties, or if I’m just not getting invited. Oh, well, not sure it matters either way. Actually, I’m sure it doesn’t matter if the answer is I’m just not getting invited, because when I want to be around folks chatting and eating, I have my own party. But I’d think if the answer is there are less dinner parties being thrown, it’s an unfortunate trend. see THE LOGGER, page 8


March 30, 2011

Green Mountain Outlook - 5

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News of the Week

Middlebury student found in Syria By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com MIDDLEBURY — A Middlebury College student who had been r eported missing in r ebellion-torn Syria was found in the custody of Syrian authorities over the weekend, his father reported. Pathik "T ik" Root, 21, of Ripton, was last heard from March 16. The Middlebury junior was studying Arabic overseas. He had been involved with anti-government pr otests in Egypt during the antiPathik "Tik" Root. Mubaric uprisings earlier this year. Root resumed his studies in Damascus, Syria’s second largest city and a hub of the anti-government pr otests there. Several of Root’s Middle East photographs appeared in a recent issue of the Middlebury campus magazine; the images accompanied a news article about the Middlebury College students who wer e evacuated fr om Alexandria, Egypt. Root’s video footage of the 201 1 Egypt uprisings appeared internationally on CNN-TV in January. Being visible in the news media, he may have been pegged as an anti-government sympathizer in Syria. College officials released a statement about the missing student: “Everyone at the college is anxious to hear that Tik is safe, and we look forwar d to receiving word when his family hears more about his status.” In an e-mail to the campus community , college President Ronald Liebowitz wrote that “the college is doing everything it can to assist in the effort to locate Tik.” He noted that he had of fered his support to Root’s par ents and promised to keep the campus updated if cir cumstances changed. According to Root family members, a U.S. State Department official said Root is most likely being held by Syrian authorities. That turned out to be the case, and family members wer e working closely with the Syrian embassy in Washington to expedite his release. Prior to the news that Pathik was being held by Syrian authorities, Andi Lloyd and Tom Root, the student’s parents, released their public comments through Middlebury College: “We are very grateful for everyone’s concern and thoughts, but our energy at this time is fully committed to bringing our son home. We will therefore not be able to do any interviews at this time.” Tom Root, the missing student’s father, is a biology professor at the college. According to college of ficials, emer gency law in Syria has suspended most constitutional pr otections and the government may conduct arrests without arrest warrants. Middlebury College continues to send students into the most violent ar eas of the Middle East. The college announced earlier in the month that it has established an academic program in Jor dan, part of its C.V . Starr-Middlebury School Abroad. Located in Amman and affiliated with the University of Jordan, the pr ogram will begin of fering classes this autumn. The pr ogram is the college’s second in the Middle East. The first pr ogram started in 2007 in Alexandria, Egypt. Earlier this year , Root was among the 22 Middlebury students evacuated from Alexandria, Egypt, during antigovernment uprisings.

Sorrell: Rutland police action justified MONTPELIER — Attorney Gen. William H. Sorrell announced March 21 that his office has completed its review of the police-shooting incident that occurre d Oct. 28, 2010, in Rutland. The Attorney General's Office has concluded, as a matter of law, that Vermont State Police Trooper Christopher Lora was legally justified in the use of deadly force when he discharged his firearm at James Lamont. The legal standard for the use of deadly forc e is whether the officer reasonably believed that he or a third party was in imminent danger of death or serious bodily injury, and that deadly force was necessary to respond to the threat.

KUDOS TO VOLUNTEERS—Kurn Hattin Homes in Westminster held its Annual Volunteer Recognition Banquet March 22 to honor local people who volunteer at the Homes. Pictured, with several missing, are Bill and Louise Luring, Rev. Sami Macrae, Anthony and Elizabeth Maiola, Jacky Mallory, Rick Manson, David J. Maysilles, Walter B. Menzel, Francese Mills, Sally Motzer, Sally Mundell, Keri and Joseph Newton, George Nostrand, Michael J. Obuchowski, Sara and Ben Olson, Hugh Perkins, Mary Kay Pfadenhauer, Ann Reed Prager, Mrs. Frank J. Prindl, Jasmin Queen, Karen Rumrill, Tina Smith. Kurn Hattin is a residential home and school for in-need and at-risk children. Photo provided

Mystery author coming to Ludlow LUDLOW — Archer Mayor—death investigator , deputy sheriff and author of the highly acclaimed, Vermont-based, Joe Gunther mystery book series—will speak at 7 p.m. at Ludlow’s Fletcher Memorial Library Thursday, April 14. Bring your questions and your favorite Joe Gunther books to be signed. The Book Nook and the library ar e hosting this free event at Ludlow’s downtown library at 88 Main St. Mayor ’s Joe Gunther series has been described by the Chicago Tribune as “the best police procedurals being writ-

ten in America.” Mayor is also the 2004 winner of the New England Independent Booksellers Association Award for Best Fiction—the first time a writer of crime literatur e has been so honored. Mayor will discuss topics ranging from writing and publishing to living in Vermont, as well as his latest, cliffhanger of a novel, “Red Herring.” The book can be borr owed at the library or purchased a the Book Nook acorss the street.

Walk helps raise Academy funds LUDLOW — Following its W alk for Local History in Ludlow last fall, Black River Academy Museum (BRAM) has scheduled its second annual walk for Saturday, April 30. Last year , mor e than 70 walkers participated in BRAM's walk through Ludlow. This year, walk coor dinator Shar on Combes-Farr has invited potential walkers to celebrate the arrival of spring during the three-mile long walk through the village. Combes-Farr said that r efreshment stations will be available along the

course and at its conclusion at the Black River High School. The walk’s course starts and finishes at the Black River High School on Main Str eet in Ludlow . It passes the Black River Academy Museum on High Street, along Dug Road out of town, turning South on r oute 103 and back through Main Street. Check-in is at the Black River High School at 10 a.m. The walk begins at 10:30 a.m. Registration fee includes a T-shirt, entertainment, beverages, and snacks. Adults $20. Students and sen-

iors (65 plus) $10. The first 100 walk registrants will receive t-shirts of the event. Mail entries and checks may be sent to BRAM, P.O. Box 73, Ludlow 05149. All money raised will be matched dollar-for-dollar by Richar d Nye as part of his matching challenge grant aimed at completing all fund-raising for an elevator by June 30. Any questions or concerns may be directed to the museum at 802-2285050 or e-mail: director@bramvt.org.

UVM dancers to visit SHS SPRINGFIELD — The University of Vermont dance program, "Dancing Uphill on-the-Road" will be coming to the Springfield High School Kevin Sheehan Auditorium on Wednesday, March 30. The public is invited to enjoy the modern dance concert fre e of charge beginning at 8:40 a.m. Additional information may be obtained by calling Lisa Murray or Catherine Moore at 802-885-7900 or by e-mail: cmoore@ssdvt.org

‘Tuscan Sun’ film at library C H E S T E R - C AV E N D I S H — T h e Cavendish Fletcher Community Library will host its annual "Dinner and Movie" event on Saturday, March 26, 14 p.m., in the library. The program is free to the public but donations are welcome. For more information please call Kata at 802-226-7503.

BIG FISH, LITTLE GUY — Five-year-old Trey Lee of Benson caught his first fish while ic e fishing with his parents at Lake Champlain last week. Trey’s Northern Pike prize weighed 10 pounds and was 34 inches long . Brother Dylan, 9, helps hold up the fish. The young angler’s mother Cindy Lee, a Middlebury College employee, took the photo.


6 - Green Mountain Outlook • Sports

March 30, 2011

www.gmoutlook.com

Windsor hosts annual Senior All-Star Games Get In The Game A View on Sports by Joe Milliken WINDSOR — It was a day of hoops and awards recently at the annual V ermont Basketball Coaches Association's Senior All Star Games at W indsor High School. The day featur ed two boys' and two girls' games, featuring the top senior hoop players

in the state. In the boys' Division III-IV game, the North team dominated in a 91-69 victory over the South. Kyle Benway of Williamstown led the way for the North squad with 19 points, while Oxbow's Cody Eastman and Thetfor d's Jacob Osborne each pitched in with 10. For the South, the South Royalton tandem of Tyler McShinsky and Brian Falzo score d 10 and nine points respectively. In the Division I-II boys' game, it was a much closer affair as the South won an old-fashioned shoot-out, 1 11-102. Rutland High School coach Mike Wood directed the squad, as the Raiders'Alex Snyder and Mike Triller helped the cause with 16 and 15 points r espectively. Spaulding's Evan Tuller led the South with 17 points. For the North, Milton's Cor ey

Chase and U-32's Ryan Shea each scored 12 points. In the Division III-IV girls' contest, the North beat the South in a close one, hanging on for a 63-61 win. Oxbow's Tori Brill led the way for the North team with13 points, while Poultney's Kelly Festa led the south with 1 1 points. Gr een Mountain's Julie Comstock, Leland & Gray's Aly Marcucci, Windsor's Kaitlin Callahan and T win V alley's Kylie-Blu Crawford all pitched in with six points. In the Division I-II girls' match up, the North defeated the South 76-65, as South Burlington's Rachel Crews led the way with 15 points. South Burlington's Br ook Burrington also pitched in with 13 points. For the South team, Middlebury's Nicole Brown scored 13 points while Burr & Burton's Nina Shehadi pitched in with 10.

The Castleton Spartans repeat as NAC champs From CSC News Reports CASTLETON — Castleton State College was selected as the men’s lacro sse preseason North Atlantic Confer ence favorite of the North Atlantic Conference in a vote conducted by the league’s coaches. The Spartans received seven first place votes and a total of 63 points in the NAC men’s lacrosse preseason poll. Castleton r eturns seven starters fr om a 2010 squad that captured their first NAC ti-

tle. The Spartans return two of their top thr ee point leaders fr om last season, attackers Nohea King and Samual Bailey, along with senior faceof f specialist Criag MacDermont. The entire starting defense r eturns with junior goalkeeper David DeGhetto anchoring the defense. Maine Maritime finished second in the poll and capture d one first place

vote. The Mariners r eturn nine starters including four first team all-conference performers. Junior attacker Andrew DiSalvo, last season’s confer ence Player of the Year will lead the squad along with 2010 Rookie of the Year T om Houle. 2011 NAC Men's Lacrosse Poll 1. Castleton - 63 (7) 2. Maine Maritime - 55 (1)

3. Husson - 49 4. Johnson St. - 38 5. Thomas - 29 6. Lyndon State - 27 7. Green Mountain - 18 8. Farmington - 9 Mount Ida and St. Joseph’s (Maine) are no longer associate conference members. Points in ar e awar ded in descending or der with first-place votes (in par entheses) earning 8 points through eighth-place votes which are worth one point.

