Issuu on Google+

Flying the tin can

Memorial Day

The Logger heads south to the Land of Enchantment and finds ...

Middlebury puts on a parade and honors vets on Memorial Day.

See page 6

By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com MONTPELIER — Gov. Peter Shumlin signed a medical marijuana bill into law that will cr eate several medical marijuana dispensaries in V ermont in the coming year or two. The Legislature passed the bill even though there was fier ce opposition from the state law enforcement officials and anti-drug groups. Medical marijuana has been permitted in V ermont since 2004. Patients and their car egivers ar e permitted to gr ow small amounts of hemp. Some critics say the dispensaries will open themselves up to criminal activity by announcing their locations. Legislators were unfazed by the charges. Vermont is the eighth state to permit registered marijuana users legal outlets for the drug. State Sen. Jeanette White said, “we left medical marijuana users in a bind; on the one hand, we granted them the right to use this drug, but did not provide them with a safe way to find it.” The V ermont Department of Public Safety is now charged with issuing a total of four dispensary licenses within one year. So far , White said two Vermont r esidents have expressed an inter est in establishing a dispensary. Gov. Shumlin signed the legislation on June 2 in Montpelier.

P.O. BOX 338 ELIZABETHTOWN, NY 12932 POSTAL PATRON

See page 12

Serving Addison and Chittenden Counties

June 11, 2011

Shumlin signs bill for medical marijuana dispensaries

FREE

ECRWSS PRESORTED STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE PAID NEW MARKET PRESS/ DENTON PUBLICATIONS

Take one

Lodge residents display artistic side

Art on Display

By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.co m M I D D L E B U RY — R e s i dents of the Lodge at Otter Creek i n M iddlebury ar e displaying sides of their lives rarely seen in public— their artistic sides. And judging by the r esident art on display in this upscale re tirement facility, the Lodge seems to have an abundant resource of dynamic talent—all in their 80s and 90s. Paige Larson, dir ector of activities at the Lodge, thought a r esident and staf f art exhibit was a good idea when it was first pr oposed by resident and artist Jo Birnbaum. The idea was to appr oach various artists living at the Lodge and ask them to donate (or cr eate) artwork for

the public display. Next, display areas were set up in the lobby, common room and social areas to permit easy access; wa lker- and wheel chair-bound r esidents can get in close and enjoy the art. “The response to this community exhibit turned out to be overwhelming,” said Larson. Residents enter ed a variety of work in the exhibit, which has all the appear ances of an upscale urban gallery—from paintings to photography, sculptur e to woodware, and needlepoint to stained glass—and everything in between. One L odge s taffer, m edical technician Daniel Hamilton, enter ed an unusual piece—a finely detailed natur e scene etched on the underside of a cap of a giant tree mushroom. See ARTISTS, page 9

Resident artists at the Lodge at Otter Creek gather in the common room. Their work was on display for the public last week. The exhibit may be extended.

Capital region assesses flood damage By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com

BUY LOCAL — Happy shoppers from Brandon and Middlebury visit the Brandon Farmers Market, located on the town green across from the Brandon Innand public library. They enjoy a wide selectionof “Buy Local” items such as fresh baked goods, organic produce, fabrics, honey, maple syrup and sugar products as seen here. The market opened last month and welcomes shoppers from around the area.

MONTPELIER — For many central V ermont r esidents, Friday, May 27, 201 1 is a date that will live in infamy. As if flooding in the Champlain Valley region earlier in the month wasn’t enough to test the r esolve of local r esidents, last Friday’s violent thunderstorms in the state’s capital r egion pushed some ar eas untouched by earlier spring flooding into crisis mode. During the early morning hours of May 27, a series of powerful, tr opical-like thunderstorms moved th rough Vermont’s mid section. The ensuing heavy rain water , falling and accelerated downslope by steep, narrow mountain valley walls, cr eated the flash flood emer gency. The Winooski River and its feeder streams quickly reached flood levels.

Photo by Lou Varricchio

Suburban Propane

See FLOODING, page 5

Take control of your energy costs... Today.

• Payment Plans • 24 Hour Emergency Service • Automatic Delivery • Certified Service Techs & Drivers 388-7212 • 800-591-6604 • 2242 Route 7 So., Middlebury

CON A B SIDER UD N OWG E T ! 82562


www.addison-eagle.com

2 - The Eagle

June 11, 2011

McGRATH FLOORING CENTER “The Floor Store”

Best Names in Carpet! Best Prices in Carpet! Route 7, New Haven • 453-5533 82585

www.mcgrathsflooring.com

Furniture New & Used VT-Made

JEWETT’S GREEN MOUNTAIN

Furniture New & Used VT-Made

FURNITURE BARN

(802) 483-6844 Pittsford VT, 2128 Route 7

FURNITURE - IS - OUR - BUSINESS LOTS TO LOOK AT - STOP TODAY • Mattress New All • Baker Rack Sizes • Shop Equipment • Magazine Racks • Foundations New All • Corner Entertainment Sizes • Lamps Cabinet • Wicker Hamper • Chest • Dresser w/ Mirror • Used Chairs • Coffee Tables • Desk • Setback Hutch • Night Stands • Used Tables • Trundle Beds • Ironing Board Old • Pictures • Entertainment • Recliners Cabinets • Plank Board • Wing Back Cushion • Mirrors • End Stands Chairs • Sofa Table • Plant Stand • Sofas • Love Seats • Ottomans • Beds Twin - Full • Hide Away Love Seats Queen - King

ORWELL PARADE — Members of the GFWC Orwell Fortnightly Club were among the local participants in the annual Orwell Memorial Day Parade held M ay 29. One of the floats was a classic 1951 Chevr olet pickup truck o wned by Malcolm Swogger. Parade members handed out beads to the children along the parade route.

• Hide Away Sofas • Trunks Old • Bed Frames • New Chairs Lots • Pub Tables • VT Made Tables All Sizes • Benches • Old Furniture • Wine Racks • Side Boards • Bar Stools • Storage Cabinets • Drop Leaf Tables • New Tables All Sizes • VT Made Bookcases All Sizes • Rockers • Commodes

2128 US ROUTE 7 • PITTSFORD, VT 05763 • 483-6844

CHARLOTTE — On May 31, at approximately 2:01, p.m., Vermont State Police troopers and DMV Enforcement officers responded to Route 7 in Charlotte at the intersection of Church Hill Road for a tractor-trailer accident. A 2005 Mack truck and trailer, operated by Arthur Vezina, 53, of Shelburne, veer ed off the edge of the r oadway northbound, striking a telephone pole befor e overturning on Route 7. No other vehicles wer e involved. Route 7 was closed for approximately three hours while the truck was removed. Operator inattention is blamed for the crash.

VERGENNES, VT 877-30 48 RT.22A

VSP investigate dump-truck mishap WEST ADDISON — Craig S cribner, 64, of Bristol was driving a Mack dump truck east on Vermont Route 17, May 31, in the area of DAR State Park when the tru ck caught utility wires that were across the road. The wir es tor e the dump body of f the tr uck; the tr uck rolled onto its right side and went of f the south side of the road. The utility wires were at a normal height, so it is believed that a faulty mechanical issue caused the dump body to raise while the truck was in motion. Vermont State Police troopers and a Vergennes Area Rescue cr ew r esponded; Scribner was transported to Porter Hospital. The Addison Fire Department also responded and provided security and traffic control.

Champlain Discount Foods

The Middlebury Council of the Knights of Columbus will hold their

MON. SAT. 8:30 - 5:30

The Eagle’s TRIVIA Question Of The Week!

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Ques. 1 After John F. Kennedy’s Assassination, Vice Pres. Lyndon Johnson Assumed The Office Of President - Who Became His Vice President? Ques. 2

Route 7 closed after accident

78976

Our store is loaded wall to wall, 6,500 Square Foot Show Floor. PRICES ARE GREAT! WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS! IT IS WELL WORTH THE DRIVE! STORE HOURS: TUES - SUN 10AM TO 5PM, CLOSED MON

Photo by Loretta Lee

The “Shot Heard ‘Round The World” Was Fired In A Battle In Which Town In Massachusetts?

•••Answers Appear On The Puzzle Page ••• 72959

IT’S BACK

Annual Benefit

25¢ SALE

Canned Tomatoes

Auction

28 oz. can

On the Middlebury Green

Assorted Mustards Cocktail Sauce Near East Gourmet Chicken

Wednesday Evening, June 15, 2011 The auction will begin promptly at 6:15 PM

Midway through the auction, the drawing for $15,000 cash prize or your choice of a 2011 Chevrolet, Chrysler or Ford make auto will take place!

meal kit

Assorted Breading Mixes

BUY 1 GET 1 FREE

The raffle is being sponsored in support of St. Mary’s School. Raffle tickets are still available at the cost of $50.00 each. Only 1200 tickets will be sold.

all Salad Dressings French, Ranch, Italian & more

MORE IN STORE SPECIALS Sale ends June 18th or while supplies last.

82583

NOTE: This is a change in location for this year’s auction. Under the tent in case of rain. 82525

PELLET STOVES, WOOD STOVES AND BOILERS

Box 205, 2046 N. Main St. Londonderry, VT 05148 824-3677 8:30am - 4:30pm M-F, 8am-1pm Sat. 82576

2479 Rte. 7 Ferrisburgh, VT 870-3220

21 Orchard Drive Bennington, VT 05201 753-7393

www.thestovedepot.com

5598 Rte. 7 North Clarendon, VT 05759 747-9950 10:00am - 5pm M-Sat. 82587


www.addison-eagle.com

June 11, 2011

The Eagle - 3

College honors student leaders

Sof t Shell Crabs, Halibut and Wild King Salmon are here!

From Staff & News Reports

the College Shirley Collado. The Carri A. Smith ’98 Award for Outnewmarketpress@denpubs.com standing Inter commons Council Member , which goes to a student who exemplifies the MIDDLEBURY — Student Leadership Awards, Public Service Leadership Awards, ideals of the commons system, a passion for Student Government Association A wards the college and a commitment to student and joint Dean of the College/Student Gov- life, was pr esented by Dean Collado to Kathryn Benson ’13 of Mount V ernon, Wash., ernment Association Awards – a total of 26 honors all together – were presented to Mid- and Barbara Ofosu-Somuah ’13, of the Bronx, N.Y. dlebury College students, advisors and orThe Interfaith Cooperation Award of the ganizations at a ceremony at Atwater Dining Charles P. Scott Center for Spiritual and ReHall last week. ligious Life was presented to Anoushka SinPresident Ronald D. Liebowitz and Dean ha ’13 of Houston, T ex., and Charles of the College Shirley Collado gr eeted the gathering of students, faculty, staff and com- Arnowitz ’13 of Highland Park. Ill., for their munity members, and gave opening er marks joint celebration of Holi and Purim. The award, pr esented by Chaplain Laur el about the leadership and initiative demonMacaulay Jordan ’79 andAssociate Chaplain strated by Middlebury students. Ira Schif fer, goes to students who actively Student Leadership Awards The Angels Award, for a sophomor e promote and facilitate interfaith underwoman of color who demonstrates lead er- standing, communication or programming. The Religious Life Innovation Award of ship, scholarship and activism, was pre sentthe Charles P. Scott Center for Spiritual and ed to Barbara Ofosu-Somuah ’13, of the Religious Life was pr esented to Zachary Bronx, N.Y., by Associate Dean of the ColFenster ’12 of New York, N.Y., David Imber lege Karen Guttentag. ’13 of Medfield, Mass., Daniel Metzger-TraThe Barbara J. Buchanan ’62 Memorial Prize for a senior woman who r epresents ber ’11 of Lexington, Mass., Moriel Rothman Buchanan’s academic excellence and ideal of ’11 of Yellow Springs, Ohio, and Jacob Udell ’12 of New York, N.Y., who conducted adult service was pr esented to Shabana BasijRasikh ’11 of Kabul, Afghanistan, by Dean of See LEADERS, page 10

Tomorrow’s outstanding leaders are here today and they’re at Middlebury College. These students received honors for their leadership skills and practices.

l

Specia

Best Seafood Value in the Area Fish ‘n Chips $7.95!

• Fresh Fried Seafood • Good Vegetarian Selection • Lunches and Dinners To Go • A Selection of Over 50 Local and International Wines

20% off ALL wines in Stock!

Look for our Summer Salads as well as Blueberry Slaw and Ginger Slaw

Marble Works Complex ~ Middlebury ~ 388-3385 • John Hamilton & Carolyn Costello, Owners Visit our website: www.costellosmarket.com 82586

THROUGH JUNE 30TH 2011

Largest Vermont’s lection In-StockSe t ofCubCade

cubcadet.com

Broughton’s

Rated #1

Route 22A, Bridport, VT • (802) 758-2477 • www.bigcountryhardware.com 82582

highest score of any paint tested

CUB CADET DAYS ARE HERE AND SO ARE INCREDIBLE LIMITED-TIME OFFERS. SPECIAL SALES EVENT PROMOTIONS! SEASON-LONG FINANCING PLUS ADDITIONAL INCENTIVES.

“it earned the and can be expected to keep its good looks for many years...” – Rated by Consumer Reports June 2011 Paint Ratings

Garage Sale Special

With America’s #1 Rated Exterior Paint Available Locally, Why Go Anywhere Else!

FREE CENTERING & BORDER

We’ve done it again! Why would you paint with less than the best? California Paints’ Fres~Coat Velvet Flat House Paint: Testing Results: 1 Appearance (After 9 years accelerated weathering) Excellent 2 Resistance to Dirt Excellent 3 Resistance to Color Change Excellent 4 Resistance to Mildew Excellent 5 Resistance to Cracking Excellent Overall Score Number 1 Rating

(20 Words $15)

Mail ad to... Attn: Shannon, Classified Dept. Denton Publications 14 Hand Avenue, Elizabethtown, NY 12932

Toll Free: 1-800-989-4ADS (4237) Local: (518) 873-6368 x201 Your Phone #

DEADLINES:

Name

MONDAY 8AM - ZONE C Green Mountain Outlook The Eagle

Address

City/Town

State

CC#

Zip Exp.

Starting

Available t Locally a

You may also use these other methods to submit your ad: Fax to: 518-873-6360 eMail to: shannonc@denpubs.com

CID# Run#

thru Classification

Words

Please print your message neatly in the boxes below:

1396 Rte. 7 South Middlebury, VT 05753

802-388-2500 or 820-388-3893 Email: distinctivepi@aol.com

82588

Amex Visa Master Discover Cash Check 83533


www.addison-eagle.com

4 - The Eagle

June 11, 2011

Hinesburg Farmers Market opened for the spring-summer season June 2. Photo by Lou Varricchio

Hinesburg Farmers Market returns Lions Club project

properly graded and seeded in time for this summer. Lot 1 is owned by the Town of Hinesburg; it is the town's responsibility to upgrade the newmarketpress@denpubs.com area for use by Hinesburg residents. HINESBURG— It’s farmers market time As a result, the market will r emain on its again in Hinesbur g. The annual market original site on the Community Chur ch of opened for the season June 2 at the Commu- Hinesburg grounds. nity Church of Hinesburg on Route 116. The parking lot beside the chur ch is Along with r egular vendors who bring marked off into parking spaces for the contheir handmade crafts and pr oduce and venience of patrons. Vendors do not take up baked goods, several new vendors have parking spaces after they unload their pro dsigned up to be on tap each Thursday ucts and tents (they park in the lot behind through Sept. 29. the Hinesburg Town Hall). Some of those new vendors will offer a vaThe market is staffed by Lions volunteers riety of pr epared foods so that customers only. All proceeds are returned to the comcan buy their readymade suppers when they munity in the form of assistance to persons are in a rush to prepare a meal after a day's needing vision or hearing tests, glasses or work. hearing aids, pur chases for the Hinesbur g While the Lions Club had made plans to Food Shelf, the annual Easter Egg Hunt and move the market to lot 1, located north of the an annual $1,000 scholarship for a graduatfirehouse and behind the police station, ing senior who is a Hinesburg resident. town crews were not able to get the ground

By Marge Sharp

82598

Bristol Discount Beverage & Redemption

It’s Grilling Season! We’re one stop shopping for propane and an amazing beer and wine selection… large and ever changing!

KEGS!

