Issuu on Google+

Addressed to:

Stop In And See Our Unique Inventory Of Easy To Tow, Light Weight Campers!

We Specialize in Smaller Light Weight RVs

County » Essex County Supervisors approve NCCC budget

This Week

P.O. BOX 338 ELIZABETHTOWN, NY 12932 POSTAL PATRON

26253 6253 62

We Carry A Full Line of Original Columbia Northwest Aliners! Vermontville, NY • happycampingrv.com • 518-891-5779 • Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-7pm

FREE

PAGE 4

TAKE ONE!

A Denton Publication

WWW.THEVALLEYNEWS.ORG

ECRWSS PRESORTED STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE PAID DENTON PUBLICATIONS/ NEW MARKET PRESS

One of the friendliest dealerships around!

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11, 2012

JUMPING AROUND

ELIZABETHTOWN

TUPPER LAKE

State adds 69,000 acres to Park

Librarian set to retire from post

By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com LAKE PLACID — There will soon be a lot more to the Adirondack Park experience for tourists and sportsmen. Gov. Andrew Cuomo made a trip to the Lake Placid Conference Center Sunday, Aug. 5, to officially sign off on the state’s acquisition of 69,000 acres of land formerly owned by Finch Pruyn for inclusion into the Adirondack Park Forest Preserve. The state will partner with the Nature Conservancy to conserve the land as well as provide access to areas previously off-limits to many. “This is a stellar accomplishment and a beautiful gift that we can leave to our children,” Cuomo said. “This is going to make the

PAGE 10

SARANAC LAKE

Pendragon set for season finale PAGE 10 LAKE PLACID

CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

Candidate visits ORDA sites PAGE 19

Bus vote tabled

From left, Ashlyn Howard, 6, and Anna Marie Lopez, 6, play on top of the Parties Unlimited bounce house obstacle course Thursday, Aug. 2 during the Saranac Lake Block Party. Photo by Andy Flynn

REGIONAL

Trustee working on Lake Flower Beach By Andy Flynn andy@denpubs.com

Theaters look for answers PAGE 21

SARANAC LAKE — Only four months after joining the Saranac Lake Village Board, Trustee Paul Van Cott is tackling an emotional issue for residents: re-establishing a municipal beach at Lake Flower.

Since the village beach was moved from Lake Flower to Lake Colby in 1976, residents have debated whether it should be moved back to a central location, its original location at Lake Flower. The beach at Lake Flower was closed in order to build the state highway on River Street in the mid-

1970s, a stretch of road the Adirondack Daily Enterprise once called a “fourlane drag strip.” (It is no longer four lanes.) The move was by no means popular. A number of residents have unsuccessfully submitted proposals and petitions to the Village Board over the years to reopen a beach at

By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com

Lake Flower. The inconvenient distance from downtown and complaints of “duck itch” have plagued Lake Colby’s image and hurt its attendance over the years. Accessibility has been the main issue, so much so that a bike path was built in 1976 CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

ELIZABETHTOWN — A resolution to purchase new buses and equipment as part of the Essex County Public transportation Department did not make it to the floor. Instead, Board of Supervisors Chairman Randy Douglas requested and received a motion to withdraw the resolution during the Aug. 6 meeting of the body. CONTINUED ON PAGE 11

IT’S THAT TIME AGAIN FOR THE BETTER-AND-BETTER EVERY YEAR AND WILDLY EXCITING

ESSEX COUNTY FAIR August 8 - 12, 2012 RAYBROOK, NY

(800) 559-6551

(800) 287-4525

DLR# 3160003

EDITORIAL, CARTOON

P6 P7 KIDS COUNT P7 LOCAL COLUMNISTS P10 HOME IMPROVEMENT P13-15 ADIRONDACK OUTDOORS P20 CALENDAR OF EVENTS P22 CROSSWORD PUZZLE P22 CLASSIFIEDS P23-25 AUTOMOTIVE P26-28 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11

FIND THE CAR YOU’RE REALLY LOOKING FOR AT: WWW.EGGLEFIELDBROS.COM

31938

Scan the QR Codes below with your mobile device.

Online

SIGN-UP TODAY!

www.denpubs.com

www.denpubs.com/eEditions

Each week we’ll send you the printed edition straight to your email’s inbox, for FREE! -Cancel any time. To sign up, simply go to

facebook

TO ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS, CALL 518-561-9680

Remember to keep clicking Denpubs.com all day, everyday for the latest local news, featured stories and extras.

Index

Facebook & Twitter

Become a “fan” on facebook, simply searching keyword “Valley News” or follow our tweets at

www.twitter.com/denpubs

Twitter

ELIZABETHTOWN, NY

DON’T MISS THE


2 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

Comprehensive plan committee seeking return of surveys

The Elizabethtown Comprehensive Plan Committee set up a booth at the Farmer’s Market to encourage residents to return the survey they recently sent out.

ELIZABETHTOWN — The Elizabethtown Comprehensive planning committee is seeking input from town residents in the return of the surveys they recently sent out. According to the committee, the Comprehensive Plan is a plan that reflects the voices and the opinions of the Elizabethtown community and its citizens. Members of the community, who want to have a say in the Town’s future, develop the comprehensive plan. “Let’s work together to make a great town even better — It’s time to get involved,” a committee press release said. “If you haven’t already done so, please send your Elizabethtown Survey in, this is your first opportunity to help formulate

the plan. Then, Join us on Saturday, Aug. 18, from 9 a.m. to noon at the UCC Parish Hall for our first Comprehensive Planning workshop, where we will work together to collect input, suggestions and opinions.” Also according to the committee, a town with a Comprehensive Plan has a better chance of securing State and Federal Grant money for community projects. New Businesses are more likely to come to a Town that has a positive vision of the future. The plan provides guidelines for Town officials who make decisions about the town’s future. The Plan also protects the Town from outside forces that could bring about unwanted changes in our Town.

Essex Theatre Company Celebrates Its 20th Season with

A Farce by Noel Coward Directed by Kathy Poppino Pay-What-You-Can Opening Thursday, August 9, at 7 pm Silent Auction, 6:30 pm Other Performances: August 10, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 Masonic Lodge, Essex, NY 31948

31937

$54/wk 48 mos.

QUALITY CARS AT GOOD PRICES 2005 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS 4X4

2007 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT

$9,990 -$1,000

$9,990 -$1,000

$8,990

$8,990

$54/wk 48 mos.

$54/wk 48 mos.

3.5 V6, AUTO, AC, SUNROOF, FULL POWER, ECONOMIC

6 CYL., AUTO, FRT & REAR AC & HEAT, ELECTRIC SLIDING DOOR

2004 FORD RANGER XLT 4X4

2005 TOYOTA COROLLA LE

$10,990 -$1,000

$9,990 -$1,000

$9,990

$8,990

$60/wk 48 mos.

$54/wk 48 mos.

V6, AUTO, AC, ALUMINUM WHEELS

4 CYL., AUTO, AC, FULL POWER, ECONOMICAL

2007 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

2003 SUBARU OUTBACK

$9,990 -$1,000

$6,990 -$1,000

$8,990

$5,990

$54/wk 48 mos.

$

1,000

$

1,000

USE AS PRICE REDUCTION OR DOWN PAYMENT

$46/wk 36 mos.

5 SPD., FULL POWER, AWD, PERFECT FOR OUR AREA!

V6, AUTO, AC, LOADED

WALT DOLLARS

$

1,000

USE AS PRICE REDUCTION OR DOWN PAYMENT

$

1,000

$

1,000

~ ALL PAYMENTS SUBJECT TO PRIMARY LENDER ~

4113 MAIN STREET • PORT HENRY, NY • 518-546-7506 Open Monday - Friday 9-5 • Saturday 9-2 31949

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. NYSCA

31946

Call (518) 526-4520 or email tickets@essextheatre.org

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO VIEW MANY OTHER VEHICLES

WWW.WALTSUSEDCARS.COM

25719


August 11, 2012 ELIZABETHTOWN — The Adirondack History Center Museum is offering the fifth lecture in the “Adirondack Rivers: A Mind of Their Own” series on Thursday, Aug. 9, at 7 p.m. Commissioner Wayne Reynolds of the Delaware County Department of Public Works presents on mistakes and lessons learned rebuilding bridges and highways following severe flooding. Reynolds graduated from Clarkson College in Civil and Environmental Engineering. As a licensed professional engineer, he gained experience in highway and bridge construction, hydrology, hydraulic design and interstate highway design. He joined Delaware County DPW as an engineer in 1990 and became Commissioner in 1991. Responsible for 260 miles of road and 286 bridges, he has gained a significant amount of experience recovering from floods. Future lectures in the summer lecture series include Dr. John Braico of Trout Unlimited on Aug. 16 speaking on stream morphology and assessment following Irene. On Aug. 23, Carl Schwartz, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, presents on stream restoration in the Adirondacks. On August 30, there is a reenactment of testimony against the State of New York after the 1856 flood. All lectures begin at 7 p.m. The series is presented in memory of Elizabeth H.W. Lawrence. Please call 873-6466 or email echs@adkhistorycenter.org for reservations. The price for the lecture is $5 members, $8.00 non-members, $30 full series. TFor more information contact the museum at 873-6466 or visit the website at www.adkhistorycenter.org.

By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com ELIZABETHTOWN — In the wake of recent animal cruelty cases in the region, the North Country SPCA and Essex County Board of Supervisors are joining together to crack down. Board chairman Randy Douglas said that he would look into forming a county subcommittee tasked with working to improve laws and punishments for animal cruelty during the Aug. 6 regular board meeting. “That is very alarming, some of the cases that you have brought to our attention,” Douglas said following a presentation by NCSPCA board member Jessica Hartley. “I will adhere to your request and look to appoint a task force.” Hartley spoke with members of the board about the need for stricter penalties for animal cruelty cases. “In the last month alone, we have had six new cases of animal cruelty in Essex County,” Hartley said. “These were clear-cut cases of animal cruelty and neglect, and these are just the cases that we know of.This is more than just an animal welfare issue. There is a link and a strong correlation between animal cruelty and domestic and child abuse.” Hartley said that she felt an effective committee would consist of a pair of supervisors along with representatives from the district attorney, sheriff, probation department, lo-

LANDOWNERS Paying Top $$ for All Species of Standing Timber 35 Years Experience All harvesting supervised by foresters. Advanced payment available. Timber Harvesting • Land Clearing.

Timberland Forestry (518) 293-8195

Valley News - 3

Essex County to form animal cruelty committee

Jessica Hartley talks about animal cruelty issues at the Aug. 6 Essex County Board of Supervisors meeting. Photo by Keith Lobdell

cal humane organizations and public. “We sat down with the sheriff's department and D.A. for a discussion on this matter last month and came up with a list of goals for preventing animal cruelty,” Hartley said. “We felt that a committee like this could aid in the prevention and prosecution of animal cruelty cases in Essex County.” District Attorney Kristy Sprague said that she was behind the idea. “We broke down the law element by element and there needs to be some sort of update with the law on the state level and on the local level,” Sprague said. “We need to start going over what we can do locally until the state steps up

Bridal & Formalwear

Featuring: Accudraft: Spray & Bake Booth ACTION AUTO ACCESSORIES We’re your complete accessories supplier! NYS Law States: You have the right to have your vehicle repaired at the shop of your choice.

Fashion Corner Bridal & Formalwear

31472

4325 Main St., Port Henry, NY 31474

(518) 546-7499

to do something. I am fully committed to this task force, along with the Sheriff's Department and the probation department.” Hartley said that the committee would have to work toward better local laws concerning animal cruelty, enhanced means and methods for caring for animals removed from abusive situations, education and training on animal cruelty laws and cases, standardized job descriptions for animal control officers, mutual aid agreements between town animal control officers, public education and awareness of animal cruelty, along with anti-cruelty task forces in New York and Vermont working together.

“Authorized Collision Center” Insurance Work/Paint Specialist

Bridal • Bridesmaids • Mother Flower Girl • Prom Gowns Tuxedos • Invitations • Veils Jewelry • Shoes

35957

River lecture at museum

www.thevalleynews.org

25702

390 Military Turnpike - Plattsburgh, NY - 643-8591

79600


4 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

BOE to send out mail-check cards Essex County supervisors pass By Keith Lobdell North Country CC budget keith@denpubs.com

ELIZABETHTOWN — In case you have not been able to tell by the constant, “I’m (insert name here), and I approve this message,” advertisements, there is an important election coming up soon. The Essex County Board of Elections wants to make sure that all registered voters who want to participate in the 2012 General Election and the primary elections in September can do so. To help, the BOE is sending out mail-check cards, which are sent to registered voters with their name, voting district, polling location and current address. Republican Commissioner Derinda Sherman said that those who receive the cards should take a moment to make sure that the information on them is accurate. “There are a lot of registered voters who still have their pre E-911 addresses on their voter registration,” Sherman said. “Some others have given us a post office box, but what we need is the updated, physical address of each registered voter.” Sherman added that accuracy is needed when putting a registered voter into their proper voting district. “We have seen where someone may not have updated their address and were not included on the rolls of their polling district,” she said. “That can lead to problems when someone comes in to vote and is told that

they are not on the rolls.” Sherman said that any changes should be made on the card and returned to the BOE as soon as possible, but that the deadline date for those was Oct. 12. The mail-check cards are yellow in color, and will include the following information: name of registered voter at the address mailed to, where their polling site is located and if that site has changed, along with if the site is handicapped accessible (Sherman said that all are). Any needed changes can be made either by returning the card through the mail to the BOE or delivering it to the offices in Elizabethtown. The state and local primary will be held on Thursday, Sept. 13. Currently, only two local primaries are being contested with a Republican race for town justice in Moriah and a Republican race for tax collector in Jay. The primary will not be held on the traditional Tuesday, Sept. 11, as it is the federal Patriot Day holiday. Sept. 11, 2001, was also a primary election day in New York state. The General Election will take place on Tuesday, Nov. 6, with voters being asked to make their votes for president of the United States (incumbent D-Barack Obama, R-Mitt Romney); federal senator (incumbent DKirsten Gillibrand, R-Wendy Long); federal 23rd Congressional District (incumbent DBill Owens, R-Matt Doheny); New York State 114th Assembly District (D-Dennis Tarantino, R-Dan Stec), along with other state and local elections.

FINAL CLEARANCE CLOSED FOR THE SEASON AFTER SUNDAY AUGUST 12

Sales for the Week of Aug. 9th - Aug. 15th Hours: Mon. - Fri. 6:00 am - 9:00 pm Sat. 7:00 am - 9:00 pm • Sun. 7:00 am - 9:00 pm

3609 Essex Road • Willsboro, New York 12996

MEAT SPECIALS

All 6” Perennials

$1.99 to $4.99

All 1 Gallon Shrubs

$3.49

All 2 Gallon Flowering Shrubs (10 or more $7 ea.)

$7.99

All 2 & 3 Gallon Fruit Ornamental Trees (10 or more $14 ea.)

FROM OUR DELI

Patio Pots

We will have our homemade salads available daily through Labor Day weekend.

Phone (518) 963-8612 • Fax (518) 963-4583

The board also approved changing the way taxpayers receive information on how much of their money is being spent on unfunded state mandates. Last year, supervisors were flooded with calls from residents who thought their taxes had spiked after creating a line item on tax bills showing how much of the tax levy was being used to support mandates. Since then, the county has dropped that approach and will now send out separate flyers with tax bills to explain how the levy breaks down. “We really seemed to confuse people last year,” Connell said. “We tried something last year and it did not work. I believe that this will be more clear for our taxpayers.” Elizabethtown Supervisor Margaret Bartley asked if the supervisors would be able to see the flyers before they were sent out. “We can do that,” County Manager Daniel Palmer said. “However, you had seen the bills before they went out last year and you seemed pretty confident about them.”

and/or phone conferencing may take place. Agenda items will be Special Education Report to the Board, student/parent handbook, two resignations, extra-curricular appointments, cafeteria meal increase along with various routine actions of the board.

$1.49

All Hanging Baskets All Herbs All Evergreen Trees & Shrubs

99¢ $6.99 99¢ 50% OFF

THANKS FOR ANOTHER GREAT SEASON! 31945

Local Tomatoes......................................................................$1.59 lb. Local Cherry Tomatoes......................................................$1.69 a pint Local Carrots.................................................................$1.59 a bunch Local Radishes...............................................................$1.19 a bunch Fresh Pineapple..........................................................................$3.99

ELIZABETHTOWN — The Elizabethtown-Lewis Central School Board of Education will hold its regular meeting Thursday, Aug. 9, at 6 p.m. in the conference room. Possible board member video

Flyers to replace line item

$3.99 to $9.99

All 4 & 6 Pak Annuals

PRODUCE

ELIZABETHTOWN — The 2012-13 North Country Community College spending plan has the backing of Essex County. The Board of Supervisors voted to adopt the NCCC budget during its Aug. 6 meeting but said that they are concerned with having to adopt the plan well before they start their own budget process. “It is always difficult voting on the college budget outside of the normal budget process,” Westport Supervisor Daniel Connell said. “We looked at every other agency last year and make some cuts, but we did this way before we were in that mindset.” “This will not be open for negotiation,” Essex Supervisor Sharon Boisen said. “Last year we were trying to cut this budget when we had already approved the appropriations earlier in the year.” Moriah Supervisor Tom Scozzafava said that he would vote for the budget, but did agree with Willsboro Supervisor Ed Hatch, the lone vote against, that more consolidation efforts needed to be looked at. “I support the college but I do want to say that the point that Mr. Hatch brought up as well as Mr. (Ron) Jackson when he was on the board about the feasibility of a consolidation,” Scozzafava said. “If Clinton would come to the table, I think that we should look at that.” NCCC President Dr. Steven Tyrell said the school is always looking for ways to share services and lower costs. “We always have to look at ways that we can share services with other entities in the area,”

Tyrell said. “It makes sense to do. There is a lot of rhetoric about shared services, but the proof is in the pudding. If there are places where we can save money, we can do that.” The 2012-13 NCCC budget calls for the increase in expenditures to $13,630,00, with Essex and Franklin counties asked to contribute $1,190,000 to the school, the same amount they put into the 2011-12 budget. Of that, $1,140,000 would go towards operations of the school and the remaining $50,000 would be used in the capital fund account of the college.

$14.99

4½” Zonal Geranium

Macaroni & Cheese Loaf.........................................................$3.89 lb. Hickory Smoked, Honey Roasted Turkey Breast.....................$5.99 lb. Muenster Cheese....................................................................$3.49 lb.

keith@denpubs.com

ELCS to hold board meeting Price

Country Style Pork Ribs..........................................................$1.99 lb. Hot Italian Sausage Griller Links............................................$3.79 lb. Bone-In, Loin End Pork Roast................................................$1.89 lb. Boneless Beef Chuck..............................................................$2.59 lb. Center Cut Pork Chops...........................................................$2.99 lb.