Spartans ski team finishes Burke, Drechsel Earn USCSA 11th at USCSA Nationals Academic All-American

From College News Reports CASTLETON — The Castleton State College men’s ski team completed the 201 1 USCSA National Championships at Sun Valley, Idaho in 11th place overall out of the top20 USCSA teams in the country . Rocky Mountain College won the team title with 4 points, while Plymouth State University finished second with 6 points. Sierra Nevada College placed third with 6.5 points. The Spartans wer e led by Robert Burke (Goshen, N.Y.), who placed 22nd overall. Burke placed 36th in the giant slalom and 29th in the slalom. Bobby Jones (Pittsfield, Mass.) finished the week ranked 29th out of 113 of the top USCSA racers in the country. Jones finished the giant slalom in 54th place, while placing 35th in the slalom. Freshman Reed Dr echsel (Carrabassett Valley, Maine) was poised to place high in the overall standings, but an injury the day prior to the slalom event limited him to only competing in the giant slalom. Dr echsel's 34th place result in the giant slalom and no result in the slalom placed him 57th overall for the championships. Rocky Mountain College's Olle Friber g captured the overall title, while Mike Bisnaire of the University of British Columbia placed second. Christopher Beadon of Plymouth State University placed third overall. Castleton's 1 1th place r esult in the 201 1 USCSA National Championships is their third-best r esult in the four years the team as qualified for the event. The Spartans best result came in 2008 when they placed eighth. The Spartans also competed in the event in 2009 and placed tenth. This year's r esult is an impr ovement fr om last season's 14th place finish. Men’s Team Results 1st - Rocky Mountain College (Montana) 4 points

2nd - Plymouth State University (N.H.) 6 3rd - Sierra Nevada College (Nevada) 6.5 4th - St. Olaf College (Minnesota) 7 5th - University of British Columbia (B.C. Canada) 7.5 6th - Boston College (Massachusetts) 13 7th - University of Nevada 14 8th - Colby-Sawyer College (N.H.) 17 9th - Clarkson University (N.Y.) 17.5 10th - Whitman College (Washington) 19 11th - Castleton State College 23 12th - Babson College (Massachusetts) 27 13th - University of Minnesota, Duluth 28 14th - Stanford University (California) 29 15th - Syracuse University (N.Y.) 29.5 16th - University of Virginia 33 17th - Colorado Mountain College (Colorado) 33.5 18th - Northern Michigan University 33.75 19th - Pennsylvania State University 35 20th - Lehigh University (Pennsylvania) 40 Men's Individual Results (Based on USSA race points for SL and GS) 1st - Olle Friber g (SWE) 9.31 (Rocky Mountain College) 2nd - Mike Bisnaire (CAN) 18.74 (University of British Columbia) 3rd - Christopher Beadon (CAN) 19.51 (Plymouth State University 22nd - Robert Burke (USA) 166.33 (Castleton State College) 29th - Bobby Jones (USA) 259.43 (Castleton State College) 57th - Reed Dr echsel (USA) 1073.30 (Castleton State College) 66th - Connor O'Brien (USA) 1 100.70 (Castleton State College) 83rd - Bartholomew Kallgr en (USA) 1237.58 (Castleton State College) T-91st - Steven Zotter (USA) 1980.00 (Castleton State College) (out of 1 13 competitors)

CASTLETON — Junior Robert Burke (Goshen, NY) and fr eshman Reed Drechsel (Carrabassett Valley, ME) of the Castleton State College ski team have been named USCSA Academic All-Americans this past week at the USCSA National Championships at Sun Valley, Idaho. Burke finished the ECSC Thompson Division ranked thir d overall and also earned All-ECSC Regional honors for his performance at the USCSA Eastern Regional slalom event, where he placed 15th out of 70 racers. At the USCSA National Championships at Sun Valley, ID, Burke placed 22nd out of 112 of the top USCSA racers in the country. Off the Robert Burke slopes, Burke has earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.38 Drechsel, the 201 1 ECSC Thompson Division Skier of the Year, finished first in the ECSC Thompson Division overall individual standings. Drechsel completed his freshman year with seven top-five er sults, including one victory and three other podium finishes. At the USCSA Eastern Regional Championships, Drechsel tied for 21st overall (along with Burke) with a 20th place performance in the slalom event and 22nd place result in the giant slalom. Dre chsel placed 34th in the giant slalom at the USCSA National Championships last week at Sun Valley, ID. In the classroom, Drechsel has earned a cumulative grade point average Reed Drechsel of 3.94. Athletes competing at the USCSA National Championships, with a cumulative grade point average of 3.30 or higher ar e named to the USCSA Academic AllAmerican Team. Burke and Drechsel helped lead the Spartans to an 1 th place finish out of the top-21 USCSA ski teams in the country at the 201 1 USCSA National Championships this past week in Sun Valley, ID.

Wrestling scrimmage at Park St. School By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com SPRINGFIELD — With Vermont State Finals just ar ound the corner , ar ea youth wrestling teams are planning to rev their engines as they go head-to-head at the Schweitzer Memorial Scrimmage on T uesday, April 5, fr om 5:30-7 p.m. at the Park Street School gymnasium on Park Str eet in

Springfield. It is the first event of its kind to be held in the area. On the roster are wrestlers K-8 from Newport N.H., as well as Springfield, Cavendish and Rockingham. To learn mor e about Springfield youth wrestling, contact the Springfield Parks and Recreation Department at 802-885-2727 or send an e-mail to team manager Kelly Stettner at: k_stettner@yahoo.com.

Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife: 2010 was a good year for deer harvest MONTPELIER — The Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife proclaimed the year 2010 as one of the best years in a decade for deer hunters. Director of Wildlife Mark Scott confirmed that the state’s deer her d is “healthy and r obust.” There were between 120,000 and 130,000 deer alive in Vermont at the end of 2010, he reported. The state reported that the 2010 deer harvest increased 2 percent over the 2009 harvest. Totaling all four of V ermont’s deer seasons—ar chery, muzzleloader , rifle and youth— hunters downed 15,523 deer here in 2010.

Submit your letters to the editor to Lou Varricchio@ newmarketpress@denpubs.com


March 30, 2011

Green Mountain Outlook - 7

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Arts & Entertainment

Local author to speak on GMC campus POULTNEY — V ermont author Stephen Kiernan will present a public talk “Authentic Patriotism” at Ackley Hall at Green Mountain College on March 24 at 7 p.m. Author of “Last Rights: Rescuing the End of Life fr om the Medical System” and a new book “Authentic Patriotism: Restoring Amer-

ica's Founding Ideals Thr ough Selfless Action”, Kiernan will visit classes thr oughout the day at the college befor e the public lecture . In his latest book, Kiernan urg es Americans to take on the challenges facing our country by telling the stories of everyday heroes who are reshaping society.

Spanning over two decades as a journalist, Kiernan has won 40 awar ds, including the Bechner Institute's Fr eedom of Information Award and the Geor ge Polk Award. He is an inspired thinker and spokesperson on contemporary issues of health care, civic engagement, ethics, service learning, social justice

and the green economy. A graduate of Middlebury College, he r eceived a master of arts degr ee fr om Johns Hopkins University and a master of fine arts from the University of Iowa W riters’ Workshop. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Fletcher Farm School News: Wanted, Idle Hands By Laurie Marechaux info@fletcherfarm.org LUDLOW — For those with idle hands, it’s time to get cr eative and join in the fun at one of New England’s finest arts and crafts schools located in Ludlow. Take on a new skill set in the field of miniatur e punch needle r ug hooking, a traditional American craft using wool yarn to make really cool cell phone bags or purses.

One of the latest trends in fiber art is needle felting, using special barbed needles and wool roving (raw wool fibers or hairs), you can sculpt fabulous fantasy cr eatures, flowers, fruits etc. The school will host the second annual International Punch Needle Rug Hooking Day on Saturday, April 9, 9 a.m.3 p.m. All are welcome to come and participate in demonstrations and mini lessons given by Oxford certified, punch needle instructor Amy Oxford.

All ages ar e welcome and please feel fr ee to call if you would like to participate as a parent and child we will offer special pricing for you and your youngster. Group inquires welcome. If you are a Ludlow, Cavendish or Proctorsville resident (age 7 and up), you ar e entitled to 50 per cent off one class per calendar year. Register online or for a copy of our fall flyer call 802-2288770.

Multi-media exhibit at CSC CASTLETON — Castleton State College will pr esent a collaborative art show titled “Arcadia Now: Contemporary Art in Country”. The opening r eception and artist talk will be held Wednesday, April 13, from 4:306:30 p.m. in the Herrick Auditorium. “Arcadia Now” combines photography , painting, sculpture and video; the exhibition addresses issues of natur e and human consequence on natur e, beauty and banality , and the ideal and the r eal in both abstract and figurative terms.

Curated by T om McGlynn, participating artists include: Sally Apfelbaum, Tim Daly, Alisa Dworsky, Bill Doherty, Ken Ikeda, Justine Kurland, Nathaniel Lieb, Mary McDonnell, Rebecca Pur dum, Kiki Smith, Fr edrik Strid, Scott W alden, Tenesh Webber, James Welling, Aaron Williams. “Arcadia Now” will be on display in the Christine Price Gallery April 1 1 thr ough May 15, the gallery is open Monday thro ugh Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“Penguins” will be first movie screened by FOLA

“Winter Wheat” book discussion slated at Fletcher Memorial Library

LUDLOW — At a recent meeting, FOLA—Friends of Ludlow Auditorium at town hall— decided that its first movie presentation for residents of the greater Ludlow area would be the popular family film, “March of the Penguins”. The first film to be shown publically in Ludlow since the 1990s will be screened Thursday, April 7, at 7:30 p.m.

