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Addison County considered for storm funds pg. 3

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December 7, 2019

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J. Kirk Edwards remembered Former Eagle photographer won numerous news awards By Lou Varricchio EDITOR

MIDDLEBURY | J. Kirk Edwards, formerly of Ferrisburgh, passed away earlier this month at his retirement residence in South Carolina. Edwards served as the Vermont Eagle’s news photographer J. Kirk Edwards. File photo from 2002 to 2011. Edwards was born in Clarence, New York, on Feb. 23, 1943. As a child, Edwards was sent to France while his father served in the U.S. Navy. He spent his later youth in Mt. Kisco, New York, Grey, Maine, and in Salisbury, Vermont, where his father ran a bungalow colony for summer rentals along the north end of Lake Dunmore. He later lived in Plainfield, Waterbury and Ferrisburgh. At the start of the Vietnam War in 1964, Edwards volunteered as a U.S. Army aviator. He flew dangerous Army Intelligence reconnaissance missions aboard a small observer aircraft, often operating low over jungle treetops near the border of the former South Vietnam and North Vietnam. A graduate of the State University of New York, Purchase with a B.A. degree in fine arts and a minor in botany, he worked for several years as a photojournalist with newspapers in the Hudson Valley region. During Edwards’ stint with the Vermont Eagle, he won numerous news awards for his photography from the National Newspaper Association and Association of Free Community Papers, among others. In addition to being a photographer, Edwards found work as a salesman, cook, carpenter, an automobile “repo man”, and arts teacher. He loved steam trains as well as hunting, fishing, painting, drawing, cooking, and astronomy. He was an accomplished musician and played the drums, stride piano, and Spanish guitar. During his retirement years, he managed the popular, and often controversial, Vermont Woodchuck political blog online. He is survived by Nancy, a beloved domestic companion of many years, and brothers Kevin and John, as well as sisters Missy, Deborah, Gina, Laura, and a pet cat named MnaMna.■

Trainspotting in miniature

On Saturday, Dec. 7, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., everyone is invited to the Sheldon Museum’s annual Holiday Open House to enjoy the elaborate model train layout, carols played on an 1831 piano, and a Miniature Christmas Tree Raffle. The raffle features 16 creative trees decorated by local artists. The historic Judd-Harris House is festooned with traditional greenery by the Middlebury Garden Club. Admission to the event is by donation. For more information or the complete holiday train schedule, call the Henry Sheldon Museum, 1 Park St., Middlebury at 802-388-2117 or visit HenrySheldonMuseum.org. Photo by Trent Campbell

VIGIL ON MIDDLEBURY GREEN WILL RAISE AWARENESS John Graham Housing & Services candlelight vigil for the homeless By Lou Varricchio EDITOR

VERGENNES | When you ask Elizabeth Ready, former director of the John Graham Shelter in Vergennes, about the holidays and homelessness, you might think her reaction would reflect an overwhelming sense of so much work to be done with so little done. Not so. Despite the increase in homeless around Vermont, Ready remains optimistic. Having served as both state senator and state auditor, Ready appeared pleased to exit politics and return to Addison County

where she could work and do the most good. She now serves as the shelter’s chief financial officer and fundraising director. “I am a fifth generation Vermonter and my father talked about the work farms here,” Ready said. “Homelessness has been a part of our state, perhaps not always so visible or as much discussed as today.” Ready said that there are no loafers at the Vergennes shelter. The staff work hard to help able adults who need their services find employment. It may not always be full-time or well paid employment, but it’s a start to get people back on their own feet. “Nearly all parents (here) are working, but wages are low and the cost of rent is high. The vacancy rate here in Addison County hovers around 1%. So, to afford an average two bedroom apartment… with rent at $1,009, a person would need to earn $19.35 an hour and work 40 hours a week bringing home $40,240. That’s according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition who does an annual study on housing wages.” See VIGIL » pg. 2

What lies beneath? Champlain Valley gas will remain untapped By Lou Varricchio EDITOR

The iconic Yandow Oil Well in St. Albans was drilled to a depth of 4,500 feet in 1957. The well tower is still visible today. Photo by the Vermont Geological Survey

Correction MIDDLEBURY | The time for the Middlebury College Lessons and Carols program featured on the front page of the Nov. 30 edition was incorrect. The correct times for the two services are 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. (not 8 p.m.). We regret this oversight. ■

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MIDDLEBURY | Mention the phrase “fracked gas” around Addison County and you may find yourself getting into a lively discussion. With strong opposition to fracking and fossil fuels hereabouts, any serious talk about drilling for Vermont natural gas may invoke the always chilling Malocchio. Vermont’s 2012 decision to forbid fracking within state lines may not be good for our long-term economic well being. How so? Other states—such as Pennsylvania, Texas, Colorado and North Dakota—have done fracking and their home-grown energy work has produced bigbudget surpluses that help support expensive social programs, health care and schools. Admittedly, only a small portion of Vermont’s northwestern extreme sits atop natural gas

deposits, but it has been known to geologists since the 1940s. And while fracking in Vermont is banned (at least until the law is changed), drilling the old-fashioned way remains legal with the proper local and state permits. “Dreams of oil and natural gas in the sedimentary rocks of the Champlain lowlands have brought about surges of optimism over many years that Vermont would become an energy producer,” according to geologist Harold Meeks who wrote a book surveying the state’s resources, titled “Vermont’s Land and Resources”. Meeks’ book includes technical details about fossil-fuel reserves here; it has fueled interest in using new technologies to explore the alleged deposits. According to the University of Vermont, the Champlain Valley was formed by a deep sedimentary basin, a typical feature where biogenic oil and gas is typically found. As early as the mid 1950s, the American Gas Association had mapped the lake region in detail and designated it as a promising source for future oil and gas development. See BENEATH » pg. 3

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M A K E A F R I E N D AT TH E H U M A N E SO C I E T Y

Adopt-A-Pet JOE is the ultimate cool cat: he’s got the whole feline James Dean, sunglasses, and leather jacket vibe going. Well, you get the idea. He knows what he wants, he knows how to get it, and he gives the best hugs to sweeten you up to get his way. Joe came to us because he kept visiting the neighbors and the neighbors didn’t appreciate unexpected house guests. This cat’s guardians tried to keep him inside, but he wouldn’t take no for an answer and would make his way outside, even if it meant pushing through window screens. Like I said, this cool cat knows what he wants and won’t take no for an answer. Not only is Joe a cool cat, he’s a smart cat, too. By the end of his first “sit” training session he would walk up and sit patiently at my feed waiting for his treat. If you are looking for an indoor/outdoor cat with character galore, look no further than Cool Cat Joe. Joe qualifies for our new Paws on the Job program. Are rodents running rampant? Do you need a night security guard for your office, shop, store, or warehouse? Homeward Bound’s working cat program, Paws on the Job, matches business with cats who would thrive in a non-traditional setting. If you would like more information about Paws on the Job, please email our Feline Coordinator at mshubert@homewardboundanimals.org. ■

CARMEN | 7-year-old hound/ shepard mix spayed female red.

John Graham has served homeless families in Addison County for 40 years, but during that time, the gap between rich and poor has widened. “The richest 5% of Vermont households have average incomes 9.6 times as large as the bottom 20% of households and 3.7 times as large as the middle 20% of households,” according to Ready.” We are literally pulling apart…” Ready said the need for homeless services has changed in recent decades. “Back in 1980 people who faced homelessness were single people who perhaps had lost a

MILLIE | 3-year-old spayed female domestic medium hair black and white.

Hello, it is nice to meet you. I am thoroughly modern Millie. I arrived at RCHS at the end of October from a very busy shelter up north. I made my way across Vermont in hopes of finding my forever home. I am a bit of a shy girl at first. However, I just want love and attention. I can usually be found in a high place taking a nap. I am a very relaxed and calm cat.

I arrived at the shelter on Oct. 28 as a stray from Rutland with my best friend Carmen. It is no wonder that Carmen and l get along so well with each other, we are both so silly. I really don’t care for treats but love, love, love to be as close

job or run into some bad luck,” she said. “Today we see many more families with children who are homeless. At John Graham we have five houses, all filled with families with children. The need for services is much greater.” John Graham helps people move from temporary shelter to stable housing. “But we also help them deal with underlying issues that may cause homelessness,” Ready stressed. “Some people are fleeing violence, or face chronic physical or mental health conditions. Others struggle with addictions and may be in recovery. Many children grapple with adverse childhood events which can scar them with trauma difficult to overcome. Our trained

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service coordinators help people get permanent housing and then stick with them to help them get or keep a job, work to resolve health and mental health issues, or finish their education.” Ready and the shelter staff credit local churches for their help as well. “I hesitate to mention any one Addison County church because they all do such wonderful things to help the homeless and they work with us,” she said. Ready is upbeat about John Graham’s annual candlelight vigil and sleep out. The event will be held on Saturday, Dec. 7, in downtown Middlebury. The event is kind of a “camp meeting” to increase awareness about local homelessness. The vigil includes hot drinks, sharing, and lots of tents. “On Dec. 7 a group of hearty souls will sleep out above the Middlebury Falls in downtown Middlebury,” she said. “We hope many will