By Keith Lobdell

First Season Greenhouses 2153 Button Bay Road Open 7 Days a Week 9 - 5 Near Vergennes. No credit cards. Supervised children only. 36105

Elizabethtown Community Hospital

Pediatric Care Close to Home Dr. Michael Celotti offering pediatric services in Elizabethtown. • Complete pediatric care • School physicals • Well-child visits • Vaccinations Call the Elizabethtown Community Health Center to schedule an appointment at 873-6896

31894

Elizabethtown Community Health Center 66 Park Street, E’town 873-6896 31935


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

Valley News - 5

Timbuctoo exhibit slated at Paul Smith’s VIC Hydrofracking talk LAKE PLACID — Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) is presenting a special program, “Hydrofracking in New York,” on Saturday, Aug. 11 at 8 p.m. at ADK’s High Peaks Information Center in Lake Placid. This presentation is free and open to the public. For more information about our programs, directions or questions about membership, contact ADK North Country office in Lake Placid at 523-3441 or visit our website at www.adk.org.

Encore film at LPCA LAKE PLACID — The Metropolitan Opera presents an encore presentation of their Live in HD performance of “Der Rosenkavalier” (Strauss) on Thursday, Aug. 9, at 7 p.m.

hibition will be on display at Paul Smith’s College VIC thru Sept. 15, 2012, just a few miles from the black enclave settled in the late 1840s as part of an abolitionist “scheme of justice and benevolence” aimed at achieving equal voting rights and economic uplift for free African American males in New York State. Produced by the freedom education and human rights project, John Brown Lives! and curated by independent scholar Amy Godine, Dreaming of Timbuctoo situates a little-known chapter of

O

FREE

GOODYEAR • UNIROYAL • FIRESTONE • GENERAL TIRE DUNLOP • MICHELIN • BRIDGESTONE • B.F. GOODRICH • PIRELLI

29642

274 Quaker Rd. Queensbury, NY (across from Lowe’s) (518) 798-1056

T H E A M E R IC A N A C A D E M Y O F P H T H A L M O L O G Y H A S R E C O G N IZ E D

A U G U ST A S C ATA R A C T A W A R E N E SS M O N TH ! P R E M IU M , PE R S O N A L , PR O F E S S IO N A L E Y E C AR E

Don’t throw it away those unwanted items. Promote them in the “For Sale” section in the Classifieds. You’ll turn your trash into cash!

T he M D m a kes the d ifferen ce!

Our operators are standing by! Call...

www.denpubs.com

GUARANTEED LOWEST INSTALLED PRICE OR YOUR At Time Of Sale TIRE IS

Specializin g in C ataracts, G lau com a an d E ye P lastics

CLEAN HOUSE

“We’re more than a newspaper, We’re a community service.”

Christopher Moore and Sally Roesch Wagner and environmental philosopher Marianne Patinelli-Dubay, plus a performance by the Akwasane Women Singers. All programs will be held at the VIC and admission is $5. Visitors are encouraged to come early and see the exhibition and admission to the exhibition is free. Dreaming of Timbuctoo will be on display For more information, contact Martha Swan, Executive Director of John Brown Lives!, at mswan@capital.net or 9624758.

Duncan F. Winter MD FACS

When it’s time to

Call 1-800-989-4237

black history at the heart of the Adirondack landscape and underscores the importance of the ballot box and the plough in the political war on slavery and inequality. Special events held in tandem with the showing at the VIC are planned to enlarge the exhibition narrative and inspire fresh consideration of the meaning of and relationship to land, nature and the vote. Thursday, Aug. 16 at 7 p.m. History, Land & Meaning: An unconventional conversation with historians

SURGICAL EYE CARE

Call for an appointment: 518-891-5189 or 1-800-EYE-C-YOU Bring this ad in to receive 15% off a new pair of glasses.

24463

PAUL SMITHS — The Dreaming of Timbuctoo Ex-

31944

What's so special about the Adirondack Park? Stories from the Wild #6

So...we have two meat-eating plants right here in the Adirondacks?

Featuring exceptional food and cocktails! Entree Specials: Maryland Crab Cakes Fish & Chips • Steamed Mussels

Ever think you'd feel sorry for a bug? Meet the Sundew and the Pitcher plants, both smarter than the average Adirondack bear. The Sundew tricks insects into touching the sticky stems on its leaves. When the insect lands, the plant strangles the poor little guy.

Don’t miss this week’s live entertainment! Friday 8/10

ROAD SIDE MYSTIC

Meanwhile, the Pitcher dines on insects tartare by enticing them with a sweet liquid pool in its body. So, here we have it, vegetation that isn't vegan.

Saturday 8/11

WHITE HOT MONKEY

If you actually want to find these scary plants, they grow in the waterlogged bogs full of peat, sphagnum moss and other water-loving plants. Note: if you're a bug, stand clear. Head south. (Many Adirondackers would happily support that, anyway.)

DANCE CONTEST! Winner gets a Gift Certificate for Dinner at the hotel.

Put your dancing shoes on! Come to where the fun is!

Find out more: contact AdirondackCouncil.org

6691 Main St. Westport, NY • 518.962.4501 www.thewestporthotel.com 31947

Wild things happen in the Adirondacks.

www.internationalpaper.com

Illustrations by Sheri Amsel www.adirondackillustrator.com/www.exploringnature.org

31936

www.AdirondackCouncil.org


www.thevalleynews.org

Opinion

A COMMUNITY SERVICE: This community newspaper and its delivery are made possible by the advertisers you’ll find on the pages inside. Our sixty plus employees and this publishing company would not exist without their generous support of our efforts to gather and distribute your community news and events. Please thank them by supporting them and buying locally. And finally, thanks to you, our loyal readers, for your support and encouragement over the past 65 years from all of us here at the Valley News and Denton Publications.

Viewpoint

Valley News Editorial

Is there hope for a sequel?

E

veryone likes to get away for a while, to escape their worries and the daily grind and escape, even if it is just for a couple of hours. One of the best ways to do that is by going to the movies, where audiences are taken on an adventure, made to laugh or cry, and even given a chance to think. Don’t believe us? Then let’s look at the numbers. The top three grossing movies of 2011 (“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part II,” “Transformers: Dark of the Moon,” and “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides”) made $947.5 million. However, people throughout the North Country may soon lose their access to Hollywood, and it will be Hollywood’s fault. You see, by the end of next year, every motion picture studio will be making the changeover to 100-percent digital distribution. Your children will soon view 35mm film in the same way they view dial-up internet connections, phones with cords, floppy disks and cell phones you could not text on. So how are the movie companies helping theaters out? In the case of several small, independently owned local establishments, they are not. Their message is loud and clear: either pay an average of $100,000 per screen to convert to digital or find yourself as extinct as the featured characters in “Jurassic Park.” Another option is to lease the digital equipment from the movie companies. Sounds good, right? Wrong. Any theater that entered into a lease would be under the control of, “the man,” only being able to show the movies given to them by the companies. For places like the Palace Theater in Lake Placid, the Hollywood in Au Sable Forks or the Strand in Schroon Lake, this would mean all of the special shows that they put on during the holidays or to support local volunteers would go out the window. The cold truth is, why would the movie companies care about these three theatres, when they only have seven screens total ? (Palace - 4, Hollywood - 2, Strand - 1) Why would they care about the one-screen State Theater in Tupper Lake, the one-screen Strand in Plattsburgh, the single screen at the Indian Lake Theater, or the two screens at the Glen Drive-In of Queensbury? That’s a grand total of 12 screens. Think about that. In the entirety of the Adirondack Park, there are only nine movie

screens (the Glen and Plattsburgh Strand are located outside the Blue Line). Why would big movie companies care about these theaters when there are 21 screens between the Cumberland 12 and Regal Cinemas 8? While Cumberland is an independent multiplex, Regal Cinemas at Champlain Centre also has the backing of 6,463 screens in 555 locations across the United States. Again, why would big companies care about nine screens in an area the size of several states when they have all of these others? Another case of the little man getting stepped on. And if you are thinking that this is no big deal, here’s some data for you. According to a study done by the Adirondack Film Society, the local Adirondack movie screens attract over $11 million in spending to the region each year. That is almost $1.3 million in estimated sales tax revenue (state and local) that is desperately needed by the communities and counties that make up the park. That is another big hit when you add the fact that another big man—the state—is keeping the little man down with a two-percent tax cap. These theaters need to survive. They need the help of the state and their local communities, or they are going to be gone forever. We urge the North Country Regional Economic Development Council to do all that they can to provide funding so these theaters can purchase their own digital projectors and screens so they can continue to provide entertainment to their communities. We note that it is also alarming that during a press conference last week, those who have been seeking grant funds for this undertaking said that they were refused entrance into the NCREDC funding pool because they were, “five minutes late,” in submitting their application. We thought the NCREDC was here to work with local businesses, not add more red tape to their plight. Luckily, the group was able to get in an application for a consolidated grant directly to the state, which we feel must be approved. If not, this could be the biggest cliffhanger ever seen for these local theaters, with no hopes of a sequel. This editorial is the collaborative opinion of a board comprised of Thom Randall, Fred Herbst, Shaun Kittle, Keith Lobdell, Stephen Bartlett, Andy Flynn, and John Gereau. Comments should be directed to denpubs@denpubs.com

Denton Publications, Inc.

W e’re m ore tha n a n ew spa per.W e’re a com m un ity service.

Our goal at Denton Publications is to publish accurate, useful and timely information in our newspapers, news products, shopping guides, vacation guides, and other specialty publications for the benefit of our readers and advertisers. We value your comments and suggestions concerning all aspects of this publication.

Denton Publications Founded By Wm. D. Denton PUBLISHER................................................................................................................................................................Daniel E. Alexander ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER................................................................................................................................................................Ed Coats OPERATIONS MANAGER..............................................................................................................................................William Coats BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER...........................................................................................................................Cheryl Mitchell GENERAL MANAGER CENTRAL.............................................................................................Daniel E. Alexander, Jr. MANAGING EDITOR.............................................................................................................................................................John Gereau ASST. MANAGING EDITOR...............................................................................................................................................Andy Flynn GENERAL MANAGER NORTH.....................................................................................................................Ashley Alexander GENERAL MANAGER SOUTH.....................................................................................................................Scarlette Merfeld HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER.......................................................................................................................Tom Henecker FINANCIAL CONTROLLER..............................................................................................................................................Nicole Pierce

Visit us online at www.denpubs.com The official web site of Denton Publications and its community newspapers

Northern Office

Central Plant Office

Southern Office

PLATTSBURGH 14 Hand Ave., P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 Phone: 518-873-6368 Fax: 518-873-6360

ELIZABETHTOWN 14 Hand Ave., P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 Phone: 518-873-6368 Fax: 518-873-6360

TICONDEROGA 102 Montcalm St., Suite 2, Ticonderoga, NY 12883 Phone: 518-585-9173 Fax: 518-585-9175

Or drop us a line at feedback@denpubs.com Tell us how we’re doing, make a suggestion or send us a news tip!

Denton Publications’ Adirondack Northern Editions North Countryman • The Burgh • Valley News Denton Publications’ Adirondack Southern Editions Adirondack Journal • News Enterprise • Times of Ti Scan this QR Code from your mobile device.

Ask about our sister publishers Eagle Newspapers (Central NY), New Market Press (Vermont) and Spotlight Newspapers (NY Capital District), and their fine community publications.

Members: FCPNY NYPA IFPA afcp PaperChain

28950

ADVERTISING POLICIES: Denton Publications, Inc. disclaims all legal responsibility for errors or omissions or typographic errors. All reasonable care is taken to prevent such errors. We will gladly correct any errors if notification is received within 48 hours of any such error. We are not responsible for photos, which will only be returned if you enclose a self-addressed envelope. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local Zone $29.00 Annual Voluntary (includes subscription to Grocery Dough), Standard Bulk Mail outside local zone (no refunds due to late postal delivery) $47 Annual, First Class Mail (sent in sealed envelope) $50 for 3 months / $85 for 6 months / $150 for an annual. ADDRESS CORRECTIONS: Send address changes to P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, New York 12932. EDITORIAL AND OPINION PAGE POLICY: Letters, editorials and photo submissions are welcomed. Factual accuracy cannot be guaranteed in Letters to the Editor or Guest Editorials. Editor reserves the right to reject or edit any editorial matter. All views expressed in Letters or Guest Editorials are not necessarily the views of the paper, its staff or the company. ©COPYRIGHT PROTECTION: This publication and its entire contents are copyrighted, 2010, Denton Publications, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without prior written consent. All Rights Reserved.

August 11, 2012

Four more years of gridlock

G

ridlock and continued widening of the gap between the two political parties on the Federal level, leaves most Americans questioning how we will ever resolve the many problems facing the nation. Both parties have taken political spin mastery to outrageous new levels. Playing to the outer limits of their political bases have done nothing positive for the country and thus it leaves only division, anger, confusion and misinformation among the masses. More and more American citizens are realizing that neither party has their best interest at heart. Playing chicken, showing complete disrespect for each other and the offices they hold, leaving the country deep in debt while failing to control spending and yet promising that their party alone can solve the ever growing problems facing our nation is leaving citizens with little choice and opportunity. The American political system is now seriously broken and no one in a leadership role nor established party seems prepared to modify their approach in an effort to fix it. Instead this election is shaping up to be just another head bashing, over promising, negative and deeply dividing event sure to leave many frustrated voters wondering how much longer we can tolerate the sad state of the country. It’s doubtful we will see well recognized national figures break ranks from the established parties, join together and provide serious solutions while proving their genuine sincerity, I fear we will be left once again hoping something will change. We need to face the simple fact that neither party candidate will win with a national mandate thus forcing the losing party to dig in their heels even further, causing even greater stonewalling and the only things growing will be gridlock, unemployment and the national debt. We all know it’s going to happen like the car accident that happens before your eyes in slow motion. Gridlock is the only thing Washington has mastered over the last 20 years and it insures the status quo of “If we can’t win then we’ll keep you from being successful at all costs so we have a better chance next time around”. That game may work for the politicians but it’s done little for the country and its future generations. Somehow, someway we need to break this cycle and scare the “you know what” out of two established parties. They need to understand that they stand, oh so close, to the abyss and the American public won’t tolerate this foolishness any longer. The big problem, is there a nationally recognized and well fi-

nanced figure out their who could step in at this late date and make a serious bid for the Presidency? The individual Dan Alexander or group would Thoughts from Behind the Pressline have to be so very well established, not seen as a polarizing figure, have unlimited funds and be fearless in the face of a tremendous onslaught from both parties. While such a candidacy might not succeed it could be just enough to bring the two parties to the simple realization that they had better find solutions now or surely be prepared to face an even tougher challenge in 2016. Currently there are five major third or alternative parties in the United States and dozens of lesser know third parties. Gary Johnson the former governor of New Mexico, ran for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination, running on a platform based on legalization of marijuana, and is the leading candidate for the Libertarian party nomination. Despite dropping out of the Republican race a week before the Iowa caucuses, Mr. Johnson has not given up his hopes of competing for the White House in November. Having switched to the third party, Mr. Johnson says he is confident that he will be one of three people to compete in all 50 states in the fall along with Jim Gray, a former California judge, as his vice presidential running mate. I find it hard to believe Mr. Johnson’s candidacy will do little to impact the results this fall. Despite how frustrated the American public may be with the Washington leadership, and the current two established choices, a third party candidate like Mr. Johnson is just not up to the monumental task of even making a dent in the 2012 political scene. But a serious dent is exactly what’s needed to shake up the established parties and bring them back to the getting things done. Until the two parties see their existence and power seriously threatened, why should they alter the good thing they have going? It’s sad but it seems no one is prepared to save us from yet another four years of gridlock reruns, Washington bickering and further indebtedness and that is my greatest fear of exactly what we’ll have more of regardless of who we elected in 2012. Dan Alexander is publisher and CEO of Denton Publications. He may be reached at dan@denpubs.com.

28987

6 - Valley News


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

Tournament supported To the Valley News: On Saturday, July 28 Literacy Volunteers held its first “READ” the Green Golf Tournament at Craig Wood Golf Course in Lake Placid. Randy Quayle’s team from Lake Placid took first place, followed by Pete Towns’ team from Mineville. Marci Heery’s team from Saranac Lake came in third. Literacy Volunteers would like to thank the following local businesses that sponsored a hole in the amount of $100: Grand Union, Lakeside Plumbing & Heating, Lockrows, Malone Office Products, Mirror Lake Inn, Mt. View Indian Lake Association, Pat Ida, Ticonderoga Federal Credit Union, Ticonderoga International Paper Mill, and Upstate Agency Insurance. We would also like to thank those who donated prizes for first, second, third and closest to the pin. They are Craig Wood Golf Course, Crowe Plaza Resort & Club, Malone Golf Course, Tupper Lake Golf Course, and Whiteface Club & Resort. Last but not least, we would like to thank James Wasson Jr, PGA Professional at Craig Wood Golf Course, for helping us put together our first golf tournament. This fundraiser was very successful and all proceeds will benefit Literacy Volunteers’ Adult Literacy programs. We look forward to next year’s event! Fundraising Committee Literacy Volunteers

Set up for a fall To the Valley News: Thank you Dan Alexander, for acknowledging what many hardworking independent Americans think of Obama’s “You didn’t build that” statement. Neither Mr. Obama’s nor your positions acknowledges our true debt however, that is, without God none of this would even exist! If anyone “helped us build that” it was the Creator in whom we live and move and have our being. Indeed our Declaration of Independence declares that we are endowed by “our Creator” with “certain inalienable rights.” You succinctly stated that, “The American Dream, available to all citizens, is to provide the freedom to own a home, create a life and build a career or a business. The freedoms our forefather fought and died to preserve are based solely on building a life free from government control. Yet this wonderful system that has given

Valley News - 7

our nation so much is now being minimalized by the commander in chief, the leader of the free world, as something that couldn’t exist without government assistance?” Freedom of religion from government interference was omitted from your otherwise accurate description of the freedoms which our commander in chief has dismissed as unimportant. The free exercise of religion has been integral in the founding and development of every aspect of this great nation. The first amendment, which states in part “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;” has been abolished in effect by the HHS mandate requiring religious institutions to violate the tenets of their religions. I hope people are seeing a pattern here. Since the Colorado shooting I have heard many people say too that “the Second Amendment is outdated and needs to be repealed.” Another freedom is seen as unnecessary. I hope, at this great height of hubris, we have not set ourselves up for a very great fall.

LAKE PLACID — The 2012 summer skating continues Aug. 10-11, with Friday’s Freaky Friday and the Saturday Night Ice Show at the Olympic Center, in Lake Placid, N.Y. Friday’s Freaky Friday event begins at 4:30 p.m., while the Saturday night’s show is slated to begin at 7:30 p.m. Both events will be held in the center ’s 1932 Rink Jack Shea Arena. Ashley Cain (Coppell, Texas), the 2012 U.S. junior national championship silver medalist, is Saturday night’s featured skater. To learn more about the Lake Placid summer skating program, log on to www.lakeplacidskating.com. For more information on ORDA’s Olympic venues and events, visit www.whitefacelakeplacid.com.