LUDLOW — The Friends of the Library of the Fletcher Memorial Library in Ludlow will its monthly book discussion Mar ch 24 at 7 p.m. The selection will be “W inter Wheat” by Mildred Walker. The story focuses on a two year span in the life of the main character , Ellen Webb who comes from a rural wheat growing family in Montana in the 1940s.

Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Southern Vermont

14TH ANNUAL HOME & RECREATION SHOW Saturday, April 2, 2011 9 AM - 3 PM Spartan Arena Behind Diamond Run Mall • Route 7 South, Rutland, VT

 Exhibitor Booths  Free Kids’ Activities provided by the Boys & Girls Club, The Mentor  Special Prizes for kids (1st Connector and Linda MacFarlane, 50 kids get a birdhouse kit) Children’s Musical Performer  Door Prize Drawings all Day

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Customer Appreciation Night

30-MINUTE WORKSHOPS 9 am..........Psychology of Color 10 am........The Decision to Build or Remodel 11 am........Home Energy Savings Noon..........Learn About Marvin Replacement Windows 1 pm..........Growing Your Garden in a Box 1:45 pm ....How to Refinish Your Wood Floor

Sunday, April 3rd • 5-9 PM

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on all Appetizers, Entrées and Desserts

Admission is FREE In-kind Sponsors: Giancola Construction, Mr. Twitters, Gilmore Home Center

If you’re building, remodeling, or just want to browse, this is an event you won’t want to miss.

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Route 103 • Ludlow, VT 802-228-7222 www.panarellos.com 90418


8 - Green Mountain Outlook from page 4 and implements can’t be used is going to be a lot more labor-intensive and therefore a lot lower on the output-productivity scale than growing them on — guess what — plain old farmland. The pr oductivity of such r oofs and gardens (payback, if you pr efer) question was never even raised by any of the instr uctors. In the brave new world beyond economic necessity, image and per ception ar e scor ed more highly than profit and payback. A key element of that is the derisive r ejection of any real-payback question with some variation on the old Oscar W ilde quote: “your question, sir, identifies you as one of those lesser beings who know the price of everything and the value of nothing.”

Sort of like the V ermont-Progressive pleasure in the prospect of taxing Amazon: not because it would generate economic payback to government but because it would meet more noble, if more intangible, non-economic, goals. Maybe, like hunting for sport instead of survival, such objective changes r eflect a mor e pr osperous society, which, of course, was made that way by earlier generations which actually cr eated tangible wealth, made a profit doing so, and — a little generational irony here — created the trust funds spinning off the monthly checks for which their non-wealth-cr eating grandchildren now farm their mailboxes (the re ally high-tech ones ar e on dir ect deposit via electronic transfer). Former V ermonter Martin Harris lives in Tennessee.

The Logger from page 4 Why is it an unfortunate trend, and what are the reasons there may be fewer dinner parties being thrown? The answers to those questions would make up two or three more columns, and I’m not to overly worried about any of it, so I’ll leave it at that. I’m excited to be going to a dinner party tonight. I’m going to arrive hungry, and relax, and I’m going to have fun. And, I’m bringing the hosts a sweet little candle and glass holder, which have both been wrapped carefully in tissue and placed in a sturdy green box with a bow. See what you’re not getting, not inviting me to your dinner party?

Letters to the Editor

Japan meltdown To the editor: The nuclear crisis in Japan r eminds us of the ur gent need to develop r enewable energy sources. In Vermont, though, controversy rages over which types of r enewable energy development are appropriate. But this debate is actually moot. It doesn’t matter whether one believes that wind turbines work or not, or ar e acceptable on ridge lines. It is a fact of physics that ridgeline wind in the eastern U.S. has very little potential to replace coal and nuclear. According to Department of Energy figures, if all of the onshore commercially viable wind resource of the eastern U.S. were developed, only about 17 gigawatts of conventional generation could be of fset at best, and pr obably much less in practice. Compar e this with the fact that U.S. demand for electricity is equivalent to 450 gigawatts of continually operating generation, and that electricity accounts for only about one thir d of our ener gy consumption. Only a massive expansion of solar generation has the potential at present to significantly reduce conventional generation in the eastern U.S. W ind power fr om offshore or fr om the midwest might also contribute in principle, but it is not certainthat either resource will be environmentally or economically acceptable. We would be much better off focusing on ramping up solar now, and accelerating its cost reduction in the pr ocess, rather than pouring hundr eds of millions of dollars into an approach that will mainly just devastate our mountaintop ecosystems, our eco-tourism based economy, and divide our closely knit communities into warring camps. Ben Luce

Submit letters and guest viewpoints to Lou Varricchio at newmarketpress@denpubs.com

Rusty DeWees tours Vermont and Northern New York with his act “The Logger.” His column appears weekly. He can be reached at rustyd@pshift.com. Listen for The Logger, Rusty DeWees, Thursdays at 7:40 on the Big Station, 98.9 WOKO or visit his website at www.thelogger.com

Religious Services RUTLAND All Saints Anglican Church - An orthodox Anglo-Catholic Christian Community. Mass & Liturgy offered every Sunday at 4:00p.m. Childcare available. Handicap Accessible. Christian Education. 42 Woodstock Ave., Rutland (Services at Messiah Lutheran Church) 802-282-8098. Email: AllCelticStaintsRutland@comcast.net Alliance Community Fellowship - Howe Center, Sunday Worship 10:30a.m. Phone: 773-3613 Calvary Bible Church - 2 Meadow Lane, Rutland, VT 802775-0358. (2 blocks south of the Rutland Country Club) Sunday Worship Service 9:30a.m. Nursery care available. www.cbcvt.org Christ the King - 66 South Mail St. - Saturday Mass 5:15p.m., Sunday Masses 7:30, 9:30 & 11a.m. Church of the Nazarene - 144 Woodstock Ave., Pastor Gary Blowers 483-6153. Sunday School for all ages at 9:30a.m. Morning Worship at 10:30a.m., Evening Worship at 6:00p.m. & Wednesday Prayer at 7:00p.m., Children’s Church available during Worship Service. Church of Christ - 67 Dorr Dr., Sunday Worship 10:30a.m. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints - North Strewsbury Rd., 773-8346. Sacrament 10a.m. Church of the Redeemer - Cheeney Hill Center, Cedar Ave., Sunday Service 10a.m. First Baptist Church - 81 Center St., 773-8010 - The Rev. Mark E. Heiner, Pastor. Sunday worship 10:30a.m., Sunday school 9:00a.m. Good Shepherd Lutheran - Hillside Rd. - Saturday Worship 5:30p.m., Sunday Worship 9:30a.m. Grace Congregational United Church of Christ - 8 Court St., 775-4301. Sunday Chapel Service 8:30a.m., Worship 10a.m. Green Mountain Baptist Church - 50 Barrett Hill Rd. , 747-7712. Sunday Worship 11a.m., Evening service 6p.m. Green Mountain Missionary Baptist Church 98 Killington Ave., 775-1482 Sunday Worship 11a.m. & 6p.m. Immaculate Heart of Mary - Lincoln Ave. Saturday Mass 4:30p.m., Sunday Mass 8 & 10:15a.m. Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses Gleason Rd. - Public Meeting 10a.m. Messiah Lutheran Church - 42 Woodstock Ave., 7750231. Sunday Worship 10a.m. New Hope in Christ Fellowship - 15 Spellman Terrace, 773-2725. Sunday Worship 10:15a.m. Pentacostals of Rutland County - Corner of Rt. 4 and Depot Lane, 747-0727. Evangelistic Service 6p.m. Roadside Chapel Assembly of God - Town Line Rd., 775-5805. Sunday Worship 10:25a.m. Rutland Jewish Center - 96 Grove St., 773-3455. Fri. Shabbat Service 7:30p.m., Sat. Shabbat Service 9:30a.m. Salvation Army - 22 Wales St. Sunday Worship 11a.m., Praise Service 1:30 p.m. Seventh-Day Adventist - 158 Stratton Rd., 775-3178. Saturday Worship 11a.m. St. Nicholas Orthodox Church - 8 Cottage St. Sunday Service 10a.m. St. Peter Church - Convent Ave. - Saturday Mass 5:15p.m., Sunday Masses 7:30 and 11:30a.m. Trinity Episcopal Church - 85 West St., 775-4368. Sunday Eucharist 8, 9 & 10a.m., Wed. 12:05p.m., Thurs. 9a.m., Morning Prayer Mon.-Sat. at 8:45a.m. True Vine Church of God - 78 Meadow St., 775-8880 or 438-4443. Sunday Worship 10:30a.m. • Training for Reigning, Wednesdays at 7p.m. Nursery available during Sun. & Wed. services. J.A.M. Sessions for teens bi-weekly Fridays at 7p.m.