LOTTERY! Redemption

BUY WINE BY THE CASE, OR MIX ‘N MATCH A CASE

SAVE 15%

Soda, Snacks and More

Everyday Low Prices

21 Prince Lane • Bristol (next to Shaw’s) • 453-3990

Mon. - Sat. 9-7, Sun. 10-4 Redemption Mon. - Sat. 9-6, Sun. 10-3 50336

82561


www.addison-eagle.com

June 11, 2011 from page 1 Many owners of homes, farms and businesses in the greater Montpelier , Barr e, Waterbury ar ea—especially those in the W inooski River Valley—awoke May 27 to rising water and evacuations. In the capital city of Montpelier, the municipal wastewater tr eatment plant was flooded and pollutants escaped into floodwater May 27. Montpelier of ficials asked r esidents and those working in the city to practice “extr eme water conservation” by avoiding drinking tap water. State of ficials also issued warnings t o m inimize c ontact with floodwater because of pollutants from the wastewater plant as well as fuels and fertilizers that enter ed waterways during the flood. On May 27, state offices in Caledonia, Orange, and Washington counties wer e closed; many r eopened last week. On June 2, over 160 flood victims who had just experienced the worst Memorial Day holiday weekend in their memories, gather ed at the Barr e Auditorium. The

survivors were there to learn what assistance was available in order to find new, dry shelter. Vermont Emergency Management and American Red Cr oss of ficials wer e on hand to help and collect names. Fortunately , no flood-related deaths wer e reported at press time. According to Mark Bosma, spokesman for V ermont Emer gency Management, “state employees who were affected by the reduced workforce status during this period, did so without loss of pay or benefits. All employees designated as essential personnel for r educed workforce situations including Corrections, Public Safety, Institutions and T ransportation Maintenance r eported for work as normally expected.” Bosma had his hands full May 27 answering questions from an anxious public. A temporary communications center was located at Barr e City Hall. Several news r eporters wer e on hand to r eceive updates on what roads around the capital area were open or closed. In addition to flooded buildings, the state faced damaged roads from Waterbury to Barre. “Residents ar e ur ged to

use extreme caution and patience while navigating the roadways in and ar ound affected ar eas,” Bosma said. “Over the coming days and weeks crews will be working on af fected ar eas, some delays and detours ar e possible.” By June 1, downtown Montpelier and B arre wer e open again, but numer ous businesses remained closed. Vermont Emergency Management posted the following capital-r egion damaged roads at press time: Coburn Road: Closed to through traffic; safe for residential one-way use; very rough on the Vermont Route 14 side Clark Road: Closed to through traffic; safe for residential traf fic fr om Barr e Town side with dead end just beyond Pickel r esidence; no access fr om East Hill due to complete r oad washout at first culvert; this culvert needs a complete hydraulic study. Hammett Hill Road: Closed to through traffic; the road is safe for residential one-way use only but pr oceed with extr eme caution; the r oad is extr emely hazardous near V ermont Route 14. Kelton Road: Closed to

Deep water across Route 2 near Waterbury, May 27. Photo by Lou Varricchio

through traffic; safe for oneway r esidential use only; proceed with caution. Quaker R oad: O pen; o ne lane open only; pr oceed with caution. Brazier Road: Closed to through traffic; safe for residential use from Towne Hill Road t o w ashout a nd f rom Center Road to washout; proceed with extreme caution. Muddy Br ook Road: Closed until further notice.

Lincoln teen wins library video contest LINCOLN — Lincoln teens Andrew Rainville was one of the winners of a statewide video contest held last month. Rainville’s video will be used to advertise the teen summer r eading pr ogram for the V ermont Department of Libraries. Rainville used the r eading pr ogram’s theme, “Y ou are Here”, as part of his video production. The contest was sponsored by the V ermont Department of Libraries. Rainville won $250 and the Lincoln Library r eceived $100.

In addition to pr operty damage, the V ermont Geological Survey announced that capital-region residents should keep an eye open for landslides. According to V ermont State Geologist Laur ence Becker, “local residents need to be aware of these flood-re lated activities—small landslides, cracks in the ground, or any other unusual gro und conditions that were not previously there.” Becker said ther e are other things to look for, too. “Look for changes in landscape and water drainage or new cracks in foundations and sidewalks,” he said. “Watch the patterns of storm-water drainage on slopes near your home or business, and note especially the places wher e r unoff water conver ges, incr easing flow over soil-cover ed slopes. Watch the hillsides around your home or business for signs of land movement, such as small landslides or debris flows or pro gressively tilting trees.” Bosma said cleanup is already underway in several communities in and ar ound Montpelier, however, the re-

Photo provided

Wayne’s Small Carpentry

Campbell, & In ge i a

802.453.6600

Serving Vermont and New York for 35 Years

• Cut • Removal of Dangerous Trees, TreesTrimmed • Stump Grinding • Crane Service • Trusses and Post • Beams Set Reasonable Rates Our Service Available Year-Round 24 Hour Emergency Service

Any Small Scale Construction

72171

waynespencer2008@comcast.net

50% OFF

Business Insurance Call Andrea, Bill or John

72588

We’re In Full Bloom!

Plant Specials (For a limited time only)

Stop In And See Our Large Selection of Pottery Annuals,Herbs, Seeds, Onion Sets Vegetables & Perennials & Seed Potatoes

Now available at: Better Planet Books, Bristol

82596

BUY DIRECT FROM THE GROWER

2153 Button Bay Rd, Vergennes Open 9am - 5pm • 7 Days a Week No credit cards & children must be supervised.

The warm weather is here.

VT Bookshop, Middlebury

Can You Dig It?

VT Energy Company, Ferrisburg

We’ll give you plenty of reasons to! 140 North Street, Bristol

Brown Dog, Hinesburg

802-453-7555

Visit VermontWild.com for a complete list! Please come out and meet Megan Price at her Book Signing: June 11 • VT Book Shop in Middlebury • Noon - 2PM June 18 • Better Planet Books • Bristol • 11AM-2PM

82248

GH# Salvia, Dusty Miller 6-pack 26 Reg. $2.09 Sale$1.05 Pansy,Viola 4-pack 26 Reg.$2.09 Sale$1.05 AllHerbs 4” 21 Reg.$1.79 Sale$0.89 AllHerbs 4-pack 21 Reg.$1.99 Sale$0.99 6” Asiatic Lillies Fiber Pot 21 Reg. $4.49 Sale$2.25 6” Hosta Fiber Pot 21 Reg. $4.49 Sale$2.25 AllSingle Tomatoes 2 Reg.$0.69 Sale$0.35 4” Lobelia & Verbena 25 Reg. $1.79 Sale$0.89 AllShrubs Black Pot 14 $10.00 AllTrees 14 $20.00 10”Hanging Baskets 24, 25, 26, 3 $7.99

First Season Greenhouses

Insurance & Financial Services 35 West St., Bristol, VT Home & Auto Quotes

802-989-7231 82246

453-3351 - Office 475-2185 - Home 363-5619 - Cell

Decks, Sheetrock, Roofing, etc.

c.

BROWN’S TREE & CRANE SERVICE

Call for FREEr Estimates fo e. Tree Servic

gion is still in an emergency zone. Sightseers are asked to keep out of flood-af fected areas. “Gov. Peter Shumlin sent a formal r equest to Pr esident Barack Obama for a disaster declaration,” he said. “The process of approving such a request can take one week to several weeks. V ermont Emergency Management is working with the governor to submit an add endum to the state’s earlier flood r equest to include last Friday’s storms.” To be approved, the Federal E mergency M anagement Agency or FEMA must agree that the floodin g is part of the same weather pattern that caused previous floods, Bosma noted. Bosma also said FEMA must agr ee that saturated ground conditions are a r esult of soaking rains over the past month. “If FEMA declines that request Vermont will begin the process of obtaining a separate disaster declaration for this week’s event,” he noted. “Either way , communities and homeowners should call 2-1-1 to r eport damage to their property.”

Grace Worcester Greene of the Vermont Department of Libraries presents Andrew Rainville with $250 for winning a statewide video contest.

P

Flooding

The Eagle - 5

82633

Hours: Mon. - Sat. 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Directions: Take North St. from the traffic light in the center of Bristol – We’re 1 mile on the right!


www.addison-eagle.com

6 - The Eagle

Opinion

June 11, 2011

A COMMUNITY SERVICE :This community newspaper and its delivery are made possible by the advertisers you’ll find on the pages inside. Our twenty plus employees and this publishing company would not exist without their generous support of our efforts to gather and distribute your community news and events. Please thank them by supporting them and buying locally. And finally, thanks to you, our loyal readers, for your support and encouragement over the past 16 years from all of us here at The Addison Eagle & Green Mountain Outlook.

From the Editor

Time machines among us T here’s a passage in Ray Bradbury’s 1957 fantasy novel, “Dandelion Wine,” that has always haunted

spiration is rapidly disappearing—the Greatest Generation, a term coined by broadcaster Tom Brokaw. me. This, our oldest surviving generation, The grandfather character of Bradbury’s tempered by economic depr ession, steeled protagonist, 1 2-year-old D ouglas S pauld- by w ar, s hocked b y t he a tom b omb, d eing, is referred to reverently by the kids on serves better. the block as a “living time machine.” When As many baby boomers like me str uggle the old man spun his colorful memory sto- with mortgage payments, college-bound ries while r ocking on the family’s fr ont kids, and the early warning signs of our porch, the boy traveled back in time with mortality—why aren’t we getting to know the old man, too. this generation better in or der to seek its I personally know two living tim e macounsel? Those of us of the Baby Boom Genchines that have been a part of my life since eration, born between 1946 and 1964, ar e birth. (I am sure you know one or two time the first generation to be less appreciative machines just like them.) of those who came before us. Shame on us. My 95-year -old mother and 97-year -old Last week, I had the privilege to tour a father are an amazing time-travelling couwonderful senior citizen art exhibit curple. rently on display in the lobby of the Lodge Approaching the century mark, they live, at Otter Cr eek adult living center in Midindependently, in the 1956 suburban Penn- dlebury (see the story in this week's Eagle). sylvania house where I grew up. In a sense, This art exhibit is pr oof positive that their household is a living time machine, you’re only as old as you think. too, even though I now know the days ther e All the art on display at the Lodge is senare dwindling down to a precious few. sitive, playful, accomplished, inspir ed— While my father sleeps more and has suf- and the creators are all in their 80s and 90s. fered a physical setback in the past year , There’s so much more we can learn (as well he’s still sharp as a tack; he r eads several as about the art and science of living) from books a month and passes them on to me. this Greatest Generation—so much wisdom Interestingly, he was pictur ed on the fr ont yet to be harvested. page of the local newspaper—mowing the Maybe you know an elderly neighbor, a grass with his old-fashioned r eel-lawn- widow at chur ch, a neglected father , a mower during an August heatwave a few World War II or Korean War veteran down years ago. Well, that’s my old man—tough the street? There’s still time for you to disand old fashioned; "conservative" in all the cover—and experience for yourself—their meaningful, valued ways of the definition. world, as they lived it. Put aside your issues My father, born during the month and because this is not about you. For when that year the Great War exploded in Europe, has generation is gone, their memories will strong m emories g oing b ack t o t he e arly fade away like the “old soldier” of Gen. 1920s—from having met U.S. Army veter - MacArthur ’s 1951 farewell address to Conans of both the U.S. Civil W ar and W orld gress. War I to having seen Babe Ruth play baseAnd just like my parents’ own stories of ball a nd s haking t he h and o f a m an w ho the Depression and World War II, someday shook the hand of President Abraham Lin- your Baby Boom-era memo ries, college coln. tales, an d ‘ 60s v agabonding e xperiences, When I talk with my father and mother , will inspir e, even motivate someone the world of the 1920s, ‘30s, and ‘40s comes younger. alive. So, don’t wait for your child or niece or My mother is a one-woman workfor ce, nephew to ask you about your past—tell still trimming the backyard hedges, and all them about yourself, warts and all. Sit them the while sewing beautifully , handcrafted down and gently have them listen. They clothes. She alos still recounts stories of her may grumble, they may groan, but your life lean youth during the Gr eat Depr ession, stories, like seeds cast upon fertile soil, will feeding railr oad “hobos” at the family’s one day sprout and bloom as richly scented back door, and helping collect neighbor - flowers to be passed on. hood scrap metal for the war effort. Now r un—look in the mirr or. Meet the The point of this editorial is to point out newest living time machine. that one of America’s greatest sources of inLou Varricchio

Visit us today at

www.denpubs.com PUBLISHER GENERAL MANAGER MANAGING EDITOR OFFICE MANAGER PRODUCTION DESIGN

EdwardCoats Mark Brady LouVarricchio Jennifer Delmain DentonPublications Production Team EDITORIAL WRITERS Martin Harris John McClaughry LouVarricchio

MARKETING CONSULTANTS Tom Bahre • Roxanna Emilo • Heidi Littlefield Mary Moeykens • Joe Monkofsky • Regina Styles CONTRIBUTORS Angela DeBlasio • Rusty DeWees • Alice Dubenetsky Joe Milliken • Catherine Oliverio • Fred Pockette Beth Schaeffer • Dan Wolfe

New Market Press, Inc., 16 Creek Rd., Suite 5A, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 Phone: 802-388-6397 • Fax: 802-388-6399 • newmarketpress@denpubs.com Members of: CPNE (Community Papers of New England) IFPA (Independent Free Papers of America) • AFCP (Association of Free Community Papers) One of Vermont’s Most Read Weekly Newspapers Winner of 2006 FCPNE and 2008 AFCP News Awards ©2011. New Market Press, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part without written permission of the publisher. Editorial comments, news, press releases, letters to the editor and items of interest are welcome. Please include: name, address and phone number for verification. Subscriptions: All New Market Press publications are available for a subscription $37 per year; $24 six months. First Class Subscription: $200/year. Subscriptions may also be purchased at our web site www.denpubs.com New Market Press, Inc. and its advertisers are not liable for typographical errors, misprints or other misinformation made in a good faith effort to produce an accurate weekly newspaper. The opinions expressed by the editorial page editor and guest columnists are not necessarily those of New Market Press, and New Market Press cannot be held liable for the facts or opinions stated therein. 85189

Submit letters to Lou Varricchio at

How sweet it is

I

t isn’t often that a local Fourth Estate enterprise scoops one of the national pros, but that happened last week when the Addison Eagle was—after a gap of several weeks—followed by the Wall Street Journal on the subject of health care plans designed to reward healthy consumer behaviors. Both op-ed writers were amateurs with non-FourthEstate day jobs (one is your humble scribe, writing several weeks back on the Safeway Health Care Plan and its applicability to Vermont), and the other is one David Gratzer, M.D. (who was accorded more than 24-column inches on the op-ed page of the WSJ’s May 21-22 edition to discuss Vermont’s embrace of the public option or single-payer health care strategy. Towards the end, Dr. Gratzer argues, as had your humble scribe earlier, that Vermont would have been a particularly fertile field for a plan with a wellness-reward component, and that it’s a pity that Vermont chose not to. Clearly, Dr. Gratzer ’s correct, even if he didn’t first get his argument from the pages of the Eagle (then again, Dr. Gratzer may well have been inspired by your humble scribe’s recent column). Nevertheless, as 1950s television icon Jackie Gleason often said on such salutary occasions—“How sweet it is!”