Hello, I am Sid. I arrived at RCHS at the beginning of October. I came in as a stray so not too much is known about my past. I am a little bit of a quiet guy when you first get to know me. I can be found most days at the humane society lounging in the window or asleep in my hammock. I enjoy relaxing on these cold evening days. However, I’m hoping to find my forever home with my own person. ■ Amelia Stamp, Events & Community Outreach Coordinator, Rutland County Humane Society | 802-483-6700 | www.rchsvt.org

come out for the vigil on the Middlebury Town Green beginning at 4:30 p.m. and there’s a dinner to follow at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Parish Hall. Some community members will be sleeping out for the 6th year in a row.” According to Ready, during last year’s vigil, snow fell throughout the night and attendees woke up covered in several inches of cold, wet snow. Other years, low wind chills made tenting a challenge. “For us it was just a single night,” Ready said. “Each person shares the uncertainly and fear that homeless neighbors often feel: not having a safe place to stay, a door that shuts and locks, a place to go after work or school, a private place of one’s own. It’s amazing how much dread you can feel on a cold, dark night. But in the morning we warm up around the fire, share some coffee, and know throughout the coming year many of our neighbors will get safe housing because we spent a cold night by the falls.” ■

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Early deadlines are as follows:

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sat., dec. 14th, 2019 • 8:00-10:00am santa arrives @10:30am

The Burgh/North Countryman Sun The Valley News Sun Thursday, December 19th @ Noon

This event is free and open to members and all member’s families. Gifts will be presented to children ages 0-10. Santa will arrive by horse-drawn wagon, weather permitting, with rides available around the parking lot.

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to you as possible. I will just lean into you with head held high and smile. I really like to play with all sorts of dog toys but I do have to say that tennis balls and squeaky toys are my favorite. I think you will agree that I am one handsome boy.

SID | 2-year-old neutered male domestic short hair brown tiger.

WALLE | 7-year-old pit mix neutered male black and white.

Hannah Manley, Director of Development Homeward Bound: Addison County’s Humane Society | 802-388-1100 ext. 224

From VIGIL » pg. 1

I arrived at the shelter on October 28 as a stray from Rutland with my best friend Walle. I am a happy, silly lady. I love treats and have a very gentle mouth when taking them. I know sit, shake and lay down. Once I am down I will roll over for a nice belly rub. I told you I was a silly lady. My favorite toys are squeaky ones. The more they squeak the better I like them. It is very important that Walle and I go home together.

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The Rutland County Humane Society (RCHS) is fortunate to get a lot of community support and there are many people who want to help our organization and the animals we care for. Here are a few easy ways supporters can help RCHS: Shop at Amazon using AmazonSmile and select RCHS as your charity of choice. Amazon donates 0.5% of your eligible Amazon purchases to RCHS. Search online using Good Search and/or iGive and RCHS will get money each time you search and/or shop through their participating businesses. Download the Walk For A Dog app on your phone and raise funds for RCHS every time you walk, run or bicycle. Drop redeemable bottles and cans in the shed at the RCHS shelter in Pittsford or at Green Mountain Bottle Redemption at the Howe Center in Rutland. Just tell them they’re for RCHS. Donate your spare change in the dog banks many local merchants have on their counters. Your spare change can help save a life. Please thank the merchant for supporting the animals. To learn more about any of these programs visit rchsvt.org or contact the RCHS Business Office at 802-483-9171.

Contact Rutland County Humane Society at 483-6700 or rchsvt.org or stop by 765 Stevens Road | Pittsford, VT Hours: Tues-Sat 12-5 | Sun & Mon Closed

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The Vermont Eagle | December 7, 2019 • 3

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Addison County considered for storm funds Oct. 31-Nov. 1 storm damaged roads, property By Lou Varricchio EDITOR

MIDDLEBURY | The U.S. Department of Transportation has approved $500,000 in emergency relief funding following the Halloween rainstorm that left widespread damage throughout Vermont, according to Gov. Phil Scott’s office. Communities in Addison, Chittenden, Essex, Franklin, Lamoille, Orange, Orleans

and Washington counties will be considered for funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for repairs to local public infrastructure. “These emergency funds will assist the Vermont Agency of Transportation in repairs to roads on the federal highway system damaged during the Oct. 31-Nov. 1 storm event. This funding is a critical step toward restoring Vermont’s infrastructure after this devastating storm,” Scott said last week. “I’m grateful to all of the emergency responders and road crews for their ongoing service in these efforts.” The governor said that severe storm and flooding are estimated to have caused more than $5 million in damages to state, local, and federal roads in Vermont.

File photo

Scott noted that Vermont Transportation Secretary Joe Flynn requested emergency funds from the Federal Highway Administration, and the state has been granted a quick release of $500,000 for VTrans to begin emergency repairs to the federal system. Flynn told reporters that “remaining federal highway funds will likely be released as the work is completed. Repairs on some of the most heavily damaged infrastructure may extend out 24 months. “The state has placed a high priority on emergency management planning, particularly since Tropical Storm Irene in 2011,” Flynn added. “We were prepared for this, we activated swiftly, and our crews out in the field worked diligently to get roadways re-opened as quickly as possible.” ■

Bread Loaf Corp. trains from within for needed skilled labor Middlebury company is ahead of the labor curve From News Reports THE EAGLE

Justin Wright, Bread Loaf Corporation’s site supervisor, says the program is an unexpected but remarkable part of the legacy of the $31 million Putnam Block Redevelopment Project, which is expected to serve as a model for rural downtowns throughout the Green Mountain State and in rural areas across the country. Photo provided From BENEATH » pg. 1

The remains of one large commercial drilling operation, which began in 1957, can still be seen on the old Yandow Farm in St. Albans. The Yandow well was drilled to a depth of 4,500 feet. “The well, drilled by the Henderson Company, used a cable-tool rig typical of 20th-century wells in Texas. As time passed, the wooden blocks at the base of the derrick

MIDDLEBURY | Skilled workforce shortages plague the construction industry, with Bureau of Labor Statistics data showing 379,000 vacant jobs in the sector nationally. Meanwhile, Middlebury-based Bread Loaf Corporation, Construction Manager of Bennington’s ambitious Putnam Block Redevelopment Project in Bennington—intended to catalyze economic and community development in southern Vermont—has been staying ahead of the curve, leveraging the skilled labor shortage to its advantage. Where the firm joins its peers in remaining eager to continue recruiting and retaining skilled workers from the general labor pool, it stands out, in a remarkable win-win, by investing in the folks already on the payroll. Since mid-September, Bread Loaf Corporation has been offering free weekly training sessions for its unskilled workers, who already contribute in other ways. The payoff for the workers is a marketable skillset and path to promotion; the company, and the industry, gains talent they can build on. Ryan Ahern, Bread Loaf Corporation’s director of safety and training, spearheads the initiative. Backed by the site’s construction foreman, lift operator, and other skilled construction workers, Ahern says the innovation turns part of his workforce into volunteer teachers for an eager pool of vetted, ready labor—who now will have to

rotted and the derrick settled on the well head, tipping it about 30 degrees,” according to the Vermont Geological Survey project summary. When the Bellrose family of Swanton struck a pocket of natural gas—while drilling a 650-feet-deep water well, in 1957—it set of a mini gas boom. This period of what would be several up and down booms never produced anything; it petered out in the mid 1970s. “We had a new well drilled to 650 feet deep

pay nothing for a vital leg up in the field. Taught are fundamental skills such as tool use and general framing techniques, moving up to foundational carpentry, with such skills as building a stud wall and framing sequencing, familiarity with technical terminology, and lift safety. On average, Ahearn says, approximately 15 employees take classes every week. There’s even a translator for a hearingimpaired worker. Justin Wright, Bread Loaf Corporation’s site supervisor, says the program is an unexpected but remarkable part of the legacy of the $31 million Putnam Block Redevelopment Project, which is expected to serve as a model for rural downtowns throughout the Green Mountain State and in rural areas across the country. “We’re very happy with how this is working out for the workers showing us what they’ve got and for our skilled construction professionals, who are really impressing us with the care they’re giving to make sure the right skills are taught safely and in the right way. It not only improves workplace morale, it also provides a team building experience for the crew,” Wright said. In addition to renovating three buildings gracing the National Register listed Historic District, Phase I demolishes structures, executes environmental remediation, and creates parking and mixed-use office, residential, restaurant, and retail space. The block will boast 78,000 square feet of renovated space and 30 new market-rate and income-qualified apartments. Planners expect the work to draw more than 50 new residents downtown and to create hundreds of permanent jobs. The project, with M&S Development as development consultant and Stevens & Associates as lead design firm, is backed by more than 17 public and private sources and more than 20 local investors. The groundbreaking was Aug. 7. ■

and hooked the water into the house. After you drew it from the tap it looked and tasted like Alka Seltzer,” Mrs. Lawrence Bellrose reported to Meeks about the 1957 drilling effort. “(One day) my husband went down to the cellar... he struck a match and the room lit up with a ball of fire!” Despite an effort by the state of Vermont to reach 90 percent carbon-free energy by 2050, it’s still interesting to consider what fossil fuel

deposits remain untapped, perhaps forever, beneath the local bedrock. As Vermont moves away from adding more oil into its energy mix, it has welcomed the use of natural gas (all of it Canadian gas unless you consider local biogas such as what will be produced at the Goodrich Farm in Salisbury next year). But who knows? Perhaps this hidden, natural energy resource may be tapped to serve the people of Vermont in the faraway future. ■