Women’s Bible Study Tuesdays at 10:30a.m. Unitarian Universalist Church - 117 West Street. Sunday Services through August 22 begin at 9:30a.m. No service on Sept. 5. Rev. Erica Baron. For further info call 802-775-0850. United Methodist Church - 71 Williams St., 773-2460. Sunday Service in the Chapel 8 and 10a.m. United Pentecostal Church - Corner of Rt. 4, Depot Lane, 773-4255. Sunday Services 9:30a.m. and 6p.m., Evangelical Service 5p.m. Wellspring of Life Christian Center - 18 Chaplin Ave., 773-5991. Sunday Worship 11a.m. BRANDON Brandon Congregational Church - Rt. 7 Sunday Worship 10a.m. Brandon Baptist Church - Corner of Rt. 7 & Rt. 73W (Champlain St.) Brandon, VT 802-247-6770. Sunday Services: 10a.m. Adult Bible Study, Sunday School ages 5 & up, Nursery provided ages 4 & under. Worship Service 11a.m. *Lords supper observed on the 1st Sunday of each month. *Pot luck luncheon 3rd Sunday of each month. Wednesdays 6:30p.m., Adult prayer & Bible study, Youth groups for ages 5 and up Grace Episcopal Church - Rt. 73, Forestdale February-April: 9am, Holy Eucharist; 9a.m. Sunday Morning Program for children preschool and older. 247-6759, The Rev. Margaret (Margo) Fletcher, Priest-in-Partnership LifeBridge Christian Church - 141 Mulcahy Drive, 247-LIFE (5433). Sunday Worship 9a.m., www.lifebridgevt.com, LifeGroups meet weekly (call for times and locations) Living Water Assembly of God - 76 North Street (Route 53), Office Phone: 247-4542. Email: LivingWaterAssembly@gmail.com. Website: www.LivingWaterAOG.org. Sunday Service 10a.m. Wednesday Service 7p.m. Youth Meeting (For Teens) Saturday 7p.m. St. Mary’s Parish - 38 Carver St., 247-6351, Saturday Mass 4p.m., Sunday Mass 9:30a.m. St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church - Rt. 7, Brandon Village. February-April services will be held at Grace Church, Rt. 73 Forestdale: 9a.m., Holy Eucharist; 9a.m. Sunday Morning Program for children preschool and older. 247-6759, The Rev. Margaret (Margo) Fletcher, Priest-in-Partnership United Methodist Church - Main St., 247-6524. Sunday Worship 10a.m. CASTLETON Castleton Federated Church - Rt. 4A - 468-5725. Sunday Worship 10:30a.m. Church of Christ - Bible study & services Sunday 10:00a.m. All are cordially welcome. Contact Mike Adaman 273-3379. Faith Community Church - Mechanic St., 468-2521. Sunday Worship 10:45a.m. Fellowship Bible Church - Rt. 30 North, 468-5122. Sunday Worship 10:45a.m. & 6p.m. Hydeville Baptist Church - Hydeville, Rt. 4A Sunday Worship 9:30a.m. 265-4047. St. John the Baptist Catholic Church Saturday Mass 4p.m., Sunday 8:30a.m. St. Mark’s Episcopal Church - Main St. Sunday Worship 10:45a.m. third Sunday of the month. CHITTENDEN Church of the Wildwood United Methodist Holden Rd., 483-2909. Sunday Service 10:30a.m. Mt. Carmel Community Church - South Chittenden Town Hall, 483-2298. Sun. Worship 5:30p.m. St. Robert Bellarmine Roman Catholic Church - Saturday Mass 4p.m.

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Special Thanks To These Fine Local Businesses For Supporting The Religious Services Page Wesleyan Church - North Chittenden, 483-6696. Sunday Worship 10a.m. CLARENDON The Brick Church - 298 Middle Rd. 773-3873. Sunday Worship 10a.m. Nursery Care Available. www.brickchruchvt.com Reformed Bible Church - Clarendon Springs, 483-6975. Sunday Worship 9:30a.m. FAIR HAVEN First Baptist Church - South Park Place, Sunday Worship 11a.m. First Congregational Church - Rt. 22A Sunday Worship 10a.m. Our Lady of Seven Dolors - 10 Washington St. Saturday Mass 5:15p.m., Sunday 8 & 9a.m. St. Luke’s - St. Mark’s Episcopal Church Sunday Worship 10:45a.m. United Methodist Church - West St., Sun. Service 8:30a.m. FORESTDALE Forestdale Wesleyan Church - Rt. 73 Sunday Worship 11a.m. St. Thomas & Grace Episcopal Church - Rt. 7, Brandon village: 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite 1 (traditional language). 9:30 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite 2 (contemporary language), with music. “Sunday Morning Program” for children preschool and older (during school year). Telephone: 247-6759, The Rev. Margaret (Margo) Fletcher, Priest-in-Partnership Grace Church - Rt. 73, Forestdale - part of St. Thomas & Grace Episcopal Church: May-July services held at St. Thomas, Brandon village (corner of Rt. 7 and Prospect): a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite 1 (traditional language.) 9:30 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite 2 (contemporary language), with music. “Sunday Morning Program” for children preshcool and older (during shcool year.) Telephone: 247-6759, The Rev. Margaret (Margo) Fletcher, Priest-in-Partnership. Living Water Assembly of God - 76 North Street (Route 53), Office Phone: 247-4542. Email: LivingWaterAssembly@gmail.com. Website: www.LivingWaterAOG.org. Sunday Service 10a.m. Wednesday Service 7p.m. Youth Meeting (For Teens) Saturday 7p.m. HUBBARDTON Hubbardton Congregational Church - Sunday Worship 10a.m. • 273-3303. East Hubbardton Baptist Church - The Battle Abbey, 483-6266 Worship Hour 10:30a.m. IRA Ira Baptist Church - Rt. 133, 235-2239. Worship 11a.m. & 6p.m. LEICESTER Community Church of the Nazarene - 39 Windy Knoll Lane • 9:30a.m. Worship Service, 11:00 a.m. Bible School, 6:00p.m. Evening Service. Wed. Evening 7:00p.m. Dare to care and Prayer. 3rd Sat. of the month (Sept.-May) 8a.m. Men’s breakfast St. Agnes’ Parish - Leicester Whiting Rd, 247-6351, Sunday Mass 8a.m. MENDON Mendon Community Church - Rt. 4 East, Rev. Ronald Sherwin, 459-2070. Worship 9:30a.m., Sunday School 11:00a.m. NORTH SPRINGFIELD North Springfield Baptist Church - 69 Main St., N. Springfield, VT • (802) 886-8107 Worship Services Sunday 10a.m.; Faith Cafe (discussion group) Sundays 11:15a.m.-12p.m.; Sunday School for children K-4; Bible Study Fridays 9:30a.m. Call us about our youth ministry program

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PAWLET Pawlet Community Church - 325-3716. Sunday Worship 9:30a.m. St. Francis Xavier Cabrini Church - West Pawlet. Sunday Mass 9:30a.m. The United Church of West Pawlet - 645-0767. Sunday Worship 10a.m. PITTSFORD Pittsford Congregational Church - Rt. 7, 4836408. Worship 10:15a.m. St. Alphonsus Church - Sunday Mass 9a.m. POULTNEY Christian Science Society - 56 York St., 287-2052. Service 10a.m. St. David’s Anglican Church - Meet at Young at Heart Senior Center on Furnace St., 645-1962. 1st Sun. of every month, Holy Eucharist 9:30a.m. Poultney United Methodist Church - Main St., 287-5710. Worship 10:00a.m. St. Raphael Church - Main St. Saturday Mass 4p.m., Sunday Mass 10a.m. Sovereign Redeemer Assembly sovredeemer@gmail.com • Sunday Worship 10a.m. Trinity Episcopal Church - Church St., 287-2252. Sunday Holy Eucharist 10:45a.m. United Baptist Church - On the Green, East Poultney. 287-5811, 287-5577. Sunday Worship 10a.m. Welsh Presbyterian Church - Sunday Worship 10a.m. PROCTOR St. Dominic Catholic Church - 45 South St. Sunday Mass 9:15a.m. St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church - Gibbs St. Sunday Worship 9a.m. Union Church of Proctor - Church St., Sun. Worship 10a.m. SHREWSBURY Shrewsbury Community Church - Sun. Service 10:30a.m. SUDBURY Sudbury Congregational Church - On the Green, Rt. 30, 623-7295 Open May 30-Oct. 10, for Worship (No winter services) & Sun. School 10:30a.m. WALLINGFORD East Wallingford Baptist Church - Rt. 140, 2592831. Worship 11a.m. First Baptist Church - School St., 446-2020. Worship 11a.m. First Congregational Church - 446-2817. Worship 10a.m. St. Patrick’s Church - Sat. Mass 5p.m., Sun. 10:30a.m. Society of Friends (Quaker) - Rotary Bldg., Rt. 7 Sunday meeting for worship 10a.m. South Wallingford Union Congregational Church - Sunday Worship 9a.m. WEST RUTLAND First Church of Christ, Scientist - 71 Marble St., Sunday School & Service 10a.m., Wednesday Evening Service 7:30p.m. St. Bridget Church - Pleasant & Church Streets Saturday Mass 5p.m., Sunday 9a.m. St. Stanislaus Kostka Church - Barnes & Main Streets, Saturday Mass 4:30p.m., Sunday 9a.m. United Church of West Rutland - Chapel St., Worship 10a.m. 3-26-2011 • 77182 77183

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Flooding from page 1 Last week, several roads boarding the Otter Creek in Rutland and Addison counties were closed due to spring flooding. But the flooding—annoying to r esidents along the river—nevertheless reflects a new “live and let live approach” to flood management here in Vermont. The Otter began flooding its banks a few weeks ago when multiple ice jams along the river (it’s far bigger than the name “cr eek” implies) forced the river, in spots, into normally dry fields and woodlands, and into a few residential basements, too. The annual spring flooding of the Otter Creek is the result of snowmelt from both the Green and Taconic mountain ranges. In most places along the Otter Creek Valley, the last big March snowcover is rapidly disappearing. You didn’t have to drive far around the valley to see “high water” and “road closed” signs. Last week, flooding occurred near Proctor and Pittsford, including the creation of an island composed of the Pittsfor d Cover ed Bridge on Depot Street. Normally, dry farmland, near the Route 7 bridge in Salisbury , was also inundated by flood water. In Middlebury , sections of Cr eek Road were also closed due to high water. Much of the flood waters could be seen last Wednesday as a vast frozen sheet covering farmland on both sides of the river. A heavy volume of water has also been er ported at the major falls in Center Rutland, Middlebury and Vergennes. Despite the inconvenience of soggy local roads, flooding along the Otter Cr eek is an annual, expected occurrence. Vermont ecologist Mike Kline discussed the Green Mountain State’s au naturel solutions to flooding, best seen along the Otter Creek. Kline appears on several websites including the Utne Reader and Miller-McCune. “The best way to deal with erosion, flooding and all the other pr oblems associated with out-of-control rivers wasn’t to manage the river ,” he said. “Just give the river enough room to move, change and create its