Irene’ performance scheduled

VoiceYourOpinion

Dorothy McDevitt Bean Schroon Lake

Photographs on display

Glenn Miller Orchestra to play

ELIZABETHTOWN — 2012 fall soccer registration is underway for the ElizabethtownLewis Youth Commission. The program is open to students entering kindergarten to sixth grade in the fall. Registration forms are available at both town halls and should be completed and returned to either the Elizabethtown or Lewis town hall by Aug. 24. We are currently seeking volunteer coaches and assistants for all age levels. For more information, or if you are interested in helping out, please contact Karen Disogra at 8732099. Please visit ELYC website at elizabethtownlewisyc.wordpress.com for more information.

KEENE VALLEY — Keene Valley Library’s Summer Lecture Series 2012 presents “Night Vision: The Wildlife Photography of Hobart Vosburg Roberts,” by Laura Rice, Chief Curator of the Adirondack Museum, on Monday, Aug. 13 at 7:30 p.m. at the Library. Based on an exhibition currently on display at the Adirondack Museum, Chief Curator Laura Rice will talk about Roberts’ photographs, techniques, and his own accounts of working in the Adirondacks. Admission is free. For more information, call the Library at 576-4335.

LAKE PLACID — the Glenn Miller Orchestra, which appears at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts on Wednesday, Aug. 15 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $22 and can be purchased by calling the LPCA at 523-2512. For more information visit online at LakePlacidArts.org.

ESSEX — Essex Farm is hosting a Celebrate Summer farm tour on Saturday, Aug. 11. The tour leaves from the barnyard at 10 a.m. and will cover the vegetable fields, pasture, and livestock areas. “Mid-summer is a wonderful time of year to see a highly diversified farm in full production,” owner Kristin Kimball said. Participants should come prepared to walk long distances over rough ground. After lunch, there will be an optional high-energy work party. Kimball will also sign copies of The Dirty Life, her 2010 memoir about the farm’s start-up year. Suggested donation: $25 adults; $10 fulltime farmers & students; $5 children. Please see the events page at www.kristinkimball.com, email essexfarm@gmail.com or call 963-4613 for details.

1812 Essex to be presented ESSEX — The Belden Noble Library in Essex is pleased to announce a multimedia presentation entitled, “An 1812 View of Essex,” by Shirley La Forest, Essex Town Historian. This event will be held at the Essex Community Church Thursday, Aug. 9 at 7:30 p.m. Using photos, drawings, personal recollections and later recordings of long-time Essex citizens, the period will be brought to life by using material, not only dating back to 1805, but related subsequent years from the first half of the 19th century. LaForest excels at drawing the audience into her talks which inevitably enlivens the presentation. Refreshments follow.

Canal Splash comes to Westport

LAKE PLACID — The Lake Placid School of Ballet, housed at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts, is offering the opportunity to introduce girls and boys to dance through a week-long dance camp. Children between the ages of 6 and 9 will learn the basics of ballet, jazz and character from experienced instructors. Dance Camp classes are from Aug. 20 until Aug. 24 from 9:30 until 11:45 a.m. The cost for 10 classes during the week is $110. Registration is required for the Dance Camp. For more information, visit lakeplacidarts.org/files/DanceCamp2012.pdf or call 523-2512.

WESTPORT — The Westport Marina is joining the annual Canal Splash celebration on Saturday, Aug. 11. From noon to 2 p.m., the Ship’s Store will feature a book signing by Vermonter Sara J. Henry. Her book, “Learning to Swim,” is a Lake Champlain mystery. She was the winner of the 2012 Agatha Award and the Mary Higgins Clark Award and was nominated for three other awards for the best first novel. Former Plattsburgh radio personality, Gordie Little will be signing his children’s book, “Little Champy Goes to School,” illustrations are by retired U.S. Air Force pilot Les Bradford. On The Galley Restaurant deck at the marina, singer-songwriter Rob Pulsifer will entertain during lunch from noon to 2 p.m. with his acoustic guitar.

‘Gasland’ to be shown

‘Biddy soccer registration set

LAKE PLACID — The Lake Placid Center for the Arts Summer Film Series continues on Friday, Aug. 10, at 7:30 p.m. with Gasland. Nominated for Best Documentary Oscar in 2011 and Official Selection for Sundance 2010, Gasland is a documentary focusing on fracking. Tickets are $6, available at the door.

WESTPORT — The Westport Youth Commission's fall soccer season will begin with registration and a short practice on Tuesday, Aug. 14, at Westport Central School's modified field. Registration will begin at 5:30 p.m. with practice to follow from 6 to 7 p.m. Beginning on Aug. 21, practices will be held at Camp Dudley on Tuesday evenings from 6-7 p.m. until school starts. Games will be played on Saturdays in September and October. All players need shin guards, cleats and water bottles. Some outgrown cleats in small sizes are available at no cost. Parents are encouraged to volunteer for Youth Commission activities as coaches and team managers. For more, contact westportyouthprogram@gmail.com or visit westportyouth.org.

Dance camp in Lake Placid

Paine Library sets book sale WILLSBORO — The Friends of the Paine Memorial Free Library in Willsboro will hold their Annual Used Book Sale on Friday, Aug. 10, and Saturday, Aug. 11. There is a large selection of special and rare books. There will be a Preview Sale on Friday from 5 to 8 p.m. Refreshments will be served. The Saturday sale hours are 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

C

urrently, 23.1 percent of America’s children are being raised in poverty. That rate puts child poverty in America at a higher rate than in Latvia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Lithuania and Slovenia. It seems inconceivable that a wealthy nation such as ours could host such a dubious distinction. While no one can deny that By Scot Hurlburt poverty is advancing in America, there is a substantive divide among Americans regarding what should be done to address the issue. Phrases such as “haves” and “have nots” or “can” or “can nots” have made their way in to the lexicon. Some believe that if you find yourself mired in a cycle of multigenerational poverty you need only to try a little harder and “pull yourself up by your bootstraps.” This camp offers that the individual is responsible for him or herself in every way, not the government, not your neighbor, only the individual. Still others believe that the purpose of government is to address the needs of the people and especially those that are impoverished. This camp measures the civility and decency of America by the support it affords the most vulnerable Americans. While the debate between these two camps wages their respective campaigns, another ominous indicator has come to light in America. Remember when George and Wheezy Jefferson moved up to the East Side and affluence, they were “upwardly mobile.” Today, the Jefferson’s might not have had that opportunity to better their lives and the lives of their children. Recent research has found that 42 percent of American males raised in the bottom fifth of income, remained there as adults compared to 25 percent in Denmark and 30 percent in England. Only 8 percent of American males who started out at the wage bottom rose to an upper salary position while 14 percent of males in Demark reached higher salaries and 12 percent in England. The research also has shown that families that save are more upwardly mobile. Poor families with low incomes often find saving next to impossible. When the car breaks down, medical expenses arise or other essential spending must take place, credit cards with high interest rates become the only option. It is not hard to see how people can enter this impossible debt cycle if credit is the only available option. Of high saving low income families, 71 percent were able to move out of poverty in a generation, unfortunately the number of poor families achieving high savings is very small. While we have no control over who our parents are therefore no control over our economic status, I do not believe that we can turn a blind eye to so many American children being raised in poverty. Oklahoma Coach, Barry Switzer so famously said, “some people are born on third base and often go through life believing that they were the ones that hit the triple that put them there.” In other words, if you have it pretty good, show a little humility, share a little of your good fortune with those that don’t have it so good. Clearly, moving up in America is much more difficult than it was thirty years. Still, I would like to believe that a person can still improve their lot in America with perseverance and hard work. Millions of American youth are also counting on this possibility. Remember, all kids count.

ELYC prepares for soccer

Farm tour scheduled

Hard Times Especially Hard on Children

Library book sale set KEESEVILLE — The Keeseville Free Library's Annual Book Sale will be held Wednesday, Aug. 15, from 10 a.m. until noon and 1 to 5 p.m.; Thursday, Aug. 16, from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m.; and Friday, Aug. 17, from 10 a.m. until noon and 1 to 5 p.m. Books priced from 25 cents to $1. For more information call 834-9054.

Kindergarten orientation set WESTPORT — Westport Central School Kindergarten Orientation has been scheduled for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 28-30, from 8 until 10:30 a.m. at the school. Kindergarten orientation has been designed to assist children to become more comfortable with their new school, teacher and classroom routines. Transportation will be provided by the school. Please call the school at 962-8244 no later than Aug. 10 to register and arrange transportation.

EYE CANS event scheduled SARANAC LAKE — The Adirondack Carousel will sponsor a free art class in EYE CANS art on Saturday, Aug. 11, at noon under the direction of Joanne Court. For more information about the Adirondack Carousel’s hours and other special events, visit adirondackcarousel.org or call 8919521.

Skating shows continue

KEENE VALLEY — The musical Irene will be performed on Aug. 11, at 7 p.m., Keene Central School Auditorium. An old-fashioned musical with familiar numbers like “You Made Me Love You” and “Alice Blue Gown.” It is the culminating performance of a one-week intensive theatre workshop for children ages 8 to 18. Directed by Kathleen Recchia with orchestra led by Bill Stokes. Admission is free, with donations accepted. Call 946-8323 for more information.

Kids Count

The Valley News welcomes letters to the editor. • Letters can be sent to its offices, 14 Hand Avenue, PO Box 338, Elizabethtown, 12932 • Or e-mailed to keith@denpubs.com • Letters can also be submitted online at www.thevalleynews.org Letters should not exceed 400 words and must be signed and include a telephone number for verification.


8 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

Construction begins at old Willsboro CS for new senior living center By Katherine Clark katherine@denpubs.com WILLSBORO — In case the sign in the sky has gone unnoticed, contractors for the

Fri., Aug. 10 - Mon., Aug. 13, 2012

Brave (2D) (PG) 12:15PM Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG) 12:30PM • 2:45PM • 5:00PM 7:20PM • 9:30PM Hope Springs (PG13) 12:05PM • 2:25PM • 4:45PM 7:05PM • 9:25PM Ice Age: Continental Drift (2D) (PG) 2:35PM • 9:25PM Ice Age: Continental Drift (RealD 3D) (PG) 12:10PM • 5:05PM • 7:15PM Ted (R) 12:15PM • 2:35PM • 5:10PM 7:25PM • 9:50PM The Amazing Spider-Man (RealD 3D) (PG13) 3:35PM The Bourne Legacy (PG13) 12:20PM • 3:15PM • 7:15PM 9:55PM The Campaign (R) 12:45PM • 2:50PM • 4:55PM 7:35PM • 9:35PM The Dark Knight Rises (PG13) 12:00PM • 1:30PM • 2:30PM 5:00PM • 6:00PM • 7:10PM 8:30PM • 9:20PM The Watch (R) 2:40PM • 4:50PM 7:05PM • 9:20PM Total Recall (PG13) 12:25PM • 1:20PM • 3:05PM 4:20PM • 6:15PM • 7:20PM 9:00PM • 9:50PM

Champlain Valley Senior Community assisted living facility have begun construction and plan to be opening doors by March 2013. “We want people in the community to know this is new news,” Eli Schwartzberg, developer of Stone Brooks Properties said. “People ask all the time whats going on here and we’re now finally into the construction phase of the project.” Stone Brooks Properties was able to raise the final amount of money for the project through private investors and local supporters. The company broke ground on the transformation of the former school into an assisted living facility project two months ago. “The most important thing is we want the community to know this project is going to happen and it’s going to open soon,” Schwartzberg said. The construction began

Eli Schwartzberg of Stone Brook Properties shows original artwork in the former Willsboro school building as workers begin construction on new assisted living facility. Photo by Katherine Clark

with asbestos abatement in the original building and the building’s 1957 addition. Since, the construction crew of about 40 have been stripping the layers of flooring, removing old ceiling materials, doors and windows while replacing with newer and more energy efficient ones.

Restoring an icon

The former Willsboro Central School was built in 1929 and operated as the town’s

central school for 72 years before closing in 2001. Although the construction crews have begun the building’s transformation from a school to an assisted living facility, Schwartzberg said he wants the building’s past and future to be evident upon the project’s completion. “The school is a monument in the town and now the old building will be here and in use for hopefully another 100 years,” Schwartzberg said.

The construction crews have preserved murals in the hallways and the scoreboard in the former gymnasium will remain in the dining hall. Old school desks will be used in the reception area and chalkboards with messages of the last day of school will be left intact. The construction plans also call for keeping the existing wood door frames, allowing for wide hallways to be set up with bookshelves and computer kiosks for residents to use. The home will feature 64 bedrooms with a maximum residency of 75. Resident’s bedrooms will be in place of former classrooms and will all have a river view, Schwartzberg said. The facility will also have a doctor ’s office,beauty parlor, ice cream shop and coffee shop with an outdoor seating area to be constructed in the former faculty parking lot off

the south side of the building. Schwartzberg said the idea will be to have residents living in the center of town to keep their independence attainable and serve to bring members of the community into the home. “Modern assisted living facilities have a sterile and hospital feel and usually build out of town where residents are disconnected from the core of the community,” Schwartzberg said. “Here, residents will be close to everything and within walking distance.” When the home is completed, it will serve as a means to keep residents in the Adirondacks after they are no longer able to stay in their homes, Schwartzberg said. For more information about the construction project or to learn about potential residency at the Champlain Valley Senior Community call 888963-1110.

Chris Conte Trio to play Summer Swing in Whallonsburg WHALLONSBURG — The sweet sounds of jazz and swing music from the 30s through the 50s will fill up the night on Saturday, Aug. 18 as the Whallonsburg Grange Hall hosts Hot Sum-

mer Swing: Music and Dancing with the Chris Conte Trio. The music starts at 7:30 p.m. and all ages are welcome. The Chris Conte Trio plays

its own arrangements of jazz standards from musical legends such as Nat King Cole, Tony Bennett, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, Chet Baker, and others. Conte is backed by a trio

of double bass, drums and piano. Along with great music, the evening features a light menu and beverages available for purchase, catered by the Cobble Hill Inn in Elizabethtown. The Grange has a large dance floor and plenty of room for listening and enjoying conversation.

Tickets are $8 in advance and $10 at the door. Advance tickets can be purchased at the Cobble Hill Inn and Arsenal Restaurant in Elizabethtown, Kim’s Karpets in Lewis and the Essex Ice Cream Cafe in Essex. For more information visit thegrangehall.org or call 962-4386.

The Rotary Club of Plattsburgh proudly presents... THIRD ANNUAL

WHO:

WHERE: WHEN: HOW:

BED RACE!

Anyone 18+ (or 13+ with parental permission) **COED Teams of 5-7! (4 pushers, 1 rider, 2 alternates; and at least ONE member of the opposite sex! City Hall Place, downtown Plattsburgh Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012, 3:15PM To enter and for a complete list of rules visit www.plattsburghrotary.org

• Two teams will race at a time with two heats occurring simultaneously! • The last 2 teams will compete for 1st and 2nd place! • Teams advance under single elimination format • Team pairings will be random as determined by the Rotary Bed Race Committee and will be announced the day of the race!

AWARDS AND PRIZES Teams will compete for 3 CASH PRIZES and BEST OVERALL THEME (trophy and cash!) FIRST PLACE: $500 CASH • SECOND PLACE: $250 CASH THIRD PLACE: $100 CASH BEST OVERALL THEME: $150 CASH and the coveted Golden Bed Pan to be displayed until next year’s race. Be creative! Prize for best overall theme will go to the most creatively decorated bed!

31565

31557

s ’ y l l e n n Do m a e r C Ice

31558

REMEMBER, ONLY 32 TEAMS TOTAL MAY ENTER THE RACE! Don’t miss the fun! Start getting your team together now! Reserve your spot today! www.plattsburghrotary.org

You can prevent forest invaders

Don’t Move Firewood

Home of the Original Two Tone Cone

Open 7 days a week 11ish to 9:30 pm

Buy it Local - Keep it Local

“It’s Worth The Trip!”

In New York Call Toll Free: (877) STOP-ALB (877-786-7252) or visit www.hungrypests.com 39207

Corner of 86 and 186 Halfway Between Lake Clear & Saranac Lake

This message brought to you by the New York State Dept. of Agriculture & Markets and USDA-APHIS 31600


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

ELYC heading for Centennial

Annual meeting scheduled

ELIZABETHTOWN — On Friday, Aug. 17, the Elizabethtown-Lewis Youth Commission will sponsor a trip to Centennial Field in Burlington, Vt. to watch the Vermont Lake Monsters vs. Staten Island Yankees. This trip is open to ELCS students in grades K-12 and their families. A bus will leave ELCS at 5 p.m. and return immediately following the game. Space is limited so act fast. More information can be obtained by calling Paul Pulsifer at 873-2682 or by visiting the ELYC website at: elizabethtownlewisyc.wordpress.com.

WILLSBORO — On Aug. 17, the Willsboro Heritage Society will hold their annual meeting and election of officers at 7 p.m. at the Willsboro Visitor Center. Tim Tefft, author of “History of the Adsit Cabin,” will be the guest speaker. Free admission. For more, visit willsboroheritage.hostzi.com.

Garden Club fashion show set WESTPORT — The Annual Elizabethtown-Westport Garden Club Fashion Show Luncheon will be held on Thursday, Aug. 16, at the newly remodeled Westport Inn and Tavern. There will be an 11:30 a.m. social time with lunch at noon. The Bessboro Shop from Westport will be modeling fall fashions. There will be door prizes, basket and gift raffles. Reservations are required, tickets are $22 and on sale now at the Bessboro Shop or please call 962-8348. This is a club fundraiser, with the proceeds going to support their many community beautification projects, education and programs. The EWGC meetings are held on the first Thursday of each month at the Elizabethtown Social Center, at 11 a.m., for more information call Helen at 873-9279 or email time4hmd@yahoo.com.

Provoncha to speak in Wilmington

Valley News - 9

Comp plan meeting to be held ELIZABETHTOWN — A Comprehensive Planning Workshop will be held on Saturday, Aug. 18, from 9 a.m. to noon at the United Church of Christ Parish Hall. All Elizabethtown residents encouraged to attend. Refreshments will be served.

A capella alum group in Essex ESSEX — On Monday, Aug. 20, the Yale "Whiff Alumns" Octet will perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Essex Community Church. It is a performance of Yale alumni members of the Whiffenpoofs as undergraduates. Admission is $10 adults, all others free. For more information, call 962-8882.