The Land of Enchantment Part 1

I

park on level two of Burlington International Airport’s too small garage, because my return flights usually de-plane on the second floor of the terminal and I like to walk a straight shot from the plane directly across the skywalk to my car. Traveling without even a carry-on assures I can navigate the route from plane to turning my truck’s ignition within an elapsed time of about three minutes. It cost $82 for six days parking, in case you wondered. Burlington’s airport is clean, the ticket folks are attentive, and it’s small. Not so small that it doesn’t have all the bland modern day apparatus larger airports have, it just has less of it all. It’s often better to have less things—food, people, magazines, trinkets. Not urinals. It’s good to have too many urinals. Relaxed in extra leg-room seat 5-C, a short taxi of I’d say 20 yards stops with a chime from the cockpit and our pilot’s shockingly un- intelligible voice, (apparently it takes very little verve to fly a plane), informing us that Washington’s Dulles Airport is stacked up and that we’ve been ordered to wait 30 minutes till take-off. 30 minutes stretched to and ended at 60, and we were off to Washington. I rarely travel on a tight schedule and I had a two-hour wait to connect once I got to Dulles, so the 60-minute hold-up didn’t raise the tiniest hair on my neck. Flying and waiting time all gets filed under—time to read. And read I did. My Christmas 2010 under-the-tree book haul totaled 5, and I’m well past done reading those, plus one, “Unbroken,” given me by a fellow from the gym. So for the trip to my sister’s in Albuquerque, N. M., I spent part of a 100 dollar gift certificate my ma got me on two books. Steve Martin’s “An Object of Beauty,” a novel about a young women mixed up in the New York City art world. I was personal assistant to the late William J. Doyle, founder of

Dr. Gratzer recites all the usual reasons why Vermonters, in the state which scores number 1 in the nation, health-wise, according to the United Health Foundation, using various wellness measures, “…Could receive incentives to prevent diseases caused by obesity, tobacco, and other life-style choices…,” but then, recognizing Vermont’s political disposition, closes with “…but don’t expect Vermont…to test it any time soon. Not while the public-option itch is still out there waiting to be scratched.” Exactly. Unlike your humble scribe, Dr. Gratzer addressed zero column-inches to why is Vermont number 1. The answer is in some readily available statistical rankings. Warning: some viewers will find these statistics displeasing to the point of requiring censorship. We start with the recognized positive correlation between citizen health and citizen I.Q. This subject has been broached, cautiously, in a number of domestic generalreadership publications, but knowing that they would be dismissed by a majority of Addison Eagle readers as identifiably infected with a conservative bias, your humble scribe hose to cite a pair of academic publications instead. One is a collaborative effort between the Universities of Delaware and Edinburgh, in which authors Gottfedson and Deary document the epidemiological fact that See HARRIS page 9

Doyle New York, (as seen on “Antiques Roadshow”), for six years, so I thought I’d relate to Martin’s latest. The second purchase, “How to Be Alone”, is a book of essays by Jonathan Franzen. I had read, “Freedom”, his latest novel, and loved it, and having finished his book of essays I’m happy to report I loved them too. How fantastic and rare it is to find someone you love to read. I trust you’re at least tolerant of this column? Upon arriving at Dulles Airport, my first glance at the departures/arrivals board noted my connecting flight was running 30 minutes late. Cake, not a problem. I was into Martin’s book in good shape and was happy to spend the added gate wait forging deeper. After a potty break, the ever changing departure board noted my connecting flight was to fly 90 minutes past it’s schedule, leaving me with more than 2 1/2 hours to fill. I don’t eat when I travel. I hardly hydrate. I have no one to call for leisure chat. 3 hours isn’t time enough to taxi to town and see the president. So I read a bit more, then figured a way to make my time 100 percent meaningful. I walked the terminal. At a stout pace I walk a mile in 15 minutes. So I tittered from terminal A-C,3, to the very end of B, and back, twice, for a total of an hour’s time, and four miles traveled. Here’s what I saw along the way. To be continued. Rusty DeWees tours Vermont and Northern New York with his act “The Logger.” His column appears weekly. He can be reached at rustyd@pshift.com. Listen for The Logger, Rusty DeWees, Thursdays at 7:40 on the Big Station, 98.9 WOKO or visit his website at www.thelogger.com


www.addison-eagle.com

June 11, 2011

The Eagle - 7

MUHS Class of 2011 gets ready for graduation From News & Staff Reports

newmarketpress@denpubs.com MIDDLEBURY — Middlebury Union High School has announced its 2011 co-valedictorians and co-salutatorians.

Christine Artim Christine Artim, the daughter of Diane Hermann-Artim and Nick Artim of Middlebury has been named co-valedictorian. Artim has achieved High Honors all four years and was awar ded the Pr esidential Award for Academic Excellence in grades 9, 10 and 11. She received Student Recognition Breakfast Awards in grade 1 1 for Fr ench by Ms. Dunleavy and for chemistry by Ms. Atkins. Christine received the American Legion Department Awards for science and fine arts in grade 9 and for math, science and foreign language in grade 11. She received the Highest Honor fr om the Society of W omen Engineers in grade 1 1. Christine also scored in the top 10 percent in the UVM Math Contest. She was the r ecipient of the Latin Book Award in 10th grade and the Middlebury College Book Award in grade 11. Artim has been a member of the track and field team, since grade 11, when she received the Most Improved Award. She placed second in the 3000 meter event for Division 2 at the V ermont State Meet. This past fall, she competed on the cr osscountry team, when she r eceived the Most Valuable Player Award for the team. Christine placed 6th for Division 2 at the Vermont State Meet. In grade 1 , Artim was a member of the Rube-X team, which placed first in the category and second place in the marketing award for its kinetic wind sculptur e in the UVM Engineering Challenge. She was a member of the Arabic Club in grades 9, 10 and 11. Artim has also volunteer ed for sev eral community service projects and tutored in the MUHS Learning Lab. Artim will attend Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the fall.

ference at Lyndon State College in grades 10 and 1 1. He has been active in the Student Senate for the past thr ee years; serving as treasurer of the Class of 201 1 in grade 9, pre sident in grade 10 and vice-pre sident in grade 11. He was also a member of the Student Coalition on Human Rights (SCOHR) and played baseball for the T igers for the past three years. He has also competed on the Nordic ski team, cross-country team and the track and field team. In grade 1 1, James r eceived the Louis Armstrong Jazz Award from the MUHS music pr ogram. He has played baritone saxophone in the Concert Band all four years and in the Jazz Band since grade 10. Cobb was selected for the Gre en Mountain District Music Festival and the All-State Band last year. He was the re cipient of the St. Michael’s College BookAward for community service in grade 11, volunteering for several community service pr ojects; including 400 hours for the Volunteer Fire Department and research in a bio-chemistry lab. Cobb will attend Davidson College.

Joe Kelley of Shoreham, has been named cosalutatorian. She has achieved High Honors throughout high school, earning the Pr esidential Award for Academic Excellence in grades 9, 10 and 1 1 and is a member of the National Honor Society. In grade 11, Kelley received the Society of Women Engineers Honors Award. In grade 10, she was nominated to attend the HOBY Leadership Conference and the RYLA Leadership Conference, sponsored by the Rotary Club and the Athletic Leadership Confer ence. Kelley r eceived the MUHS Community Service Award in 2009 and the St. Michael’s Book Award for outstanding community service and academics in 2010. She is a Peer Leader and an Ally, as well as a member of SCOHR at MUHS. Kelley has been active in the Student Senate all four years and is curr ently the vicepresident of the Class of 201 1. She was a starter for the varsity soccer team all four years, serving as captain in grades 11 and 12 and was named to the 2nd All-State team in grade 1 1 and the Addison County All-Star team in grade 12. She also played basketball in grades 9 and 10. Kelley is the captain of the varsity lacrosse team. She was named to the 1st All-State team in grades 10 and 11 and was an Academic All-American in grade 11. Kelley was selected to compete in the lacrosse junior national tournament in Maryland last May for the W estern Upper New England team. Kelley will attend Boston University this fall, where she received a scholarship to play lacrosse.

Jarrod Ashley Jarrod Ashley, the son of Jonathan and Janelle Ashley of Middlebury , has been named co-salutatorian. He has achieved High Honors all four years and is a member of the local chapter of the National Honor Society. Ashley was the r ecipient of the W illiams College Book Award in 2010, for ranking in the top 5 percent of his class, demonstrating intellectual leadership and making a significant contribution to the life of the school. He r eceived the 21st Century Discovery Award from the English department in grade 11. Jarrod has scored in the top 10 percent in the UVM Math Contest for the past thr ee years. Ashley has been active in the Student Senate, the Arabic Club and the Concert Choir and other choral gr oups at MUHS. He has played r oles in the musical Gr ease and the senior play Oliver . In sports, Ashley was a member of the track and field and football teams, where he served as a captain this year . Ashley has competed on the wrestling team all four years, serving as captain since grade 11. In 2010 and 201 1, he placed 4th in the state of Vermont in his weight class. Ashley has volunteer ed 120 community service hours knitting at blankets for theAddison County Humane Society and the Memorial Baptist Chur ch Sunday School. He also raises award-winning sheep and works with 4-H children. Ashley will attend Cornell University.

Jane McCabe Jane McCabe, the daughter of Monica and Andrew McCabe of Middlebury , has been named co-valedictorian. She has achieved High Honors throughout high school, earning the Presidential Award for Academic Excellence in grades 9, 10 and 11 and is a member of the National Honor Society.

McCabe r eceived Honorable Mention for art in grades 9 and 10 and for Spanish in grade 11. She has been active in the Student Senate as a senator in grades 10, 1 1 and 12 and currently serves as its tre asurer. McCabe is a Peer Leader and an Ally, as well as a member of SCOHR at MUHS. In sports, McCabe played soccer each year of high school and was a captain this year . She also played tennis in grades 10, 1 1 and competed in gymnastics in grades 9, 10 and 11. In March, McCabe played the role of the Artful Dodger in the senior play, Oliver. She has volunteered for several community service projects including; the art r oom at Mary Hogan Elementary School, Relay for Life, Hospice V olunteer Services Not-Just Art Auction and in Bill’s Kitchen in Puerto Rico. She has worked at the Snow Bowl as an Alpine ski instructor. McCabe will attend Middlebury College.

Mariko Totten Mariko T otten, the daughter of Chris Sylvestri and Scott T otten of Salisbury has been named co-valedictorian. She has achieved High Honors thro ughout high school, earning the Presidential Award for Academic Excellence in grades 9, 10 and 11. Totten was the recipient of the American Legion Department Award for Spanish in grade 10. In grade 11, she received Society of Women Engineers High Honors Award. Totten is a Peer Leader and anAlly, as well as a member of SCOHR and the Arabic Club at MUHS. She has been active in the Student Senate as a senator in grades 10, 1 1 and 12. Totten performed in the senior play Oliver last March. She has volunteered for several community service pr ojects including; the Relay for Life and the Hospice V olunteer Services Not-Just Art Auction. Totten was a member of the soccer team in grades 9 and 10 and the gymnastics team in grade 9. Totten will attend the University of V ermont.

James Cobb James Cobb, the son of Kimberly and Wade Cobb of Middlebury has also been named co-valedictorian. He has achieved High Honors all four years and received the Presidential Award for Academic Excellence in grades 9, 10 and 11. He was the r ecipient of the American Legion Department Awards for English in grades 9 and 1 1; social studies in grade 10 and science in grade 10. He is the pr esident of the local chapter of the National Honor Society. Cobb was selected to attend Boys’ State in grade 11 and for the Rotary Leadership Con-

Elizabeth Kelley

HELMET CHECK — Middlebury's Annual Bike Rodeo was held May 21 and attracted over 100 participants. Marshall Sanchez had his helmet checked for a safe fit by Mary Hogan School nurse Mary Gill. Children could request free helmets, get their bikes checked by Bike Center and Skihaus mechanics who volunteered their time, and ride through an obstacle course staffed by older student volunteers to test their navigation skills and rules of the road. Photo provided

Elizabeth Kelley, the daughter of Deb and


www.addison-eagle.com

8 - The Eagle

June 11, 2011

15 $ 9

$

/wk per zone

BUSINESS CLASSIFIEDS /wk per zone BUSINESS CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3 PM

20 Word Max, 25¢/word over

20 Word Max, 25¢/word over

To place a classified ad, simply mail or fax this coupon. Or contact us by phone, email or online at denpubs.com MailT o: Denton Publications: PO Box 388, 14 Hand Avenue, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 FaxT o: 518-873-6360 • Phone: 518-873-6368 • Email:s hannon@denpubs.com

Irving Oil offers discounts, chance to win free fuel RUTLAND — With high gas prices and summer travel underway, Irving Oil has launched a rewards program for customers. Now visitors to any of the 289 participating Irving locations in Maine, New Hampshir e, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island can save at the pump and possibly win free gas for a year through Irving Rewards. In Vermont, customers can save at 28 participating Irving locations. The more drivers fill up at Irving between now and Aug. 31, the more they’ll save on gas this summer. Every $200 in fuel purchases earns 10 cents off per gallon at the next fill-up. Customers can obtain an Irving Rewar ds card, register it online at www.IrvingOil.com/Rewards, and use it at every fill-up at participating Irving locations. When the card recognizes $200 in fuel purchases, it will automatically roll back the price at the next visit. Customers who register their card online are also entered to win one of six prizes of free gas for a year or one of 100 Irving gift cards for $100. Irving Rewards teams will also be giving out fr ee gas car ds and prizes at select locations throughout New England starting in July. The Irving Rewards promotion runs through Aug. 31.

Bristol to rock June 18 ZONE A

Name Address

ZONE B Phone

AmountE nclosed

Card# Exp.D ate

Signature

83557

chine and dunking booth. The Bobcat C afé and Br ewery will be open for lunch and will give tours of their brewing operations. A Young Musicians’ Stage will be set up at Almost Home on North Str eet, where young people will play their instr uments and showcase our area’s future generation of talented musicians. The outdoor stage will feature music by four wellknown and loved bands: Bread and Bones; T ammy Fletcher and the Disciples; The Grift; and W aylon Speed. The town was originally named Pocock in 1762.

82577

All classifieds 25¢ per word over 20 words.

BRISTOL — The Main Street of Bristol will be rockin’ with music, food and fun as the thir d annual Pocock Rocks Music Festival and Str eet Fair kicks of f on Saturday, June 18, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. The downtown will be hopping with performances by regional bands, wine, microbrew, cheese and chocolate tastings, specialty food and craft vendors, history booths, demonstrations, farmers market, and, of course, our own incr edible restaurants and shops. Children’s activities will include a bouncy house and craft area, and for older kids and adults, a pitching ma-


www.addison-eagle.com

June 11, 2011

Artists

Harris

from page 1 “I was pleasantly surprised by all the entries,” said Larson. “W e’re very proud of the residents. Their work is accomplished, beautiful. These Lodge r esident are tr ue artists in every sense of the word.” Larson said the display opened two weeks ago and was scheduled to close last week, but now ther e’s a good chance it will be extended—and the public is invited to view it. For younger artists living around Addison County, it’s worth a visit to the Lodge exhibit if only to study the rich legacy of this local group of “Gr eatest Generation” artists. Television news broadcaster T om Br okaw coined the phrase “Greatest Generation” applying it to the Great Depr ession-World War II generation; certainly the wor d “gr eatest” fits when it comes to the artists and other residents of Middlebury’s Lodge. Clearly, ther e’s a lot to learn fr om this gr oup of men and women that has endured an economic depr ession and a world war. At the Lodge, you’ll see original works by several area artists such as Prindle Whistler, Elsia W aller, V irginia Folino, among others. “You should see Prindle Whistler ’s r oom at the Lodge,” said Larson. “It is alive with her V ermont work.” Whistler has been painting sought-after Middlebury scenes for over 40 years. Also joining Jo Birnbaum in creating the display was Lodge resident Jim Borden. Like Birnbaum, Bor den is an accomplished artist; he also teaches a drawing class at the Lodge. “We have so much talent living under one roof,” Birnbaum said. “And that’s why we wanted to put it all on display for everyone to admire.” Birnbaum, in her 80s, is an

from page 6

Daniel Hamilton’s fungus art on display at the Lodge at Otter Creek. Photos by Lou Varricchio

accomplished former New York City sculptress. Having spent several years living in Cuba before Castro’s revolution, her works showing lovers in embrace—and cr eated in exquisite woods— display a Latin American sensuous and near-eroticism that shouldn’t be surprising. After all, a person’s artistic vision, even if it’s on the sensuous side, can often r emain ageless thr oughout life. In the end, having r esidents’ artwork on display at the Lodge was an inspiring idea. Here’s a brief sampling of the 48 entries on display at the Lodge: -Elaine Kaufman, needlepoint -Jim Borden, drawings -Dick Saunders, handmade rugs -Nancy Diamond, stained glass window art -Joyce Heath, handmade baskets -Lois Hunsdorfer , paintings -Rich Locher, paintings -Nancy Niebuhr, hand-

sewn children’s clothing-Peg Condon, photography -Elisabeth Boeke, art Replacing the facility’s “corporate art” with original work cr eated by the r etirement community has had a surprising eff ect. After talking with several r esidents (both artists and non artists), it was clear that the display cr eated an internal buzz that was uplifting to all residents a nd s taff. S everal of the r esident artists even found themselves becoming local “celebrities” overnight. The attention, it appears, was worth the effort. Consider r esident Elsia Waller. She suffers from multiple sclerosis, yet her sculptural work is an expr ession of a far ranging cr eative mind and sensitive spirit. For many seniors at the Lodge, and elsewher e for that matter , age doesn’t blunt what the heart sings. And art is often the channel for expr essing voices and longings long hidden.