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Opinion

Our goal at the Vermont Eagle is to publish accurate, useful and timely information in our newspapers, news products, shopping guides, vacation guides, and other specialty publications for the benefit of our readers and advertisers. We value your comments and suggestions concerning all aspects of this publication. Publisher Ed Coats ed@addison-eagle.com Editor Lou Varricchio lou@addison-eagle.com Account Executive Cyndi Armell cyndi@addison-eagle.com Account Executive Heidi Littlefield heidi@addison-eagle.com

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Ph.: 518-873-6368 Fx.: 518-873-6360 ADVERTISING POLICIES: Denton Publications, Inc. disclaims all legal responsibility for errors or omissions or typographic errors. All reasonable care is taken to prevent such errors. We will gladly correct any errors if notification is received within 48 hours of any such error. We are not responsible for photos, which will only be returned if you enclose a self-addressed envelope. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: All of The Eagle publications are available for a subscription rate of $75 per year. First Class Mail Subscription is $150 annually. EDITORIAL AND OPINION PAGE POLICY: Letters, editorials and photo submissions are welcomed. Factual accuracy cannot be guaranteed in Letters to the Editor or Guest Editorials. Editor reserves the right to reject or edit any editorial matter. All views expressed in Letters or Guest Editorials are not necessarily the views of the paper, its staff or the company. ©COPYRIGHT PROTECTION: This publication and its entire contents are copyrighted, 2018, Denton Publications, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without prior written consent. All Rights Reserved. Association Members of: CPNE • IFPA • AFCP • FCPNE • PaperChain 172878

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Please help us continue to tell the stories of Vermont and New York’s North Country Each week, we do our best to provide our readers with timely, accurate community news, as well as coverage of education, features on engaging community members, and the high school sports coverage you have come to expect. We see it as our role to highlight the good things that are happening in our North Country communities, and to shine a spotlight on the many wonderful volunteers and organizations that might otherwise go unrecognized. More often than not, when we cover an event, we’re the only media there. Gone are the days when one of the paid regional dailies or local broadcast entities sent a camera operator and reporter to cover local events. Only the rare story that might have regional appeal is picked up by other entities. But while we’ve outlasted the competition for hyperlocal news, competition for advertising dollars – the lifeblood of our newspapers – has increased. At the same time, price increases beyond our control, affecting the cost of personnel, newsprint, supplies, equipment, and postage have increased and will continue to increase in the future. These challenges are not unique to The Eagle and The SUN. Newspapers across the country are struggling with the burden of increased costs and declining advertising revenues. In the past five years, more than 1,800 weaker publications have already collapsed under the weight. In looking for ways to control expenses, we’ve

attempted to make some reductions in our coverage area. In turn, readers, advertisers, and even town officials have stressed how important the role of The Eagle and The SUN plays in reaching and serving our rural communities. Now, before it is too late, we’re asking you to help us continue to perform The Eagle and The SUN’s mission of providing you with a source of compelling and accurate community news. Please consider for a moment the value you receive from the news, features, sports, commentary, fliers and local marketing information you read each week in your Eagle and SUN. Is that worth 50 cents a week to you? Or $1? Perhaps more? If so, then, please consider contributing to this critical source of local journalism. Some of our readers may recall, the concept of paying for a subscription to the weekly newspaper is not a new one. Not too many years ago, the only way to receive our local weekly newspaper was to pay for an annual subscription or to plop down 50 cents a copy at a local convenience store. Over the years, we made the decision to deliver the paper to every household, free of charge. In doing so, local merchants and commercial operators were anxious to have their information provided to the readers in The Eagle and The SUN, delivered through the U.S. Postal Service.

That model of distribution helped us to increase our circulation and fill a valuable void at a time when other newspapers were experiencing circulation declines. And, for several years, we saw a corresponding uptick in advertising because our clients gained the benefit of those additional readers through our expanded reach. But, with new advertising competition as well as changes in consumer buying habits, that trendline has changed. While local advertising is, and will remain, our core revenue source, current trends suggest that without reader support, advertising alone will not cover the high costs we face maintaining our current rural circulation reach. That is where you come in. By providing The Eagle and The SUN with Enhanced Support (see page 8), you will help preserve and strengthen this vital community resource. You will also be eligible for monthly prize drawings and be invited to join our staff for periodic events where you can share your thoughts about the community, the newspaper, and how we can make The Eagle and The SUN an even more vital part of your community. For more than sevent y years, Denton Publications, now rebranded as The Eagle and The SUN, has been telling the story of this magnificent area. With your support, we can continue to share the stories for many years to come. — The Eagle ■

Guest viewpoint

Giving thanks For Vermont farmers, friends and food By Anson Tebbetts SECRETARY, VERMONT AGENCY OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD & MARKETS

We just celebrated the season of giving thanks. The autumn harvest is complete, and we thank farmers, particularly our Vermont farmers, for providing us with food. Thanksgiving is special time for family and friends to reconnect, pause and enjoy a few hours together over a meal - a meal, thanks to a farmer. Many of you will enjoy a fresh Vermont turkey that was raised by neighbors, perhaps filled with local bread or stuffing mix. Maybe you like to change it up around the dinner table, serving pork, chicken, lamb or beef. Vermont is blessed to have so many choices thanks to our farmers. From parsnips to potatoes, Vermont farmers statewide supply fresh vegetables to add to the repast. It might be spuds smothered in Green Mountain butter or butternut squash doused in pure Vermont Maple. It’s all made possible by a farmer or producer.

We raise our glasses to our farmers. The Thanksgiving toast might be a fresh glass of milk from one of our local dairies, or the cheers could come from Vermont’s outstanding wine, beer or spirit companies. We are thankful for their commitment to agriculture on this day and every day. Thanksgiving would not be a day for to give thanks without pumpkin, apple, or mince pie. Our desserts are made possible by our bakers and farmers. It’s a sweet way to complete the Thanksgiving meal. Thanksgiving is also a day to think of those less fortunate: neighbors helping neighbors… what Vermonters do. Farmers often are the first to contribute to their local food shelf or donate fresh products to a gleaning program. Their contributions make a difference to so many. Farmers also open their land to recreation. Hikers, hunters, anglers and other recreational enthusiasts are thankful for what farmers provide. We also give thanks to our farmers for their contributions to our land, water and hills. It’s been a challenging year with snow, rain and floods. But farmers are adapting and still feeding us. Those open fields and vistas don’t happen without hard

work and commitment to Vermont’s environment. Farmers work hard, 365 days a year, to care for our forests, open land, sugar woods and tree farms. Our visitors are thankful when they come to the Green Mountains in all five (mud!) seasons. We also give thanks to all those who support Vermont’s farmers and producers. Buying your food at a farmers’ market or at a local co-op called out with that Vermont label, buying local food through a CSA program at your place of business or shopping at one of Vermont’s many farmers markets. It might be giving gifts of Vermont products - we are thankful for those who ship a taste of Vermont all over the world. Commitments to buy local are meaningful and do not go unnoticed. They help all of us. Thank you for pausing and thinking about our tremendous assets this season – the harvest, the care we show each other, and our care of the land. We are blessed to have so many around the table thinking of our farmers, this Thursday, and every day. ■ — Anson Tebbetts is the Secretary of the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets

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If you’re a fan of newsprint like we are, you can now immerse yourself in 200-plus years of local newspapers on the internet. You can now explore hundreds of thousands of pages of old Vermont papers dating from the 1700s to 1922, and all for free. To learn how go online and visit: sec.state.vt.us/ me dia/9 139 53/v s ar a _ newspaperscom_instructionsfor vtresidents.pdf. Pictured: Cyclists outside the Island House in South Hero in the early 1900s. Photo courtesy of Luis Vivanco, UVM

Attention All Advertisers! EARLY NEW YEAR’S DEADLINES FOR THE ISSUE OF SATURDAY, JANUARY, 4 2020 Our offices will be closed on January 1, 2020 Early deadlines are as follows: NORTHERN NY ZONE The Burgh/North Countryman - Sun Valley News - Sun Friday, December 27, 2019 @ Noon

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Local landscaping firm wins national award Charlotte company started in 1987 By Lou Varricchio EDITOR

CHARLOTTE | At the annual ASLA Conference on Landscape Architecture in San Diego, California, last week, the American Society of Landscape Architecture (ASLA) presented one of its highest honors, the Landscape Architecture Firm Award, to Heritage Landscapes, LLC, headquartered in Charlotte. The ASLA Landscape Architecture Award recognizes the Heritage Landscapes distinguished body of work, with a litany of successful projects addressing landscapes of great historic significance throughout the United States and abroad.