Nature walk to be held WILLSBORO — The Willsboro Farmer ’s Market will host its second free nature walk on Wednesday, Aug. 15, starting at 1:30 p.m. This easy, informative walk will teach about what wild plants are edible and medicinal. Space is limited. For reservations, call Linda at 9634383. The Farmer’s Market is open Thursdays on Route 22 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.

Cemetery tour slated

WILLSBORO — On Aug. 25, the Willsboro WILLSBORO — The Wilmington Histori- Heritage Society presents a local cemetery tour, with Willsboro Town Historian Ron cal Society will present a program "Links, Chains and the Mallory Grant," with Essex Bruno. They will meet at 10 a.m. at the WillsCounty Clerk Joseph Provoncha as the boro Heritage Society Museum, 6 Gilliland speaker, to be held on Friday, Aug. 24, at 7 Lane, and carpools will be formed. Free admission. For more, visit p.m. at the Wilmington Community Center. The program is free and open to the pub- willsboroheritage.hostzi.com. lic. Refreshments will be provided by the Country Bear Authorize Bakery in Wilmington. For OPEN RS HEAP Deal d U er 24 HO further information, contact A Division Of Countryside Management Corp. Karen Peters at 524-1023 or (800) 411 - F UEL or (518) 873-329 7 Merri Peck at 946-7627. Farm Diesel • Fuel Oil • Kerosene

Six classmates from the 1949 Graduating Class of Willsboro Central School gathered together for lunch at The Old Dock in Essex on Friday, July 28, to celebrate their 63rd high school reunion. Those attending were (from left) Ella (Doyle) Coonrod, Betty Lou (Sayward) Squire, Arlene (Jones) Mason, Grace (Patterson) Uhlig, Edrie (Wrisley) Dickerson and Mary Ann (Carver) Cardarelli.

Paine Memorial tournament held WILLSBORO — The Willsboro Golf Club hosted the Annual Paine Memorial Library Golf Tournament on July 12. Many local individuals and merchants donated prizes for the event. Ann Choate served as chair with assistance from many friends and supporters of the Library. The Committee consisted of Marcia Bierce, Cheryl Blanchard, Gayle

Bridge, Linda Heintz, Joyce Lindemann, Patty Paine, and Ralph Marcotte. In the Women’s Division, first place was taken by Alice Leclerc, Renee Lewis, Etta Moredock, and Maureen Perry. Second place winners were Mona Cross, Arlene Davis, Janet Jaquish, and K. Puccia. The winners of the Men’s

Division were Ron Bruno, Ray Leclerc, Roger Jaquish, and Rick Benedict. Second place was captured by Eric McCauliffe, B. Jaquish, Patrick McCauliffe, and Mike McCauliffe. The Noel Merrihew team placed third. In the mixed division, first place went to the team of S. Lydamore, E. Lydamore, J. Marcotte, and T. Marcotte.

ntryside CouFuels

call for current prices or visit our web site!

*Prices are subjectM to OST change without todayCfor current price.CAll deliveries are made C.O.D.• SERVICING OF Enotice. SSEXCall& LINTON OUNTIES I-87

Exit 32 • 873-3297

We accept MasterCard, Visa, Amex, Discover, Cash & Checks. 150 Gal. Min. CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR DAILY PRICES WWW.COUNTRYSIDEFUELS.COM

31925

THINK YOU’RE

HOT NOW, Wait until you try our steamy lattes. The ADK Cafe is now serving espresso based hot and cold drinks. Wow! wow! Wow!

2837 NYS Rt. 73, Keene, NY 12942 6:30A-9P Mon-Sun 518-576-9111 theadkcafe.com 31940

31661

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner


10 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

Tupper library manager to retire By Andy Flynn andy@denpubs.com

Saranac Lake Block Party Above, People enjoyed kettle corn, cotton candy and snow cones along Main Street Thursday, Aug. 2 during the Saranac Lake Block Party. Below, Alex Evans, 5, plays on the Parties Unlimited bounce house obstacle course Thursday, Aug. 2 during the Saranac Lake Block Party. Photos by Andy Flynn

Pendragon season wraps up with a ‘Shipwrecked!’ event SARANAC LAKE — “Shipwrecked! The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougement (as told by himself),” opens at Pendragon Theatre on Aug. 15. The family friendly entertainment tells the tale of the real life Louis de Rougemont and his incredible 30 years adventure in the Australian outback after being lost at sea. Bob Pettee plays Louis de Rougement, the Victorian adventurer and yarn spinner. Mackenzie Barmen and Tyler Nye play multiple characters including children, society gossips, aborigines, scientists and Bruno, the dog. Karen Kirkham, Pendragon’s incoming Executive and Artistic Director, directs the high-

ly imaginative production. She continues her long time collaboration with award winning Set Designer, Tijana Bjelajac. Alexis Foster, Costume Designer at SUNY Potsdam, outfits all of the characters. Current Technical Director and succeeding Managing Director, David Zwierankin is the Lighting Designer. “Shipwrecked!” plays Aug. 15,16,18, 21, 24, 25,30, 31 and Sept 1 at 8 p.m.; and Sunday, Aug. 19 for a 2 p.m. matinee. Pendragon’s new ticketing system allows patrons see available seats and to purchase tickets on line by visiting the website: pendragontheatre.org. For phone reservations, contact the theatre at 891-1854, or via e-mail: pdragon@northnet.org.

Beach

On Friday, Aug. 3, Van Cott posted a Lake Flower beach update on his Facebook page, stating that the first water quality sample passed state Department of Health standards, “which is good news. Regular water quality sampling would be required to ensure that the beach is safe for swimming.” Van Cott said he is setting up meetings with officials at the DOH, state Department of Environmental Conservation and state Department

Continued from page 1 prior to Lake Colby’s opening. But it’s had little effect to gain the hearts and minds of many local swimmers. Yet recent pleas from residents — especially Shawn Boyer — have caught the attention of the current Village Board. Van Cott is now studying whether it’s feasible to move the beach back to Lake Flower.

TUPPER LAKE — When Linda Auclair began her job as the manager for the GoffNelson Memorial Library in 2003, people w e re s t i l l u s i n g p a p e r l i b r a r y c a rd s t o take out books. Now, as she readies for retirement, plastic cards are used and book borrowing is processed on the computer. During her nine years at the helm, Auclair has seen how technology has changed the way people use libraries. Yet, even with the popularity of ebooks, she believes in the future of paper books. “I think people will always want some of both,” Auclair said. “And publishers haven’t figured out the perfect price model yet for ebooks. Those are pretty limited unless you want to buy every book you read. So I don’t see paper books at your library going away any time.” Auclair will be retiring on Aug. 26 after b e i n g t h e G o ff - N e l s o n M e m o r i a l L i b r a r y ’ s m a n a g e r s i n c e M a rc h 3 , 2 0 0 3 . Asked what she will do with all her free time, she joked, “I’m going to live a life of leisure.” Why now? “The time is right,” Auclair said. “We have a couple of sons and stepchildren, and they live all over the country and I’m looking forward to being able to spend more time with all of them in the near future.” Many times, retirees find that they get busier after retirement. “Everybody’s telling me that,” Auclair said. “I’m going to resist that with everything in me.” The biggest changes at the library over the past years have been technological. “We have become automated,” Auclair said. “The circulation of library materials is now completely computerized. Every transaction is recorded and takes place via a computer. It took us a while to learn it. It was extremely difficult at the very b e g i n n i n g b e c a u s e w e w e re u n f a m i l i a r with the system, but it worked out well, very efficient, but it was a challenge.” When looking back at her time at the library, Auclair takes pride at being an accessible manager who was open to ideas. “You know what I did? I said ‘yes’ to everything that came through the door,” Auclair said. “If people had good ideas, I said, ‘Yeh, let’s do that.’” Coming into the Goff-Nelson Memorial Library in 2003 on the heels of the retirement of library manager Chalice Dechene c o u l d h a v e b e e n d a u n t i n g f o r a n y re placement. Dechene was well respected and had been a fixture at the library for m o re t h a n 4 0 y e a r s . A n d w o r k i n g a t a community library was new to Auclair; she had worked in the library at the Trudeau Institute in Saranac Lake prior to her appointment in Tupper Lake. And she took the transition in stride. “I relied heavily on the staff,” Auclair said. “They answered a lot of my ques-

Footrace set for Whiteface WILMINGTON — In June, cyclists raced to the top of Whiteface Mountain’s Veterans Memorial Highway, in Wilmington. In September, it will be the runner ’s time to conquer the eight-mile climb to the summit of New York State’s fifth highest peak. As many as 200 running enthusiasts from the northeastern United States and Canada are expected to participate in the 35th annual Whiteface Mountain Uphill Foot Race. For the first 34 years this popular event was run in June, preceding the uphill bike race, but this year, organizers moved the date to Saturday, Sept. 22, hoping to attract even more competitors to the 3,500 foot climb up the mountain. To register for the 35th annual Whiteface Mountain Uphill Foot Race, log onto

of Transportation to explore the regulatory hurdles. Regulation is a field familiar to Van Cott, as he is an attorney at the Adirondack Park Agency. “I am also talking with a consultant about what it would take (including costs) to develop a plan and to obtain all of the approvals that the village would need for a beach,” Van Cott wrote. “There is no village money budgeted for this year for this project, but my goal is to get it as

Linda Auclair tions. I asked a lot of questions of Chalice and anybody who would give me an answer.” Even though the library relies heavily on computer system for managing its b o o k s , A u c l a i r s e e s w h e re t e c h n o l o g y could help the library even more. “I think the biggest hurdle we have is to become more technologically adept,” Auclair said. “We should have an interactive webpage. We should have a blog or two going. We should have an in-house network of communication among the employees.” Right now, patrons can log onto a computer and search for books, not just at the G o ff - N e l s o n M e m o r i a l L i b r a r y b u t t h ro u g h o u t t h e e n t i re C l i n t o n - E s s e x Franklin Library System using the interlibrary loan program. They can even take out and renew books from home, logging on to the CEF Library System website. “They can do a search for a book, and if we don’t have it, we can get it for them in four days from another library,” Auclair said. “That’s how technology is helping us now, and it’s only going to get more and more important.” The popularity of ebooks and the Internet — long prophesized as the two technological wonders that will eventually wipe out community libraries — has not hurt the patronage at the Goff-Nelson Memorial Library. Auclair says the number of people who use the library may actually be up from nine years ago. It seems technology is working in the library’s favor. The reason? The price. Although people want to use the Internet, not everyone has the ability to pay for the hardware and online access. “A lot of people come in to use the public access computers and almost an equal number of people come in to use our WiFi network,” Auclair said. Yet a lot of people are still using the Tupper Lake library for its original purpose: to borrow books to read. And that’s exactly what Auclair will be doing during her retirement, when she’s not traveling, playing the piano, gardening, cross-coun-

runreg.com/Net/2964. The cost is $35 per athlete. Online registration will be available through Thursday, Sept. 20. For more information about the event, visit whitefaceregion.com, or whitefacerace.com.

LaDuke exhibit to open SARANAC LAKE — BluSeed is proud to present the color photography of Jack LaDuke titled Sun & Shadow. A special “Meet-the-Artist” reception and gallery talk will be held on Thursday, Aug. 16, from 6 to 8 p.m. that is free and open to the public. This exhibition will be available for viewing from Aug. 3 through Sept. 16. For more information visit bluseedstudios.org or call 518-891-3799.

far along as possible so that it can be considered with everything else for next year’s budget.” Van Cott told the Valley News July 23 that before any decisions are made regarding the re-establishment of a municipal beach at Lake Flower, residents would be invited to give input during a public meeting. A date for that meeting has not yet been set, and Village Board members have not discussed the issue at any recent meetings.


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

Valley News - 11

Balzac performance

Depot Theatre annual Gala event set for Saturday WESTPORT — Coming Saturday, Aug. 11, is the Depot Theatre’s Annual Gala Dinner and Auction. This exciting tent pole event will feature an opportunity to mingle with the cast and crew of the Depot Theatre’s current production, “The Marvelous Wonderettes,” at the beautiful Westport Country Club. Guests of this event will enjoy dinner and cocktails and are welcome to join in on bidding at the live and silent auction and to shake a leg on the dance floor. “The Gala is really my favorite Depot event of the calendar,” says Y. Angel Wuellner, “it’s really a wonderful opportunity for the Depot to thank all of those who support us throughout the year.” For more information about the Gala and to purchase tickets, contact the Depot Theatre box office at 962-4449. “The Marvelous Wonderettes,” the Depot Theatre’s third main-stage show is in full swing. This catchy musical set in 1958 is so full of tunes from the 50s. “They’ll sing all your favorite songs better than you remember them,” Shami McCormick, Artistic Director of the Depot, said. The show will play at the Depot Theatre until Sunday, Aug. 19. At the Saturday Aug. 11, 2 p.m. performance,

Buses Continued from page 1 “It does not seem like we are under any time constraints with the New York State DOT so I would like to have the transportation committee look at this and then bring it back to us at budget time where we can make a decision,” Douglas said. “I do not want to get into a situation where we obligate ourselves to do it and then find out that we do not have the money come budget time.” The resolution calls for the purchase of two buses, along with other equipment and materials, including a lift for working on the vehicles and bus stop shelters. The county would act as the lead agency and be joined by the village of Lake Placid and the Olympic Regional Development Authority, who have previously purchased buses

WESTPORT — On Aug. 15, Sam Balzac's Anti-Student Loan Cabaret: Tonight Only will take place at The Depot Theatre at 8 p.m. Balzac presents an evening of song, drama, and instrumental music. Invited guest performers include George Cordes, Liz Cordes, Karen Rappaport, Bill Stokes, Peter Craig, and George Davis. Tickets are $15. For reservations contact 962-4449.

Turkey dinner at Federated WESTPORT — There will be a roast turkey dinner Thursday, Aug. 16, at the Westport Federated Church. Serving starts 4:30 p.m. with takeouts available. Cost is $9 Adults, $4 Children 12 and under.

Westport school board to meet the Depot Theatre and PromCon will be collecting gently worn prom and bridesmaid dresses for charity. Those who are able to donate a dress will receive a complimentary ticket to the Depot Theatre’s final show of the 2012 season, “Real Women Have Curves,” opening Aug. 24. Bingo for the Depot is happening again on Tuesday, Aug. 14, at the Heritage House in Westport from 6 to 8 p.m.

“Bingo was how the Depot got started,” says Beth Glover, a Depot Theatre Board Member and performer of the upcoming Mississippi Voodoo on Thursday Aug. 16, “We are so thrilled that it is back and people are loving it.” More information is available regarding upcoming events including the spectacular summer season on the website www.depottheatre.org, by contacting 962-4449 or emailing info@depottheatre.org.

through the county. The bulk of the funding for the purchases would come from state and federal 5311 funding totalling $1,537,856. Lake Placid and ORDA would pay a little more than $61,000 of an estimated $170,000 local share, while the county would pay $60,418. “I think that this is a wise move,” Moriah Supervisor Tom Scozzafava said. “We need to make this decision in conjunction with our total budget,” Westport Supervisor Daniel Connell said. “We have a lot of issues and we need to look at where we are going for money. There is a lot that we want to fund but we do not have the money to fund everything.” “The idea was, let's restart on this and look at what we need to get and where we can get funding for these,” County Manager Daniel Palmer said.

Scozzafava and others brought up their concerns again that some routes do not sustain themselves. “Is there any way that we can get a log set up so we can see how many bodies are on those buses each day,” Scozzafava asked. “I can give you a daily log of the riders but I do not know if everyone would want to sign it,” Transportation Director Nancy Dougal said. “We do have a log of how many people have been on.” Wilmington Supervisor Randy Preston agreed that something should be done with lower ridership routes. “I do not know how this board can continue to chip in and fund these different programs when the state and federal government continue to withdraw funding,” Preston said. “I really think we need to take a look at the transportation department and

Tw e l f t h

WESTPORT — The Westport Central School District Board of Education will hold its monthly meeting Thursday, Aug. 16, at 5 p.m. in the library. All board of education meetings are open to the public.

Zen Buddhism talk to take place WESTPORT — The Westport Library will host Dr. Alan Cole to speak about Zen Buddhism on Thursday Aug. 16 at 7 p.m.

these routes and get rid of the ones that are not performing.” Palmer said that the board would have to be careful because dropping the number of routes could also drop the amount of funding available. “If you start taking out routes that are part of our under-served areas, then your chances of getting grants on your stronger areas are going to go down,” Palmer said. “We don’t want to just assume that we can just throw out all of these low routes and expect that the federal and state government are going to continue to support us.” “It is a sad state of affairs when you have to have a policy that provides services you do not need in order to get funding for services you do need,” Newcomb Supervisor George Canon replied.

A n nu a l

LOOK FOR ONE UNBELIEVABLE ONE TIME OFFER IN THE CENTERFOLD IN 2 WEEKS. SALE IS TWO DAYS ONLY SO DON’T MISS THIS ONE !

BIGGEST ENERGY EXPO SALE

EVER! FINANCING AVAILABLE SIX MONTHS INTEREST FREE* * For qualified buyers.

FREE LOW E!

FORPCEOERN

2 DAYS ONLY!

! P S O DA AND

FR EE D RAW IN G fo r $1 00 L. L. Be an G ift Ce rt ifi ca te On e Drawin g Per Day

Friday, August 24 - 8am-6pm Saturday, August 25 - 8am-3pm

• Energy Trailer With Live Demos on Site • Factory Reps on Hand • Service Technicians & Installers on Site to Answer Questions • Pre-Season Prices... Too Low to Pass Up!

10% OFF!

ALL HUSQVARNA PRODUCTS! Chainsaws • Lawn Mowers String Trimmers

Model #1450

Napoleon Split Air Systems

10% OFF!

www.adirondackhardware.com

Find Out How To Eliminate Your Heating Bills!

This offer excludes all other rebates. Not responsible for typographical errors.

1698 FRONT ST, KEESEVILLE, NY 12944 • 518-834-9790

31670

• Learn how the E-Classic can heat your home, shop, pool, domestic hot water and more. • 25 Year Limited Warranty available.

First Come First Served! FIND US ON FACEBOOK

10% OFF!