Bridal & Formalwear

“Intelligence Predicts Health and Longevity.” The second is similarly European in origin: the February issue of the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation. It’s on the web at www.physorg.com, where you can read that “I.Q. is among the strongest [negative] predictors of cardio-vascular disease…” and “...lower I.Q. scores could elevate cardiovascular disease risk, notably the application of intelligence to healthy behavior [choices…” and (viewer discretion advised) “…I.Q. may well be one important factor behind the place of social class as a fundamental determinant of inequalities in health…more so than access to[health-care] resources …a low I.Q.…as suggested in this study, may be a further independent explanation.” In layman’s language, smarter people are statistically predictable to make smarter personal life-style and wellness choices than not-so-smart people. So, inquiring minds want to know, what’s the correlation between smartness and wellness, not just at the individual statistical level, but at the state level? After all, it’s now the states which, as “laboratories of democracy” in the famous words of the progressively-politically-ori-

The Eagle - 9 ented Justice Louis Brandeis, are designing and adopting a variety of health-care plans. Such state smartness rankings are readily available. You’ll see one such ranking on the website of “The Audacious Epigone” (test your college classics major on definition) where you’ll see Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Vermont in the top three, with I.Q.s in the 101-102 range, and New Mexico, Michigan, and District of Columbia in the bottom three, with I.Q.s in the 9194 range. Vermont is the nation’s healthiest state, according to UHF rankings; bottomranking I.Q. Michigan is the unhealthiest. From another source, Estimating state I.Q. (Intelligence Magazine), M.A. McDaniel wrote in 2006 that the highest I.Q.s are in Massachusetts (104.3), New Hampshire (104.2), and Vermont (103.8) while “…I.Q.s are lowest in the southeastern states.” To prevent additional reader distress, your humble scribe has redacted certain other demographic rankings totally, and will just briefly refer back to an earlier Safeway plan discussion wherein the City of Memphis is found to be one of the unhealthiest jurisdictions in Tennessee, while adjacent rural counties in Tennessee and Michigan score much higher. Overall (urbanplus-rural) Tennessee scores number 47 in the UHF health rankings of

states and its healthiest counties are mostly in rural Appalachia, with socio-economic structures and development patterns not unlike Vermont’s. From a University of North Carolina study (Reeves and Basalik, 2010) we can read that “…more mothers in states with high I.Q.s breast-feed their babies, ensure that infants are immunized, take better care of their teeth, get more exercise, and refrain from smoking. At the same time, highI.Q. states have lower infant mortality, lower rates of HIV infection and AIDS, lower overall mortality, lower rates of heart disease, and lower rates of adult and child obesity.” Both your humble scribe and the WSJ’s distinguished op-ed contributor draw the same conclusion: Vermont would have been an ideal venue for a trial run of a State Health Plan with incentives-for-wellness components. Heck, Vermont is already the healthiest state in the union. Why, then, did the Golden Domers of Montpelier and Gov. Peter Shumlin reject such an obvious quality up/cost down element? An answer to this question was offered long ago by U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt: “Nothing in politics happens by accident.” FDR knew, firsthand. Former Vermonter Martin Harris lives in Tennessee.

Bridal • Bridesmaids • Mother Flower Girl • Prom Gowns Tuxedos • Invitations • Veils Jewelry • Shoes

Fashion Corner Bridal & Formalwear

4325 Main St., Port Henry, NY 79788

(518) 546-7499

This is a great time to spruce up your deck!

16 Creek Road, Middlebury • 802-388-4050 82584

82595


www.addison-eagle.com

Leaders from page 3 bar/bat mitzvah preparation classes on campus. Presented by Chaplain Jor dan and Associate Chaplain Schiffer, the award goes to students w ho s how u nusual o riginality i n the development of r eligious activities on campus. The Spiritual Life Leadership Award of the Charles P. Scott Center for Spiritual and Religious Life was presented to Joseph Brent Allen ’11 of Moultrie, Ga., and Tiernan Meyer ’1 1 of Hartland, W is. The awar d for advancing the spiritual lives of others on campus was pr esented by Chaplain Jor dan and Associate Chaplain Schiffer. The First-Year Achievement Prize for aca-

$ $

$

demic excellence and the ability to r elate well to others was pr esented to Alexandria Jackman ’14 of New York, N.Y., by Dean Collado. The Alexander T wilight 1823 Diversity and Community Leadership Award was presented to Rebecca Harper ’11 of New Haven, Conn., for exemplifying T wilight’s leadership and determination in a way that transcends boundaries of race, class and gender. It was presented by Jennifer Herrera, special assistant to Dean Collado and senior advisor for diversity. The Franklin G. W illiams 1913 and Sarah H. Williams 1912 Memorial Award was presented to Elizabeth McCarthy ’13 of W ellington, N.Z., by Dean Collado. It is awarded to a sophomor e on the basis of natural kindness, perceptivity to the needs of others, and

June 11, 2011

an abiding sense of personal responsibility. Public Service Leadership Awards The John M. McCar dell Jr. Public Service Award goes to a student or students whose efforts bring the college and the town of Middlebury closer together. It was pr esented to Amanda Perry ’1 1 of Columbia, Mo., Quan Pham ’12 of Honolulu, Hawaii, and Brittany Gendron ’12 of Severna Park, Md., for their work in cr eating the Service Cluster Board, an umbrella organization that promotes and funds student service initiatives in response to needs of the gr eater Middlebury community. Jane W illiams, Laura W illiams, Melissa Hirsch, Kristin Haas, and Shree Dhond. The Bonnie McCar dell Public Service Award is awarded to a student or students for excellence in outreach in literacy, youth and fam-

ily services, or the special needs of at-risk youngsters. It was p resented to five members of the Class of 201 1 as r epresentatives of DREAM, a student or ganization that spends Friday afternoons mentoring children and adolescents living in a local affordable housing community , in addition to planning special events and writing grants for the youngsters. The Dana Mor osini Reeve ’84 Memorial Public Service Award is bestowed on a student with spirit and determination from the heart that has far -reaching and ef fective public service. It was pr esented to Shabana Basij-Rasikh ’ 11 o f K abul, Afghanistan, f or her tireless work for women’s rights in her homeland, in Vermont, and elsewhere in the world, and for promoting cross-cultural See LEADERS, page 11

Congratulations To Bill & Ellie Friml Of New Haven Winner Of The Eagle’s 2011 ‘Grand Prize’ •••• $1,000.00 •••• The Friml’s Located The Hidden One Thousand Dollar Certificate In A Tree Stump Off Hemenway Road In Bridport!

$$

10 - The Eagle

$

TM

2011 EAGLE $GRAND PRIZE$ CLUE MEANINGS: CLUE # 1

CLUE # 2

CLUE # 3

THIS GAME WILL EMBARK FROM LAST YEAR’S DESTINATION TO SEIZE THE GRAND YOU’LL NEED TO BE SMART IN CASE YOU DON’T RECALL THE LOCATION DRAGON BROOK RD. IN RIPTON’S WHERE WE’LL START

JOIN ROUTE 125 THROUGH EAST MIDDLEBURY THEN PLAN TO HITCH UP WITH 116 A $1,000. CHECK WITH YOUR NAME ON IT NOW JUST THINK WHAT THAT COULD MEAN

DID YOU KNOW MIDDLEBURY HAS A MUNICIPAL FOREST? WELL INDEED MY SEARCHING FRIEND THEY DO I’D PASS BETWEEN IT AND THE COBBLE ON 116 N THAT WOULD PROVE TO BE A HELPFUL HINT FOR YOU

WE’RE OFF FROM LAST YEAR’S DESTINATION: DRAGON BROOK ROAD, RIPTON

ROUTE 125 THROUGH EAST MIDDLEBURY JOIN ROUTE 116

TAKE 116 N BETWEEN THE COBBLE AND MIDDLEBURY MUNICIPAL FOREST

CLUE # 4

CLUE # 5

CLUE # 6

IF I WERE YOU I’D PASS COVE ROAD FOR THE ROUTE THAT’LL LIKELY SERVE YOU BEST WHEN YOU JUNCTION AT 17 AND 116 I’D POINT MY TRUSTY COMPASS WEST

THE KEEPERS’ UP FOR A CUP OF ‘JOE’ THE NEW ENGLAND BRAND HE HOLDS QUITE DEAR YOU CAN STOP BY WITH PARKING IN FRONT ‘CAUSE THEY ALWAYS HAVE IT HERE

CROSS 7 AT THE JUNCTION AND YOU’LL THINK THIS GAME’S A SLAM YOU’LL KNOW YOUR COURSE IS WORKIN’ OUT IF YOU JOURNEY THROUGH WALTHAM

GO WEST AT THE JUNCTION OF 17 AND 116 - BRISTOL

NEW ENGLAND COFFEE AT THE STORE IN NEW HAVEN VILLAGE

CROSS ROUTE 7 AT NEW HAVEN JUNCTION TAKE 17 INTO WALTHAM

CLUE # 7

CLUE # 8

CLUE # 9

YOU’LL NEED TO TAKE A MOUNTAIN ROAD THE QUESTION IS WHICH ONE IF YOU KEEP THE BIG SNAKE ON YOUR LEFT YOU MAY BEGIN TO HAVE SOME FUN

IF I SAID TAKE MOUNTAIN RD. TO THE EXTENSION TO MOUNTAIN RD. YOU MIGHT SAY HUH? THE KEEPER SAYS JUST FOLLOW THE CLUE IT’S AS SIMPLE AS THAT....DUH!

SHEPHERD’S PIE, A GOOD MEAT LOAF SLOPPY JOE’S OR A WARM BEEF STEW COMFORT FOOD AMERICAN STYLE BUT ONLY ONE CAN PROVIDE A BOOST FOR YOU

TAKE THE WESTERN MOUNTAIN ROAD KEEP SNAKE MOUNTAIN ON YOUR LEFT

TAKE MOIUNTAIN ROAD TO MOUNTAIN ROAD EXT. TO MOUNTAIN ROAD

SLOPPY JOE’S WAS ERNEST HEMINGWAY’S FAVORITE BAR IN KEY WEST

CLUE # 10

CLUE # 11

CLUE # 12

IT’S TIME YOU SECURE THE ELUSIVE GRAND PRIZE BEFORE DAYTIME TURNS TO NIGHT IF YOU HAD BUT 1/4 OF THE DAYTONA 500 I’D TAKE WHAT’S LEFT.... BUT RIGHT

YOU COULD TURN YOUR GRAND INTO A BAND OF GOLD SO YOU COULD SMILE AND WATCH IT GLISTEN ONE ROAD MAY REMIND YOU OF THAT ‘70 HIT BUT THERE’S NO TIME TO STOP AND LISTEN

RICE AND BEANS AND CORN AND WHEAT DONE RIGHT NEED NOT BE BLAND IF YOU SELECT THE ONE THAT’S RIGHT YOU MIGHT WIN YOURSELF A GRAND

TAKE ROUTE 125....RIGHT

PAYNE ROAD - BRIDPORT FREDA PAYNE RECORDED ‘BAND OF GOLD’

RICE HILL SHOULD BE ON YOUR RIGHT, JUST BEYOND HEMENWAY ROAD

CLUE # 13

CLUE # 14

CLUE # 15

LET ME BE FRANK - YOU CAN BE ERNEST TOGETHER WE CAN FIGURE OUT THE CLUE ONE CAN HELP YOU MORE THAN THE OTHER WHICH ONE TO CHOOSE IS UP TO YOU

THIS POPULAR RESTAURANT IN PROVIDENCE HAS AN ENGAGING BILL OF FARE IF YOU DINE WHILE THIS IS SCHEDULED YOU CAN ENJOY WATERFIRE RIGHT FROM THERE

THIS GAME HAS ALL BUT WORN YOU OUT OVER HILLS AND AN OCCASIONAL DALE I’M NOT HORSIN AROUND WHEN I SAY IF YOU KNOW YOUR CLYDES YOU MAY PREVAIL

ERNEST, AS IN HEMINGWAY - HEMINGWAY HILL IS ON HEMENWAY ROAD

HEMENWAYS RESTAURANT - PROVIDENCE IE: HEMENWAY ROAD

CLYDES HILL - SOUTH OF HEMENWAY ROAD, BRIDFORD

CLUE # 16

CLUE # 17

CLUE # 18

THE VOLUMINOUS VERMONT HISTORICAL GAZETTEER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE YEAR OF 1892 YOU NEED TO FIGURE OUT HOW THIS CAN HELP BECAUSE THEREIN LIES THE CLUE

I’D BE INCLINED TO HEED THE KEEPER’S ADVICE IF YOU WANT TO PUT THIS GAME TO BED YOU MAY FIND YOURSELF ON AN INCLINE WITH THE WINDY VALLEY UP AHEAD

HE WAS OUR REVERED 16TH PRESIDENT AND HERE’S A CLUE YOU SHOULDN’T MISS IT WAS THE SUMMER OF 1830 IN DECATUR WHEN FOR THE FIRST TIME HE DID THIS

AUTHORED BY ABBY HEMENWAY RE: HEMENWAY RD.

ON A BIT OF AN INCLINE BELOW WINDY VALLEY ROAD

THE SITE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN’S FIRST STUMP SPEECH

Now You Can Play The $GRANDP RIZE$ All Year Long! Go To: www.keeperoftheclues.com


www.addison-eagle.com

Leaders

from page 10

WAGON WHEEL RESTAURANT

Language Scholarship to learn Arabic. Loehr is also a member of MOQA, the Sign Language Club, W eybridge House, Juntos, and was a Malt trip leader. The Exceptional Advisor Award goes to the mentor of a student or ganization who delves into the work of the organization, impr oves quality, connects with students and contributes significantly to the Middlebury community. Sharing the award for 2011 were the coadvisors to the Solar Decathlon team: Andrea K. Murray, visiting lectur er in architecture, and Ashar Nelson, visiting assistant professor of architecture. The Extraor dinary Initiative Award recognizes an exceptional pr ogram, cultural event, guest speaker or pr oduction that is conceived and carried out by a student or students. The r ecipient was Cloe Shasha ’11 of New York, N.Y ., for or ganizing “TEDx,” a locally or ganized “TED” event designed to “stimulate dialogue through TED-like experiences at the local level.” TED, which stands for technology, entertainment and design, is a nonprofit or ganization dedicated to “ideas worth spreading.” The Outstanding Leader of a Student Or ganization honors a student who motivates the actions and ideals

of an or ganization for the betterment of the Middlebury community. The 201 1 recipient was Rachel Pagano ’11 of Santa Fe, N.M., who served multiple years as president of the Middlebury chapter of College Republicans. The Outstanding New Organization goes to a newly formed, SGA-r ecognized campus group that addr esses a need or community issue that had not pr eviously been supported. The 2011 recipient was Middlebury Geographic, an or ganization that produces a color magazine in the style of National Geographic and is written, edited, illustrated and published by Middlebury students. The Outstanding O verall Achievement Award recognizes one organization for sustained contributions to the campus and student life. The r ecipient was the Middlebury College Or ganic Garden, which has hundreds of student-participants, makes r egular donations to the local food shelf, has a contract with Dining Services to pr ovide food for students in 201 1-12, and built vegetable gar dens at local schools in the region. Kathryn Bostwick, chairwoman of the SGA Constitution Committee, pr esented the SGA awards.

Middlebury and Other Addison County Locations.

SALE BY OWNER • Please Call 802-363-3341

72643

Happy Father’s Day

OTION AUTOM

Dinner Specialties Include:

• Rib-Eye Steak with Shrimp • BBQ Pork Loin Serving from 1-8pm

GIVE DAD A WAGON WHEEL GIFT CARD!

Prime Rib Every Friday & Saturday Starting at $11.95

88436

Beer • Wine • Cocktails

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CAR & TRUCK REPAIR

1065 Wicker Street, Ticonderoga, NY Sun.-Thurs. 5AM-8PM • Fri. & Sat. 5AM - 9PM

(518) 585-7755

DARRIN HEATH 482-2080

50630

Main Street, Hinesburg, VT 482-2030

MIDDLEBURY — Vermont photographers John Miller, Peter Miller, and Richard Brown will be part of a joint exhibit examining the culture of Vermont and the character of its residents. On Friday, June 10, 5-7 p.m., the eVrmont Folklife Center will host an opening reception for our summer exhibition, “Visions of Place: The Photography of John Miller , Peter Miller, and Richard Brown.” “Visions of Place” will be on exhibit at the V ermont Folklife Center ’s Vision & Voice Documentary W orkspace in Middlebury thr ough Sept. 3. Photographers Brown, Miller, and Miller have had an impact on the ways in which people—both inside and outside Vermont—perceive the state and its inhabitants. Each has photographed Vermont for over forty years, returning repeatedly to particular farmsteads, families, and individua ls over ex tended periods of time. In the process they have created a richly nuanced record of the now historic culture of this region and a reference point for the dramatic changes that have occurr ed her e over the past fifty years. But ther e is also a forwar d-looking dimension to the work. This exhibit brings the work of these photographers together for the first time and poses the questions, What do these photographs tells us about the cultur e of Vermont and the character of its people? How can we draw on the values embedded in these images as a esource r for pondering the shape of our future? Check It Out: The Vision & Voice Documentary Workspace is located in the Vermont Folklife Center headquarters building at 88 Main St. in Middlebury. Gallery hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Call 802-388-4964.