www.gmoutlook.com own floodplain, and then get the hell out of the way. If we leave the rivers alone, in a sense, they’ll fix themselves,” he said. Environmental writer R yan Blitstein also echoed Kline’s comments about V ermont’s approach to flood management on the Wild Green blogsite. “Vermont, a state with a smaller population than the city of San Francisco’s, has become a leader in the effort to reduce the costs of flooding through unconventional means: it’s ripping out levees to let rivers flood naturally and provide towns with financial incentives to discourage building in floodplains,” he said. Among the mor e memorable Otter Cr eek floods in history was the deluge of April 16, 1895. Rutland County was especially hard hit by the flooding that year . The cr eek r ose fr om 10 to 15 feet above its normal level. Farm land between Rutland and Brandon was flooded and was described, by a Middlebury newspaper account of the event, as looking like “an inland sea as far as the eye can reach... (with) whitecaps caused by a heavy north wind... rolling in farm houses and gardens, while fences and stacks of hay and low land barns have been swept away, and some live stock drowned.” Paul Carnahan, librarian of the V ermont Historical Society in Montpelier , has seen the r ecords of some of the worst f looding along Otter Creek—and elsewhere in in the state. He noted that the worse occurr ed not in spring but in the month of November in 1927. “The torr ential rains began on Nov . 3, 1927,” accor ding to Carnahan. “It was the greatest disaster in the history of the state. It wiped out a lot of infrastar ucture, especially bridges. Nine inches of rain fell in a 36-hour period and horrendous flooding began.” While the Otter Cr eek br oke all flood records in 1927, so, too, did most str eams through out New England. Though all of New England was affected, Vermont was devastated, according to Historical Society r ecords. From Newport to Bennington, towns wer e under water . As many as 85 people perished and at least 9,000 went homeless. Roads, rails, and over

1,000 bridges were washed away. Carnahan said the ‘27 flood still permeates the state’s collective memory . Downtown Montpelier still worries about ice dams and downtown flooding, he noted. “But flood dangers ar e mor e isolated today,” he added. “It doesn’t have the widespread impact that it did a century ago. Lost railroad tracks don’t af fect as many people today.” The great Flood of 1927 turned the fiercely independent state to looking to the federal government for help. While the Flood of 1927 spurr ed levee building and dr edging

Green Mountain Outlook - 9 statewide, in an ir onic twis t, those e fforts helped contribute to wider floods during the 1936 and 1938 floods. “A river constrained by structures adjusts by incising, or digging down into the landscape, adding speed and power to the stream,” according to Blitstein. But now the Otter Creek flows long and free, unobstructed for most of its long trace.And like the refrain of the Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein “Show Boat” song that celebrates America’s great rivers—that ol’ Otter Creek, it just keeps rolling along.

Rail Plan from page 1 operates marble quarries and a pr ocessing plant in V ermont, is a heavy user of fr eight rail. It also hopes to be the prime user of a controversial $34 million, 3.3-mile-long rail spur that is being planned for Middlebury by Vermont Railway. Taxpayers will also be tapped to build this rail line. Critics have called Amtrak “Nostalgia Limited” saying it is not in the public interest to fund passenger rail. Amtrak, the nation’s governmentowned passenger train provider, has been been losing $32 per passenger since the mid 2000s. According to a study by Subsidyscope of the Pew T rust, 41 of Amtrak’s 44 passenger routes l ose m oney a nnually. The rail service requires large taxpayer subsidies to cover its operating costs.

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Congratulations, Timothy Wade. He came in 2nd in the Vermont State Bowling Finals with a 208, 256, 236-700 series, losing by 6 pins. Hippology Competition There was a 4H study of horses at Rutland High auto refinishing. Congratulations, Chris. By Catherine M. Oliverio School and 7th grader Marissa Constantine Juniors Nicole Bogucki and Kim Rupe wer e catherine.oliverio@rswsu.org two out of 10 Stafford students that have attained placed 8th. Congratulation, Marissa. Coffee House National Certification in Hazar dous Materials Editor’s Note: W e apologize for err ors in our last PHS held another traditional coffee house with PHS news report. We reprint the report in its entire- Awareness. Congratulations, Nicole and Kim! students and faculty showcasing their talents in The Red Ribbon Event held at the Diamond ty this week. Run Mall was planned and executed by members singing, skits, playing instr uments, and playing Senior Jenise Lemon is a Naa word game. of the Staf ford Technical Center SADD Chapter tional Achievement Award fiThanks from Class of 2012 with junior Ginger Vaughn as the overall project nalist—one of 800 students. The Class of 2012 Basket Party was a tremendirector along with assistant pr oject dir ectors The award is an academic comdous success.Thanks to all who donated and parfrom two other high schools. Congratulations, petition established in 1964 ticipated in this event. Ginger! and consists of thr ee stages of Environmental Club Survey Model Congress participation. Guidance DirecMr. Ford’s environmental class would like to Model Congr ess advisor, Don Keagy , along tor Mrs. Gallipo pr esented Jenise Lemon with students Kim Rupe, Justin Mackey, and thank the students that participated in the enviJenise with the certificate. ConJenise Lemon attended the 71st Model Congress ronmental club survey. Out of the 97 erspondents, gratulations, Jenise! 35 percent expressed an interest in joining an enComcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarships at American International College (AIC) in Springfield, Mass.. More than 300 students wrote, vironmental club, an additional 50 per cent were The Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarships are one-time awards in the amount of $1,000 amended, debated, and voted on a variety of bills interested in supporting the club, and only 15 perduring the three-day event competing in approx- cent were not interested at all. Based on these refor college costs and expenses. Senior Kelsi sults,we feel that there is enough interest to move imately $200,000 in AIC scholarships. PHS was Brown was awar ded this scholarship filling the forward and create the club. An initial meeting criteria of being a full-time high school senior at the only V ermont school r epresented, and the the time of application, demonstrating a str ong Poultney delegation presented a bill pr ohibiting will be scheduled in the near future. Stay tuned! Course Registration smoking in parks nationally . Although the stucommitment to community service, displaying Course registration for the 2011-12 school year leadership abilities in school activities or through dents engaged in hearty debate, the bill did not work experience, having a grade point average of pass. Congratulations for your stellar efforts Kim, will begin with the class of 2012 after the spring break. Other grades will follow. Beginning next Justin, and Jenise. 2.8 or higher at the time of application, and atyear, students will have the opportunity to take a Green Mountain Music District Festival tending a high school in a community served by selection of supplemental online courses through The Gr een Mountain Music District Festival Comcast. Congratulations, Kelsi! was held at Mill River Union High School. Th e Virtual High School at no cost. Seniors will have Stafford Success students rehearsed all day followed by a concert. priority followed by juniors and sophomor es Senior Bryan Crandall won “Student of the with administrative approval. More information Congratulations t o o ur P HS p erformers S adie Marking Period” at Staf ford Technical Center will be available later in the spring. Brown, high school band; Emma Baker middle where he majors in power mechanics and weldSeniors school band; Meghan W ood and Sarah Coker , ing. Congratulations, Bryan! Seniors going on the senior trip must have their middle school chorus! Junior Chris Loomis won “Student of the PDCs done by March 1. Pending PDCs will be Vermont State Bowling Finals Marking Period” at Stafford Technical Center for

PHS senior is NAA finalist

done during TA in the library with Mr. Fitzgerald and Mr. DeBonis. Parent Portal Some parents may have noticed that there was no access to student grades during final exams. The grade and report card sections will be closed during the last week of each marking period/progress period to allow teachers time to complete and verify grading. When checking your student’s grades, please give teachers a week to grade and enter assignments into the computer database. March Basket Raffle Seventh and tenth graders ar e reminded that all baskets for the raf fle on March 26 need to be in to Mrs. Dunlap or Mrs. Grenier. You may drop them off at PHS, Tot’s Diner, or our houses. Thank you. Sarah Mook Poetry Contest Students please see English teacher Catherine M. Oliverio for mor e information. This year ’s awards will be $100 First Prize, $50 Second Prize, and $25 Third Prize in each of four categories: K2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. VSAC GEAR-UP Program The Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC) is of fering a unique opportunity to students in grades 7–11. GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Under graduate Programs) is looking for students who are interested in pursuing education and training beyond high school. If you are interested in VSAC, please see Mrs. Gallipo in guidance for an application. If you would like more information, please feel free to contact Monda Kelley at 1-800-660-3561 ext 407. Anyone interested in receiving PHS news electronically, please e-mail catherine.oliverio@rswsu.org or visit PHS’ website: www.phsvt.org.

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Green Mountain Outlook - 11

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Police Blotter Woman hits boyfriend, flees scene in Pittsford On March 13, at approximately 4:25 p.m., members of the Pittsford First Response, RegionalAmbulance Service, and the Vermont State Police responded to Stevens Road in Pittsford for a report of a motor vehicle crash involving a pedestrian. Investigation at the scene found that Thomas Conte, 27, had been riding in his girlfriend’s minivan when they began to ar gue. During the dispute Conte got out of the van, and began to walk on Stevens Road. While Conte was walking, his girlfriend, Cassandra Keyes, 22, of Sudbury drove behind him in the van, and accelerated rapidly and onto the shoulder of the roadway where Conte was walking. Keyes’s van hit Conte. The impact, accor ding to a motorist eyewitness caused Conte’s body to flip backwards and land in a snow bank. Conte had a laceration to his head and a possible injury to an ankle. After the impact, Keyes did not stop; she fled the scene. Cassandra was later located at her r esidence where fresh impact damage to her van was found. Cassandra admitted that she had str uck Conte with her van. Cassandra explained that she did not stop or remain at the scene because she does not have a license. Keyes was later lodged at the Marble Valley Correctional Center.

Fair Haven man arrested for lewd conduct with a child On March 11, Det. Trooper Scott Dunlap of the Vermont State Police arr ested Eric L. Chambers, 41, of Rutland for Lewd and Lascivious Conduct with a Child and Burglary. The incident occurred

in September 2010 in Fair Haven. Investigation revealed that Chambers unlawfully entered a residence and inappr opriately touched a juvenile. Chambers was cited at the Southern State Correctional Facility, as he is curr ently incarcerated on unrelated charges.