When Patricia O’Donnell founded Heritage Landscapes, LLC in 1987, there were no official guidelines for historic landscape preservation works. Heritage Landscapes has completed over 500 projects nationally and internationally, including four World Heritage sites and 44 National Historic Landmarks, and have won 89 professional awards to date. “We here in the Vermont Chapter of ASLA are extremely proud of Patricia and her team at heritage Landscapes and very glad that they are getting the national recognition that they deserve.” said Jim Donovan, president of the Vermont Chapter of ASLA. “We congratulate Heritage Landscapes, LLC on their incredible achievements.” ■ Award-winning: Notable projects by Hertiage Landscapes, LLC, of Charlotte, include Shelburne Farms. Public domain photo by Marc N. Belanger

Fake doctor convicted of possessing child pornography Texas man tricked a Middlebury student By Lou Varricchio EDITOR

MIDDLEBURY | A Texas man, who was

accused of posing as a medical a doctor as a way to “medically inspect” a Middlebury College student, was convicted of a federal charge of possessing child pornography in Burlington last week. In a federal court in downtown Burlington, the jury found Nam Vu Bui, 35, of Houston, Texas, guilty. The jury’s decision was on a felony

charge of possessing child pornography. Bui could spend 10 years in prison as a result of the jury’s outcome. In 2016, Bui was alleged to have sexually assaulted a Middlebury student in her dorm posing as a physician. However, Bui had claimed that he was on campus to see his girlfriend.

According to court records, Bui had convinced his Middlebury victim that he was an M.D. at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire. Addison County’s State’s Attorney Dennis Wygmans said he had dismissed some of the various charges against Bui so that a stronger federal prosecution effort could proceed against him. ■

Condos, others urge support of revised voting act Condos takes lead on proposed law From Staff & News Reports THE EAGLE

Jim Condos: “Senator Leahy, Senator Sanders, and Representative Welch have represented Vermont well as outspoken advocates for voting rights.” Photo by Lou Varricchio

MONTPELIER | Last week, Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos called upon members of Congress to pass comprehensive voting rights legislation. The U.S. House of Representatives may vote soon on the Voting Rights Advancement Act, which would restore the 1965 Voting Rights Act protections that were voided by the Supreme Court’s decision in Shelby County v. Holder. U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy authored and led 46 senators in introducing the Senate version of the Voting Rights Advancement Act earlier this year. “The right to vote is a sacred right enshrined in our Constitution,” said Condos. “In the last decade we have seen a renewed assault on voting rights in states across the country. It’s time for Congress to step up and ensure that every eligible American can access their right to register and vote.” Condos is a long-time champion for voter rights and access, and Vermont is seen as a national leader. Voter access reforms enacted in Vermont include automatic voter registration, same day voter registration, online voter registration and polling place look-up, deliberative voter checklist maintenance practices, and a no-excuse 45 day early voting period. “The erosion of civil rights, like the right to vote, is a threat to our very democracy,” said Condos. “The Shelby County decision opened the doors for discriminatory voter suppression laws in states around the country, allowing opponents of voting rights to use strict voter ID laws, aggressive voter registration checklist purging, and gerrymandering to strengthen their political power by suppressing the voting rights of minority communities.” In the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision, considered by liberal voting rights advocates to be a “damaging blow to

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democracy”, the Court said that Congress needed to build a record of discriminatory activity. Following field hearings around the country by House Administration, the Voting Rights Advancement Act was introduced in February 2019. The Voting Rights Advancement Act was introduced by lead sponsor Senator Patrick Leahy, and was co-sponsored by Senator Bernie Sanders. Representative Peter Welch is a co-sponsor of HR 4, the companion House bill. “Congress has the ability, and responsibility, to ensure that the rights of all American voters are upheld,” said Condos. “Senator Leahy, Senator Sanders, and Representative Welch have represented Vermont well as outspoken advocates for voting rights. I hope their colleagues will join with the Vermont delegation, and civil rights leaders from across the country, in this important voting rights advancement. In the spirit of those who have fought so hard throughout our country’s history to advance voting rights, it’s time to move forward, not backwards.” Condos, and legislative leaders in Vermont, have resisted the voting rights roll-backs seen in other states, which are often justified by baseless fearmongering and unsupported claims of widespread voter-fraud. As a result, Vermont has high registration rates and no problems with voter fraud. “Election integrity does not have to come at the expense of lawful voter access to the ballot box,” said Condos. ■

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For more details on these listings please visit events.addison-eagle.com

Calendar of Events Please submit events at least two weeks prior to the event day for them to appear in print. Some print fees may apply.

DEC. 6

Bristol » Candy Cane Hunt held at

Bristol Town Green; 6:00 PM. The hunt for the hidden candy canes begins at the corner of the Green next to the Veterans Memorial. Bundle up, bring your flashlight and help Santa find them all! This event is free and open to all ages.

DEC. 7

Bristol » Christmas Bazaar held

at Bristol Federated Church; 9:00 AM. Homemade crafts, homemade soup and sandwich lunch, silent auction, homemade baked goods, indoor yard sale. Santa visits from 10am-12pm.

DEC. 7TH

Sheldon Museum’s Annual Holiday Open House

Middlebury » Sheldon Museum’s Annual Holiday Open House held at Henry Sheldon Museum; 10:00 AM. Enjoy the elaborate model train layout, carols played on the Sheldon’s 1831 piano, and a Miniature Christmas Tree Raffle featuring 16 trees decorated by local artists. Admission by donation. Burlington » Book Signing: Molly Stevens, “All About Dinner” held at Phoenix Books Burlington; 12:00 PM. Join Molly Stevens for a meetand greet and book signing of her new book, “All About Dinner.”

DEC. 8

Middlebury » Sheldon Museum’s Annual Holiday Open House held at Henry Sheldon Museum; 12:00 PM. Enjoy the elaborate model train layout, carols played on the Sheldon’s 1831 piano, and a Miniature Christmas Tree Raffle featuring 16 trees decorated by local artists. Admission by donation. Brandon » 39th Annual Brandon Carol Festival held at Brandon Congregational Church; 3:00 PM. This holiday favorite features The Brandon

Festival Singers, a flute soloist and The Catamount Brass Quintet. Gene Childers, conductor. Jean Childers, accompanist. Free will offering.

DEC. 12

Middlebury » Community

Breakfast and Discussion on the Impact of an Aging Population held at Counseling Service of Addison County; 8:00 AM. Economist Dr. Art Woolf will be speaking about the impact of Vermont’s aging population on the economy of Addison County and Vermont. This free event includes a light breakfast. RSVP: Jenn Staats at 802-388-0302 ext 442 or jstaats@ csac-vt.org.

DEC. 15

Brandon » Gifts Galore Kid Store! held at Brandon House of Pizza; 2:00 PM. Kids under 12 years are invited to come and shop for gifts for their family and friends! Nice, gently used items are available for prices of 50¢, $1, and $3, so they can experience the joy of giving. Limit of 6 gifts per child, please.

DEC. 19

Brandon » Moonlight Madness

Craft Fair Part 2! held at Brandon Town Hall; 4:00 PM. Food, last minute shopping on 3 stories, unusual vendors, locally sourced items.

DEC. 20

Bristol » Friday Night Film

To list your event call (518) 873-6368 ext. 225 or email calendar@suncommunitynews.com. You can also submit your event on our website! Go to: events.addison-eagle.com

Showing: “Elf” held at Lawrence Memorial Library; 7:30 PM. Bristol CORE and the Lawrence Memorial Library continue their Reel Film Fridays season of classic and contemporary films with a showing of the holiday classic Elf starring Will Ferrell, James Caan, and Bob Newhart.

DEC. 21

Brandon » Brandon Farmers

Market Holiday Fair held at Neshobe School; 9:00 AM. Featuring local vendors of all kinds: soaps, syrup, dried flowers, ornaments, toys, jewelry, knits, houseplants, preserves, cheeses, and delicious locally made food! Bristol » Lantern Making Workshop held at Holley Hall; 4:30 PM. Create your own holiday lanterns in this special, free workshop, led by Art on Main, then use them at the Lumen Celebration of Fire & Light event! All ages welcome, and all supplies provided! Bristol » Lumen Celebration of Fire & Light held at Bristol Town Green; 5:30 PM. Bristol CORE and Tandem host this unique event featuring Vermont fire performing troupe Cirque de Fuego on the Town Green, a procession down Main Street, and fire pits, food and drink downtown. Brandon » Christmas Concert! held at Brandon Town Hall; 7:00 PM. Combining traditional songs, and not-so-traditional songs, this is

a family friendly evening! Surprise visitor at the end of the concert! There will be concessions for sale. No admission, but donations are gratefully accepted.

DEC. 22

Brandon » Big Christmas Party!

held at Brandon American Legion Post 55; 2:00 PM. Crafts, Santa, music and fun!