Chippewa • Red Wing • Irish Setter • Carhartt • True Grit • Outback • Naot • Clarks • Mod-O-Doc • Dri Duck • Frye

JOHN’S SHOE SHOP NORTH (4 Corners)

35 W. Main St., Richmond, VT

802-434 - 5299 78975

TAKE-OUT AVAILABLE

Folklife Center features photographers

Open Tues.-Fri. 10-5:30, Sat. 10-3 We gladly accept cash, checks and debit.

Baffin • Teva • Blondo • Kenetrek • El Naturalista • Vasque • Merrell • LaCrosse • Brooks • Ojai • K. D. Hill • Kavu • Darn Tough • Softt • Isis

dialogue and understanding. Shabana founded HELA, a nonpr ofit educational or ganization in Afghanistan, and serves as executive dir ector of the Afghan Youth Initiative. Also r eceiving Public Service Leadership Awards were: T aryn T ilton ’1 1 of Sycamore, Ill., for her leadership in the MiddleburyAlternative Spring Break (“Malt”) program to Ecuador and for helping to create a mentoring pr ogram for adopted Chinese children in the Middlebury are a; Kathryn Ruymann of Medford, N.J., for her involvement with the Relay for Life, Malt trip to Oakland, Calif., and GlobeMed, a global public health student organization; and Whitney Hanson ’1 1 of W ayne, Pa., for creating community partnerships and r ecruiting student volunteers through the Volunteer Services Or ganization on campus. The Public Service Leadership Awards were presented by Tiffany Sargent ’79, director of the Alliance for Civic Engagement, and Patrick Durkin ’79, who started the PSLA program at Middlebury in 1993. Joint Dean of the College/Student Government Association Awards The Outstanding Campus

Leader Award r ecognizes a junior or senior for innovation, motivation, initiative and perseverance, and the 2011 r ecipient was Catarina Campbell ’1 1 of Indianapolis, Ind., for striving to make the Middlebury community a mor e positive place for everyone thr ough her work with the Middlebury Open Queer Alliance (MOQA) and Feminist Action at Middlebury organizations. The Extraordinary Emerging Leader goes to a firstyear student or a sophomore for outstanding leadership and involvement in the campus community. The awar d was pr esented to Rachel Sider ’14 of Fort Wayne, Ind., for myriad activities including J S treet U , C ommunity Council, Somali-Bantu ESL Tutoring Gr oup, Juntos and the Judicial Boar d Selection Committee. J.J. Boggs, associate director of campus activities, presented the joint awards. Student Government Association (SGA) Awards The Baumgarten ’98 and Udzenija ’99 SGA Memorial Award honors a sophomor e who personifies academic achievement, the passion for learning, compassion for others and involvement in student activities. The recipient was Daniel Loehr ’13 of Andover, N.H., who in the past year has r eceived a Kathryn W asserman Davis Project for Peace grant and a State Department Critical

The Eagle - 11

Baffin • Teva • Blondo • Kenetrek • El Naturalista • Vasque • Merrell • LaCrosse • Brooks • Ojai • K. D. Hill • Kavu • Darn Tough • Softt • Isis

June 11, 2011

Chippewa • Red Wing • Irish Setter • Carhartt • True Grit • Outback • Naot • Clarks • Mod-O-Doc • Dri Duck • Frye

YOUR LOCAL CHOICE FOR FIRESTONE TIRES

County Tire Center SEYMOUR STREET • MIDDLEBURY 78945

388-7620

WWW.COUNTYTIRECENTER.COM

82594


www.addison-eagle.com

12 - The Eagle

June 11, 2011

Middlebury remembers vets on Memorial Day By Lou Varricchio

newmarketpress@denpubs.com MIDDLEBURY — Hundr eds gathered at last week’s Middlebury Memorial Day Parade. Local military and veterans gr oups, school bands, fraternal clubs—

even this year’s reigning Miss Vermont, Car oline Bright, 20, of Colchester—made appearances as special participants in the annual parade. This y ear, s everal r ecent v eterans of the Middle Eastern theater in the War on Terrorism took part

in the remembrance. Good weather was r esponsible for a lar ge attendance at the shir e town’s parade. Visitors lined Main Street and around the town gr een; several visited the Civil War monument a cross f rom t he Town Hall Theater.

The monument was also the scene of a wreath-laying ceremony later in the day. Middlebury r esidents also used the special day to r emember George “W edge” Mur doch, cofounder of the Middlebury Volunteer Ambulance Association. Mur-

doch died May 22 and was buried in Middlebury May 26. Murdoch helped establish MVAA in 1970. Since that time, MV AA has moved from downtown to its new facility on South Str eet next to Porter Medical Center.

TOWN & COUNTRY HOMES, INC.

105 Panton Road, Vergennes, VT 05491 (802)877-3257 • tchvt.com

WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL!

‘This Week’s Real Estate Opportunities In The Region’

Providing music at the Middlebury Memorial Day parade

x à t à á X

Photo by Erika Liljestrand

82579

SHOREHAM - Spacious 2 level home featuring chef’s kitchen w/Richville Dam view, formal DR, LR w/fireplace, 4 BR, 3 baths, family room w/ woodstove and bi-level decks all on 10.13 A. minutes from Shoreham village. PRICED UNDER PROFESSIONALAPPRAISAL! $299,990. Call Donna LaBerge

EAST MIDDLEBURY - 1962 sq. ft. village home, LR w/woodstove in FP, formal DR, kitchen, laundry area, den/office, 1st fl. BR w/ba, 3 BR & bath up, 3 season porch on the back and spacious yard w/berry bushes. COME HOME TO EAST MIDDLEBURY! $199,000. Call Donna LaBerge

MIDDLEBURY - This home is so much more than it looks like from the road! Custom cherry kitchen, fireplaces in LR & FR, 4 BR, 2.5 baths, wonderful 3 season porch, walkout lower level to spacious yard w/pool. SOUGHT AFTER IN-TOWN LOCATION! Reduced to $359,900. Call Donna LaBerge

MIDDLEBURY - Sunny, light filled, 1 level, end unit condo! Recently updated with new range & refrigerator, kitchen, BR & ba. flooring & interior paint! Living/dining areas have hardwood floors. Full basement, deck on the back and agarage. READY TO MOVE INTO! REDUCED TO $177,900. Call Donna LaBerge

LANG MCLAUGHRY SPERA MIDDLEBURY

LANG MCLAUGHRY SPERA MIDDLEBURY

LANG MCLAUGHRY SPERA MIDDLEBURY

LANG MCLAUGHRY SPERA MIDDLEBURY

385-1115

385-1115

385-1115

385-1115

IF YOU WOULD LIKE A LISTING ON THIS PAGE CALL THE EAGLE AT 388-6397 NEWLY

Middlebury Office

Vergennes Office

66 Court Street Middlebury, VT

268 Main Street, Vergennes, VT

802-388-1000

802-877-3232

www. lmsre.com NEWLY

VERGENNES Charming home that is walking distance to all city amenities. Many recent upgrades including bathrooms and some windows. Priced to sell!

$172,400

MLS 4047483

LINCOLN Private, rural setting with open floor plan and well designed kitchen. Deck off of the dining room, year ‘round hot tub room, partially finished basement, attached garage.

$260,000

MLS 4038478

LISTED

FERRISBURGH Beautiful farmhouse with original detailed woodwork, hardwood floors, walk-in pantry and large, enclosed porch. Traditional, hip roofed barn & hay mound.

$249,000

MLS 4068553

LISTED

SUDBURY This home has so much to offer! Great kitchen with cherry cabinets, separate dining area, mudroom, large living room and screened front porch and open back yard.

$172,900

MLS 4065858

VERGENNES Spacious Cape located on a large lot, close to schools and recreation park. First floor master bedroom. Large private back lawn. Walking distance to town amenities.

$199,900

MLS 4028367

BRANDON Charming in-town home with lots of character and nice qualities. Open living and dining area with built-ins. Kitchen has been updated. Finished space in basement.

$149,900

MLS 4037237

FERRISBURGH Newly built ranch home in private setting with master suite and two additional bedrooms. Mudroom/utility entry, large kitchen open to dining area, slider to deck.

$219,000

MLS 4065815

CORNWALL This is a great opportunity to own in Corwall. Lots of recent upgrades including vinyl siding and newer windows. Three bedrooms on main level. Walk-out basement.

$199,900

MLS 4007447 82581


www.addison-eagle.com

June 11, 2011

The Eagle - 13

82041

Memorial Day in Middlebury

Photos by Erika Liljestrand

WE’RE YOUR HAULING HELPER!!! • Utility Trailers • Cargo Trailers • Horse & Stock Trailers • Heavy Equipment Trailers • Dump Trailers • Snowmobile Trailers • Used Trailers Available

Complete Parts Department

63988

33 Gardner Circle • Hinesburg, VT 05461 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9-5; Sat. By Appt.

802-482-2250 • 1-800-533-0504

Are You Planning A Wedding? Denton Publications has complimentary Bridal Guides with everything you need to plan your special day!

90934

Call Susan at 518-585-9173 or Email susan@denpubs.com to get your guide!

WE CAN HELP KEEP YOU TRUCKIN’

CALL US ABOUT BUSINESS INSURANCE. Call

FOOTE’S INSURANCE AGENCY 6 Green Street, PO Box 39 Vergennes, VT 05491

802-877-3351 • 877-6784

63987

Subject to availability and qualifications. Other terms, conditions and exclusions may apply. Allstate Insurance Company, Allstate Indemnity Company, Northbrook, Illinois. ©2000 Allstate Insurance Company

82580


www.addison-eagle.com Saturday, June 11

14 - The Eagle

Wednesday, June 8 BRIDPORT — Seniors night meal at the Br idport Grange f eaturing r oast chicken, potat o salad , peas , applesauce cake will be served at 5 p.m. Following the meal will be a tea cup and silent auction. Arrive at 4:30 to bid and visit. Suggested donation is $5. Bring your o wn p lace s etting. For r eservations, call Tracey at 1-800-642-5119, ext. 615. LINCOLN — Special senior pr ogram at the Lincoln Librar y. M eet at the Librar y at 11 a.m. and tra vel t o South Starksboro to the home of Linda Bar nard f or a t our of her gar dens

and a pot luck lunch. MIDDLEBURY — Puccini’s “La Rondine” at Town Hall Theater at 8 p .m. Tickets f or $40-$55 ar e a vailable through the THT Box Office by calling 802-382-9222, online or in person Monday–Saturday, noon–5 p.m. MIDDLEBURY — Trivia N ight, 7 p.m., $2 per person goes t o winning team at Two Brothers Tavern.

Friday, June 10

HINESBURG — Music N ight with John Daly 7 p .m.at Brown Dog Books and Gifts. MIDDLEBURY — Puccini’s “La Rondine” at Town Hall Theater, 8 p.m. Tick-

ets for $40-$55 are available through the THT Box Office by calling 802-3829222, online or in person Monday–Saturday, noon–5 p.m. MIDDLEBURY — Ar ts Walk Happ y Hour with the Michele Fay Band (local, original Blueg rass band), 4:30 p .m. Free at Two Brothers Tavern . MIDDLEBURY — Three Sheets 2 the Wind, (rock and roll), 10 p.m., $3 atTwo Brothers Tavern. VERGENNES — “Chaos and Creativity” with har pist and per former Martha G allagher at the Vergennes Opera House. Tickets are $15, $12 seniors/students.

June 11, 2011 Monday, June 13

MIDDLEBURY — “ Vermont Wild” book sig ning, pr e-Father's Da y ev ent for k ids and adults at Vermont Book Shop. Ties in with free Fishing Day. Long time area warden Denny Gaiotti will attend. MIDDLEBURY — I n the P ocket (blues, rock, soul), 10 p .m., $3 at Two Brothers Tavern.

Sunday, June 12

MIDDLEBURY — “The I mportance of Being Ear nes” liv e br oadcast fr om Broadway’s Roundabout Theatr e Company; production of the comedic masterpiece about class and courtship screened at Town Hall Theater, 1 p .m. Tickets, $17, a vailable through the Town Hall Theater Box Office by calling 802-382-9222, online, or in person M onday–Saturday, noon–5 p.m.

p.m. Free at Two Brothers Tavern.

BRIDPORT — The Br idport Book Club will ha ve hold a meeting at the Carl Norton Highway Department’s conference room at 7 p .m. M embers will d iscuss “Death a t L a F enice” b y Donna Leon. All interested readers are welcome. VERGENNES — A ddison C ounty Right t o Lif e will meet in St. P eter's Church Parish Hall, 7 p .m. Visitors are welcome. F or details , call 802-3882898 or e-mail L2Paquette@aol.com.

Tuesday, June 14

MIDDLEBURY— M onster H its Karaoke, 9 p .m. Free at Two Br others Tavern.

Wednesday, June 15

MIDDLEBURY — Annual Benefit Auction to s upport S t. M ary’s S chool on the Middlebury Green, 6:15 p.m. MIDDLEBURY— Open Mic Night, 8

Friday, June 17

VERGENNES — Friday Night Flicks, 7:30 p.m., at the Vergennes Opera House. Free. MIDDLEBURY — “Middlebury Does Soul“ at Town Hall Theater, 8 p.m. Tickets, $17, a vailable thr ough the Town Hall Theater Box Office by calling 802382-9222, online or in person M onday–Saturday, noon–5 p.m. MIDDLEBURY— Jokers Wild (classic rock), 10 p.m., $3, at Two Brothers Tavern.

Saturday, June 18

BRISTOL — P ocock Rocks Music Festival and Str eet Fair, 10 a.m. t o 3 p.m. The downtown will be the site for local musci bands, wines, microbrews, cheeses and chocolate tastings, specialty food and craf t vendors, history booths, demonstrations, farmers market, and downt own r estaurants and shops. MIDDLEBURY — “Middlebury Does Soul“ at Town Hall Theater, 8 p.m. Tickets, $17, a vailable thr ough the Town Hall Theater Box Office by calling 802382-9222, online or in person M onday–Saturday, noon–5 p.m. MIDDLEBURY — Satur day N ight Karaoke, 9 p .m. Free at Two Br others Tavern.

Sunday, June 19

BRISTOL — Christian singer, Kristyn Leigh on t our at the F irst Baptist Church of Bristol, 7:30 p.m. MIDDLEBURY — Taking Flight, the current exhibit at Town Hall Theater’s Jackson Gallery, depic ts birds in var ious media by Vermont artists. The work will be on exhibit thr ough June 19. The galler y, on M erchants Row, is open Monday–Saturday, noon–5 p.m. MIDDLEBURY — P oint C ounterpoint presents an evening of 21st century c hamber m usic b y K athryn Alexander, David Rakowski and talented y oung composers . Free ev ent, 2 p.m., atTown HallTheater. For information, call 802-382-9222.

Christian rocker in Bristol June 19 BRISTOL — Singer Kristyn Leigh is on tour and will perform at the First Baptist Chur ch of Bristol, June 19, 7:30 p.m. Leigh will be singing material from her newest CD along with many of her other popular songs. Everyone is invited to hear this young talented singer. An opportunity to make a donation to help defray expenses will be given, but it is totally voluntary. Leigh’s music is God-inspired har d-edged r ock, punk pop, ballads and old time hymns.

Name MailingAddress City

State

Phone

E-mail

Payment $

Cash [ ] Check [ ] Charge [ ]

16 Creek Rd. Middlebury, VT www.addison-eagle.com 802-388-6397

Card Type: Visa [ ] Master Card [ ] AmEx [ ] Dscvr [ ] # Exp.