RUUD Whole Home Generator

Model #235

Napoleon NPS40

SEE IN STORE FOR PROMO

Rain or Shine


12 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

Lemza recalls family vehicle won at the fair By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com PORT HENRY — Tony Lemza remembers well the drives that his family would take in the family’s 1934 Ford sedan. Lemza, who was a young child at the time, remembers that his family had one of the few cars in town during the midst of the Great Depression. “Not many people in Moriah had cars, particularly new cars like this,” Lemza said. “I was born in ’32, but I can remember riding in that car when I was a kid.” Lemza said that he also remembered how his father, Walter, had received the car. He won it at the Essex County Fair. Lemza said that his father had entered a contest that appeared to have been designed to help boost the economy during tough times. “Stores in the county were having the contest along with Belden and Edwards Ford in Port Henry,” he said. “If you bought a certain amount in goods (which happened to be 25 cents) from

one of the stores, then you would receive a ticket for an entry into the contest.” Lemza still has both the ticket and stub that turned out to be lucky for his father. The stub states that the drawing was done by the Essex County Agricultural Society, which operates the fair, along with, “the cooperation of the Merchants of Essex County who will present a coupon with each 25c purchase.” The drawing took place on Aug. 24, 1934, when the number 28702 was called, which had the name Walter Lemza written on the back of it. To celebrate, a photographer took a picture of Walter receiving the keys from Charles Belden. “The photo has been in my family ever since, along with the tickets,” Lemza said. After winning the car, Lemza said that his father took very good care of the vehicle. “He had a log book in the kitchen that he would write down the odometer numbers every time he returned

from a trip,” Lemza said. “He had even made a garage to store it.” Lemza added that he felt the quality of care his father gave to the car was based on how fortunate he felt the family was to have it. “He was just so amazed that he had a car,” Lemza said. “He was an immigrant from Poland who moved here in 1912 and was working hard. It was just so amazing that there was a car being raffled off during the Depression and that through it, he now had this Ford.” The car remained in the family for about five years, when it was involved in an total-loss accident. “I can’t remember who was to blame for the crash,” Lemza said. “I think there was some blame on my stepbrother, but I also think there was some coverup in order to hide the real story behind the accident.” Lemza said that each August he enjoys reflecting on the car and the times during when his family had it. “It’s fun,” he said. “This is something that we remember every year when the fair comes around.”

County approves emergency bridge funding By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com

31462

ELIZABETHTOWN — The Moriah Center Bridge was scheduled for reconstruction next summer. That timeline needs to be moved up.

IT’S EASY TO DO THE RIGHT THING Help the environment and save money. Sign up today for Zero-Sort® Recycling & trash curbside pickup, receive 1 MONTH*...

After the bridge, which is seen as the main artery for the town of Moriah, was redflagged by the New York State Department of Transportation, Essex County Department of Public Works Superintendent Anthony LaVigne got to work seeking alternatives. “We had to close the bridge or post it, and we posted the bridge with a five ton limit,” LaVigne said. “The structural component that was flagged was the

steal.The bridge is in design for replacement through a federal aid program and is scheduled for summer of 2013.” LaVigne presented members of the Essex County Board of Supervisors Aug. 6 with an emergency resolution to start repairing the near-failing structure, which could cost up to $70,000. That money would be taken from unexpended fund balance. LaVigne said that the im-

portance of the ridge necessitates its repair. “This is the busiest bridge that I have on inventory,” he said. “There are more than 3,000 cars per day. The only diesel fuel in town is adjacent to the bridge. The emergency squad that utilizes the bridge. I need to get that bridge open to all traffic.” LaVigne said he hoped to use four beams that are currently in the county inventory and three more that he has located through a contractor.

The Area’s Largest Selection of Serta Mattresses!

FREE!

Mon.-Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 12-4

23 Weed Street

518-566-9950 Near Georgia Pacific - Exit 38 South, left on Boynton Ave., cross railroad tracks, right on Weed St.

Easy curbside pick-up only...

(PLUS TAX)

FINANCING AVAILABLE! 12 Months Same As Cash on selected models. See store for details!

TWO FREE LARGE CARTS

$1074

after instant boxspring savings! 39544

26 /MONTH .95

$

You also receive...

Queen Sets Starting As Low As

Call today and start saving!

(888) 431-2298 Mention this offer and receive 1 FREE month of service. Offer expires 6/30/12

*

Learn more at zerosort.com 31668

CDL A TRAINING • STUDENT LOANS & GRANTS FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS • APPROVED FOR VETERAN TRAINING • LOCAL & NATIONWIDE PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE

AUGUST CLASSES FORMING NOW! 1-800-243-9300 www.ntts.edu

Denton Community Newspapers are the PRIMARY SOURCE of LOCAL news and information to over 71,000 homes and businesses in the Adirondack Region. *Over 41,000 in the Saratoga/Capital District Region and over 29,000 in Central New York.

81%

of adults age 18 and older choose this local newspaper and trust the information, products and services found on our pages.

These same readers are

4650 Buckley Road Liverpool, NY

If you want to deliver your campaign message directly to the voters in a proven and trusted source the choice is clear...

DENTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS! 31477

*SOURCES: 2011 CVC Readership

31584

DENTON COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS Call Tanya 518-873-6368 ext. 104 • Email: Tanya@denpubs.com

Consumer Information http://ntts.edu/Programs/Disclosures


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

Valley News - 13

Make your

House a HOME! Before the holidays bring family celebrations and visiting friends to your home, give your home a new look and improve its comfort level. Check out the suggestions below, make your project list, and then go to your local hardware store for the tools and accessories to get the job done. Entrance, Windows & Floors -- Give your entrance an easy update with a new door or add color and new hardware to your existing one. Install new windows that are attractive, reduce heating and cooling costs, and are easy to maintain. And consider installing a hardwood floor in at least one of your rooms -- possibly the entryway and/or the living/ family room.

or ones you build. For a wood table and chairs, consider using a stain or topcoat to enhance the wood’s appearance or to match the color of your cabinets. Shelving & Lighting -- Adding shelving anywhere you have unused space (bedroom/bathroom closets) will help control clutter and provide display space for your favorite photos and collectibles in living room, family room, and kitchen. Enhance cabinets and furniture with new decorative LED lighting.

Living/Family Room -- Arranging furniture into “areas” will allow for varied activities simultaneously, Kitchen & Dining Areas -- Apply stain or such as conversation and watching color to your kitchen cabinets and replace events on television or playing games. Use plants, a bookcase hinges and pulls or knobs to brighten your “home cafe.” If your cabinets have seen better or a divider to separate areas. Paint walls, hang pictures or stain wood furniture to add color. days, install new ones -- either store-bought

NORTHEAST ROOFING™

PRECISION TREE SERVICE

Roofs of all Types • Siding • Roof Repairs

Free Estimates/Fully Insured Owner operated Winter Discounts

(518) 942-6545 FREE ESTIMATES

Area Referrals • Free Estimates

31538

27373

Vincent Place President

*Dangerous Removals / 127 Foot 33 Ton Crane Work / Pruning *24 Hour Emergency Service *Lot Clearing / Brush Chipping / Stump Grinding Over 20 Years Experience In The Tree Care Industry

Comprehensive Housing Services including: Energy Audits • Home Rehab Assistance Home Buyer Financing • Housing Counseling

Phone: (518) 873-6888 Fax: (518) 873-9102 103 Hand Avenue • PO Box 157 Elizabethtown, NY 12932

31543

Cell: 518-907-4827 Office: 518-962-4646

Housing Assistance Program of Essex County, Inc.

BIG JOB? We Now Offer 24 Hour Service

AVERY ENERGY CUSTOMERS

We Have Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel and LP Gas!

Full Service Heating System Cleanings & Service for LP & Automatic Fuel Customers at a Discounted Rate!

Serving Ticonderoga, Crown Point, Moriah, North Hudson, Scroon Lake, Westport & Surrounding Areas! (office in Crown Point behind Citgo)

Crown Point, NY

(518) 597-3444 • (518) 570-8057 Will Deyo • Family Owned and Operated

25708

NEW CONSTRUCTION OR REMODELING: FOR ALL YOUR ROOFING, DOORS AND WINDOWS

Maicus Building Supplies Has You Covered.

Valley Sanitation has BIG containers! 2 -12 Yard Dumpsters 15 - 40 Yard Roll Off Containers

WE ARE YOUR FRIENDLY GARBOLOGISTS

Not responsible for typographical errors.

31541

249 Buck Hill • Au Sable Forks, NY 518-647-5170 • www.maicusbuildingsupplies.com Independent Contractors Available

State Certified, Woman Owned Business

31539

518-566-0453

AN EXTRA 3% WITH MENTION OF THIS AD


14 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

Make your

HouseSeven a HOME! inexpensive ways to update a home now!

Hamilton Brothers v Truckmount Carpet Cleaning (Commercial & Residential)

v Upholstery Cleaning v Building Services v Tile Floors (Strip & Wax) Voicemail

(518) 298-8182 • Dean Hamilton (518) 726-0742

538 St. Johns Road, Champlain, NY 31486

When you get inspired to make improvements to the home but fear how much it may take out of your wallet, consider inexpensive tricks that can induce a big “wow� factor. What many homeowners may not realize is that there are many ways to make updates and changes to a home that do not require a major overhaul or a large price tag. The following are seven projects that won’t break the bank.

3. Add new pillows or drapes. Changing a few aspects of a room can give it an entirely new look. If you want to add a splash of color but don’t know what to do, think about incorporating some new throw pillows or change the curtains. An accessory here and there in a bright color also can incorporate a new hue without it being overwhelming.

4. Change knobs or small accents. Give a room a new look by focusing on the small details. Switch out cabinet knobs for something updated and modern. Take inventory of wall 1. Move around furniture. You may be able to change the look of a room outlets and light switches and think about selecting new ones that coordinate with your home decor. without spending any money. Interior designers 5. Use plants. Empty corners or spots you’re not certain how know how to arrange furni- to fill may benefit from a plant. Plants are inexpensive ways ture for maximum appeal, to add instant color and visual appeal to a room. Plus, having but the average homeowner live plants can help improve indoor air by filtering out concan do it, too. Find a focal taminants. A home with plants also feels more cozy. point in the room and angle 6. Hang new wall art. It may be time to look at your photos the furniture toward it. and artwork and make a few adjustments. Finding new prints 2. Add lighting. Lighting at different levels in the room can create a vibrant impact. Many homeowners mistakenly put in a couple of table lamps and think that will be adequate. However, properly illuminating a room means varying the lighting to create different moods at different times. Plus, more light can make a

• Water Wells • Pumps Residential & Commercial • Sales • Service • Installation • Hydro Fracking 31484

518-566-9388 • Plattsburgh, NY

room feel more welcoming.

to hang could instantly change a room’s ambience. Grab your camera and take a few close-up shots of flowers or take in a landscape scenery. Many of today’s home printers can produce professional-quality prints in minutes. 7. Try a new coat of paint. After you’ve exhausted other avenues, choosing a new paint color may be the new look you desire. Painting is one of the least expensive yet most dramatic methods of changing a home’s interior. With dozens of hues to choose from, and new apps that enable you to take snapshots of things in nature or in your life and match them up to a paint color, you will have scores of opportunities to explore fresh new colors for your home.

ANCO Heating Services, ces,, LLC. C. BEAT THE FALL RUSH! $

plus parts & tax

115

Have your Furnace/Boiler Tune up NOW! FREE ESTIMATES FOR NEW HEATING SYSTEMS We sell Daikin and Fujitsu mini split A/C sytems! 31544

101 Golf Course Road, Au Sable Forks, NY • deyoe@gmail.com • 518-647-8108

Keeping North Country families warm since 1974

Large Oak Corner Cabinet

Solid Oak Table - 42x66

Reg. $1249 SPECIAL $995 Open Hutch w/Server Reg. $887 SPECIAL $795

w/4 leaves $1995 Chairs - Solid Oak Windsor $259 Each

The

WOW!

SINCE 1974

WOOD GRAIN

MON-FRI 9-5:30 SAT 9-5 • SUN 12-4 DELIVERY AVAILABLE

1976 RT. 3 • CADYVILLE, NY 12918 • 518-293-6268 19 Visit Us At: WWW.ADIRONDACKFURNITURE.COM

CHOICE™ Package

34

$0 Down

99

*

& 0% Financing for 5 Years*

MONTH

For 12 mos. AFTER REBATE

A.P.R.

It Pays to Own Orange

This is the year to reward yourself with a new Kubota. Right now you can get long-term, low-rate financing on a versatile BX Series sub-compact tractor. It always pays to own quality.

EVERY GAME. EVERY SUNDAY. NOW INCLUDED AT NO EXTRA CHARGE. 2012 NFL SUNDAY TICKET included at no extra charge with qualifying packages.° Out-of-market games only. All DIRECTV offers require 24-month agreement.** Regional Sports Fee may apply.

CLEAR SHOT SATELLITE 373 STATE ROUTE 3 SUITE # 3

Your Local Authorized DIRECTV Dealer

518-563-1111 888-905-9774

Offers end 10/3/12. Credit card required (except in MA & PA). New approved customers only (lease required). $19.95 Handling & Delivery fee may apply. Applicable use tax adjustment may apply on the retail value of the installation. Programming/pricing may vary in certain markets.

BX2660

Eligible Models

Down Payment

Maximum Term

A.P.R.

Monthly Payments per $1,000 Borrowed

All New Kubota BX Series Models

$0

60 Months

0.00%

$16.67

10% Down

72 Months

4.49%

$15.87

Dragoon’s Farm Equipment, Inc. 2507 Route 11, Mooers, NY 12958 (518) 236-7110

www.kubota.com ŠKubota Tractor Corporation, 2012

GRZQ$35Âż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ÂżQDQFLQJPD\QRWEHDYDLODEOHZLWKFXVWRPHULQVWDQWUHEDWH &,5 RIIHUV)LQDQFLQJLVDYDLODEOHWKURXJK.XERWD&UHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQ86$'HO$PR%OYG7RUUDQFH&$VXEMHFWWRFUHGLWDSSURYDO6RPH H[FHSWLRQVDSSO\2IIHUH[SLUHV6HHXVIRUGHWDLOVRQWKHVHDQGRWKHUORZUDWHRSWLRQVRUJRWRZZZNXERWDFRPIRUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQ

31478

*BILL CREDIT/PROGRAMMING OFFER: IF BY THE END OF PROMOTIONAL PRICE PERIOD(S) CUSTOMER DOES NOT CONTACT DIRECTV TO CHANGE SERVICE THEN ALL SERVICES WILL AUTOMATICALLY CONTINUE AT THE THEN-PREVAILING RATES. Free HBO, STARZ, SHOWTIME and Cinemax for three months, a value of $135. LIMIT ONE PROGRAMMING OFFER PER ACCOUNT. Featured package name and price: CHOICE $63.99/mo. In certain markets, a $3/mo. Regional Sports Fee will be assessed with CHOICE Package or above and MĂ S ULTRA Package or above. Price includes the following bill credits for 12 months after phone-in or online rebate: $24 for CHOICE plus an additional $5 with online rebate and consent to email alerts. Upon DIRECTV System activation, customer will receive rebate redemption instructions (included in customer’s ďŹ rst DIRECTV bill, a separate mailing, or, in the state of New York, from retailer) and must comply with the terms of the instructions. In order to receive $29 monthly credits for CHOICE in the ďŹ rst 12 months, customer must submit rebate online (valid email address required) and consent to email alerts prior to rebate redemption. Rebate begins up to eight weeks after receipt of rebate submission online or by phone. Duration of promotional price varies based on redemption date. °2012 NFL SUNDAY TICKET OFFER: Package consists of all out-of-market NFL games (based on customer's service address) broadcast on FOX and CBS. Games available via remote viewing based on device location. Local broadcasts are subject to blackout rules. Other conditions apply. 2012 NFL SUNDAY TICKET regular full-season retail price is $199.95. 2012 NFL SUNDAY TICKET MAX regular full-season retail price is $299.95. Customers activating the CHOICE Package or above or the LO MAXIMO Package will be automatically enrolled in the 2012 season of NFL SUNDAY TICKET at no additional cost and will receive a free upgrade to NFL SUNDAY TICKET MAX for the 2012 season. NFL SUNDAY TICKET subscription will automatically continue each season at special renewal rate unless customer calls to cancel prior to start of season. To renew to NFL SUNDAY TICKET MAX, customer must call to upgrade after the 2012 season. Subscription cannot be cancelled (in part or in whole) after the start of the season and subscription fee cannot be refunded. Account must be in “good standingâ€? as determined by DIRECTV in its sole discretion to remain eligible for all offers. **24-MONTH AGREEMENT: EARLY CANCELLATION WILL RESULT IN A FEE OF $20/MONTH FOR EACH REMAINING MONTH. Must maintain 24 consecutive months of your DIRECTV programming package. Advanced Receiver-DVR fee ($8/mo.) required for DVR lease. Advanced Receiver-HD fee ($10/mo.) required for HD Receiver lease. Advanced Receiver fee ($20/mo.) required for HD DVR and TiVo HD DVR from DIRECTV lease. TiVo service fee ($5/mo.) required for TiVo HD DVR from DIRECTV lease. If you have two boxes or one box and an enabled TV, an additional $6/mo. fee applies. For each additional box and/or enabled TV on your account you are charged an additional fee of $6/mo. per box and/or enabled TV. NON-ACTIVATION CHARGE OF $150 PER RECEIVER MAY APPLY. ALL EQUIPMENT IS LEASED AND MUST BE RETURNED TO DIRECTV UPON CANCELLATION, OR UNRETURNED EQUIPMENT FEES APPLY. VISIT directv.com OR CALL 1-800-DIRECTV FOR DETAILS. INSTALLATION: Standard professional installation in up to four rooms only. Custom installation extra. Programming, pricing, terms and conditions subject to change at any time. Pricing residential. Taxes not included. Receipt of DIRECTV programming subject to DIRECTV Customer Agreement; copy provided at directv.com/legal and in order conďŹ rmation. NFL, the NFL Shield design and the NFL SUNDAY TICKET name and logo are registered trademarks of the NFL and its afďŹ liates. Deion Sanders, Eli/Peyton Manning: James Michelfelder+Therese Sommerseth. Š2012 DIRECTV. DIRECTV and the Cyclone Design logo are registered trademarks of DIRECTV, LLC. 31480

31483

31540

QUALITY FINISHED & UNFINISHED FURNITURE

$

It is AMAZING how wonderful this wood cleaner works on kitchen cabinets! No odor • Non-toxic!


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

Valley News - 15

SALE

SALE

ON ALL IN-STOCK WOODEN LAWN FURNITURE

ON ALL IN-STOCK PLAY SETS

MANY SIZES, STYLES, OPTIONS & COLORS. VARIOUS BUILDINGS IN STOCK OR WE CAN CUSTOM BUILD!

Make your House a

CUSTOM BUILT TWO-CAR GARAGES COME SEE OUR DISPLAY MODELS!

HOME!

GARAGES

How to improve your home’s curb appeal

Clean up. The most effective way to improve curb appeal is to clean up the property. Make sure all hedges are trimmed and remove weeds, sticks and other debris from any flower beds. Lay mulch in the flower beds and garden, as mulch prevents weed growth while helping the soil retain moisture, resulting in more attractive gardens.

12’x24’ High Wall Garage

14’x28’ High Wall Garage

14’x40’ Cottage Style Garage

$4,215

$5,280

$6,900

NEW STYLE! ELITE SERIES SHEDS

CAMPS

Edging. Edging is another easy and effective way to improve curb appeal. Edge driveways, sidewalks and other walkways around the property, removing or trimming anything that is hanging over the driveway or walkways. If the boundary between your driveway and lawn is not distinct, consider installing edging materials such as stone or bricks.