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Remembering Jake Burton Carpenter Co-inventor of the snowboard From News Reports THE EAGLE

BURLINGTON | Jake Burton Carpenter (April 29, 1954 – Nov. 20, 2019), also known as Jake Burton, was an American snowboarder and founder of Burton Snowboards and one of the inventors of the modern day snowboard. He grew up in Cedarhurst, New York. After college, Carpenter’s interests returned to the slopes. Working from a barn in Londonderry, Vermont, he improved on the Snurfer, a basic toy snowboard which featured a rope to allow the rider some basic control over the board. By the late 1970s, he joined a small cadre of manufacturers who had begun selling snowboards with design

features such as a bentwood laminate core and a rigid binding which held the board firmly to the wearer’s boot. Burton is credited with developing the economic ecosystem around snowboarding as a lifestyle, sport, and culture, in addition to premier board manufacturer. Burton has been one of the world’s largest snowboard and snowboarding-equipment manufacturers since the late 1980s. Carpenter’s wife, Donna, serves as Burton Snowboards CEO. Carpenter resided in Stowe, Vermont, with his wife, Donna and his son, Timi. Carpenter also had two other sons, George and Taylor. Burton Carpenter was a member of the Vermont Sports Hall of Fame. Carpenter survived several health scares in his later

years: knee injuries, testicular cancer, pulmonary embolism, and, notably, the Miller Fisher variant of Guillain–Barré syndrome, a rare and serious neurological disorder. “It takes millions of years to move mountains, but Jake Burton Carpenter was able to do it in a single lifetime,” said Gov. Phil Scott last week.” From snowboarders being chased from the slopes to Olympic gold medals being placed around their necks, Jake led the way and changed winter as we know it. We are forever grateful for his contributions to Vermont and snow sports around the world.” Carpenter died Nov. 20, 2019, in Burlington, Vermont, after announcing reoccurrence of his cancer to Burton staff earlier in the month. ■

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Survey seeks local farmers’ input By Lisa Halvorsen U VM EXTENSION SERVICE

MIDDLEBURY | Interest in pursuing agritourism opportunities is increasing among farmers and value-added producers in Vermont and other states as a means of enhancing farm viability and profits. Many manage farm stands and pickyour-own operations. Others host on-farm suppers, farm stays, school field trips, public tours, outdoor recreation and harvest events, among other experiences. To gauge the scope and impact of the industry nationwide, farmers throughout the country are being asked to participate in a short survey for a study led by the University of Vermont. The data will be used by cooperative extension and research personnel to develop resources to help increase the success of small- and medium-sized farms that offer on-farm direct sales, education, hospitality, recreation, entertainment and other types of agritourism. The survey, which will take about 10-15 minutes to complete, is available online

a go.uvm.edu/agritourismsur vey. All responses will be kept confidential, and participants may opt out of answering survey questions at any time. In addition to demographic and farm information, the survey will collect data on direct sales and agritourism experiences offered, visitor numbers and goals, successes, challenges and future plans for agritourism. Farmers also will be able to provide input on the types of support needed to achieve success with agritourism including on-farm direct sales. This multi-state survey and research project is being coordinated by Extension Professor Lisa Chase and Associate Professor David Conner, both with the University of Vermont, and funded through a Critical Agriculture Research and Extension grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Collaborators include research and cooperative extension faculty in California, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon and West Virginia. For questions regarding the survey, contact Lisa Chase at lisa.chase@uvm.edu or 802-2577967, ext. 311. ■

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A remarkable likeness of the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, Rutland’s newest sculpture is designed to celebrate William G. Wilson, known as “Bill W.” The bust was unveiled last week in the Center Street Marketplace. Wilson was born in Dorset and moved to Rutland as a young child.The sculpture, carved in Danby white marble was donated by Vermont Quarries. Photo provided

Briefs

Middlebury OKs liquor license

MIDDLEBURY | Upon recommendation from the Middlebury Infrastructure Committee, the Selectboard awarded a contract to Broughton’s Farm Supply in Bridport for the purchase of a Cub Cadet 4x4 utility vehicle for use by the Parks & Recreation Department, for a total cost of $11,968. Funding for the purchase had been earmarked in the FY 2019-20 capital budget. Also, the Board provisionally approved a First Class Liquor License Application for Joshua D. Newton LLC, doing business as the Caddy Shack, for its 260 Exchange St. location, pending the

successful completion of required public safety inspections. A First Class Liquor License from the Vermont Department of Liquor Control (DLC) grants a licensee permission to sell beer and wine for onpremise consumption. ■

“Moonlight Madness” Xmas event in Brandon BRANDON | Moonlight Madness Part 2 will be held on Thursday, Dec 19, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., in Brandon Town Hall. Friendly vendors will be on hand in a holiday atmosphere where you can relax, eat good food and help out local charities. For more information, contact Colleen Wright at cwright@townofbrandon.com. ■

Religious Services ADDISON ADDISON COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH - Addison Four Corners, Rts. 22A & 17. Sunday Worship at 10:30am, Adult Sunday School at 9:30am; Bible Study at 2pm on Thursdays. Call Pastor Steve @ 759-2326 for more information. HAVURAH, THE JEWISH CONGREGATION OF ADDISON COUNTY - Havurah House, 56 North Pleasant St. A connection to Judaism and Jewish life for all who are interested. Independent and unaffiliated. High Holy Day services are held jointly with Middlebury College Hillel. Weekly Hebrew School from September to May. Information: 388-8946 or www. addisoncountyhavurah.org BRANDON BRANDON BAPTIST CHURCH - Corner of Rt. 7 & Rt. 73W (Champlain St.) Brandon, VT 802-247-6770. Sunday Services: 10am. Adult Bible Study, Sunday School ages 5 & up, Nursery provided ages 4 & under. Worship Service 11am. BRANDON CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH - Rt. 7 Sunday Worship 10a.m. LIVING WATER ASSEMBLY OF GOD - 76 North Street (Route 53), Office Phone: 247-4542. Email: LivingWaterAssembly@gmail.com. Website: www.LivingWaterAOG.org. Sunday Service 10a.m. Wednesday Service 7p.m. Youth Meeting (For Teens) Saturday 7p.m. FURNACE BROOK WESLEYAN CHURCH BRANDON CAMPUS - 1895 Forest Dale Rd., Brandon, VT. Sunday Service 10am Children’s Church, nursery and free coffee www. furnacebrook.org (802) 483-2531 office@furnacebrook.org ST. MARY’S PARISH - 38 Carver St., 247-6351, Saturday Mass 4pm, Sunday Mass 11am SAINT THOMAS & GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH - 19 Conant Sq. Sunday Worship - Rite II, 8:00am. - no music, low key and contemplative. 10am. - with music, family friendly. BRIDPORT BRIDPORT CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH - Middle Rd., Bridport, VT. Pastor Tim Franklin, 7582227. Sunday worship services at 10:30am. Sunday School 9:30am for children ages 3 and up. BRISTOL BRISTOL CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP - NOW meeting for worship Sundays at 3 p.m. at The Bristol Federated Church 37 North Street Bristol VT 05443 Use the side door entrance. 453-2660 or 453-2614 Website: www.bristolcf.org or find us on Facebook! BRISTOL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH - 839 Rockydale Rd. - Saturday Services: Bible Studies for all ages - 9:30am to 10:30am, Song Service, Worship Service at 11am. Prayer Meeting Thursday 6:30pm. 453-4712 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF BRISTOL - 10 Park St., Bristol. Worship Service 10:15am, Children’s Sunday School 11am. For more info call (802) 453-2551. Visit our Facebook page for special events. BRISTOL FEDERATED CHURCH - 37 North St., Bristol. Sunday Worship Service 10:15am. All are Welcome! Children join families at the beginning of worship then after having Children’s Message down front, they head out for Sunday School in the classroom. Winter service will be held in the renovated Education Wing. Enter at side door on Church Street. Come as you are. For more info call (802) 453-2321. Pastor Bill Elwell. Rescueme97@yahoo.com bristolfederatedchurch.org EAST MIDDLEBURY/RIPTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH - Jct. Rt. 116 and 125. Service at 9am. Contemporary Service

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VERGENNES UNITED METHODIST CHURCH -10:30a.m. VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH - 862 US Rt. 7, Sunday: 9:45am Bible Hour For All Ages Including 5 Adult Classes; 11:00am Worship Including Primary Church Ages 3 to 5 & Junior Church 1st - 4th Graders; 6pm Evening Service Worship For All Ages. Wednesday 6:30pm Adult Prayer & Bible Study; 802-877-3393 VERGENNES CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH - 30 South Water Street. Sunday Morning Worship begins at 9:30am. Sunday School and nursery care are available. Rev. Dr. Barbara Purinton, Interim Pastor. Abigail Diehl-Noble Christian Education Coordinator. 802-877-2435. https://www.vergennesucc.org/ WHITING WHITING COMMUNITY CHURCH - Sunday school 9:45am, Sunday Service 11am & 7pm RUTLAND ALL SAINTS ANGLICAN CHURCH “The Bible Catholic Church” - 42 Woodstock Ave., Rutland, VT 802-779-9046, www.allsaintsrutlandvt.org. Sunday Service 8am & 10am. CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH - 2 Meadow Lane, Rutland, VT 802-775-0358. (2 blocks south of the Rutland Country Club) Sunday Worship Service 9:30a.m. Nursery care available. www.cbcvt.org FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH - 81 Center St., 773-8010 - The Rev. Mark E. Heiner, Pastor. Sunday worship 10:30a.m., Sunday school 9:00a.m. GOOD SHEPHERD - Gather weekly on Saturdays @ 5:30 and Sundays @ 9:30. The Reverend John m. Longworth is Pastor. GREEN MOUNTAIN MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH - 98 Killington Ave., 775-1482 Sunday Worship 11a.m. & 6p.m. MESSIAH LUTHERAN CHURCH - 42 Woodstock Ave., 775-0231. Sunday Worship 10a.m. ROADSIDE CHAPEL ASSEMBLY OF GOD - Town Line Rd., 775-5805. Sunday Worship 10:25a.m. RUTLAND JEWISH CENTER - 96 Grove St., 773-3455. Fri. Shabbat Service 7:30p.m., Sat. Shabbat Service 9:30a.m. ST. PETER’S CHURCH - 134 Convent Ave. - Saturday Afternoon Vigil Mass at 4:15p.m., Sunday Masses 11:00a.m. TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH - 85 West St., Rutland, 775-4368. Holy Eucharist, Sunday 9:30a.m., Thursday 10:30a.m., Morning Prayer Monday-Saturday at 8:45a.m. UNITED METHODIST CHURCH - 60 Strongs Ave., Rutland, 773-2460. Sunday Service in the Chapel 9:30a.m. IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY (IHM) ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH - 18 Lincoln Ave., Rutland. Pastor: Msgr. Bernard Bourgeois, Office: 802-775-0846, Religious Education: 802-7750846, Liturgy of the Mass: Saturdays at 4p.m., Sundays at 8a.m.; Holy Days: To be announced. ihmrutland@comcast.net; IHMRutland.com GATEWAY CHURCH - 144 Woodstock Ave., Rutland, VT 802-773-0038. Fellowship 9:45a.m.; Adult Service 10:30a.m.; Children’s Service 10:30a.m. Pastors Tommy and Donna Santopolo. tommy@gatewaychurchunited.com www.gatewaychurchunited.com WEYBRIDGE WEYBRIDGE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH - 2790 Weybridge Rd., Weybridge, VT, 545-2579. Sunday Worship, 10a.m. Childcare provided. Rev. Daniel Cooperrider, email: pastor_weybridge@ gmavt.net; website: weybridgechurch.org