SecCode

86725

This offer is good when you subscribe to the print version of the Eagle. Sorry No refunds These are not DIY Internet Coupons

Subscription Rates (Local zone = $29) (Standard mail $47) (First Class $50 3months/ $85 6 months / $150 Yr) / Local zone available in these zip codes: 05443, 05456, 05472, 05487, 05491, 05734, 05753, 05461

SERVICE GUIDE

Place an ad for your business in the Eagle’s Service Guide. Call (802) 388-6397 for information and rates.

Cleaning • Repairs Stainless Steel Lining Video Camera Inspection Brian Dwyer 1-800-682-1643 388-4077

ENGINE REPAIR

GLASS

Eastern Mountain Contracting

Full Service Small Engine Repair

Glass • Screens • Windshields

Scott Martin, Proprietor General Contractor Building & Remodeling Roofing

CHAINSAWS • MOWERS SNOWBLOWERS Also Selling Parts & Equipment

Build It Right. Make It Last. 802-324-0587 scott@easternmountain.com

R.J.’S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR 802-324-8635 802-425-4863

HEATING

DESABRAIS GLASS Boardman Street, Middlebury, VT

388-9049

82099

Auto • Home Commercial

PAINTING

ROLL OFF CONTAINER SERVICE

ROOFING

SALES & INSTALLATION

Randy D. MayoP ainting

Please call us for your roofing, remodeling, demolition and new construction projects.

82505

INTERIOR / EXTERIOR

(Clapboard& TrimRe placement) Estimates Available 15 Years Experience

802-349-2776

randy9859@ hotmail.com

82045

CLOVER STATE

FRIEND 453-2255

CONSTRUCTION BRISTOL, VT

WASTE MANAGEMENT

Phone: 802-877-2102 Cell: 802-316-7166 Email: mlbrunet@gmavt.net 82104

• Equipment Installation &Financing • Heating Systems • Service Contracts & 24 Hour Emergency Service 50 Industrial Ave., Middlebury

82914

Of Replacement Windows Vinyl Siding Asphalt & Metal Roofs As well as construction of

Additions & Garages

CLOVER STATE

ROOFING

WINDOW & SIDING CO., INC.

Specializing In Asphalt Shingles - Free Estimates - Fully Insured -

Phone: 802-877-2102 Cell: 802-316-7166 Email: mlbrunet@gmavt.net

82991

West Central VTLocally Lumber Made

802 388-8449

We Make House Calls Serving Addison & Chittenden Counties

Member of VT, NYS & National Chimney Sweep Guilds

LUMBER/SHAVINGS

82243

72638

SEPTIC SERVICE

CLARK SEPTIC SERVICE

Shavings & Bedding 10 Yard Truck Load Available For Delivery JUMBO BAGS 30 GAL PAPER BAGS $3.00 each BRING YOUR OWN BAG $2.00 BARK MULCH AVAILABLE! Call Norman for more details 247-3144

82044

COMPLETE CHIMNEY CARE

CONTRACTOR

82502

CHIMNEY SWEEP

WINDOWS/SIDING

Marcel Brunet & Sons,I nc.

Windows & Siding

Vergennes, Vt.

Complete Septic System Maintenance & Repair Systems Installed PromptService

Siding • Additions Roofs • Garages Replacement Windows Decks • Free Estimates!

Serving Addison County & Beyond!

Owned and Operated by Richard Brunet Since 1981

388-0202 453-3108

63681

800-439-2644

877-2640

72637


www.addison-eagle.com

June 11, 2011

The Eagle - 15

Williams wins first NASCAR modified race at Devil's Bowl WEST HAVEN — Continuing his domination of the Champlain V alley Racing Association, Joe W illiams made his way to victory lane in convincing fashion Sunday in the 50-lap NASCAR modified feature, sponsored by People’s United Bank, at Devil's Bowl Speedway. Taking advantage of his second place starting spot, Williams took over first place by lap two and began to run away from the field. After a green flag race for 45 laps, a yellow with five to go for Hunter Bates (flat tire ) saw W illiams on point for the restart, followed by Ron

Proctor and Alex Bell. Pr octor had been gradually r eeling in Williams after patiently getting by Don Miller and Bell. He wasn’t able to overtake the lead, but finished in second with a great run. Bell nipped Miller at the line for third, Miller was fourth, and Bobby Hackel fifth. Chris W ilk of Rutland started the season in victory lane after leading Dan Petronis and Hunter Bates to the finish in the pr o late model feature. Petr onis closed late but could have used another lap or two, with a final gap of only half a second between him and Wilk.

Bill Dupr ee notched his second win in a r ow in the Renegades. Br uce Carmen won the Atlantic Coast Old Timers featur e, John Dipietro came out on top in the STAR Antique Racers Sportsmen featur e, and James Ferland took home the trophy in the STAR Modified division. All divisions will be in action on Sunday, June 5, with the pr o late models scheduled for a 50-lap feature. MODIFIEDS: JOE WILLIAMS, Ron Pr octor, Alex Bell, Don Miller, Bobby Hackel, Kevin W right, Hunter Bates, Michael Bush,

Billy Mueller , Jessey Mueller, Joey Trudeau, Dave Snow, Frank Hoard III. PRO LA TE MODELS: CHRIS WILK, Dan Petr onis II, Hu nter B ates, K evin E lliot, David Emigh, Kayla Bryant. RENEGADES: BILL DUPREE, Jer emy Jones, Frank Monr oe, Jonathan Hayes. Brian Hoar Earns Second Straight ACT Spring Green Win Seven-time and defending ACT Late Model T our Champion Brian Hoar of Williston claimed his second straight Spring Gr een and

his second win of the 201 1 season at Devil’s Bowl Speedway on S unday, M ay 21. Hoar won a har d fought battle with leader Craig

Bushey and later John Donahue to lead the final 36 laps and earn the win. Hoar ’s win came in his first event in See DEVIL’S BOWL, page 16

• MEMORIALS STARTING AT $126 • OTHER MONUMENTS UP TO 40% OFF RETAIL PRICE

Come visit our carving studio Bus. Route 4 & Pleasant St., W. Rutland, VT 05777

802-438-2945

78961

Religious Services ADDISON ADDISON COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH Addison Four Corners, Rts. 22A & 17. Sunday Worship at 10:30am, Adult Sunday School at 9:30am; Bible Study at 2pm on Thursdays. Call Pastor Steve @ 759-2326 for more information. WEST ADDISON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday, 9am HAVURAH, THE JEWISH CONGREGATION OF ADDISON COUNTY - Havurah House, 56 North Pleasant St. A connection to Judaism and Jewish life for all who are interested. Independent and unaffiliated. High Holy Day services are held jointly with Middlebury College Hillel. Weekly Hebrew School from September to May. Information: 388-8946 or www.addisoncountyhavurah.org BRANDON BRANDON BAPTIST CHURCH - Corner of Rt. 7 & Rt. 73W (Champlain St.) Brandon, VT • 802-247-6770. Sunday Services: 10a. Adult Bible Study, Sunday School ages 5 & up, Nursery provided ages 4 & under. Worship Service 11am *Lords supper observed on the 1st Sunday of each month. *Pot luck luncheon 3rd Sunday of each month. Wednesdays 6:30pm, Adult prayer & Bible study, Youth groups for ages 5 & up LIFEBRIDGE CHRISTIAN CHURCH - 141 Mulcahy Drive, 247-LIFE (5433), Sunday worship 9am & 10:45am, www.lifebridgevt.com, LifeGroups meet weekly (call for times & locations) BRIDPORT BRIDPORT CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH - Middle Rd., Bridport, VT. Pastor Tim Franklin, 758-2227. Sunday worship services at 8:30am and 10:15am with nursery care provided. Children’s ministries include Sprouts for children age 3-Kindergarten and WOW for grades 1-6, during the 10:15am service. HOPE COMMUNITY FELLOWSHIP - Meets at Bridport Community Hall. Bridport, VT • 759-2922 • Rev. Kauffman. Sunday 9am, 10:30am, evening bible study. ST. BERNADETTE/ST. GENEVIEVE - Combined parish, Saturday mass 7:30pm Nov.1-April 30 (See Shoreham) BRISTOL BRISTOL CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP - The River, 400 Rocky Dale Rd., Bristol. Sunday Worship 9:00am. 453-2660, 453-4573, 453-2614 BRISTOL FEDERATED CHURCH - Sunday service at 10:15am FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF BRISTOL - Service Sunday, 10am ST. AMBROSE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH Saturday service 6:30pm, & Sunday 8am BRISTOL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 839 Rockydale Rd. - Saturday Services: Bible Studies for all ages-9:30am to 10:30 am, Song Service, Worship Service at 11am. Prayer Meeting Thursday 6:30pm. 453-4712 THE GATHERING - Non-denominational worship, second & fourth Saturday of the month, 7pm Sip-N-Suds, 3 Main St. • 4532565, 453-3633 CORNWALL FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF CORNWALL - Sunday worship 9:30am EAST MIDDLEBURY/RIPTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH - Sunday worship, 9am VALLEY BIBLE CHURCH - Rev. Ed Wheeler, services on Sundays: Sunday School for all ages at 9:30am, morning worship at 10:45am (nursery provided), and 6:30pm on Wednesdays; Youth Group and AWANA meet on Thursday evenings at 6:30pm ESSEX CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE ESSEX ALLIANCE CHURCH - 36 Old Stage Rd., Essex • 878-8213

ESSEX JUNCTION CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH - 61 Main St., Essex Junction - 878-8341 FERRISBURGH/NORTH FERRISB. FERRISBURGH METHODIST CHURCH - Sunday worship 9:30am NORTH FERRISBURGH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH - 227 Old Hollow Rd., North Ferrisburgh, VT 802425-2770. Rev. Kim Hornug-Marcy. Sunday worship 10am, Sunday School 10am, Nursery Available. http://www.gbgm-umc.org/ nferrisburgumc/ CROSSROADS CHAPEL - 41 Middlebrook Rd., Ferrisburgh, VT 05456. (802) 425-3625. Pastor: Rev. Charles Paolantonio. Services: Sunday 10am. FERRISBURGH CENTER COMMUNITY METHODIST CHURCH - Rt 7, Ferrisburgh - next to the Town Offices / Grange Hall. New Pastors Rev. John & Patrice Goodwin. Worship time is now 10:45am. HINESBURG LIGHTHOUSE BAPTIST CHURCH - 90 Mechanicsville Rd., Hinesburg. Sunday Service at 10:30am. Pastor Hart, info: 482-2588. ST. JUDE THE APOSTLE - 10759 Route 116 Hinesburg. Masses: Sat. 4:30pm; Sun. 9:30am UNITED CHURCH OF HINESBURG - 10580 Rte. 116, Sunday Worship & Sunday School 10am. Pastor Michele Rogers Brigham - 482-3352. LINCOLN UNITED CHURCH OF LINCOLN - Sunday worship service 9:45, Church school 11:15am, united Student Ministries for grades 7-12, 6:30pm Sunday evenings. 453-4280 MIDDLEBURY CHAMPLAIN VALLEY UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY - Sunday service & church school, Sunday 10am CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY - Middlebury. Middlebury Community House, Main and Seymour Sts, Sunday Service and Church School-10am; Wednesday-7:30pm. THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF MIDDLEBURY (UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST) Sunday 10am worship service THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS - Sunday Sacrament 10am-11:15am EASTERN ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN WORSHIP Service in Middlebury area: call 758-2722 or 453-5334. HAVURAH, THE JEWISH CONGREGATION OF ADDISON COUNTY - Saturday morning Shabbat services, 388-8946 MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH - 97 South Pleasant St., Middlebury. Sunday morning worship & church school 10am, Wednesday evening Bible Study, 6:30pm. 388-7472. MIDDLEBURY FRIENDS MEETING - (Quakers), Sunday worship & first day school 10am (meets at Havurah House) SAINT MARY’S ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH Saturday, 5:15pm, Sunday 8am, 10am ST. STEPHEN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH - (On the green in Middlebury). Reverend Terence P. Gleeson, Rector. Sunday Eucharist 8 & 10:30am Child care & Sunday school available at 10:30am service. Wednesday at 12:05pm Holy Eucharist in the chapel. www.ststephensmidd.org or call 388-7200. UNITED METHODIST CHURCH - 10am Grades K-5: Activities, Grades. 6-8 & 9-12: Church School Classes, Refreshments & fellowship time: 10:45am-11am. Sunday morning worship service 11am. Nursery provided both at 10am & 11am. MONKTON MONKTON FRIENDS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH - Sunday service & Sunday school, 8:45am

NEW HAVEN ADDISON COUNTY CHURCH OF CHRIST - 145 Campground Rd., 453-5704. Worship: Sunday 9 & 11:20am; Bible classes: Sunday 10:30am, Tuesday 7pm. Watch Bible Forum on MCTV-15 (Middlebury) or NEAT-16 (Bristol) NEW HAVEN CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH Church services 10am on Sunday. All are welcome. NEW HAVEN UNITED REFORMED CHURCH Sunday services, 10am & 7pm ORWELL FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH - Sunday worship service, 10:00am. Contact: Rev. Esty, 948-2900 SAINT PAUL’S ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH Sunday mass 11am, 468-5706 RICHMOND RICHMOND CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST - 20 Church St., Richmond • 4342053. Rev. Len Rowell. Sunday Worship with Sunday School, 10am; Adult Study Class, Sunday 8:30am RIPTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH - 388-2510 SALISBURY SALISBURY CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH (UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST) - Sun. worship svc., 10am SHELBURNE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF SHELBURNE - 127 Webster Road, Shelburne • 985-2848 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH - 2166 Shelburne Rd., Shelburne. 985-2269 Sunday Services: 8am & 10am. Bible Study 9:00am • Sunday School: 9:50am. The Reverend Craig Smith ALL SOULS INTERFAITH GATHERING - Rev. Mary Abele, Pastor. Evensong Service and Spiritual Education for Children Sun. at 5pm. 371 Bostwick Farm Rd., Shelburne. 985-3819 SHELBURNE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH - 30 Church St., Shelburne • 985-3981 • Rev. Gregory A. Smith, Pastor, 8:00am - Holy Communion Service • 9:30am - Family Worship Service with Sunday School SHOREHAM ST. GENEVIEVE/ST. BERNADETTE - Combined parish, Saturday mass 7:30pm, May 1-Oct. 31. (See Bridport) SHOREHAM FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCHUCC - Sunday worship and Sunday school 10am. Pastor Gary O’Gorman. 897-2687 STARKSBORO THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF STARKSBORO 2806 Route 16, Starksboro. Sunday worship 11am. Chat, Chew & Renew, a pre-worship fellowship and discussion time 10am10:45am. Sunday mornings in the Fellowship Hall on the accessible first level. All are welcome. First Baptist is an American Baptist church yoked with The Community Church of Huntington for support of its pastor, The Rev. Larry Detweiler revdets@gmail.com; 802.453.5577. SOUTH BURLINGTON NEW COVENANT BAPTIST CHURCH SBC - 1451 Williston Rd., South Burlington. 863-4305 VICTORY CENTER - Holiday Inn, Williston Road, South Burlington • 658-1019 BURLINGTON UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH - Pastor Paul Lyon • 860-5828. Sundays: 10am & 6pm. Wednesdays: 7pm. at 294 North Winooski Avenue. SUDBURY SUDBURY CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH - Sunday worship service and Sunday school, 10:30am

SOVEREIGN REDEEMER ASSEMBLY - Sunday worship 10am VERGENNES/PANTON ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHRISTIAN CENTER - 1759 U.S. Route 7, Vergennes, VT • 802-877-3903 • Sunday school 9am, Sunday worship #1 10am, Sunday worship #2 6pm, Youth, adult gathering 6pm CHAMPLAIN VALLEY CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH - Sunday worship svcs. 10am & 7pm CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF VERGENNES (UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST) - Sunday, 9:30am NEW WINE COVENANT (CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST) - Sunday worship 10am PANTON COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH - Sunday school from 9:30am-10:15am Pre-K to adult, Sunday worship service 10:30am ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH - Main and Park Streets, Vergennes. Rector: The Rev. Alan Kittelson. Sunday Services 8am and 10am; childcare provided at 10am. All are welcome. For information call 758-2211. ST. PETER’S ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH Saturday 4:30pm, Sunday 10:30am VERGENNES UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 10:30am VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH - 862 US Rt. 7, SUNDAY: 9:45am Bible Hour For All Ages Including 5 Adult Classes; 11:00am Worship Including Primary Church Ages 3 to 5 & Junior Church 1st - 4th Graders; 6pm Evening Service Worship For All Ages. WEDNESDAY 6:30pm Adult Prayer & Bible Study; AWANA Children’s Clubs (3yrs to 6th grade); JAM Junior High Group (7th & 8th grade); Youth Group (9th - 12 grade). Nursery is provided for children up to 3 years old. Classes are provided for children age 3 and up. 802-877-3393 WEYBRIDGE WEYBRIDGE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH Worship and Sunday School 10am. Daniel Wright, Pastor. 545-2579. WHITING WHITING COMMUNITY CHURCH - Sunday school 9:45am, Sunday Service 11am & 7pm WILLISTON CHRIST MEMORIAL CHURCH - 1033 Essex Road, Williston. 878-7107. St. Minister Wes Pastor. Services: 8:30am and 10:30am TRINITY BAPTIST CHURCH - 19 Mountain View Rd., Williston. 878-8118 CHRIST MEMORIAL CHURCH - 1033 Essex Rd., Williston 878-7107 CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE - 30 Morgan Parkway Williston, VT 05495 • 802-878-8591 bwnazarene@juno.com CAVALRY CHAPEL - 300 Cornerstone, Williston. 872-5799 MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CHURCH - 1037 S. Brownell Rd., Williston. 862-2108 IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY - Route 2, Williston878-4513 SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH - Route 2A, Williston 878-2285 WILLSTON FEDERATED CHURCH - 44 North Willston Rd., Williston. 878-5792

S SANDERSON FUNERAL SERVICE

Hardware

North Chapel 934 North Avenue Burlington,VT 802-862-1138

Mountain View Chapel

Fax 802-861-2109

www.readyfuneral.com

Phone: 802-388-2311 Fax: 802-388-1033 Email: sandersonf@comcast.com 77177

‘Big Country’ Store Rt. 22A, Bridport

758-2477

77178

77180

“Join us after church for lunch!”