Take to the trees. Many homeowners grow accustomed to overgrown trees around their property and may not notice that lowhanging, unsightly branches are hiding the home from view. Buyers want to see the house, so take to the trees and trim any branches that hang too low or obscure your home.

14’x32’ Pavilion $5,670

12’x16’ Utility

10’x14’ Dormer

$3,606

$3,937

GAZEBOS ALL IN-STOCK WOODEN GAZEBOS ON SALE!

14’x40’ Summer $7,035

Clean the gutters. If your property includes lots of trees, install guards to keep twigs and leaves out of the gutters. 10’ Octagon Timber Ridge

12’ Octagon Forester

12’x 16’ Oval Deluxe

with screens Reg. Price: $3,750

with screens Reg. Price: $4,252

with screens Reg. Price: $6,887

with screens Reg. Price: $4,870

SALE $3,600

SALE $4,082

SALE $6,612

SALE $4,625

GAZEBOS

12’x16’ Oval Forester with screens Reg. Price: $6,043

SALE $5,799

10’ Vinyl Octagon

PLAY SETS & SWING SETS

Small Playset Boat

Medium Boat

Reg. Price: $2,702

Reg. Price: $3,874

SALE $2,648

SALE $3,797

PLAY SETS & SWING SETS

Swing Sets ALL IN-STOCK SWING SETS ON SALE!

STORAGE BARNS

Tractor & Wagon

4 Pc. Train Set

10’x12’ Low Wall

10’x16’ Quaker

Reg. Price: $2,119

Reg. Price: $2,363

SALE $1,995

SALE $2,195

$1,575

$2,460

STORAGE BARNS

12’x 20’ High Wall

$2,500

$2,950

CHATEAUGAY 5984 US Hwy 11 Chateaugay, NY 10-15 min. East of Malone on Rt. 11

Hours: M-F 8-4

(315) 389-5032

adkbarns.com

31934

12’x16’ Cottage

PLAY HOUSES PLAY P PL LAY Y HOUSES HOU OUSE SES SE ES

NORTH LAWRENCE 11726 US Hwy 11 N. Lawrence, NY Between Potsdam & Malone on Rt. 11

Hours: M-F 8-5 & Sat. 9-3


16 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

Waterway restoration work begins on Ausable River in Keene Valley er drops sediment along this slow stretch and must then find alternate routes around deposited gravel, the widening process perpetuates. Furthermore, silt and sand sediments have clogged the gravel beds that trout rely upon for spawning and feeding and caused major deterioration of fish habitat. Carl Schwartz, New York State Coordinator for FWS’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, designed this large-scale restoration project that employs toe wood structures to stabilize and reshape the banks so that they are less erodible and mimic a natural channel as well as log vanes to deflect flow from the banks. Schwartz will oversee the work on the plan which will narrow the channel (speeding the flow and decreasing deposition), decrease erosion, provide habitat for aquatic species, and restore the river ’s access to the floodplain (improving flood resiliency). “This is a wonderful example of using natural, local materials to improve the river ’s health, build resilience to flooding, while also keeping the river scenic and the costs reasonable,” Martha Naley, FWS Biologist, said. John Braico of Trout Unlimited is coordinating the project and led teams during several weekends in June as they collected necessary geomorphic measurements to inform Schwartz’s restoration plan. “This is a win-win situation for the entire community, including the landowners,” Braico said. “For a fraction of the originally-proposed cost, recreational resources like swimming and angling will be drastically improved, as well as the area’s aesthetics.” Starting on July 14, volunteers and Ward Logging, a lo-

cal company, began harvesting the trees to be used in the stream restoration work that began this week. “As locals, we’re excited and proud to be fixing our river,” Ward Logging owner Mike Ward said. “It is our river, we fish in it, we canoe it and we all need to take care of it.” The work will progress through July and into August this year and is the result of a collaboration of local government, landowners, individual volunteers and partner organizations. “I’m happy to see the project moving forward and am glad we’ve found a way to make it happen with all these partners and volunteers,” Town of Keene Supervisor Bill Ferebee said. To make the restoration project accessible to the community, the Ausable River Association and Essex County SWCD will host workshops at the site on Aug. 16 when Schwartz will use the project to train interested community members about river dynamics and techniques for natural channel design. “It’s great to be working with such committed partners to accomplish long-needed restoration work on the East Branch.” AsRA’s Director Corrie Miller said. “We’re particularly fortunate that Carl Schwartz is back in our watershed and willing to share his expertise with the community.” “It’s great to be able to use this project to demonstrate stream restoration, to train people and contractors so that we are better prepared in the future.” said Dave Reckahn, Essex County SWCD Manager.

31583

33594

KEENE VALLEY — Work is underway this week on a river bank stabilization and habitat restoration project along the East Branch of the Ausable River in the hamlet of Keene Valley. This project is a cooperative effort between Trout Unlimited (TU), the Ausable River Association (AsRA), Essex County Soil & Water Conservation District (SWCD), U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS), the Town of Keene, and local landowners to improve water quality, restore valuable fish and wildlife habitat, and improve flood resilience. A combination of historic land uses and highly erodible soil has caused this 2,800 foot stretch of river to become over widened, shallow and slow, diminishing the water ’s ability to carry the sediment load from upstream. As a result, over many decades, the area around Rivermede Farm has become a site for gravel and sand deposition. As the riv-

Three Convenient Locations On Site Surgery Center Refractive Surgery Retina Services

Welcome to Eye Care for the Adirondacks

31572

Malone Office and Optical Shop 14861 State Route 30 • Malone, NY 12953 • 518-483-0065 Saranac Lake Office and Optical Shop 51 Woodruff St. • Saranac Lake, NY 12983 • 518-891-8412 Eye Care for the Adirondacks 450 Margaret St. • Plattsburgh, NY 12901 • 518-566-2020 • 800-272-1003

BUILDERS

B U S I N ES S DI RECTORY

TO ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN THIS DIRECTORY CALL 873-6368 EXT. 104 Professional Cleaning Service

STEVENS

“When We Clean We CLEAN MEAN”

CONSTRUCTION

Houses Cottages Camps In-Door Construction Clean-Ups

518-585-6964 25720

28413

Call Us Today At

• Electrical Contracting • Lighting Control • Audio / Visual • Home Integration

Elizabethtown, NY

25+ Years Experience DEPENDABLE YEAR ROUND SERVICE Fully Insured

Generac Generators

Todd Stevens Phone: (518) 873-2740 Cell: (518) 586-6750

Fully Insured

Screen Topsoil Stone • Road Gravel Sand • Mulch You Pick Up or We Deliver

BAIT FISHING TACKLE We Have Live Minnows! 8549 Route 9, Lewis (Across from Lewis Post Office)

(518)873-6806

www.adirondackoutdoor.com

TREE CARE PROFESSIONAL

Cleaning • Repairs Stainless Steel Lining Video Camera Inspection

Brian Dwyer 1-800-682-1643 597-3640

PARTY TENTS

Member of NYS & National Chimney Sweep Guilds 35594

SEPTIC

TENTS OF CHAMPLAIN

GERAW’S OK SEPTIC SERVICE

Bill Izzo - Owner and Arborist

(518) “Don’t Get Caught In The Rain Call Tents of Champlain!” • Tents • Tables & Chairs • Side Curtains Parties, Reception, Picnics

With 2 Locations Essex & Champlain, NY

- CESSPOOLS & SEPTIC TANKS - CLEANED & INSTALLED - ELECTRIC ROOTER SERVICE - DELIVERY OF GRAVEL • STONE • TOPSOIL - ALL TYPE BACKHOE WORK - PORTABLE RESTROOM 29636

WOODEN FURNITURE

LAWN FURNITURE SHOP • Dressers • Wishing Wells

at? h W w e Se athleen Whit tery K Uphols ons to Alterati

4371

31302

585-2845 597-3634

FAST SERVICE

518-963-7593

UPHOLSTERY

(518) 524-4415 29916

Ticonderoga (518)585-9424

Custom Homes Log Cabins Remodel 873-6874 or 593-2162

COMPLETE CHIMNEY CARE

(518)

35 Years Experience 0% Financing on Hazard Tree Removal for Qualified Clients 33-Ton Crane with Man Basket Adirondack Best of the Mountains 4 Years Running

Adirondack Sand & Gravel CrownP oint (518)546-3000

891-3600 Raybrook, NY

TOPSOIL, STONE, SAND, GRAVEL & MULCH

Since1 989 Fully Insured

LLC

YOUR COMPLETE SOURCE FOR HOME AUTOMATION

New Construction & Remodeling Log Homes • Doors & Windows Roofing & Siding

Nawakua Builders

Book Local & Save On Delivery!

26256

Spic-N-Span

FISHING TACKLE HUNTING CAMPING

ELECTRICAL

31845

CONSTRUCTION

CHIMNEY SWEEP

20910

YOUR COMMUNITY

CLEAN-UP

31686

518-962

26594

• Folding Chairs • Adirondack Chairs $55 • Custom Work • & More

963-8630 DELIVERY AVAILABLE!

Middle Road, Willsboro, NY 12996

34347

www.eyecareadk.com

34361

76048

The leading eye facility in Northern New York-Champlain Valley area. Providing state of the art comprehensive and surgical eye care for over 30 years.


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

Valley News - 17

$)3*4501)&3$)&730-&5u$)3*4501)&3$)&730 0-& - 5u$)3*4501)&3$)&730-&5u$)3*4501)&3$)&730-&5u$)3*4501)&3$)&730-&5

CHRISTOPHER CHEVROLET BUICK INTRODUCES

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS!

TOTAL CONFIDENCE

` YOU PICK YOUR VEHICLE ` YOU PAY PREFERRED GM PRICING

` RECEIVE ADDITIONAL

CHRISTOPHER LOYALTY

` NO HAGGLE PRICING... WE NEW 2012 BUICK CRUZE LS

NEW 2012 CHEVY EXPRESS VAN 2500

NEW 2012 BUICK LACROSSE

NEW 2011 CHEVY VOLT DEMO

MSRP................................$17,595 DISCOUNT.............................-$500 REBATE CASH...........................-$500

MSRP................................$33,320 DISCOUNT............................-$3264 REBATE CASH..........................-$1000

MSRP................................$33,775 DISCOUNT............................-$1200 REBATE CASH..........................-$1000

MSRP................................$43,050 DISCOUNT............................-$3250 TAX REBATE............................-$7500

STK#121086

$

BUY FOR

STK#127040

BUY FOR

STK#124009

BUY FOR

STK#111062

BUY FOR

16 595 $29 056 31 575 32 300 *

,

$

*

,

SHOW YOU THE INVOICE!

*

,

$

*

,

0

%

EW 202012122 CCHEVY HEHEVY EVY SISILV SILVERADO LVLVERERAD ERRADADOO 2500 2255000 RREGEG WWITH ITITHTH PLPLOW PLOW NEW 2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 CREW LT NENEW

STK#127074

STK#127005

MSRP................................$39,215 DISCOUNT............................-$2500 REBATE CASH..........................-$4000

$

BUY FOR

MSRP................................$39,918 DISCOUNT............................-$2000 REBATE CASH..........................-$3000 BUSINESS CHOICE....................-$1000

BUY FOR

NEW 2012 BUICK ENCLAVE NE

STK#124005 MSRP................................$46,480 APR DISCOUNT............................-$1500 REBATE CASH..........................-$2000 OR

BUY FOR

32 715 $33 918 $42 980 *

,

,

*

,

*

$

500

BONUS CASH

FOR CONFIDENCE PRICE BUYERS!

FINANCING

FOR 72 MONTHS

ON SELECT MODELS. LIMITED TERM CONTRACT. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. IN LIEU OF FACTORY REBATES

THE 2012’S WON’T LAST LONG!

% CREDIT APPROVAL PROGRAM r u o t u o b a Ask 100 NOW AT CHRISTOPHER CHEVROLET!

WITH APPROVED CREDIT

CHRISTOPHER CHEVROLET BUICK IS YOUR PRE-OWNED HEADQUARTERS!

SPECIALS UNDER $10,000 2004 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GTP $ 6995 2007 SATURN ION $ 6995 2009 CHEVY IMPALA LS $ 7995 2008 SUZUKI SX4 AWD $ 8995 2004 CHEVY MALIBU LS $ 8995 2006 PONTIAC G6 $ 8995 2008 CHEVY IMPALA $ 9300 2007 PONTIAC G6 $ 9955 GAS SAVINGS 2011 CHEVY AVEO LT $ 12,500 2009 PONTIAC G6 $ 12,995 2009 CHEVY IMPALA $ 13,300 2011 CHEVY CRUZE LS $ 14,490 2008 BUICK LUCERNE CXL $ 16,500 105K MILES, LEATHER, ROOF STK#1703 ONE OWNER, 5 SPEED STK#121094A

92K MILES, LEATHER, ROOF STK#1702 72K MILES, STK#121099A

56K MILES, ONE OWNER, LIKE NEW STK#1707A 64K MILES, AUTO STK#1705

93K MILES, ONE OWNER STK#121101A

87K MILES, AUTO STK#1706

25K MILES, AUTO, 1 OWNER STK#121069A 33K MILES, AUTO, 1 OWNER STK#127075A

43K MILES, AUTO STK#121098A

27K MILES, 5-SPEED, 1 OWNER STK#121077A

$UV SAVINGS 2008 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

$

12,995 $ 13,500 $ 13,850 $ 13,995 $ 21,995 $ 23,888 $ 25,440 $ 29,500

68K MILES, AUTO, STOW AND GO SEATS STK#121010B

2008 GMC ENVOY SLT 4X4 88K MILES, AUTO, ROOF STK#121095A

2009 NISSAN ROGUE 4X4 75K MILES, 1 OWNER STK#127110A

2009 MERCURY MARINER HYBRID 4X4 96K MILES, LEATHER, ROOF, 1 OWNER STK#127121A

2010 CHEVY EQUINOX LT AWD 36K MILES, 1 OWNER STK#127123A

2009 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT AWD 30K MILES, 8 PASS STK#124010C

2011 HONDA PILOT EX 4X4 54K MILES, 1 OWNER, ROOF STK#124011A

2011 KIA SORENTO EX 4X4 28K MILES, LEATHER, ROOF STK#127078B

AUGUST SPECIAL!

2010 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500

36K MILES, EXT CAB, 4X4 STK#127098A

21,995

$

39K MILES, LEATHER STK#1694

PRICES PLUS TAX, TITLE AND REGISTRATION FEES. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PICTURES OF VEHICLES FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. OFFERS END 8/31/12. *DEALER RETAINS ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. PLUS TAX, TAG, WITH APPROVED CREDIT. MUST OWN A 1999 OR NEWER GM PRODUCT TO QUALIFY FOR TRADE ASSIST. MUST BE AN USAA MEMBER TO QUALIFY FOR $750 REBATE.

800-336-0175

MEMBER OF

SHOP OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY 24/7 AT

www.CHRISTOPHERCHEVY.com

24460

STATE RTE. 9 N IN TICONDEROGA


18 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

KRYSTAL 1 % ON EVERY 0 IN-STOCK 2012

#

Among The Highest in Customer Satisfaction of All Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge Dealers in The Entire United States

Chrysler Jeep Dodge Dealer in Northeast ~ Telemarketing Sales Group 2009-2011

NEW 2012 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4

Stk#12294, Loaded w/Air, Tilt, V6, Sirius Radio, Full Power. MSRP $25,770

OR

*

$

16,499

NOW ONLY

LEASE FOR

**

$

179

Stk#12240, loaded w/auto, pwr. windows & locks, keyless entry. MSRP $23,025

$ NOW ONLY . . .

16,999

*

$

17,999

NOW ONLY . . .

LEASE FOR

189

NOW ONLY

OR

** 39

$

239

20,999 249

mos.

NEW 2012 RAM 1500 4X4 Stk#12310, Loaded w/ Power & Remote Entry, Chrome Appearance Group, Anti Spin, Popular Equipment Group. MSRP $30,235

NOW ONLY

$

23,999

*

NEW 2012 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4

NEW 2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING

24,999

OR

*

27,999

LEASE FOR

$

**

259

39 mos.

** 39

$

269

LEASE FOR

mos.

NEW 2012 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE X PKG 4X4 Stk#12331, Loaded w/leather, sunroof, Navigation, heated seats, 18’’ wheels & much more MSRP $38,465

MSRP $32,120

$

24,999

OR

$

33,999

NOW ONLY

OR

LEASE FOR

Rts. 9 & 28, Warrensburg, NY 12885 Just 4 miles off Exit 23 where Rt. 9 and Rt. 28 Connect

(518) 623-3405

$

**

339

249**

$

LEASE FOR

39 mos.

NEW 2012 RAM QUAD CAB 4X4

*

$

*

$

NOW ONLY

Stk#12379, loaded w/anti spin, chrome appearance group, Sirius radio, cruise, full power, keyless & more MSRP $32,775

Stk#12343, loaded w/ alloys, DVD, power sliding doors, Bluetooth, power seat & more MSRP $30,930

Stk#12378, Loaded w/Power Seat, Keyless & Go, Sirius Radio, Roof Rails, & Much More.

NOW ONLY

Stk#12353, loaded w/ 3rd row seats, Heated seats, V6, power seat, rear air, remote start MSRP $29,730

MSRP $22,965

OR

Many Others at Similar Savings

39 mos.

Stk#13001, Loaded w/Turbo, Navigation, Sirius Radio, Backup Camera, Bluetooth & Much Much More.

NOW ONLY

2 Available At This Price

199**

$

LEASE FOR

NEW 2012 DODGE JOURNEY SXT AWD

IN STOCK

** 39

$

19,999

OR

mos.

*

$

NOW ONLY

ALL NEW 2013 DODGE DART SXT/ RALLYE

*

LEASE FOR

Stk#12372, Loaded w/ Sun/sound Pkg, leather, 4 Cyl, Premium wheels MSRP $26,875

*

Stk#12349, loaded w/ air, Sirius Radio, V6, fog lamps & more. MSRP $24,060

$

NEW 2012 CHRYSLER 200 LIMITED

18,999

LEASE FOR

*

Many Others at Similar Savings

$

NOW ONLY

mos.

NEW 2012 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4

16,999

Stk#12367, loaded w/3 zone air, sunscreen glass, Stow ‘n Go MSRP $23,830

OR

** 39

$

$

NOW ONLY . . .

3 Available At This Price

NEW 2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

Stk#12366, Loaded w/V6, dual exhaust, 18’’ alloys, power seat & more MSRP $24,015

Stk#12259, loaded w/Auto, A/C, Power Group, Remote Keyless, Tilt & More. MSRP $22,025

*

Many Others at Similar Savings

NEW 2012 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING “S’’

OR

NEW 2012 JEEP PATRIOT 4X4

NEW 2012 JEEP COMPASS 4X4

2 Available At This Price

39 mos.