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at 10:30am. Sunday School during 9am service. Call Pastor Bob Bushman at 388-7423 for more information. All are welcome. VALLEY BIBLE CHURCH - 322 East Main St., Middlebury. 802-377-9571. Sunday School 9:30am, Sunday Worship 10:45am, Thursday AWANA 6:30-7:30pm. Sunday evening and mid week life groups. Contact church for times and places. Pastor Ed Wheeler, midvalleybc@aol.com MIDDLEBURY CHAMPLAIN VALLEY UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS - 2 Duane Ave., Middlebury, VT. Sunday church services and Religious Exploration for children begin at 10:00 am. Parking is available at the church and at nearby Middlebury Union High School. Coffee hour immediately following the service. Rev. Barnaby Feder, minister. Office: 802-388-8080. www.cvuus.org MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH - 97 South Pleasant St., Middlebury. Sunday Worship at 10:00am with Junior Church (K-4th) and nursery (0-4) available. Sunday School for children and adults at 9:00am. Youth Group/Bible Study and Small Groups/Fellowship Groups during the week. Pastor: Rev. Dr. Stephanie Allen. Web: www.memorialbaptistvt.org. Email: membaptistvt@gmail.com. Facebook: MBC Middlebury Vermont 802-388-7472. UNITED METHODIST CHURCH - 43 North Pleasant St., Middlebury, VT 05753, (802) 388-2510. Sunday schedule: 10:00am Adult Education, 10:45am Morning Worship. Rev. Mari Clark. CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS (MIDDLEBURY WARD) - Sacrament Worship Service: Sunday 9:00am. Meetinghouse-133 Valley View, Middlebury, VT 05753. NEW HAVEN ADDISON COUNTY CHURCH OF CHRIST - 145 Campground Rd., 453-5704. Worship: Sunday 9 & 11:20am; Bible classes: Sunday 10:30am, Tuesday 6pm. Free home Bible studies available by appointment. NEW HAVEN UNITED REFORM CHURCH - 1660 Ethan Allen Hwy, New Haven, VT. (802) 3881345 Worship services at 10am & 7pm. Pastor Andrew Knott. www.nhurc.org newhavenvturc@ gmail.com PROCTOR ST. PAUL LUTHERAN CHURCH - 1 Gibbs Street (opposite elementary school) Proctor, Vermont 05765. Sunday Service at 9:00am. 802-459-2728 VERGENNES/PANTON ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHRISTIAN CENTER - 1759 U.S. Route 7, Vergennes, VT • 802-8773903 • Sunday school 9am, Sunday worship 10am. Sunday evening and mid week life groups: Contact church office for times and places. Rev. Michael Oldham. pastormike@agccvt.org; agccvt.org CHAMPLAIN VALLEY CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH - 73 Church St in Waltham. The Rev. Phillip Westra, pastor. Sunday: Worship services at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., nursery available, Sunday school for children at 11:15 a.m. Weekday groups include Coffee Break Womens’ Group, Young Peoples (7th to 12th grade), Young Adult Married and Singles, and more. 877-2500 or www.cvcrc.net. PANTON COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH - 49 Adams Ferry Road, just around the corner from the Panton General Store. Pastor Tom Lupien, Teaching Pastor Eric Carter. Sunday School and Adult Bible Study 9:30 am, Worship Service 10:30 am with nursery and junior church. Wednesday evening Bible study is held in a local home; call for details. 802-475-2656. ST. PETER’S ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH - Saturday 4:30pm, Sunday 10:30am


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Health Services Administrator and RN Supervisor Needed in Springfield, VT! Join our growing team of over 6,000 health professionals nationwide! Centurion is proud to be a leading provider of comprehensive healthcare services to correctional facilities, state hospitals, and community mental health centers nationwide. Katie George scored the game’s lone goal in Saturday’s win.

Photo by Mark Palczewski courtesy of Middlebury College

Goal lifts Panthers in NCAA semifinals From Campus New Reports MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE

MIDDLEBURY | Second-ranked Middlebury College advanced to the NCAA Championship game for the ninth time in program history after a 1-0 win over third-ranked Salisbury (20-2) Saturday at the Spooky Nook Sports Complex in Manheim, Pennsylvania. The two-time defending NCAA Champion Panthers (20-1) will face No. 6 Franklin & Marshall in the championship game on Sunday after this week’s Eagle goes to press. In the first quarter, Middlebury had the best chance to get on the scoreboard 4:38 into play. Erin Nicholas drove down the right side, lifting a shot from three yards out that Salisbury goalie Dom Farrace saved with her left pad. The second quarter saw Middlebury control much of the action in its offensive end. The Panthers had a pair of quality scoring opportunities, both coming on penalty corners. With just over six minutes left, Emma Johns received a pass driving toward the goal and lifted a shot from five yards that Farrace padded away. In the final minute, the Panthers worked the ball around the circle before Johns laced a shot that was saved by Farrace on the left side of the crease, sending the contest scoreless into the halftime break.

After the intermission on a penalty corner with 13:20 left in the third quarter, a shot from Marissa Baker on the left side was denied by Farrace. The Panthers broke through with the game’s first goal nearly seven minutes later. Olivia Green sent a long forward pass that found the stick of Nicholas on the run. She worked down the right side, threading a pass through a couple of Salisbury defenders before finding Katie George inside the circle. In one quick motion, George turned around and fired the ball inside the right post from seven yards out for the 1-0 lead with 6:27 left. The goal was George’s team-best 13th tally of the season. The Panthers fended off a fiveminute yellow card, not allowing a shot on goal to carry the lead into the final quarter. Middlebury finished with a 13-4 advantage in shots and a 10-6 edge in penalty corners. Harlan concluded the contest with one big fourth-quarter save for her eighth shutout, tying her with Megan Collins (2018) and Emily Miller (2015) for the most in a single season. Farrace made six stops for the Sea Gulls. Middlebury will play Franklin & Marshall for the fourth time overall, each coming in the NCAA Tournament. The Panthers are now 9-1 against ranked opponents this season. ■

Panther linebacker named to All-New England Team From Campus New Reports MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE

MIDDLEBURY | Middlebury College linebacker Jack Pistorius (Park Ridge, Ill.) has been named to the New England Division II/ III Football Writers All-Star team. The junior was recently named the NESCAC Defensive Player of the Year and helped lead the Panthers to the NESCAC Championship this fall with the program’s first undefeated season (9-0) since 1972. Pistorius is the first Panther to win NESCAC Defensive Player of the Year since Erik Woodring in 2007. He tied for the team lead with 72 tackles, to go along with 5.5 sacks and 9.5 tackles for lost yardage. The linebacker’s tackle and sack numbers

Centurion is proud to be the provider of healthcare services to the Vermont Department of Corrections. We are currently seeking a FULL TIME Health Services Administrator and RN Supervisor at Southern State Correctional Facility in Springfield, VT. The Health Services Administrator (HSA) is responsible for managing the overall operations of the contracted clinical program at a designated correctional facility or complex of facilities within a Centurion contract. Additional responsibilities include planning, coordinating, directing, and supervising the clinical program providing services to patients in a correctional setting to meet service delivery requirements of the specific contract. Requirements for Health Services Administrator: • Bachelor’s degree in Hospital Administration, Health Care Administration, Health and Human Services, Business Administration, Public Administration, Nursing or related field • Experience as healthcare, nursing home or mental health administrator, nurse manager, or in multi-specialty healthcare clinic • Vermont RN license • Experience in correctional environment preferred • Must have ability to effectively communicate in writing and orally with staff and institutional administration The RN Supervisor provides supervision of nursing and support staff, on assigned shift, in the facility. Provide direct and indirect nursing care to patients. The RN Supervisor works under the direction of the Director of Nursing and collaborate with a multidisciplinary team to identify and respond to a wide range of physical and mental health needs. Requirements for RN Supervisor: • Bachelor’s degree or RN with two years’ experience required • Must hold valid Vermont RN license • Prior experience providing nursing care, working with a high degree of autonomy required • Prior experience in supervising nursing staff preferred • Experience working in a correctional environment preferred We offer competitive compensation and a comprehensive benefits package including: Health, dental, vision, life and disability insurance, 20 paid days off plus 8 paid holidays, 401(k) retirement plan with employer match, Career development benefit, Flexible spending accounts for health and dependent care and more! Interested candidates, please call Kelli at 866-616-8389; email resumes to kelli@teamcenturion.com or fax 888-317-1741; CenturionManagedCare.com EOE