Leicester man in prison On March 13, troopers and game war dens responded to a 91 1 call on Stove Pipe Avenue in Leicester. It was discover ed that Jef frey A. Bradish, 47, had used a firearm during a domestic assault. Bradish was taken into custody for Reckless Endangerment, and Domestic Assault. He was subsequently lodged at Marble V alley Correctional Center.

VSP respond to family fight On Saturday, March 12, 2011 at approximately 9:36 p.m. the Vermont State Police received a report of a family disturbance at 450 York Street in Poultney. Upon arrival, T roopers made contact with the alleged victim and through investigation learned that no criminal violation existed for the initial complaint. However, further investigation led to the discovery that one of the involved parties, Richard Fleury, Jr., 39, was on conditions of release for a prior criminal of fense. Fleury, who currently has a condition not to consume alcohol, was found to have in fact consumed beer earlier the evening. Fleury was or dered to appear in court.

Bristol joy rider flees scene On Feb. 24, at approximately 10:38 p.m., a VSP

trooper was monitoring traf fic on W est River Road in Lincoln when a vehicle was found to be traveling southbound at 70 mph in a posted 30 mph zone. The speeding vehicle was located further to the south after it dr ove up a snow bank, off the roadway, and between a telephone and its attached guide wire. The operator and passenger of the vehicle fled the scene into the woods along a frozen river. Investigation revealed that the operator of the vehicle was Ezekiel Winborn, 28, of Bristol. Winborn had borrowed the vehicle for a test drive from a patron at Dan’s Place in Bristol. Winborn’s license was found to be criminally suspended, and the above mentioned speeding violation was criminal in natur e. Winborn turned himself in to the Bristol Police Department Feb. 26. The vehicle that W inborn was test driving was owned by Rutland Motorcars. The vehicle was a red 2004 Mini-Cooper. The under carriage of the Mini-Cooper was damaged. W inborn did not suffer any injuries as a result of the crash, however he did suffer an injury to his knee while fleeing the scene.

Snowy roads leads to crash On March 7, with snow on the gr ound, at approximately 1:49 p.m. the Vermont State Police responded to a r eport of a crash on Route 30 in Poultney. The crash occurred approximately 300 feet south of the intersection of Kerber Lane and Route 30. Troopers observed a two vehicle crash with no injuries. The vehicles involved were a red 2001 Subaru Legacy that was parked in a driveway, and a black 2004 Ford Ranger that was in a ditch. VSP found through an accident investigation that Charlen Grobben, 43, of Poultney, the operator of the Subaru, was traveling north on Route 30 and was turning left into a driveway . Eric Thomson, 41, of Wells, the operator of the For d, was traveling behind her and hit her driver’s side front quarter panel with Thomson’s passenger side front quarter panel as Grobben was turning left. Thomson and his For d then went into the ditch. All parties wer e seat belted at the time of the crash.

Truck flips on snowy Route 7

Sunoco station store robbed

On March 7, at approximately 7:34 a.m., troopers were on the scene along snow cover ed U.S. Route 7, north of the Florence truck route in Pittsford for a tractor-trailer rig that had flipped onto its side. Pittsfor d Fir e Department and Kam Wrecker Service responded to the scene as well. Both lanes of Route 7 wer e closed for appr oximately 90 minutes while the rig was pulled back on the roadway. The driver of the rig, Richard K. Lavoie, 50, of Enfield, Conn., advised police that wind had blown the rig of f the roadway. No injuries as a result of the crash.

On Mar ch 7, VSP troopers r esponded to the Sunoco Service Station located on Route 4A in West Rutland. Store employees advised that between 10 p.m. Mar ch 6 and 4 a.m. Mar ch 7, the gas station had been br oken into. Employees reported the perpetrator stole cigarettes, chewing tobacco and other store merchandise totaling approximately $3,400. Stor e employees stated this was the second time in a week that the store had been broken into and both time the perpetrator broke out a window to gain access. Anyone with information pertaining to the burglaries is asked to contact Trooper Robert Rider at 802-773-9101.

RUTLAND COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY

th

5nual “Spring For The Animals” Auction n

A

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#####

Space is limited, so make your plans, invite your friends to join you and purchase your tickets soon!

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12 - Green Mountain Outlook

March 30, 2011

www.gmoutlook.com

Fo r C a l e n d a r L i s t i n g s — Please e-mail to: newmarketpress@denpubs.com, minimum 2 weeks prior to event. E-mail o n l y. N o fa xe d , h a n d w r i t t e n , o r U S P S m a i l e d l i s t i n g s a c c e p t e d . Fo r q u e s t i o n s , c a l l J e n n i fe r a t 3 8 8 - 6 3 9 7.

Wenesday, March 30 SPRINGFIELD —The Univ ersity of Vermont dance pr ogram, "Dancing Uphill on-the-Road" will be coming to the Springfield High School Kevin Sheehan Auditorium. Modern dance pieces per formed by UVM students including 2007 SHS alumna Chr istina M oore. F ree. 8:40 a.m.D etails:885-7900.

Thursday, March 31 RUTLAND —Mount Saint Joseph Academy's famed Taste of Rutland dinner . Numer ous area restaurants contribute their signature dishes t o make this annual get -together a delectable success. So mar k your date book and get y our tickets early for the Taste of Rutland. The popular event will begin at 6 p.m. at the Martin McDonough Gymnasium, located at 127 C onvent Avenue. Tickets are $25 per person and are available by contacting the MSJ Development Office at 775-0151 x112 or development@msjvermont.org. RUTLAND —SOUTHWEST FREEDOM RIDERS REMEMBER THE NEW LOCATION! Monthly meeting will be held AT SEWARD'S FAMILY RESTAURANT at 7 p.m. All bikes, New members and Guests welcome!

Street Poultney that Apr il Satur day f or book sig nings between the hours of 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. At 2:00 p.m., Co-author Hughes will give a talk about the subjec t of the book and the work and travels involved in writing and publishing it with North Wales (UK) resident, David Ellis Evans. The public is cordially invited. Light refreshments will be served. RUTLAND —Marble Valley Players' "Comedy Extravaganza II" , three hilarious one-act comedies to perform at the

Friday, April 1 RUTLAND —Marble Valley Players' "Comedy Extravaganza II" , three hilarious one-act comedies to perform at the West Rutland Town Hall Theater. Tickets $15 at our website or at the door. Curtain 7:30 p.m. RUTLAND — BIG F LICKS a t t he PARAMOUNT P resents “Back to the Classics ”“42nd STREET” (1933) Ginger Rogers , Dick Powell, Ruby Keeler 2 Oscar NominationsThe dazzling original. Choreography by the immortal Busby Berkeley. A producer puts on what ma y be his final Br oadway show – at the last minut e the star has t o be replaced by a chorus girl. One screening only 7:30p.m. All tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for those 12 and under. CASTLETON — Castleton Fellows Post 50 Amer ican Legion is hosting a Baked Ham Dinner from 5 to 7p.m.To benefit the Castlet on C ommunity C enter. The meal includes mashed potatoes, veggies, apple sauce, tossed salad, rolls, home made desser ts and bev erage for $10 per adult and $5 for children under 12. There will be a 50/50 raffle and Basket Raffle. Penguin Productions with DJ John Saltis will provide music for listening or dancing. For info call Greg at 468-8962 or 265-8003.

Saturday, April 2 POULTNEY —Her mit H ill Books and P oultney Ar ea St. David’s Society are pleased to announce that they will co host I vor Hughe s, the Vermont co -author o f “Before We Went Wireless”, the first -ever biog raphy of the br illiant British bor n in ventor, prac tical exper imenter, P rofessor of Music and Philosophy and Musician David Edward Hughes. Co-author Ivor Hughes will be at Hermit Hill Books, Main

West Rutland Town Hall Theater. Tickets $15 at our website or at the door. Curtain 7:30 p.m. RUTLAND —14th Annual Home & Recreation Show. The Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Southern Vermont proudly announces it's 14th Annual Home & Recreation Show. The show will be held fr om 9a.m. to 3p.m. at Spartan Arena which is located behind Diamond Run Mall on Route 7 South.

BRGNS from page 1 including Joe Dauscher, manager of network relations for the Vermont Food Bank, Linda Husband, representing RSVP and Steve Birge owner of Black River Produce. The festivities were kicked off by Peter LaBelle, pr esident of Black River Good Neighbor Services. Speeches wer e made by Audrey Bridge, BRGNS executive dir ector Bruce Schmidt on behalf of Okemo Mountain and the T own of Ludlow, and State Sen. Nitka. Bridge welcomed the crowd and said, “We can now better serve our clients with expanded services in a more professional atmosphere.” Schmidt pointed out the need that BRGNS fulfills, stating that Ludlow believes that having the food shelf in the new community complex is an enhancement. State Sen. Nitka gave a short presentation on the metamorphoses of the building from motor pool garage to retail facility and reminisced about how much of Ludlow life has passed through the building. LaBelle thanked donors including over 300 individuals and business. “Without the financial support of the community and the labor of the dozens of volunteers, none of this would have happened.” He singled out Hannaford Supermarkets, the University of Vermont and Black River Produce for material donations. A ribbon cutting event by the board of directors was only one of several highlights of the day . Door prizes were drawn every half hour. BRGNS officials publically thanked the following for donating gifts: Beth Lombard and Linda Olivieri, the Book Nook, Summit Soap Works, Pleasant Valley Food, and Clover Knoll Kitchen Shop. A cake was donated by Peoples United Bank and volunteers donated and served sandwiches, cookies and other treats. BRGNS serves the communities of Ludlow , Belmont, Cavendish, Mt. Holly, Plymouth and Proctorsville and is located at 37B Main St. in Ludlow.

PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE

ROWDY BUNCH By Matt Skoczen & Victor Fleming Across 1 Move to a larger container, say 6 Office exchanges 11 Put a dent in 14 “Woe __!” 18 In any way 19 Aromatic resin 20 “¿Quién __?” 21 Where the Pecos R. begins 22 *Old library aid 24 Gadget, for one: Abbr. 25 Water turbidity cause 26 Book after Neh. 27 “Midnight Cowboy” con man 28 Two-time N.L. batting champ Lefty 29 Motorcade VIP 30 Hit a lot of high notes 32 *Soda fountain choice 34 Societal ideals 36 What obsolete things fall into 38 Bananas 39 “Marley & Me” actress 41 React to boredom, perhaps 43 Defeats 47 Port of Crete 48 Cockney toast starter 50 Souvenirs at the park, usually 52 Controversial “gift” 53 Fresno-to-Bakersfield dir. 54 Not __ Town: anti-hatecrime movement 56 Procter & Gamble toothpaste 58 Salad cheese 59 Sail motions 60 Not of the cloth

61 Bombed 64 Maurice Sendak kids’ book, and the starts of starred answers 69 One way to anticipate 70 8 x 10 phots., e.g. 71 “... but maybe I’m wrong” 72 “The Dark at the Top of the Stairs” dramatist 73 Job jar items 75 Thomas Paine’s belief 76 __ band: school rally performers 79 “Golden Age” Hollywood studio 80 Kept awake, maybe 82 Bruce of “The Astronaut Farmer” 83 “There is __ in the affairs of men ...”: Brutus 85 Eager beaver 87 ’70s-’80s FBI sting 90 Like some markers 92 Swedish tennis great 94 Japanese mushrooms 96 Chops up 97 *Ragtime dance 100 Spa service 102 Big name in pineapples 103 First toothbrush to go to the moon 104 One leading a charmed life? 105 The first one was founded in 1824 Eng. to protect carriage horses 108 James or Jones of jazz 109 __-mutuel 110 *’60s Haight-Ashbury type 112 Lent organs? 113 Harrow rival 114 Saintly qualities 115 Utah’s state gem 116 Make a chart of, as land 117 Safety feature for some walkers 118 Conforms 119 Stieg Larsson was one

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 20 23 28 31 32 33 34 35 37 40 42 44 45 46 49 51 55 56 57 58 59 60 62 63

Down Regatta H-like letters *Political mantra Fixer-upper, often Dr. Mom’s forte Heavy __ Made joyous Alice’s restaurant? 1847 novel based on its author’s time in the Society Islands Milano Mr. Impressive house Inane relative? E-mail option Popular restaurants Smug grin A beanball might lead to one Personal organizer nos. *Drug problem Part of a playground exchange Very One who spiffs up your wheels It’s chewed in leas Corp. fiscal VIPs Little suckers? Santa __: West Coast winds Popular pad Abecedarian One of them? “I’m outta here!” Perfume compound One in a black suit Scammer’s ploy Calling strikes, e.g. NFL part: Abbr. Maddens Eye shades Suffix with song Lacking dates Patty alternative Getaway places Typical Bond villain’s malady

64 Uncanny 65 Good thing to have at a tearjerker 66 Prod 67 *One side of a defunct wall 68 Weed whacker 74 Battery spec 75 “Disclosure” co-star 76 *A cappella leader’s gadget 77 Falco of “Nurse Jackie”

Trivia Answers! •••••••• From Page 2 ••••••••

ANs. 1 NBC ANs. 2 UCLA 72960

SOLUTIONS TO LAST WEEK ’ S PUZZLES !

78 80 81 82 84 86 88 89 91 93 95

Push-up targets Unrestrainedly Unwrapped excitedly U.S. terr., 1861-’89 Circus Keep __ of: stay current with Persnickety sort Collapsible bed Put in a cell Pirouette Seller of the $5 FOOT-

LONG Add up to Extreme Occult medium Kind of shoes or blues Sea, with “the” Country place? Not in one’s birthday suit Cutter with a bent blade __ Schwarz: NYC toy store 111 Small change?

97 98 99 101 102 104 106 107 110


March 30, 2011

Green Mountain Outlook - 13

www.gmoutlook.com

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14 - Green Mountain Outlook

March 30, 2011

www.gmoutlook.com www.denpubs.com

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1,995

Trucks • Vans • SUVs

2004 VW Golf - 5 Dr, 4 Cyl, 5 Spd, only, 84K, Blue.......... $7,995 2003 Mitsubishi Eclipse - 2 Dr, 6 Cyl, Auto, Black.......... $3,995 2003 Dodge Neon - 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, Gray..................... $3,995 2002 VW Passat - 4 Dr 4 Cyl, Auto, Gray......................... $5,995 2002 Jaguar X-Type - AWD, 4 Dr, 6 Cyl, 5 Spd, Silver. . . . $6,995 2002 Hyundai Elantra - 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, White.............. $3,395 2001 Ford Escort - 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, Red....................... $3,495 2001 Subaru Legacy Wagon - AWD, 4 Cyl, Auto, Blue... $3,995 2000 Chevy Cavalier - 2 Dr, 4 Cyl, 5 Spd, Black.............. $1,995 2000 Pontiac Sunfire - 2 Dr, Auto, Sliver......................... $3,495 1999 Buick Park Ave - 4 Dr, 6 Cyl, Auto, Green.............. $3,495 1999 Subaru Legacy SW - AWD, 4 Cyl, Std, Gold.......... $2,995 1999 Subaru Legacy Outback - AWD, Loaded, Auto, Black...................................................................... $4,495 1998 Saturn SCI - 2 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, Gold........................ $2,495 1998 Chrysler Sebring Convertible - 2 Dr, 6 Cyl, Auto, Green..................................................................... $3,995 1998 Subaru Impreza - AWD, 5 DR, 4 Cyl, Std, White. . . $3,495 1998 Saab 900 - 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, only 70K, Bronze....... $4,995 1998 Ford Escort - 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, Mint Green............ $2,995 1997 Audi A4 - 4 Dr, 5 Cyl, Auto, Pearl White.................. $3,995 1997 Chevy Cavalier - 2 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, Gold................. $2,495 1997 Chevy Cavalier Z-24 - 2 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, Red......... $3,495 1996 Nissan Maxima - 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, Tan.................. $3,995 1996 Saturn SL2 - 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, Silver...................... $2,995 1996 Infinity G-20 - 4 Dr, 4 Cyl, 5 Spd, Gold.................... $2,995 1996 Pontiac Grand AM - 2 Dr, 4 Cyl, Auto, Gold........... $2,495 1995 Pontiac Grand Prix - 4 Dr, 6 Cyl, Auto, Red........... $1,695 1995 Acura Integra - 4 Cyl, 5 Spd, 2 Dr, Silver................ $1,995

2005 Chrysler Town & Country Van - 6 Cyl, Auto, Entertainment Center, Silver........................................... $3,995 2002 Mercury Mountaineer - 4 Dr, V8, Auto, 3rd Row Seat, 4x4, Silver....................................................................... $5,995 2002 Chevrolet K1500 XC - V8, Auto, 4x4, Maroon......... $6,995 2002 GMC K2500 XC - Duramax Diesel, V8, 4x4, Longbox, 4 Dr XCab, 90K Miles, Auto, Green.............................. $14,995 2002 Ford F150 XL Ext Cab - 4 Dr, 4x4, V8 Triton, Black............................................................................... $7,495 2002 Chevrolet S-10 - Extended Cab, PK, 6 Cyl, 3rd Dr, Auto, 4x4, Pewter............................................................ $7,995 2001 Jeep Cherokee - 4 Dr, 6 Cyl, Auto, 4x4, Blue.......... $1,995 2001 GMC S10 XCPK - 6 Cyl, Auto, 3rd Dr, 4x4, Green. . $5,495 2001 Chevrolet S-10 - Extended Cab, 4x2, 3 Dr, 6 Cyl, STD, Pewter.................................................................... $3,995 2001 Dodge Durango - 4 Dr, 4x4, V8, Auto, Maroon....... $4,995 2000 Dodge Dakota - Quad Cab, V8, Auto, 4x4, Green. . $5,995 2000 GMC Sonoma - 4x4, 6 Cyl, Auto, Red..................... $3,995 2000 Dodge Caravan - 6 Cyl, Auto, Black........................ $3,995 1999 Dodge Durango - 4 Dr, V8, Auto, 3rd Row, Green.. $3,995 1998 Chevrolet K1500 - PK, 6 Cyl, Auto, 4x4, Teal......... $3,995 1998 Ford Explorer - 4 Dr, 6 Cyl, Auto, 4x4, Blue............ $3,995 1998 Ford F250 PK - V8, Auto, 4x4, Black....................... $4,995 1998 Ford F250 XC with Plow - 4 Dr, V8, Auto, 4x4, only 72K Miles, Maroon................................................... $5,995 1997 Chevrolet K1500 - 6 Cyl, Auto, 4x4, Shortbox, 101K Miles, Teal............................................................. $4,995 1997 Chevy S-10 Blazer - 4 Dr, 6 Cyl, Auto, Red............ $3,995 1996 Plymouth Voyager Van - 6 Cyl, Auto, Green.......... $2,495 1994 Toyota PK XC - 6 Cyl, Std, 4x4, Red....................... $2,495 1994 Ford F150 - Reg Cab, 4x4, Auto, Clean, Red.......... $3,495

Open Mon. - Fri. 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. • Sat. & Sun. 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 417 West St., Rutland, VT • 802-773-4326 Owned & Operated by Laura LaVictoire - Pierce & Brian Pierce Jr.

2010 Chevrolet Impala

Full Power, Extra Clean, 45,000 Mi.

$

13,988

2003 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo

2005 Chrysler Pacifica

$

8,995

Touring

CALL US : 800-989-4237

Just South of Rutland on US Route 7 North Clarendon, VT 88079

90421

Cars

2006 Jeep Liberty Sport

63868

REACHING OVER 103,520 READERS $

$

First Week

Second Week

6 3 FREE! Third Week Is On Us!* North Countryman

INCREASE YOUR FREQUENCY WHILE REDUCING YOUR COST. $

6,995

Sold & Serviced Here, Tow Pkg.

2009 Chrysler PT Cruiser

Auto, Full Power, Only 35,000 Mi.

$

13,995

2007 Dodge Caliber SXT

The Burgh

How it works... Buy a 20 word ad in all three publications, that cover the areas shown on the map for $6 for the first week. Purchase the second week in all three publications for $3, and we’ll give you the third week FREE in all three publications! “REMEMBER... what no one needs or is looking for this week, could be a hot commodity next week!” Valley News *Second and third week offers only good with two week minimum purchase. No refunds, $6...$3...FREE. Only for personal/family ads (non-business). Call for business classified rates.