§

$

24,999

NOW ONLY

OR

LEASE FOR

259**

*

$

39 mos.

NEW 2012 DODGE CHARGER RT AWD Stk#12401, Loaded, Navigation, Leather, Sunroof, All Wheel Drive.

MSRP $41,330

*

39 mos.

$

*

36,999

NOW ONLY . . .

*Prices include all available rebates. Must qualify for returning or Conquest Lessee, Competitive Trade-in Assistance, Conquest trade-in, and Military rebates, College grad, plus tax and DMV fees. Must finance thru § Special IDL Program with last payment 10% of MSRP to well qualified buyers. 0% for 36 months in lieu of rebates for credit qualified. **Leases are based on 10,000 miles a year with $2999 down or trade equity; 1st payment, taxes and DMV fees due at inception; security deposit waived for well-qualified buyers; 20¢ a mile overage. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers end 8/10/12. end 8/15/12.

www.krystalchryslerjeepdodge.net

27007


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

Valley News - 19

Hikers learn about how to look for edible berries, food in the woods By Katherine Clark katherine@denpubs.com LAKE PLACID — Look around, and find something to eat. Members of the Master Gardener Program of Lake Placid and visitors did just that during the Edible Wild Foods Walk, Talk & Taste event on Sunday, July 29 at Heaven Hill Farm. The 14 members of the community, some skilled master gardeners and others fairly inexperienced, began the walk in the early afternoon by looking at the brush growing wild next to the buildings on the Cornell Cooperative grounds. Through the course of the two-hour class, 4-H program director and edible-wildplants expert Pat Banker showed the guests how to identify tasty plants that are often referred to as weeds and overlooked. Banker also identified poisonous plants to steer clear of. Marie Bowman, of Owls Head, said after taking the class she will be looking more closely at what she usually walks by. “I’m going to look at the things around me differently,” Bowman said. Banker started by bringing visitors to the flower beds on the ground and pulling the petals from the day lilies and describing the sweet taste the petals can add to salads or other dishes. During the program, Banker pointed out flowers and vegetation such as Queen Anne’s lace and said it can be identified by the bushel of small white flowers with a single “crown,” or purple flowers in the center. As a flower seen frequently in North America, Banker said the flower and root can be

4-H program director and edible wild plants expert Pat Banker shows identifies edible flowers to the Wild Foods, Walk, talk and taste event at Heaven Hill Farm on July 29. Photo by Katherine Clark eaten and prepared and used in many ways. With a carrot or parsley taste, Banker said the dandelion can be cooked, or dried out and used as a completely healthy salt substitute. “You can dry the flowers out and save the brown leaves and sprinkle on your food just as you would salt,” Banker said. “Completely healthier than actual salt.” Another weed mostly overlooked with the

Doheny visits Lake Placid during tourism portion of campaign By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com

Congressional candidate Matt Doheny talks with ORDA’s Jon Lundin overlooking Lake Placid.

LAKE PLACID — Congressional Candidate Matt Doheny visited the Olympic Center in Lake Placid as part of his 50 Businesses in 50 Days campaign tour. Doheny, who is again challenging incumbent Bill Owens in November, said he was visiting as part of his “tourism week,” portion of the initiative. “Nothing says tourism like Lake Placid,” Doheny said. “I grew up playing hockey in Alex Bay so we got to play here a lot.” Doheny was escorted by Jon Lundin of ORDA as the visited the Herb Brooks Arena, 1932 Arena and Lake Placid Conference Center. “This place is a huge driver of the economy in the Adirondacks,” Doheny said. “I want to understand the great things that are going on with the local and the regional economy that are generated from this area.”

OnCampus OSWEGO — SUNY Oswego has awarded merit scholarships to more than 600 incoming students, including Marisa E. Farmer of Saranac Lake. She received a $5,000 Deans' Award. The award recognizes past academic achievement and potential for success. Farmer, from Saranac Lake High School, has reserved a place in the incoming freshman class for the fall semester. Classes will begin Aug. 27. ALFRED — Cassidy Smith, a resident of Saranac Lake, was among over 500 students from Alfred State who made the spring 2012 Dean's List. Students are selected for the Dean's List if they maintain a 3.50 grade point average (GPA) out of a possible 4.0.

Lundin said that he was hopeful that, if elected, Doheny would be an advocate for ORDA and the Lake Placid/Wilmington Olympic region. “We just want people to keep us in the forefront and help us keep that strong Olympic heritage and the economic impact that it brings in the forefront,” Lundin said. Doheny also added that he hopes the ECAC Hockey tournament will return to the Olympic Center, which also hosts the Division III tournament.

Fundraiser set to help replace museum furnace SARANAC LAKE — Historic Saranac Lake announced a public campaign to raise funds to replace the failing furnace at the Saranac Laboratory Museum. The campaign seeks to raise at least $13,000 for the new furnace, which must be installed this fall. Executive Director Amy Catania explained that the boiler dates from 1950 and is threatening to break down completely. Three times last winter the current old heating system turned off unexpectedly, putting the building at risk. The old boiler inefficiently burned 2,250 gallons of oil, resulting in bills totaling $9,000. A new system is expected to use about one-third less fuel. Several leading gifts have already totaled up to about $5,000. “Now we are taking the campaign to the streets,” said Board President, Priscilla Goss. The organization will be staffing tables at a few locations in the Village in August. “We are counting on donations of any size from individuals in the community who care about our history and the work of Historic Saranac Lake,” said Goss. Anyone who donates will get a window decal, and HSL t-shirts and license plate frames will be for sale. Local businesses that are supporting the project will be recognized

exception of when it’s caught on clothes or in someones hair is the burdocks, which Banker said can not only be used as a food source, but the root’s taste resembles a maple syrup with “earthy” tones. “We wanted to do this because there are just so many different things in the wild that you can eat. I can’t even tell you how many,” said Don Grout, organizer for the event. Banker also warned that though the wild

at the tables. The total cost of the project is $26,000. Historic Saranac Lake has applied for a matching grant from the New York State Council on the Arts for the project but faces the need to raise at least $13,000, more if the grant is declined. The organization invested in an engineer ’s study of the project by North Woods Engineering, a requirement of the state matching grant, and received bids on the project, in order to begin work this fall before the snow falls. HSL researched alternative forms of fuel, such as pellet systems and geothermal. “The technology for a installing an alternative fuel system for a building of our size isn’t there yet” said Catania. “We settled on a new oil-burning furnace, which will be much more energy efficient than what we have now, and it will keep the building safe for many years to come.” Built in 1894, The Saranac Laboratory was the first lab built in the U.S. for the research of tuberculosis. Historic Saranac Lake painstakingly restored the building and opened it as a museum in 2009. The museum is open with exhibits on the history of Saranac Lake, scientific research and patient care.

has a plentiful array of food to offer, some can easily be mistaken for poisonous plants. “Hemlock can be easily mistaken for Queen Anne’s lace,” Banker said. “What I tell those looking is normally if you can spot the Queen Anne’s lace and it has flowered and you come across hemlock it will be yellowed and brownish by the time the flowers appear on the Queen Anne’s lace.” Banker warns that people should refer to several books, including Peterson’s field guide to edible plants, and look to a friend. “I always say talk to a friend who has been doing it a while, obviously if he’s still around he’s doing something right,” Banker said. To gather the plants, Banker also suggests only picking from places that are less likely to have been contaminated with pesticides. After going outside, Banker brought the group inside so they could taste for themselves the things that could be made from the identified plants. A feast of red clover, day lilly, mallow and daisy leaves salad, a burdock stem relish, lamb’s quarters and pigweed simmered over a skillet and fried Queen Anne’s lace made with a 60 percent red clover flour. “The food was really good. I can’t wait to try it at home,” Bowman said. “I want to try to use the dandelion I have near my house and make the appetizers from the stamens of day lilies and add cream cheese and shrimp.” Banker said the Cornell Cooperative Extension will be holding another event for children and their families on Aug. 25. For more information about the Truely Wild Kids and parents event, call 523-2585.

MANCHESTER, N.H. — Lauren E. Burgess of Saranac Lake graduated with a degree in English at the 119th Commencement Exercises at Saint Anselm College Saturday, May 19. She also was named to the Dean's List for the Spring 2012 semester. To be eligible for this honor, a student must compile a grade point average of 3.0 or better. BINGHAMTON — Binghamton University student Rachael A. Clark from Saranac Lake recently received the Aswad Family Award. This award is presented to a graduating senior, who has been accepted to medical school and who has achieved an outstanding academic record and whose character reflect high ethical ideals.

COLCHESTER — Lindsey Howe of Lake Placid and a student at Lake Placid Central School, was named the 2012 recipient of the Saint Michael's College Book Award for Academic Achievement with a Social Conscience. The award recognizes students who demonstrate a commitment to leadership in volunteer service and academic achievement. Award recipients, named at schools throughout the country, are high school juniors who are inductees of the National Honor Society or an equivalent school-sponsored honors organization. BINGHAMTON — Rachael A Clark and Kristy M Farmer of Saranac Lake received academic honors from the Harpur College of Arts and Sciences at Binghamton University by making the University's Dean's list for the Spring 2012 semester. CAZENOVIA — Cazenovia College, an undergraduate liberal arts college in Central New York, honored the class of 2012 on May 12. Zachary A. Quinn, of Saranac Lake, received a bachelor of science degree in criminal justice and homeland security studies. Patrick C. Sauers, of Saranac Lake, received a bachelor of professional studies degree in management specializing in sport management.

AMC Births MOYNIHAN — A son, Gabriel Joshua, was born May 1, 2012, at 3:32 p.m. weighing 7 lbs. 3 oz to Heather Moynihan of Bloomingdale. PACHECO — A son, Gavin Robert, was born on May 2, 2012 at 5:03 a.m. weighing 8 lbs. 4 oz. to Shana and Nicholas Pacheco of Long Lake. WALKER — A son, Ezra Matthew was born May 2, 2012 at 3:13 p.m. weighing 7 lbs. 13 oz. to Heidi and Theodore Walker of Norwood. BURMAN — A son, Quinn Michael, was born on May 2, 2012 at 5:23 p.m. weighing 7 lbs. 13 oz. to Geniene Willette-Burman and Dale Burman of Saranac Lake. MCINNIS — A son, Patrick James, was born on May 2, 2012 at 7 p.m. weighing 6 lbs. 11 oz. to Lindsey Brockway and Jonathan McInnis of Hampton, NH.

FEY — A daughter, Leila Marie, was born on May 3, 2012 at 7:49 a.m. weighing 8 lbs. 1 oz. to Heather Odell-Fey and Christopher Fey of Keene Valley. FITTS — A son, Arlo Daniel, was born on May 18, 2012 at 4:16 p.m. weighing 8 lbs. 6 oz. to Shelly and Andrew St. Louis of Lake Placid. ST LOUIS — A daughter, Alexis Ann, was born on May 19, 2012 at 4:16 p.m. weighing 8 lbs. 6 oz. to Shelly and Andrew St. Louis of Lake Placid. WALLACE — A son, Landin Thomas, was born on May 28, 2012 at 2:40 p.m. weighing 7 lbs. 1 oz. to Marceline Adams and Michael Wallace of Saranac Lake. HUTCHINS — A daughter, Avery Elizabeth Hutchins, was born on May 10, 2012, to Stuart Hutchins and Aran Voss-Hutchins of Westport.


20 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

The angling doldrums of August

T

he fishing season has swiftly drifted into the doldrums of August, as hot, muggy weather and passing low pressure systems have combined with soaring water temperatures, low water conditions and diminished oxygen levels to put fish down. Surface temperatures on most area lakes now hover in the mid to high 70 degree range, and while some of the local rivers and streams are considerably cooler, the diminished dissolved oxygen content has combined with extremely low water levels to make fish slow to take, and weak on the fight. The bright sun puts fish down, and it also provides a huge advantage to winged predators such as heron, osprey and eagles. While fish may still be on the prowl for food, it is up to the angler to present offerings at the proper feeding level during the appropriate time of day. Successful anglers have been presenting offerings at depths of 20-30 feet and greater to take advantage of the cooler, oxygenated conditions. For flyfishermen, terrestrials remain the fly of choice as trout are keying in on ‘hoppers and other patterns such as flying ants, beetles and foam spiders. On the lakes and ponds, both bass and trout have only been responsive for limited time frames, with small windows of opportunity available during the early morning hours and again from dusk and into the evening’s darkness. Popping for bass along the shoreline of an Adirondack lake in the pitch-black darkness is an exciting endeavor. I prefer to troll a popper about 25-30 feet behind the boat. After popping or chugging such offerings as a hula popper or a floating mouse, I listen for the splash of a strike. More often than not, the fish are hooked as they strike on a slowly trolled line. On recent trips along the Raquette River and the Saranac, we took smallmouth bass quite regularly at the base of falls and rapids. We also took bluegills, river shad and an occasional pike. I’ve given up on most of the trout streams due to the low water and warm temperatures. Fishing for trout in the rivers at this time of year puts too much stress on their systems, which makes it difficult to safely release them. Mirror Lake, Lake Placid and Lake Colby are again featuring

the lake lanterns of August, with anglers still-fishing for browns and rainbow trout during the late evening hours. I’ve also received reports that Lake Colby has been giving up some decent browns during the late afternoon and early evening hours. There have been a few flyrodders that are stubborn enough to fight off the ravenous smallmouth bass in order to find the trout. Where there’s thunder, lightning’s not far behind The recent spell of foul weather has increased the danger of lightning strikes which kill more people annually than hurricanes and tornadoes combined. Thunderstorms produce lightning in varying degrees. Sometimes there's just an odd flash or two evident, while at other times, storms can produce lightning nearly continuously, with lots of flashes to the ground. It's the flashes from the cloud to the ground (CG flashes, for short) that create problems. Typically only a small percentage of the total flashes produced by a thunderstorm are visible, since most lightning stays within the clouds. However, it only takes one CG flash to get you! The human body is essentially a bag of salty water, and it conducts electricity much better than air. As a result, lightning will often try to travel through a person to reach the ground. Any thunderstorm, despite size, should be a matter of concern for campers, hikers, paddlers, anglers and other outdoor travelers. Travelers should be aware of what to do if the situation becomes hazardous. On average, there are nearly 100 people fatally stuck by lightning annually in the United States. But it doesn’t always kill you to create major problems in your life. Hundreds of people are affected by lightning in the U.S. every year, short of being killed. Such strikes can adversely affect a person’s central nervous system for the remainder of their life.

If you are outdoors, you've already increased the risk of being struck by lightning. Highest risk categories include golfers, mountain climbers, boaters and increasingly, flyfishermen. There is only one word for a person who continues to stand in a stream or on an open fairway waving a highly conductive shaft while the sky is dark and thundering. The word is dumb! What should you do if the weather turns to thunder and rain? At the first hint of thunder travelers should get off the water, out of the stream or leave the golf course. Hikers should avoid the mountain summits, the crests of ridges, of slopes above timberline and large clearings. These are extremely dangerous places to be during lightning storms. If you are caught in such an exposed place, quickly descend to a lower elevation, away from the direction of the approaching storm. Whenever lightning is near, take off backpacks with either external or internal metal frames, toss the golf bag and drop the graphite rods. In all cases, squat down or kneel down on a pad, life jacket or waders keeping your head low and body out of contact with the ground. A dense forest located in a depression provides the best protection. Avoid taking shelter under isolated trees or a tree that is much taller than the adjacent forest. Seek out hardwood trees if possible, since softwoods are more prone to strikes due to the high moisture content. Remember, lightning strikes the tallest object. Stay as low as possible. If caught in the open, seek a depression in the earth, a ditch or hole. Be proactive in your travels and learn to recognize approaching thunderstorms and adjust your activities accordingly. Since most mountain thunderstorms tend to form in the early to midafternoon, it's generally advised that you begin hiking the higher peaks in the early morning. This will allow you to be on the way down from the summits when the threat from thunderstorms is at its highest. Keep your eyes on the sky and be prepared to abandon your hiking, paddling or angling plans if a thunderstorm develops unexpectedly. You should be able to recognize developing thunderstorms before they begin to produce lightning. Fair weather clouds on a mountain may be puffy, but they are short and show little or no vertical development. If they begin to tower up and build into deep clouds with dark bases and a flat top, they are likely in the process of becoming thunderstorms. A cloud that is tall and beginning to flatten out at the top is usually a thunderstorm. If you see clouds like this around, and there are dark cloud bases overhead, then you are in a potentially dangerous place! And you had better get moving! Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

Land deal Continued from page 1 park even better if that is possible.” Cuomo and others touted the deal as a win from both an environmental and economic standpoint. “This is a place of preservation and of conservation and this acquisition highlights that again,” Cuomo said. “We also need to have an infrastructure that is functional, where there are going to be economic and commercial experiences that were not available before. There are now more ways to enjoy the park while conserving it, but also generating revenue for the area.” “This deal will permanently protect the outstanding natural resources of the park while enhancing and expanding economic opportunities,” Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens said. “This is a record commitment to a grand conservation project,” Bill Ulfelder, Executive Director of the Nature Conservancy, said. “This is a project that benefits all New Yorkers and is the most ambitious undertaking that we have ever performed at the Nature Conservancy.” “I have been a part of groups that have been trying to get this deal done since Tim Barnett started this movement,” conservationalist John Ernst said. “This deal puts together the protection of a world-class caliber place with the possibilities of economic development.” Cuomo said that he was aware that there have been many disputes and disagreements that have gone along with the acquisition. “This has been large, complicated and not

without controversy,” Cuomo said. “But big things that are worth doing in the long run take dialogue and time and have differing opinions.” One of those topic is the future of numerous hunting camps that were leased out through the Finch Pruyn company and will now have to shut down. “There are several leases for hunting clubs that were made over 10 years in length as this has been worked out,” Martens said. “As these leases come up and expire, they will be phased out over time.” The full land acquisition will take place over the next five years, but Martens said that they hope to create accessibility to a majority of the lands involved in the deal “within the next few months.”

The purchase includes numerous tracts inside and outside the Adirondack Park’s “Blue Line,” including the McIntyre Tracts in the town of Newcomb, the Boreas Ponds Tract in the towns of North Hudson and Newcomb, the Essex Chain Tract in the towns of Minerva and Newcomb, the OK Slip Pond Tract in the town of Indian Lake, the Ice Meadows Tract in the town of Chester, and the Benson Road Tract west of Northville.