Middlebury’s Jack Pistorius has been named to the New England Division II/III Football Writers All-Star team. Photo by Middlebury College both placed him fourth among his NESCAC peers. He recorded double digits in tackles in four-consecutive games, including 10 with two sacks in a win over Wesleyan.■

Nurses Needed in Springfield, Vermont! New Increased rates offered! RNs -$35 per hour and LPNs-$29 per hour! Join our growing team of over 6,000 health professionals nationwide! Centurion is proud to be a leading provider of comprehensive healthcare services to correctional facilities, state hospitals, and community mental health centers nationwide. Centurion is proud to be the provider of healthcare services to the Vermont Department of Corrections. We are currently seeking Vermont licensed Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses and Licensed Nursing Assistants to provide nursing care in a correctional healthcare setting at Southern State Correctional Facility in Springfield, VT. Full Time, Part Time and Per Diem shifts available! Full Time Dialysis RN is also available. The Dialysis RN must have 2 years of dialysis nursing experience. The position requires the nurse to be independent; therefore nurse must already be trained and have experience working as a dialysis nurse. Dialysis certification would be ideal. Requirements: • Requirements for Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses are current license in VT, experience in med/surg or correctional environment preferred, but willing to train. The Licensed Nursing Assistant must be a graduate of a Licensed Nursing Assistant program and have an active VT Nursing Assistant License. • Must be able to pass background investigation and obtain agency security clearance.

Interested candidates, please call Kelli at 866-616-8389; email resumes to kelli@teamcenturion.com or fax 888-317-1741; CenturionManagedCare.com EOE

235005

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We offer competitive compensation and a comprehensive benefits package including: Health, dental, vision, life and disability insurance, 20 paid days off plus 8 paid holidays, 401(k) retirement plan with employer match, Career development benefit, Flexible spending accounts for health and dependent care and more!


8 • December 7, 2019 | The Vermont Eagle

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by Myles Mellor

70. First governor of 132. Fed. property 49. Certain exams Alaska manager 50. Thanksgiving Day 1. ER role 71. Soldiers event 4. Dating from 73. French novelist André Down 51. Frequent fliers 8. Black suit 74. Snorer’s solution 1. Pats dry 52. Thin flat strip 12. “Monster’s Ball” star 75. Key to a good night’s 2. Cookie with three parts 55. Concrete 17. South American sleep 3. U.S.N. rank reinforcement material mammal 76. Undercover item 4. Payroll processing 57. Mellifluous 20. Table wine 77. Nonplussed company 58. All worked up 21. Gazetteer data 79. ___ amis 5. Brit. title 59. TV room 22. Night-time covers 80. Ne’ertheless 6. Bullring cheer 61. Naturally formed 24. Illuminations 82. Holed up 7. Neighbor of Ga. methane 25. Word that means 83. Last word on a 8. Computer monitor, 62. Technology giant “kind” bedroom door sign for short 64. Digestion-related 26. “Sweet!” 85. American swimmer, 9. Long, in Hawaiian 65. Two-time U.S. Open 28. High tech speakers Kate ___ 10. Kind of port champ 29. Troubling signs 88. Announcer Hall of TV 11. Unit of power ratio 67. Porked out 34. Cellar selections 91. Biol. or chem. 12. Prince in “Henry IV” 68. “A ___ of honey” 38. Complains about the 92. Lined up the shot 13. World’s largest Beatles song pinot? 95. Was laid up peninsula 71. Rumba relative 40. Travel around 97. Investment return 14. Dud on a lot 72. Summer, in Cannes 44. Lambaste 98. Government figure, 15. Run out 73. Phone trio 45. Car club for short 16. Bends to and fro 74. Two-timers 46. Type of chair 99. Sidle 18. ____ Martin 76. Destroys, in a way 47. Word before closet 100. Keep moving under 19. Meter lead-in 78. Common carriers 48. Slumber party items adversity 23. Scatter 81. Hodgepodges 50. Nightwear 102. On a stallion 27. Mud bather 84. Stage part 53. My, in Milano 105. Twangy-voiced 30. Football Hall-of-Famer 85. Turns sharply 54. Type of freak 107. Feisty Blount 86. “That is to say …” 56. “Marriage of the Virgin” 108. Cockeyed 31. Writer Jong and others 87. “___ Enchanted” painter 109. Put the kibosh on 32. Word form for (2004 film) 58. Where the Snake R. 111. Assess “billionth” 88. Make a boo-boo flows 115. Glass-paneled 33. Kind of pad 89. Scooby-___ 60. Edmond Fitzgerald entryway 35. Astronaut Armstrong (cartoon dog) cargo 121. Illuminator for a sleep 36. Building add-on 90. Clangor 61. Farrow of “Rosemary’s walker? 37. N.L. Central team inits. 93. Barbie’s pal Baby” 126. Axiom 38. Trumpet sound 94. Oral-B recommender 63. A bit, colloquially 127. Provided that 39. Fastening clips 96. Run down Myles and 64. Clear squaresSUDOKU 128. by On the wrong Mellor way 40. “___Susan Woman”Flanagan98. Fork protrusions 106. Memorial designer 114. Singer portrayed by 66. Capable of becoming 129. Just know (Reddy tune) 101. Eagle’s nest Maya Beyonce null and void 130. Chemistry class 41. Denotes three 102. Sporty cars, familiarly 110. Roman 12 116. Average mark Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller 69. Creator of the subject 42. Texting qualifier 103. Pack of animals 112. Eager 117. Domingo, e.g. Tammany tiger grids of 131. groups To solve 43. Race 104. Continental 3X3Sch.squares. the contestants puzzle each row, columndivide? and box113. must contain each 118. Frequently, old way Suitably

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124. Hispanic aunt 125. Mormon church, for short

Level: Medium

SUDOKU

Complete the grids each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9

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WORD SEARCH

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WORD SEARCH

by Myles Mellor

Locate the words listed by the puzzle. They may be horizontal, vertical or diagonal in any direction. Circle each word as you find it.

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POLICE BLOTTER

Checkpoint yields arrest

NEW HAVEN | On Nov. 22, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Vermont State Police, Vergennes Police Department, Bristol Police Department, Addison County Sheriff’s Department, and the Chittenden County Sheriff’s Department participated in a directed patrol and DUI checkpoint aimed at aggressive driving and DUI apprehension. During the directed patrol, 26 tickets were issued and one operator was arrested for DUI. Two DUI checkpoints were conducted simultaneously, one on U.S. Route 7 in Ferrisburgh and one on Route 30 in Cornwall. During the checkpoints in Ferrisburgh, 327 vehicles were encountered, 818 people were contacted, four people were screened for DUI, and one DUI arrested. ■

Hinesburg man stopped HINESBURG | On Nov. 23, at approximately 8:20 a.m., troopers with the Vermont State Police observed a vehicle drive out of a parking lot and

travel north on Route 116 in the town of Hinesburg. Troopers recognized the operator of the motor vehicle and knew the individual to have a criminally suspended license in Vermont. A motor vehicle stop was initiated and the operator, Everett White, 37, of Hinesburg, was confirmed to be criminally suspended . Additionally, White was found to have violated his conditions of release by operating a motor vehicle. White was issued a citation to appear at the Chittenden County Superior Court to answer to the charge of operating a motor vehicle on a public highway with a criminally suspended license and violating conditions of release. ■

Plain-clothes troopers part of enforcement effort NEW HAVEN | On Nov. 11, from 1:30-3:30 p.m., troopers from the Vermont State Police New Haven Barracks conducted distracted driving enforcement within the construction zone on U.S. Route 7 in the town of New Haven. During this detail,

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2 BEDROOM MOBILE HOME in Schroon Lake for rent ( no pets) for more information call (518) 532-9538 PORT HENRY 2 BR APARTMENT 40 minute drive to jobs in Middlebury and Vergennes. Apartment in downtown Port Henry. Walking distance to grocery store, pharmacy, and other retail stores and services. No dogs, other than service dogs. $550, plus utilities. Security deposit required. Call 518-5467003 Ticonderoga-Mt Vista -1 bdrm $566+, ground floor, Appliances, trash, snow included. NO smokers. Rental assistance may be avail; must meet eligibility requirements. 518-584-4543 NYS TDD Relay service 1-800-421-1220 Equal Housing Opportunity Handicap Accessible HOMES FOR RENT

TONNEAU COVER FOR SALE. 5 1/2 footbed, black Tri-fold for GMC Canyon or Chevy Colorado pick up truck, in excellent condition. It comes with an undercover light and storage bag. $125. Please call 518-669 5903.