$

$

6 • 3 • FREE!

$

10,995

47,000 one owner mi., Auto, Air, Super Economy

$

10,995

This is Just a Small Selection of Our New & Used Inventory.

Note:

Name

*Payment must be received before classified ad can be published. Second and third week offers Address only good with two week minimum purchase. No refunds, $6...$3...FREE. All business ads are excluded. Example - Rentals, Pets, Firewood, etc. Call for business classified rates.

City/Town

State

Zip

Please print your message neatly in the boxes below: Exp.

CC#

CID#

Run#

Starting thru Classification

Mail to... Attn: Gail, Classified Dept., Denton Publications, 24 Margaret Street, Suite 1, Plattsburgh, NY 12901 You may also use these other methods to submit your ad: Fax to: 518-561-1198 eMail to: gail@denpubs.com

Words

Amex Visa Master Discover Cash Check

DEADLINES:

FRIDAY 2PM Green Mountain Outlook The Eagle

Toll Free: 1-800-989-4ADS (4237) Local: (518) 561-9680 x109 88089

84439

Touring Edition, 37,000 Mi.

Your Phone #


March 30, 2011

Green Mountain Outlook - 15

www.gmoutlook.com

Nutting’s

Automotive WHEELZ Wholesale Inc.

240 SOLD SO FAR!

85218

DONATE YOUR CAR. FREE TOWING. “Cars for Kids”. Any condition. Tax deductible outreachcenter.com, 1-800-597-9411 DONATE YOUR VEHICLE LOVE IN THE NAME OF CHRIST. Free Towing & NonRunners Accepted. 800-549-2791 Help Us Transform Lives In The Name Of Christ. DONATE A CAR To Help Children and Their Families Suffering From Cancer. Free Towing. Tax Deductible. Children’s Cancer Fund Of America, Inc. www.ccfoa.org 1-800469-8593

Check Out Our Rates First Before you sign with another company!

FIESTA AUTO INSURANCE 130 MAIN STREET, WHITEHALL, NY

518-499-9145

CALL US : 800-989-4237

(866) 605-5050 LOCATIONS NATIONALLY

NY DOI#BR-1114434

FREE ESTIMATES ON COLLISION REPAIRS WE CAN SAVE ALL OR PART OF YOUR DEDUCTIBLE!

Boldest

&Best

(518) 642-3167 Fax (518) 642-3039

Used Auto Parts • Free Nationwide Parts Locating Service Always Buying Cars & Trucks Call for Pricing (Free Towing)

Mechanical Services

Autobody Repairs

Classifieds in the REGION !

• Free Estimates • PPG Paint Mixing On Site • Frame Repairs • Auto Glass Replacement • 100% Warranty • Free Body Estimates Servicing All Makes and Models with Honesty & Integrity

88065

www.denpubs.com

Sl

6 Miles South of Granville on Route 22

alley A utomoti ve eV L t a

LC

BUSIEST

7311 State Route 22 Granville, NY 12832

Located right next door to Raymond & Sharon Nutting’s Used Cars

802-775-0091 Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9 - 6, Sat. 9 - 4, Closed Sun.

Stop into WHEELZ Wholesale for Tax Time Deals!

• Homeowners & Renters Insurance • Business/Commercial Insurance

WWW.FIESTAINSURANCE.COM

363 West Street, Rutland, VT

STAFF: Lee & Gregg Nutting, Larry Derby, Mike Steele, Lisa Nutting

AUTO & MOTORCYCLE o INSURANCE Als

AUTO DONATIONS AAAA DONATION Donate your Car, Boat or Real Estate, IRS Tax Deductible. Free Pickup/ Tow Any Model/ Condition. Help Under Privileged Children Outreach Center, 1-800883-6399.

1-800-989-4237

88092

WANTED JAP ANESE MOTORCYCLES KAWASAKI,1970-1980, Z1-900, KZ900, KZ1000, H2-750, H1-500, S1-250, S2-250, S2-350, S3-400. CASH PAID. 1-800-7721142. 1-310-721-0726.

2002 FORD F250 XL Heavy Duty. Ext. Cab, 8’ box, 8’ Fisher Plow and 4 Brand New Tires. 39,000 miles. $14,000. 518-546-7488

Catch the greatest bargains in the Classifieds Call Us At

2001 2001 1988 1999 2001 1998 2001 2004 1996 1999 1997 2003 1998 2000 2004 2000 2005 2001 1999 1977 1998 2003 1999 1998 1997 1998 2001 1996 2000 1998 2000 2001 1996 2000 1999 2002 2002 1997 1995 1996 1999 2001 2003 1997 1999 2002 2001 2002 1996 2001 1999 1999 1999 2003 1994 1999 2006 1998

Nissan Sentra Green, 5 Spd................................................................................................$2,195 Saab 9.5 Wagon 4 Cyl., Auto..............................................................................................$2,995 Chevy 4WD Truck Plow Set-up, No Blade.............................................................................$2,495 Plymouth Grand Voyager Van V6, Auto............................................................................$2,995 Saab 9.3 4 Cyl., Turbo, 5 Speed, Blue...................................................................................$2,195 Ford Expedition V8, Auto, White, 4x4.................................................... ...............................$3,995 Chrysler PT Cruiser 4 Cyl., Auto, Sunroof, Red.....................................................................$4,995 Honda Element 5 Spd., AWD, Black.......................................................................................$6,995 Chevy Tahoe V8, Auto, Blue, 4x4, Solid................................................. ................................$2,495 Chevy S10 Blazer V6, Auto, 4x4, Green..................................................... ..........................$1,495 Subaru Legacy 4x4...............................................................................................................$2,695 GMC Safari Van..................................................................................................................$4,500 Subaru Legacy Wagon 4x4.................................................................................................$2,495 Hyundai Elantra Wagon.....................................................................................................$2,495 Ford Focus............................................................................................................................$3,695 Subaru Outback 4x4, Wagon................................................................................................$3,495 Saab AWD Wagon 4 Cyl., Auto, Loaded................................................................................ $8,995 Mazda 626 4 Door, Black, 4 Cyl., 5 Spd................................................. ...............................$2,495 Cadillac DeVille V8, Auto......................................................................................................$2,995 Ford 350 Dump Truck 2WD.................................................................................................$1,995 Buick LeSabre Maroon..........................................................................................................$2,495 Dodge Grand Caravan Silver............................................................ ...................................$4,995 Dodge Durango 4x4 Silver..................................................................................................$2,995 Subaru Legacy Wagon AWD Blue......................................................................................$2,195 Saturn SL2 Gold....................................................................................................................$2,495 Chrysler Convertible Maroon..............................................................................................$2,695 Subaru Outback AWD Wagon Green..................................................................................$2,995 Jeep Grand Cherokee Black................................................................................................$1,695 Ford Windstar Van V6 Loaded, Blue......................................................... ..........................$2,695 Audi A4 4 Door, Runs Super...................................................... .............................................$2,495 Ford Escort XT 2 Door..........................................................................................................$1,495 Volvo C70 Convertible 2 Door, Auto, Blue...........................................................................$6,995 Ford Explorer V6, Auto, Clean...............................................................................................$1,795 Subaru Outback Wagon White............................................................................................$2,695 VW Passat 4 Door, Green.....................................................................................................$3,695 Chrysler Sebring Convertible Blue, Auto............................................................................$4,995 Ford Escape AWD Auto, White..............................................................................................$4,995 Mazda Miata Convertible 90K, 5 Spd.................................................................................$4,500 Volvo 850 Green..................................................................................................................$1,995 Jeep Cherokee 4x2, White....................................................................................................$2,195 Chevy S10 Blazer 4x4, Blue................................................................................................$2,495 VW Jetta Blue......................................................................................................................$3,995 Cadillac Deville Blue............................................................................................................. $3,995 Cadilla Catera Brown............................................................................................................$3,995 Ford Contour Maroon............................................................................................................$1,495 Ford Windstar Van...............................................................................................................$3,295 Mercury Sable Wagon Maroon...........................................................................................$2,195 Buick Rendezvous Silver, 4x2..............................................................................................$4,995 Subaru Outback Wagon 4x4, White....................................................................................$2,495 Subaru Outback Wagon AWD, Maroon................................................................................$2,995 Volvo V70 Wagon Pewter...................................................................................................$2,995 Mazda Extra Cab 4x4, Black, Automatic...............................................................................$3,495 Chevy Suburban V8, Automatic, Pewter, 4x4.................................................. .......................$2,995 Saturn Vue 4 Door, 5 Speed, SUV..........................................................................................$3,995 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Red, Automatic.....................................................................$1,995 Subaru Outback AWD, Wagon..............................................................................................$2,495 Ford Escape AWD, V6, Automatic, Loaded, Blue............................................... .......................$7,995 Ford Taurus 4 Door...............................................................................................................$1,595

88085

TRUCK OR VAN FOR SALE

MOTORCYCLE/ ATV

Used Cars and Trucks at Wholesale Prices

84133

L OANS A VAILABLE NO CREDIT? BAD CREDIT? BANKRUPTCY?

Hometown Chevrolet Oldsmobile 152 Broadway Whitehall, NY • (518) 499-2886 • Ask for Joe

92450

We’re Proud to introduce Factory trained Volkswagon & Audi Mechanic Jason Sweeney to our team. Jason is ASE Certified Specializing in Foreign & Domestic Vehicle repair

LABOR RATE $60 per hour Call today and get a better rate than what you’re used to.....

296 North Main Street Rutland, VT 802-775-4535 • www.careysautosales.net

88080

88091

Consistently Voted #1 Dealer In The Area For Used Car Sales & Service


www.gmoutlook.com

March 30, 2011

78413

16 - Green Mountain Outlook

GM_04-02-2011_Edition  

THISWEEK Sugaring season is here! Watch us make Maple Syrup while enjoying breakfast & lunch (weather permitting). Visit Us Online at ww...

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