ROSIE’S Restaurant & Coffee Shop

117 South Main Street Middlebury, VT05753

Wa l t e r D u c h a r m e Owner/FuneralD irector Clyde A. Walton FuneralD irector

South Chapel 261 Shelburne Road Burlington,VT 802-862-0991

68 Pinecrest Drive Essex Junction,VT 802-879-9477

Special Thanks To These Fine Local Businesses For Supporting The Religious Services Page Broughton’s

6-4-2011 • 77176

886 Route 7 South • Middlebury, Vt Open 7 Days A Week 6am-9pm (10pm Fri. & Sat.)

802-388-7052

77181

289 Randbury Rd., Rutland, VT

(802) 775-2357 2242 Vt Route 7 South, Middlebury, VT

(802) 388-7212 www.suburbanenergy.com

77179


www.addison-eagle.com

16 - The Eagle

June 11, 2011

63974

Join salute to fly-fishing women

LOW AND BEHOLD By John Lampkin 1 6 11 15 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 30 32 33 34 36 37 39 40 42 46 47 48 51 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 62 65 66

ACROSS Bovine milieu Pasture units Terrible twos types Crack in a lip Fine Japanese porcelain The Pemaquid Point Light is on its state quarter Throw 1953 Original Music Score Oscar-winning film Alluded to Skirt Tribe affiliated with the Missouria Long look at a looker Farm vet’s reference? Wings choice Elite Perp chaser, with “the” New York city or county Where the bucket slops? Pueblo people __ Brasi, “The Godfather” hatchet man Offend Type Casino roller Berlin’s “Call Me __” Procreates Milkmaid? Fish alternative? Fine fiddles Sheet purchase Email letters Arcade game starter Guitar string choice Uni- + uni- + uniLog processor Logical conclusion? Loser’s demand

69 Ratings name 71 Father of the bride’s offering 74 Exactly correct 76 Pharm. receipts 77 Crier of Greek myth 81 B&B offering 83 Colorless 84 “The Way We __” 86 The way we word 87 Imprudent 89 Calf’s folks? 92 Nautical patron 93 Nautical maneuvers 94 Avis output 95 Nautical storage 96 Like heedless ears 97 Stately trees 98 Pang of conscience 100 Improvise with the band 102 Jewel box 104 “__ House”: 1970 CSNY hit 105 Like feet of no concern to a podiatrist? 110 Squad cars 112 Where orphans go while their adoptive moms give milk? 115 Revolutionary sewer 116 River islets 118 Assertion of faith 119 Filmmaker Welles 120 Exude 121 Tax evasion investigators 122 Jackson Hole’s county 123 Wet season events 124 City on the Brazos 125 Rescuer, e.g. 126 AARP and NAACP 127 Meaning 1 2 3 4

DOWN “Lethal Weapon” cop Sardinian passion Birth-related Fad

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9

MANCHESTER — A unique Women in Fly Fishing Symposium, will run Saturday, June 1 1 and Sunday , June 12 at in downtown Manchester. Join the American Museum of Fly Fishing and Orvis to celebrate the launch of our new groundbreaking exhibition, “A Graceful Rise: W omen in Fly Fishing Yesterday, Today, and T omorrow”, with an opening weekend event. The symposium featuring pr esentations, demonstrations, displays, and casting workshops which will take place on both days fr om 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. This is a rare opportunity to learn to cast with the legendary Joan Wulff and meet over 20 other of the most significant women figures in the sport including: Fanny Krieger, Lori-Ann Murphy, Diana Rudolph, and many more. All activities will take place at the museum’s grounds on Main Street and the p resentations w ill b e h eld a t t he neighboring Orvis Fly Fishing School building. Schedule is subject to change. V isit our website at www .amff.com for an

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 28 29 31 35 38 39 41 42 43 44 45 47 49 50 52 53 54 57 60 61 63 64 67 68 70 71 72

Like “CSI” procedures Call from the flock Supercilious Vaqueros’ ropes Provide with funding Appear Small but Beat in an individual medley Figure of speech Santa’s backup bovines? Overdo the sweetness Expensive cuts? Distribute Religious devotion Disagreeing like bookies? “Way to go, bro!” Place to press a suit? Scrutinize Graphic symbol Asian teachers CSA soldiers Baseball’s Musial “Heavens to Betsy!” Down-to-earth Aid for a struggling student Curly poker Godot’s god Watch projection Sups Twist and squeeze Helices Green-card maker Numbers is part of it Trash Sent a message to, oldstyle “The Threepenny Opera” star Bovine hitmen? Rapped with something flat Climactic inning, often Barking sounds Tree anchor

up-to-date schedule and time table. The opening weekend event is sponsored by the Orvis Company with media support courtesy of the Black’s Fly Fishing Directory. A Graceful Rise is self-guided and divided into three section , spanning seven c enturies a nd f eaturing 5 0 s ignifi-

Devil’s Bowl from page 15

his new Ford powered ride out of the Rick Paya stables. Shelburne’s Jamie Fisher and Windham, ME’s Brad Babb swapped the lead early in the event as they sat on the front row after earning +6’s in ACT’s +/handicap system. Bushey took over fr om his sixth place starting position on lap seven and would swap the lead with several drivers for the majority of the event including Ricky Rolfe and Fisher befor e giving up the lead for good to Hoar on lap seventy five and faded to eighth. Donahue claimed second followed by Clare mont’s Todd Davis in third, Glen Luce from Turner in fourth and rookie driver Ben Ashline from Pittson, rounding out the top five. Babb, Fisher , Bushey, Randy Potter and Quinny W elch completed the top ten. The 111 lap event was completed with 14 cautions in one hour and 40 minutes. Thirty-two cars started the main event after forty cars attempted to qualify.

73 Easy listening in the pasture? 75 Hardwood trees 78 German aviation pioneer Lilienthal 79 Black eight, e.g. 80 Struck (out) 82 Fr. miss 85 Some OR staffers 86 Longest-serving current Supreme Court justice

Trivia Answers! •••••••• From Page 2 ••••••••

ANs. 1 NO ONE - THE CONSTITUTION DID NOT PROVIDE FOR A SUCCESSOR UNTIL 1967

ANs. 2 LEXINGTON

cant women who have made contributions to fly fishing. Check It Out: Cost for the program includes admission to the exhibition gallery. Daily rate is $10 for adults, $5 youngsters ages 5-13, and $20 for families. For more information, contact the American Museum of Fly Fishing at 802-362-3300.

72960

SOLUTIONS TO LAST WEEK ’ S PUZZLES !

88 Desktop models 89 Serpico’s biographer 90 Covered with liberally, as a liquid 91 “The Barefoot Contessa” star Gardner 93 Browning gadget 98 Calms 99 City chiefs 100 Polo competitor 101 Scent

103 104 106 107 108 109 111 113 114 117

Job that doesn’t pay? Shrek and Fiona Bluesy Carmen “__ Street Blues”: Dixieland classic Fairway choices Burn sandalwood, say :, in analogies Tetra- + tetraFamily heads Cone head?


June 11, 2011

The Eagle - 17

www.addison-eagle.com

PLACE A CLASSIFIED ANYTIME DAY OR NIGHT, EVEN WEEKENDS AT WWW.DENPUBS.COM

THE CLASSIFIED (802) 388-6397 FAX: 802-388-6399 • EMAIL: GAIL@DENPUBS.COM CABINETS ALL solid wood. Dovetail drawers with soft close. Cost $7000., Sell $1500. NEW MATTRESS SET still in plastic. Cost PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? $400., Sell $250. Tom 401-623-6863 You choose from families nationwide. LIVELECTRIC SCOOTER, 2010, 3 wheel, 2ING EXPENSES PAID. Abby’s One True Gift seater, excellent condition, accessories w/ Adoptions. 866-413-6292, 24/7 Void/Illinois many features. Perfect for seniors or disabled. Paid $6,995.00 Asking $5,400.00. (802) 438-2525.

ADOPTION

APPLIANCES

FOR SALE: Maytag electric range & hood. Excellent working order , clean. $175.00. OBO. Call (518) 569-3644 KENMORE WASHER (cold water only) with LP Dryer, $50, Brant Lake. 518-494-5149.

ELECTRONICS *FACTORY DIRECT SATELLITE TV! Why pay retail when you can buy at factory DIRECT pricing! Lowest monthly service plans available. New Callers get FREE setup! Call NOW 1-800-935-8195 DIRECT TO HOME Satellite TV $24.99/mo. FREE installation, FREE HD/DVR upgrade. New customers - NO ACTIVATION FEE! Credit/Debit Card Req. Call 1-800-795-3579 ROCK BAND BUNDLE for X-BOX, guitar,drums,software etc. in original box. (hardly used) $45.99 Call 802-459-2987

FINANCIAL SERVICES CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT(1-866738-8536) Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. REVOLUTIONARY CREDIT Fix! JUNE Special ONLY $99 Fix Your Credit QUICKLY. Remove Collections, Foreclosures, Bankruptcies, Charge Of fs, Judgments, etc. Fix your credit in no time! www.NewCreditForYou.com 1-800-506-0790 USE OPM PRIVATE MONEY To Keep Properties, Buy or Flip Real Estate. Share The Profits, Bad Economy Irrelevant. 100% Funding Guarantee, 1-800-705-7179 24/7 M s g ; www.ReoHomeCoachFundingCourse.com

FOR SALE ACR METAL ROOFING/SIDING DIST. Quality Products, Low Prices, Metal Roofing and Trims. Complete Garage & Barn Packages, Lumber, Trusses. Delivery available. Free literature. 1-800-325-1247, www.acrmetal.com

ELECTRIC SCOOTER, asking $40. Resistance W eight Bench, asking $45. If interested I can email you a photo. Call 518321-3751 FIVE BOXES of Baseball Cards 1990 and 1991. 1991 Box Unopened. $50. Call 518251-2779. FOR SALE: Twin bed, mattress, box spring. Excellent condition. Great for child or guest bed. $90 or best of fer. 518-623-2737 after 5pm. GET DIRECTTV-FREE Installation NO Start up Costs!!! Showtime FREE-Local Channels Included FREE HD DVR & HD Receiver Upgrade - Ask How!!! Call for Full Details888-860-2420 GRAND FATHER clock $99.00; Spinning Wheel $99.00. 518-563-5067.

**OLD GUITARS WANTED!** Fender , Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, Prairie State, Euphonon, Larson, D’Angelico, Stromberg, Rickenbacker, and Mosrite. Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1930’ s thru 1970’ s TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401-0440 *REDUCE YOUR SATELLITE or CABLE BILL! Confused by all these other ads, buy DIRECT at F ACTORY DIRECT Pricing. Lowest monthly prices available. FREE to new callers! CALL NOW. 1-800-795-1315 2-4 Bedroom Homes No Money Down No Credit Check Available Now Take Over Payments Call Now 1-866-343-4134 AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career . F AA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)453-6204. AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career . F AA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenancem (888) 686-1704 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com

HAYWARD SUPER Pump self priming 3/4 HP for 16x32 Pool, Purex Triton Filter model ST-80. Chemicals and Accessories. 518-873ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. 6793 Medical, Business, Paralegal, Accounting, MEMORY FOAM THERAPEUTIC NASA Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. VISCO MA TTRESSES WHOLESALE! T- Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. $299 F-$349 Q-$399 K-$499 ADJUSTA- Call 800-494-3586 www.CenturaOnline.com BLES - $799 FREE DELIVER Y 25 YEAR CASH FOR CARS: All Cars/Trucks Wanted. WARRANTY 90 NIGHT TRIAL 1-800Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come ATSLEEP 1-800-287-5337 WWW .MATTo You! Any Make/Model. Call For Instant TRESSDR.COM Offer: 1-888-525-8492

FURNITURE

CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS- up to $17/Box! Most CHERRY BEDROOM SET Solid wood, brands. Shipping Prepaid. F AST payment. Ask for Emma 1-888-776-7771 never used, brand new in factory boxes. English Dovetail. Original cost $4500. Sell for www.cash4diabeticsupplies.com $895. Can deliver. Call Tom 781-560-4409. CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET in original TEST STRIPS - up to $17/Box! Shipping plastic, never used. Original price $3000, paid. Sara 1-800-371-1136. www.cash4diasacrifice $975. Call Bill 617-264-0362. beticsupplies.com THREE COUNTRY Style Kitchen Chairs, Plank Seat, Splat and Spindle Back, Oak, Very Good Condition, $50. 518-668-5819.

GENERAL $$OLD GUITARS WANTED$$ Gibson,Fender,Martin,Gretsch. 1920’ s to 1980’s. Top Dollar paid. Toll Free: 1-866-4338277

DISH NETWORK delivers more for less! Packages starting at $24.99/ mo. Local channels included! FREE HD for life! Free BLOCKBUSTER movies for 3 months. 1800-727-0305 DISH NETWORK PACKAGES start $24.99/mo FREE HD for life! FREE BLOCKBUSTER movies (3 months.) Call 1-800-915-9514

WANT TO SAVE $500.00 on Viagra/Cialis? Get 40 100mg/20mg Pills, for only $99! No office visit. Money Back Guarantee. 4 BONUS Pills FREE! CALL 1-888-757-8646

FIX YOUR CREDIT FAST! SUMMER Special ONLY $99 Revolutionary Credit Fix! Remove Collections, Foreclosures, Bankruptcies, etc. Fix your Credit AND Earn Income. V isit TODASHARE1 on SNAP107361:Classified Headers DO NOT TOUCH:Classified Headers EPS www.NewCreditForYou.com 1800-506-0790

LAWN & GARDEN

FREE INVESTOR Training Course. Learn how to make an extra $100/day . Limited Space. Call 866-905-7676 to register FREE LIVE Psychic Reading. Incredible and Accurate Guidance! Gifted Amazing Answers for Love, Destiny , Problems, Money! Call 888-949-5111

GRANITE/MARBLE BENCHES, TABLES, BIRDBATHS, MONUMENT CLEANING AND LETTERING DONE IN CEMETERY. REFURBISHING AND REPAIRING OF MONUMENTS IN CEMETERY. 802-4382945. HANDS ON CAREER Train for a high paying Aviation Maintenance Career . F AA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. Call AIM today (866)854-6156. REACH OVER 28 million homes with one ad buy! Only $2,795 per week! For more information, contact this publication or go to www.naninetwork.com STEEL BUILDINGS. Rock bottom prices!! Save 50%/60% of f. Pre-fabricated kits!! www.actionsteelbuildings.com 1-800-6798110 ext.102 T-SHIRTS Custom Printed. $5.50 heavyweight. “Gildan” Min. order of 36 pcs. HATS Embroidered $6.00. Free catalog. 1-800242-2374. Berg Sportswear. 40. THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a New Career . *Underwater W elder. Commercial Diver . *NDT/W eld Inspector . Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid available for those who qualify . 1-800321-0298.