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SOLUTIONS TO PUZZLES! 3 6 5 4 8 1 7 2 9 4 7 8 9 5 2 3 6 1 1 2 9 7 6 3 5 8 4 8 5 4 2 1 6 9 7 3 2 3 1 8 7 9 4 5 6 6 9 7 5 3 4 2 1 8 7 1 6 3 9 5 8 4 2 9 8 2 6 4 7 1 3 5 5 4 3 1 2 8 6 9 7

C G P R I E S T S I D E C O A T N F

H R A F T V T O P S E T O R N E P L

A E A I A Z O S A U N T C R E L Y A

R W A C C O M P L I S H E D A W Y G

A E A T K O A R E A E X S I T R Y S

C N M I S S C R L R P U N D R E S S

T A I O T U H E S E A L R R A S K S

E E R N T R R U R H Y M E R I P I C

R E X S E E C I R O N J O I N O R O

I M A T C H E M S E U U S S U N T O

S P A O K N O W N M I N T O C S S T

T X E L C D I G P E A E E S E I A E

I O E E E M L I M P A L P L L B T R

C N A S L A N P U L P R L O L L S Y

S O T D N G U M S O R S C E S E W O

T S I D A B B R E V I A T I O N E L

V E H I C L E T B U L B N C L E R K

S M A N U F A C T U R I N G T O E S

R E AC H P E O P LE I N YO U R CO M M U N IT Y LO O K I N G F O R YO U R B U S I N E S S O R S E RV I C E

Service Guide

Place an ad for your business in The Eagle’s Service Guide. Call (518) 873-6368 for info & rates.

Contact

Firewood $70 face cord, you pick up, delivery extra. 518-494-4788.

518-873-6368 MASONRY

Champion Auto Glass Mobile Glass Shop Office: 802-453-6159 Cell: 802-377-1743 championautoglassvt@yahoo.com www.championautoglass.org

Marcel Brunet & Sons, Inc.

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FOR SALE; FOUR, LIKE NEW GOODYEAR WEATHER ASSURANCE 255/55 R20 all-season tires for GMC Canyon or Chevy Colorado. Only used for half of last winter in excellent condition. Won't fit on the replacement vehicle. $500. Please call 518-6695903.

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518.597.3321

mtnhollowmasonry@gmail.com

CROWN POINT, NY 231802

JOBS BOARD

1-800-682-1643 • 802-388-4077

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www.suncommunitynews.com

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WINDOWS/SIDING

FIREWOOD FOR SALE: 8 to 10month old dry hardwood, cut 16” long & split. $315 a full cord, face Cord $120. Delivered to Chestertown. Extra Delivery Charge beyond Chestertown. 518-494-2321.

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NEW HAVEN | Nov. 21, Vermont State Police troopers conducted a motor vehicle stop on Route 7 in the town of New Haven. The operator, identified as Patrick M. Sherman, 26, of Duxbury, was under criminal suspension in Vermont and not allowed to operate a motor vehicle. Sherman was placed under arrest and transported to the New Haven Barracks for processing. At the conclusion of processing, Sherman was issued a citation to appear in Addison County Superior Court, Criminal Division on Feb. 10 at 12:30 p.m. to answer to the charge of Criminal DLS. ■

Sudoku Solution

Fort Ann Antiques Always Buying 518-499-2915 Route 4, Whitehall, NY www.fortannantiques.com FARM LIVESTOCK

Arrest in New Haven

PART-TIME STAFF NEEDED FOR NIGHTS & WEEKENDS

SOUTH TICONDEROGA ANNUAL LEASE $825/mo., References/Security. Secluded 2 story, suitable for 2 people. Call 518-321-2890

APARTMENT RENTALS

Due to injuries sustained during the crash, Jerger was transported to UVM Medical Center where he was ultimately processed for DUI. Jerger was later released on a citation to appear at the Addison County Superior Court on Jan. 13 at 12:30 p.m. to answer to the charge of Title 23 VSA 1201 “Operating under the influence of intoxicants or other substance.” Jerger was released to a responsible sober party. ■

234139

JOHNSBURG CENTRAL SCHOOL is seeking a long term substitute for a Part-time Technology/Industrial Arts Teacher beginning January 27th until the end of the school year. Qualified candidates, please send a letter of interest with resume to Superintendent Michael J. Markwica, 165 Main Street, North Creek, NY 12853. Site Maintenance for small apt community in Ticonderoga. Great opportunity for motivated, organized person to handle it all; excellent customer service communication skills; reliable vehicle and hand tools. Part time with flexible hours - but does vary throughout year. Detail background/skills to Facility Manager, 346 Lake Ave, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-5305 Contact Nick 518-843-0604 WANTED.. ATTORNEY & INDEPENDENT WRITER/PUBLISHER: Defective ? Detective.. Child Murder & Whistleblower Cases: see what law enforcement, politicians, and media are hiding.. www.defectivedetective.net Christal Jean Jones: deliberately forgotten for 19 years: since January 3rd, 2001.. Will endorse Go Fund Me for investigation and publishing findpaul@defecings.. Contact: tivedetective.net ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

518-643-9942 BEFORE 7PM

FERRISBURGH | On Nov. 22, the Vermont State Police was dispatched to a single vehicle crash on Middlebrook Road in the town of Ferrisburgh. State Police arrived on scene and identified the operator as Wilhelm Jerger, 74, of Ferrisburgh. Jerger advised prior to the crash, he was traveling westbound on Middlebrook Road at approximately 35-40 mph. Evidence on scene indicated Jerger failed to maintain his lane of travel, left the roadway and subsequently traveled into a ditch. While speaking with Jerger, Troopers detected signs of possible impairment.

172670

GROWING ACCOUNTING & TAX PRACTICE Possibility of Full Time Hours January to April 15th. Part Time as needed for the rest of the year. Experience in Income Tax preparation Preferred, Must be Customer Oriented & Discreet, Must Have PTIN. If interested please call 518-648-9999

HARDWOOD BOLTS FOR MUSHROOM PRODUCTION

DUI-related crash in Ferrisburgh

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CARS

HELP WANTED LOCAL

troopers dressed in plain clothes and stood within the construction zone to observe and detect distracted operators. Details: Troopers involved: 5, Number of traffic stops: 19, number of traffic tickets issued: 16, 13 traffic tickets issued for distracted driving within a work zone, two traffic tickets issued for speeding within a work zone, one traffic ticket issued for operating with no license, and three written warnings issued. ■

Contact Shannon Christian at 518-873-6368 ext. 201 or email shannonc@suncommunitynews.com to place a classified. UNDER $1,000

RE ACH E VERY HOUSEHOLD IN YOUR COMMUNIT Y AND SELL

EXPERIENCE CARPENTER NEEDED, Must be able to pass drug test, have a valid drivers license, own transportation, own tools, references,& must be dependable. Pay based on experience. Call 518547-8268.

The Vermont Eagle | December 7, 2019 • 9

www.addison-eagle.com


10 • December 7, 2019 | The Vermont Eagle

Published by Denton Publications, Inc.

www.addison-eagle.com

Celebrate the Season and Save! Enjoy a

FFREE atBREAKFAST FR Agway Saturday, December 7 Free pancakes, sausage, coffee and milk will be served from 7am-11am

• Bring in a canned good for donation to charity • Official drop site for Middlebury Police Toy Drive

10-40% OFF

everything in the store that is not already on sale. ALL DAY LONG! Sat., Dec. 7th! HUGE SELECTION OF GREAT GIFTS AND STOCKING STUFFERS...

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Practical & Whimsical Gifts for the Gardener

AGWAY GIFT CARDS IN ANY AMOUNT

Handy Gift - Sure to be appreciated!

CLOTHING EXTRAVAGANZA

All Winter Clothing Including...

& Winter Boots ON SALE ALL WEEK LONG

Christmas Decor!

now thru 12/8/19

20% OFF

Amaryllis Kits

Beautiful blossoms during winter’s cold months! Choose from a variety of colors. Something for Everyone!

pants & jeans • jackets • shirts vests • t-shirts • socks • coveralls Best Prices & Selection in the area!

KRINGLE CANDLES

Daylight Jar Candles

PLUS gloves, mittens, hats, etc.

Perfect Gifts or Stocking Stuffers!

Carhartt styles for the whole family... Men’s, Women’s & Children’s In Stock!

Dog Wash Tokens

Take Home the Perfect Tree, Wreath and Poinsettia! Holiday Decorations Makes Great Stocking Stuffers!

Including fresh Balsam Fir and White pine roping

GIFTS FOR PETS!

with coupon

5

00

OFF

any one of our great selection of FRESH CUT CHRISTMAS TREES Valid Through 12/15/19 Use during pancake breakfast to save even more!

$

Take an extra

20 OFF

GREAT IDEA FOR CARHARTT!

any in store purchase of $200 or more! Use during pancake breakfast to save even more. $200 value refers to already discounte purchase amount. Valid now through 12/8/19.

Take an extra

100

$

OFF any Wreath or Poinsettia

Valid through 12/15/19

Middlebury Agway Farm & Garden

388 Exchange Street • Middlebury, VT • 802-388-4937 Hours: Monday-Friday 8am-6pm • Saturday 12/5 7am-5pm • Sunday 9am-4pm

YOUR YARD, GARDEN and PET PLACE™

234890

orry Don’t w rowd... c e h about t the fastest e we hav t in town! u o k c e h c

Take an extra

$38.99 $

MIDDLEBURY AGWAY COUPON

MIDDLEBURY AGWAY COUPON

MIDDLEBURY AGWAY COUPON

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