BIKES FOR TYKES look for them in Items under $100 Super savers ads

Find what you’re looking for here!

HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED? Contact Woodford Bros., Inc. for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1800-OLD-BARN, www .woodfordbros.com, MAHIC#155877; CTHIC#571557; RICRB#22078

HOME IMPROVEMENT ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement waterproofing, finishing, repairs, crawl spaces, humidity & mold control. Free estimates! From W aterproofing to Finishing! Basement Systems 877-864-21 15, ReminderBasements.com STONE TILE SALE Marble, Ceramic, Porcelain, Travertine, Slate, Wood. Every size, every color . W e beat everyone. 750sq.ft. minimum. Delivery available. Sun Tile. Call for quote: 203-775-1042

3-BEDROOM Double wide on 1.3 acres on W ells Hill Rd, Lewis NY . Asking $65,000.315-783-8946.

REAL ESTATE ***FREE FORECLOSURE Listings*** OVER 400,000 properties nationwide. Low down payment. Call now 800-250-2043. AVAILABLE NOW!!! 2-4 Bedroom homes Take Over Payments No Money Down/No Credit Check Call 1-888-269-9192 LAND LIQUIDATION 20 Acres $0 Down, $99/mo. Only $12,900 Near El Paso, TX, Owner Financing, No Credit Checks! Money Back Guarantee FREE Color Brochure. 800755-8953

STOP RENTING Lease option to buy Rent to own No money down No credit check 1877-395-0321 USE PRIVATE MONESHARE1 on SNAP107361:Classified Headers DO NOT TOUCH:Classified Headers EPS OPM. Find, Buy, Flip or Keep Properties, 100% Funding Guarantee, Share in the profits, Bad Economy Irrelevant. 1-800-705-7179 24/7 Msg; www.ReoHomeCoachFundingCourse.com

REAL ESTATE WANTED

MUSIC DRUM SET (Drum Zone), Full Set, V Good Condition, $50. 518-532-7988.

ery

FAST PAYMENT for sealed, unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS-up to $17/Box! Most brands. Shipping Prepaid. Call today & ask for Emma 1-888-776-7771 www .cash4diabeticsupplies.com OUTBOARD ENGINE - 15, 20 or 25 Horsepower, Short Shaft. 802-228-3334.

TOP CASH FOR CARS, Any Car/T ruck, Running or Not. Call for INSTANT offer: 1-800-454-6951 WANTED DIABETES TEST STRIPS Any kind/brand. Unexpired up to $18.00. Shipping Paid Hablamos espanol 1-800-2660702 www.selldiabeticstrips.com

HEALTH

TAKE VIAGRA/CIALIS? SAVE $500.00! Get 40 100mg/20mg Pills, for only $99! Call now and Get 4 BONUS Pills FREE! Your BABY BIRDS; Cockatiels $50.00; Love Birds Satisfaction or Money Refunded! 1-888-757$40.00; Quaker Parrots $250.00. All hand 8646 fed. 518-778-4030 VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!! 40 Pills +4/FREE! Only $99. #1 Male Enhancement, FOR SALE 3 Adorable Guinea Pigs, One Albino, Two Multi Banned, 6 Weeks Old, $25 Discreet Shipping. Only $2.25 a pill. Buy the Blue Pill Now! 1-888-796-8870 Each. Call 518-597-9422. GOLDEN DOODLE Puppies, Family Raised, Vet Checked, 1st Shots, Female $700, Male $650. mcroblee83@aol.com, 518-643-0456. STRAIN FAMILY HORSE FARM 50 horses, we take trade-ins, 3-week exchange guarantee. Supplying horses to the East Coast. www.strainfamilyhorsefarm.com, 860-6533275. Check us out on Facebook.

SPORTING GOODS GOLF CLUB set with bag(like new) 35” $30.00 Call 802-558-4557 JUNIOR/TEEN Golf Clubs, Excellent Condition, Used One Year, Graphite Shafts, For 12-15 Year Olds. Originally $200, Asking $60. 518-798-3433.

WANTED AAAA DONATION Donate your Car, Boat or Real Estate, IRS Tax Deductible. Free Pickup/ Tow Any Model/ Condition. Help Under Privileged Children Outreach Center , 1-800883-6399. Call us at 1-800-989-4237

EDUCATION AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-803-8630 ATTEND COLLEGE Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-692-9599 www.Centura.us.com AVIATION MAINTENANCE/AVIONICS Graduate in 15 months. FAA approved; financial aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call National Aviation Academy Today! 1-800-292-3228 or NAA. edu.

EQUIPMENT WANTED YORK Rake, Tow Behind, 6’ Wide Or Larger. Call 802-558-2540.

Check out the classifieds. Call 800-989-4237

FOR RENT Half a Duplex 13 Champlain Drive, Grover Hills 3 Bedroom, Washer/Dryer Hookup $625 mo. Application and deposit required.

518-546-7557

82206

Real Estate

Need a home? Looking for someone to Āll that vacancy? LAND LIQUIDATION- 20 Acres $0/Down, $99/mo. ONL Y $12,900. Near Growing El Paso, Texas (2nd safest U.S. CITY) Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Money Back Guarantee. 1-800-755-8953

LAWN SWEEPER attaches to mower. Sears. Excellent Condition. $99. 518-494-7292.

DONATE A CAR Free Next Day Pick-Up Help Disabled Kids. Best Tax Deduction. Receive 3 Free V acation Certificates. Call Special Kids Fund 7 days/week 1-866-4483865

PETS & SUPPLIES

78875

MOBILE HOME FOR SALE

GARDEN DUMP Cart, $25. Solid Rubber Tires, 19”x34”x9” Deep. 518-532-4467 or 518-812-3761.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS CLARINET/ FLUTE/ VIOLIN/ TRUMPET/ Trombone/Amplifier/ Fender Guitar , $69 GET YOUR DEGREE ONLINE *Medical, each. Cello/Upright Bass/Saxophone/ *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, French Horn/Drums, $185 ea. Tuba/Baritone *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Horn/Hammond Organ, Others 4 sale.1-516Computer available. Financial Aid if quali- 377-7907 fied. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com

70”W x 26” D x 58” T ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Good shape, solid, lots of storage, USA-made. Free 36” matching Toshiba TV included. In excellent shape. $350 OBO Call 518-570-1111

CONSTRUCTION

85187

DONATE A CAR Help Disabled Kids. Free Next Day Pick-Up Receive 3 Free V acation Certificates. Tax Deductible. Call Special Kids Fund 7 days/week 1-866-448-3865

REAL PROPERTY FOR SALE BUILDING LOT on Wells Hill RD, Lewis, NY. 1.5 acres, drilled well, cleared, power at road side, $30,000. 315-783-8946

RENTALS FOR RENT: One week at the largest timeshare in the world. Orange Lake is right next to Disney and has many amenities including golf, tennis, and a water park. W eeks available are in March and April 2012. $850 inclusive. Call Carol at 978-371-2442 or email: carolaction@aol.com FOR RENT, Two BR Mobile Home, Bristol Notch. Nice yard, surrounded by woods, year-round brook. $675 per month. 802-3778290.

REAL ESTATE Wanted in the Ticonderoga/Crown Poinnt/Port Henry Area, Not In Village, Fixer-Upper, Must Have Some Call us at 1-800-989-4237 Land. Call 518-562-1075.

FOR RENT, Two BR Unit, with DR and LR. Port Henry . $600 per month, plus utilities. 802-363-3341. FOR RENT, commercial store space, downtown Port Henry. 800 to 2,500 square feet. $400 to $1,250 per month, plus utilities. 802-363-3341.

VACATION/ RECREATIONAL RENTALS BRING THE FAMILY! W arm up with our Sizzling Summer Specials at Florida’ s Best Beach, New Smyrna Beach. See it at www. NSBFLA.com/Specials or Call 1-800-5419621

TIMESHARES SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE FOR CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for CASH! Over $95 Million Dollars of fered in 2010! www.sellatimeshare.com Call (800) 8820296 SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE FOR CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/Rent Your Unused Timeshare for CASH! Over $95 Million Dollars of fered in 2010! www.sellatimeshare.com Call 1-800-6406886

HOME FOR SALE

AVAILABLE NOW 2-4 Bedroom Homes Take Over Payments No Money Down No SIZZLING SUMMER Specials! At Florida’s Credit Check Call Now 1-866-343-4134 Best Beach New Smyrna Beach Stay a week or longer Plan a beach wedding or fam- Customer Satisfaction is our trademark ily reunion. www.NSBFLA.com or 1-800-541- and our reputation. 9621


18 - The Eagle

June 11, 2011

www.addison-eagle.com

Help Wanted

Need a job? Looking for that “right fit” for your company?

Find what you’re looking for here!

85217

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES $500-$1000/DAY For answering the phone? You bet. No selling, no MLM, no products to buy, no kidding! Call 800-658-5821. IRS approved. INVESTORS - OUTSTANDING and immediate returns in equipment leasing for frac industry. Immediate lease out. 1-800-3972639

HELP WANTED

$$ GET PAID $1000 to Lose W eight! Lose ugly body fat and GET PAID! Call now for details - hurry limited time. 888-253-5931

2011 POSTAL Positions $13.00-$36.50+/hr., Federal hire/full benefits. Call Today! 1-866477-4953 Ext. 150

** ABLE TO TRAVEL ** Hiring 10 people, Free to travel all states, resort areas No experience necessary . Paid training & Transportation. OVER 18. Start ASAP. 1888-853-8411

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS - $150-$300/Day depending on job. No experience. All looks needed. 1-800-281-5185-A103

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 per day depending on job requirements. No experience, All looks needed. 1-800-561-1762 Ext A-104, for casting times/locations.

Automotive

85228

MYSTERY SHOPPERS! Earn up to $150 daily. Get paid to shop pt/ft. Call now 800690-1272. PROCESS MAIL! Pay W eekly! FREE Supplies! Bonuses! Genuine! Helping Homeworkers since 1992! Call 1-888-3021522 www.howtowork-fromhome.com

BLUE JEAN Job!! Hiring Sharp/Fun People! Free to travel entire United States. Company paid Lodging/T ransportation. Great pay + Bonuses. Get Hired Today. Work Tomorrow! 1-888-853-8411 DRIVERS: CDL-A, authorized to operate a CMV in Canada. Home Daily, Very Good Pay & Benefits. Sign-On Bonus. New Schedule. 800-334-1314 x1178 wadhams.com

FEDERAL POSTAL JOBS! Earn $12 - $48 per hour / No Experience Full Benefits / Paid Training 1-866-477-4953, Ext. 131 NOW HIRING!! FRAC SAND Haulers with complete bulk pneumatic rigs only . Relocate to Texas for Tons of work. Great company/pay . Gas cards/Quick Pay available. 817-926-3535

GREAT PAY, start today . Travel hot spots DRS,LLC- 16 Day Company Sponsored CDL across America with young successful busiTraining.No Experience Needed, ness group. Paid Training, travel,and lodgGuaranteed Employment! 1-800-991-7531 ing. 877-646-5050 www.CDLTrainingNow.com CHECK us out at www.denpubs.com

$10 Off an Alignment

2 PADDLEBOATS & 1 Canoe(14’ fiberglass). $295 each. Pelican Fiji 3 pass. yellow. W aterWheeler 5 pass. green. Lake Placid. 518 524 7890

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! W e’re Local! 7 Days/W eek. Call Toll Free: 1-888-779-6495

BOAT, 18’, 90hp, Runs Good, Best Of fer. 518-546-8614.

DONATE A CAR HELP CHILDREN FIGHTING DIABETES. Fast, Free Towing. Call 7 days/week. Non-runners OK. Tax Deductable. Call Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 1-800-578-0408

FARM EQUIPMENT 1964 FORD 4000 4cyl., gas. Industrial loader & Industrial Front End, 12 spd. Sherman Transmission, pie weights, 3 pt. hitch & PTO. $6200. 518-962-2376

WANTED KUHN Hay Tedder. 802-558-2540.

MOTORCYCLE/ ATV WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLES KAWASAKI 1970-1980 Z1-900, KZ900, KZ 1000, H2-750, H1-500, S1-250, S2-250, S2350, S3-400 CASH. 1-800-772-1 142, 1310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com

78982

Get 1/2 Off an Alignment

with purchase of tires with us. Reg. price of alignment $69.95

60 Ethan Allen Dr., South Burlington, VT05403 (802) 660-0838 (888) 9 WRENCH

USED CAR SALES

We Service Honda, Subaru, Toyota & Acura

82634

AUTO DONATIONS

Hometown Chevrolet Oldsmobile 152 Broadway Whitehall, NY • (518) 499-288 6• Ask for Joe

92450

“EVERYDAY LOW PRICES” FOREIGN ~ DOMESTIC ~ CUSTOM MADE HYDRAULIC HOSES

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE LOVE IN THE NAME OF CHRIST . Free Towing & NonRunners Accepted. 800-549-2791 Help Us Transform Lives In The Name Of Christ.

1997 INTERNATIONAL truck, 21 Ft. wheelbase, no box. Navestar engine, exc. tires, standard transmission. V ery clean. Excellant haytruck. $7,500.00

Customer Satisfaction is our trademark and our reputation.

H & M AUTO SUPPLY

DONATE YOUR CAR. FREE T OWING. “Cars for Kids”. Any condition. Tax deductible outreachcenter.com, 1-800-597-9411

TRUCK OR VAN FOR SALE

LOOKING FOR a change?? Opportunity to work in small but busy environment doing mechanical and “jack of all trade” skills. Small, nearly one man shop in rural setting with some “out and about” work as well. Locatrion West Addison, VT at Reeds Sales and Service. Stop in or call Mike at 802-7592054.

L OANS A VAILABLE NO CREDIT? BAD CREDIT? BANKRUPTCY?

when you get your tires changed with us.

BOATS

HELP WANTED/LOCAL

83243

Not Just Parts,

PARTS PLUS!

482-2400 482-2446 Route1 16

Hinesburg

Open 8-5 Monday - Saturday

92445


www.addison-eagle.com

The Eagle - 19

73934

June 11, 2011


20 - The Eagle

June 11, 2011

www.addison-eagle.com

Our 5th Year Anniversary

Cus tom erAp p recia t ion Da ys Free Fat Quarter with every purchase!

COM E JOIN US!

Friday, June 10th thru Saturday, June 18th

It’s here! Our 5th Anniversary/Customer Appreciation Days, June 10 -18. Please come in to celebrate our fifth year in business!

SPECIAL DEALS FOR OUR SPECIAL CUSTOMERS! • ALL SALE FABRIC $4/YARD • BUY 4 SPOOLS OF THREAD GET 5TH SPOOL FREE • ALL IN-STOCK VACUUM CLEANERS 10% OFF OUR ALREADY DISCOUNTED PRICES!

• EVERY IN-STOCK SEWING MACHINE ON SALE! • BUY 1 BOOK OR PATTERN, GET ONE FREE! • REGISTER TO WIN A JANOME TRIM & STITCH SEWING MACHINE

Come on in and enter to win a sewing machine. Take advantage of special sales, share some refreshments and get our true appreciation of your support over the past five years.

~ COUPON ~

Remember the feeling you got making your very first quilt? Feel it again with a new sewing machine!

40% OFF 1 Sewing Notion* with coupon *some exclusions apply expires 6/18/11

Thank you for shopping locally! June 2011 marks our 5th year. We care about local people and local business. Customer service and customer satisfaction are among our top priorities. We love what we do and want to thank all of you for allowing us to continue to be here.

Route 7 South Middlebury • 388-3559 Mon.-Fri. 9-5 • Sat. 9-1 Closed Sun. www.middleburysewnvac.com

82578

WE’RE NOW OPEN 6 DAYS FOR BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER! SUNDAY - THURSDAY 6:30AM - 8:30PM • FRIDAY & SATURDAY 6:30AM - 9PM • CLOSED TUESDAYS

Our

Creemee Window isno w

OPEN DeliciousF amily Fun!

We’ll

CATER ANY

Special Event!

Yes, there’s still a detour... But if you come out Route 11, just take the Basin Harbor Road north to Route 17

Junction of Routes 17 & 125, W. Addison, Vt (next to the Bridge-to-Be) • 802-759-2152

82589

Spend some time with us, coming or going if you’re planning a trip on the ferry!


AE_06-11-2011_Edition