Right, The Nature Conservancy’s Bill Ulfelder and Gov. Andrew Cuomo sign off on the land deal to transfer 63,000 of former Finch Pruyn land to the state. Photos by Keith Lobdell

OnCampus ROCHESTER — Kyle Blemel of Westport graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in industrial design from RIT's College of Imaging Arts and Sciences in the spring 2012 quarter. CORTLAND — The following area residents were named to the Dean's List at SUNY Cortland for the Spring 2012 semester: •Megan Bagg, a senior communication studies major from Lake Placid, •Taylor Puckhaber, a senior childhood education major from Lake Placid, •Sarah Ignatuk, a junior English major from Jay,

•Alicia Mahoney, a junior fitness development major from Willsboro, •David Snyder, a junior physical education major from Saranac Lake, •Elijah Cedeno, a junior psychology major from Albany. Honorees must earn a grade point average of 3.3 or higher on a 4.0 scale, while completing 12 or more credit hours of classes during the semester.

POTSDAM — The State University of New York at Potsdam awarded more than 920 undergraduate and graduate degrees during its 2012 Commencement ceremonies

on May 19 and 20. The graduates included: Hannah Arnold of Saranac Lake, who earned a bachelor's degree in Art Studio Emily Doyle of Saranac Lake, who earned a bachelor's degree in Childhood/Early Child Education Kaitlyn Gibson of Elizabethtown, who earned a bachelor's degree in Sociology Chelsea Hughes of Elizabethtown, who earned a bachelor's degree in Psychology Stephanie Marcotte of Willsboro, who earned a bachelor's degree in Mathematics Daniel Mitchell of Elizabethtown, who earned a bachelor's degree in Business Administration (Bachelor of Science) Owen Rand of Lake Placid, who earned a

bachelor's degree in History Amy Stark of Saranac Lake, who earned a bachelor's degree in Art Studio Caitlin Terry of Wilmington, who earned a bachelor's degree in History. ONEONTA — The following area students have been named to the spring term Dean's List at Hartwick: Sophomore Devin Martin of Westport, son of Kellie King. Martin is majoring in Political Science. First-year student Kyle Murray of Saranac Lake, son of Carolyn Murray and John Murray. Murray is majoring in Physics and Music.


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

Valley News - 21

Film Society makes their stand on need for digital transition funding for theaters

Weddings Pulowski, Beaton wed

By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com LAKE PLACID — For the Adirondack Film Society, it’s not just about staving off the extinction of local theaters. The goal of generating grant monies and donations to help several local theaters convert to digital projectors and screens is not just about survival, but about the chance to allow these small, independent theater owners to remain just that — independent. “This is a bold project to tackle an issue that is facing small, rural theaters in the North Country,” Film Society Chairman John Huttlinger said. “Our goal is to help people experience film and to make all forms more accessible to the greatest amount of people possible, but that cannot happen if these theaters cannot make the transition to digital technology.” The Film Society, along with the help of consultant Naj Wikoff, has applied for a consolidated grant through the state to help local theaters, including the Hollywood in Au Sable Forks, the Palace in Lake Placid and the State Theater in Tupper Lake along with 10 others secure funding to make the transition from film projection to digital. Movie production companies have given theaters until the end of next year to make the change, when they will no longer send out movies on film. “This is a forced conversion where film will no longer be the medium for film,” Nelson Page, Vice Chairman of the society, said. “You have to replace all of the existing equipment — electric, speakers, amplifiers, screens and projectors.

Reg Clark stands next to the current projector for one of the screens at the Palace Theater in Lake Placid. Photo by Keith Lobdell This is a price that is prohibitive for any local business and will force many theaters to go out of business.” “Many of these theaters are the anchors of the downtown and part of the social fabric of the community,” Huttlinger said. “A lot of them are also part of the history of the community, as they are housed in historic buildings. We need a lot of help from the public to help influence the decision for this grant and make sure that we receive funding.” “We are at the center of a community and we do this because we love it,” Hollywood owner Corey Hanff, whose first job was at the Palace Theater, said. “I can’t understand why we are being asked to spend extra money when the end goal will be to make the same amount that we are now.” The grant application seeks $2,180,929 in funding from the state, leaving local theaters with a share of $726,976 to generate on their own.

WORSHIP IN YOUR COMMUNITY AU SABLE FORKS St. James’ Church - Epliscopal (Anglican Catholic) Rev. Patti Johnson, Seacon. Services: Wed. 6:00 p.m. Evening Prayer and Healing Service. Holy Eucharist Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Phone 518-593-1838 or 518-647-5312. United Methodist Church - Main Street. 647-8147. Sunday 11 a.m. - Worship Service. Email: afumc1@frontiernet.net Holy Name Catholic Church - Rt. 9N, Main Street, AuSable Forks, 647-8225, Rev. Kris Lauzon Pastor, John J. Ryan - Deacon, Daily Masses Monday at 5:15 p.m., Tues. - Fri. at 8 a.m., Sat. 4 p.m., Sun. 9:15 a.m. Confessions (reconciliation) one half hour before weekend masses. BLACK BROOK St. Matthew’s Catholic Church - Black Brook, Silver Lake Rd., 647-8225, Rev. Kris Lauzon - Pastor, John J. Ryan - Deacon, Masses Sun. 11 a.m. Confessions (reconciliation) one half hour before each mass. BLOOMINGDALE Pilgrim Holiness Church - 14 Oregon Plains Rd., 8913178, Rev. Daniel Shumway - Sunday: Morning Worship 11am, Sunday School 10am, Evening Service 6:30 pm; Wednesday: Prayer Service 7 pm. CLINTONVILLE United Methodist - Rt. 9N. 834-5083. Sunday, 11 a.m. Worship Service. Pastor Rev. Joyce Bruce. ELIZABETHTOWN St. Elizabeth’s Catholic Church - Court Street. 873-6760. Father Peter Riani., Mass Schedule: Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 10:30 a.m., Weekdays: Consult Bulletin. Thursday 10:15 a.m. Horace Nye Home. Sacrament of Reconciliation: Saturday 3:30 p.m. 4:10 p.m. Website: ccsespn.grainofwheat.net Church of the Good Shepherd (Episcopal) - 10 Williams Street. 873-2509. Sunday, Holy Communion 8 a.m. and 10:15 a.m. Healing Prayer Service: Every Wed. 6:30 p.m. Men’s Group: Every Fri. 7:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m. Rev. David Sullivan or Ann Marie Speir. All are welcome. Email: goodshepherdetown2011@hotmail.com Web: www.etowngoodshepherd.org United Church of Christ (Congregational) - Court Street. 873-6822. Rev. Frederick C. Shaw. Worship Service: Sun. 11 a.m.; Sunday School ages 4 - grade 6. Nursery service Email: FShaw@westelcom.com ESSEX St. Joseph’s Catholic Church - Rt. 22. 963-4524. Rev. John Demo, Admin. No Mass in Essex from Columbus Day to Memorial Day, closed for the Winter. Essex Community United Methodist Church - Corner of Rt. 22 and Main St. 963-7766. Rev. John E. Hunn. , Sunday Worship - 10:15 AM, Sunday School - 10:15 AM. web page: www.unyumc.org/churches/ detail/375 St. John’s Episcopal Church - Church Street. 963-7775. Holy Communion and Church School, Sunday 9:15 a.m., Morning Prayer, Wednesday 9 a.m. Community Potluck Supper, Tuesday 6 p.m. Old Testament Bible Study, Wednesdays 10 a.m., Rev. Margaret Shaw. Email: stjohnschurch@willex.com Foothills Baptist Church at Boquet - 2172, NY Rt. 22 in Essex. Formerly Church of the Nazarene. Wednesday Night Service at 6 p.m. Worship services are Sunday 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Sunday school 9:45 a.m. Family Christian movies on the second Sunday of each month at 6:30 p.m., and Hymn sing on the 4th Sunday of each month at 6 p.m. Email: foothillsbapt@netzero.net HARKNESS Harkness United Methodist Church - Corner Harkness & Hollock Hill Rds., Harkness, NY. 834-7577. Rev. Edith Poland. Worship 9:30 a.m. ediepoland@aol.com JAY First Baptist Church of Jay - Rev. Joyce Bruce, Pastor. Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. KEENE St. Brendan’s Catholic Church - Saturday Mass at 4 p.m.,

Sunday Mass at 11:15 a.m.; Pastor: Rev. John R. Yonkovig; Pastor. Rectory Phone 523-2200. Email: stagnesch@roadrunner.com St. Hubert’s All Souls Episcopal Church - Sunday Holy Eucharist 10 a.m., June 24 through September 9. Varying roster of priests celebrate communion each week. Keene Valley Congregational Church - Main Street. 5764711. Sunday Worship Services 10 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Choir Wednesday evening 7 p.m. and Sunday 9:15 a.m. KEESEVILLE Immaculate Conception - St. John the Baptist - 1804 Main Street, 834-7100. Monsignor Leeward Poissant. Ant. Mass Saturdays - 4 p.m. - St. John’s. Sunday Masses; 8 a.m. & 10 a.m. at Immaculate Conception during the winter months. Email: rcckparish@charter.net St. Paul’s Episcopal Church - Clinton Street, Keeseville. 563-6836. Sunday Service 9 a.m. Rev. Blair Biddle. Keeseville United Methodist Church - Front Street, Keeseville. 834-7577. Rev. Edith Poland. Sunday School 11:00 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m. 834-7577. Email: ediepoland@aol.com The Good Shepherd Church of the Nazarene - 124 Hill Street, Keeseville, NY. 834-9408. Pastor Richard Reese. Sunday Service 10:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.; Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Tuesday Prayer Service 7 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Study 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church - Rte. 22 & Interstate 87, P.O. Box 506, Keeseville, NY. 834-9620. Sunday School 9:45 a.m., Sunday Morning Worship 11 a.m., Sunday Evening Worship 7 p.m., Prayer Meeting & Bible Study - Wednesday 7 p.m.; Youth Group Sunday 7 p.m. Website: ibck.org Email: office@ibck.org Front Street Fellowship - 1724 Front Street, Keeseville, 834-7373. Pastor Warren Biggar. Sunday: Sunday School 9:30 a.m.-10:15 a.m., Worship Service 10:30 a.m., Tuesday: Home Prayer Groups 7 p.m. (Call for locations). Thursday: Ladies Bible Study 2:30 p.m. in Keeseville, 7 p.m. in Plattsburgh (Call for locations). Friday: Celebrate Recovery 6 p.m.; Kingdom Kids 6:30 p.m.; Youth Group 6:30 p.m. Website: www.thebridgekeeseville.com Email: vikki@thebridgekeeseville.com LAKE PLACID New Hope Christian Fellowship Church - 207 Station St., Lake Placid, NY. A full gospel church. Rev. Richard Ducatt, pastor. Services are Sunday 10a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Fellowship prayer, Tuesday 6:30 p.m. and Thursday Bible Study. Once a month covered dish after Sunday morning service.

Brought to you by...

Wikoff said that without the grant, the movie business could fade to black in the Adirondacks. “Just imagine that there is not a single movie screen in the Adirondack Park being open within one year from now,” Wikoff said. “We are looking at a total of 37 screens that include two drive-ins. The ramifications are profound.” Huttlinger said that the society has conducted a study of those who attend movies in the park that finds a generation of $11 million in revenue for local businesses in total. That is why they believe that the best solution to the problem is for the local businesses to own their screens. “They can put on their own shows rather than just being able to have first-run movies,” Wikoff said. “We want to do more than just help them stay in business and keep the doors open. We want to help create a whole new business model for the small theater.” Child care available Sunday & Thursday. Handicapped accessible. For more information call 518-523-3652. Lake Placid Baptist Church - Leading people to become fully devoted followers of Jesus Christ Worship service Sunday 10:15 a.m. 2253 Saranac Ave., LP 523-2008, www.lpbaptist.org. St. Eustace Episcopal Church - Worship services Sunday 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m.; Tuesday 5:15 p.m. Holy Prayers; Wednesday 5:15 p.m. Holy Eucharist & Healing 2450 Main St., LP, 523-2564, www.steustace.org. St. Agnes Catholic Church - Saturday Mass 5:30 p.m., Sunday masses 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., 169 Hillcrest, LP, 523-2200. Rev. John R. Yonkovig Adirondack Community Church - Wherever you are on your spiritual journey, you are welcome here. 2583 Main St., LP. 523-3753, www.adkcomchurch.org. Pilgrim Holiness Church - 6057 Sentinel Road Lake Placid, NY 12946. Tel. 518-523-2484 Pastor: William S. Saxton. Sunday School - 9: 45 AM Sunday Worship - 11:00 AM Sunday Evening Service - 7:00 PM Wednesday Prayer & Bible Study - 7:00 PM www.lakeplacidpilgrimholinesschurch.com LEWIS Elizabethtown Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses - Rt. 9 West, Lewis, NY. Sunday Public Talk 10 a.m. followed by Watchtower Study 10:35 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study & Theocratic Ministry School & Service Meeting. For further information contact Brian Frawley 518-873-2610. First Congregational Church - Lewis, 873-6822. Rev. Frederick C. Shaw. Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Email: Fshaw@westelcom.com www.firstcongregationalchurchoflewis.com PORT HENRY Lake Champlain Bible Fellowship - Adult Sunday School 9:00-10:00 a.m., Coffee fellowship 10:00-10:30 a.m.; Worship service starts at 10:30 a.m.; Nursery and 36 Sunday School provided during worship service; VOICE Youth Group for teens; Variety of bible studies and groups available that meet weekly. FREE community movie night the first Saturday of every month at 7 p.m. Visit our website to see what is showing 6 Church St., (518) 546-4200, www.lcbible.org, Pastor Tom Smith. REBER United Methodist Church - Valley Road. 963-7924. Rev. Chilton McPheeters. Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m.; Church School 11 a.m. SARANAC LAKE St. Bernard’s Catholic Church - Saturday Mass 5:00 p.m., Sunday Mass 7:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m. Father Mark Reilly, Pastor, 27 St. Bernard Street, SL, 891-4616, www.stbernardssaranaclake.com

FRED’S REPAIR SHOP 137 - 13 Route 9N AuSable Forks, NY 12912 518-647-5791

W.M. MARVIN’S SONS, INC. Funeral Home Elizabethtown, NY 873-6713

SERVICE, INC.

DODGE • JEEP • CHRYSLER George Huttig, President Route 9 South, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 Phone: 518-873-6386 • Fax: 518-873-6488 20908

BESSBORO BUILDERS & SUPPLIES Westport, NY 962-4500 20900

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Beaton of New Russia, New York, are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter, Cassandra Beaton, to Benjamin Pulowski, son of Mr. and Mrs. David Pulowski of Holyoke, Mass. The ceremony was held at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Westfield, Mass. on Saturday, June 23, 2012. A reception followed at Crepes Tea House. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Pulowski Mrs. Cassandra Pulowski is a 2006 graduate of Elizabethtown-Lewis Central School. Mr. Pulowski is a 2006 graduate of the American School of Correspondence. The couple is currently participating in the sign-language congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Springfield while residing in Holyoke, Mass.

Tournament to Benefit AARCH KEESEVILLE — There will be a golf tournament to support Adirondack architectural heritage at the Saranac Inn Golf and Country Club on Monday, Aug. 27. The day will feature a buffet lunch followed by a round of golf with cart, and the opportunity to win great prizes. The format is a four-man scramble with shot gun start. The fee is $100 per player. To register your foursome please call Susan Arena at 518-834-9328.

Habitat golf tournament slated WESTPORT — AuSable Valley Habitat for Humanity is gearing up to open another door for a local family. To help in the costs with the new home, they will be hosting a golf tournament at the Westport Country Club Friday, Aug. 31. The format for the tournament is a fourperson scramble with a shotgun start. Registration will take place at noon, with start at 12:30 p.m. The cost is $300 per foursome and $75 individual, which includes prizes, greens fees and a buffet dinner. Anyone who would like to sponsor a hole may do so for $100. For more information, call Elizabeth Frum at 524-6650, Dee Way at 962-4829 or the Westport Country Club at 962-4470.

Episcopal Church of St. Luke - 136 Main St., SL, 891-3605. Sunday worship services at 7:45 a.m. and 10:00 a.m., led by the Reverand Ann S. Giallard, www.stlukessaranaclake.org High Peaks Church - A Bible-believing, non-denominational church. 97 Will Rogers Drive, Saranac Lake, 891-3255 Saranac Lake Baptist Church - 490 Broadway, Saranac Lake, 891-5473 First United Methodist Church - 63 Church Street, Saranac Lake, 891-3473 Adirondack Alliance Church - 72 Canaras Ave., SL, 8911383. Sharing the hope of Christ, building relationships with god. Sunday worship 10:00 a.m. with nursery care available. First Presbyterian Church PC(USA) - 57 Church Sreet, Saranac Lake, NY, 518-891-3401, Rev. Joann White. All Are Welcome Here! 9:45am Sunday Worship. Sunday School for All Ages. Nursery Care. 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study. Handicap Accessible & Hearing Assistance. www.saranaclakepresbyterianchurch.org Saranac Lake Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses - 5043 Rt. 3, Saranac Lake, 518-891-9233 Sunday Public Talk 10 a.m. followed by Watchtower Study 10:35 a.m. Lutheran Church of the Holy Trinity - Worshipping at the First United Methodist Church at 63 Church St., Saranac Lake. Pastor Michael Richards presiding. 518-8915262. Services on Sunday mornings at 11:30 a.m. followed by coffee hour. Sunday School available. TUPPER LAKE United Community Church - 25 High Street, Tupper Lake, 359-9810 Holy Name Catholic Church - 114 Main Street, Tupper Lake, 359-9194 St. Alphonsus Church - 48 Wawbeek Avenue, Tupper Lake, 359-3405. St. Thomas Episcopal - 8 Brentwood Ave, Tupper Lake 359-9786 WADHAMS United Church of Christ - Sunday worship celebration at 11:00 a.m., Pastor Leon Hebrink. 962-8293 *For other ministry & discipleship opportunities see the Westport Federated Church schedule. WESTPORT Federated Church - The “Stone Church” on Main Street, Westport - Woship Celebration Sundays at 9:00 am with “Children’s Church.” Bible and book discussion fellowship at 6:00 pm Thursdays in the parsonage. 518-962-8293 / www.westptchurch.com “Come follow Jesus in the company of friends.” Westport Bible Church - 24 Youngs Road. 962-8247. Pastor Dick Hoff. Sunday Morning Worship 9:15 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Sunday School 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening 5:30 p.m.; Wednesday Night Prayer 7 p.m.; Teen Club Saturday 6 p.m.; Olympian Club Sunday

OLDSMOBILE, INC. 26656

20902

DENTON PUBLICATIONS Community Newspapers & Printing Kidsville News, 14 Hand Ave., Elizabethtown, NY • 873-6368 20906

George Huttig, President Route 9 South, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 Phone: 518-873-6389 • Fax: 518-873-6390 20901

ZAUMETZER-SPRAGUE Funeral Home - John H. Thwaits 3 College St., Ausable Forks, NY 647-8177 20909

Eg

gle

5:30 p.m. (Sept. - May) Email: westportbiblech@westelcom.com St. Philip Neri Catholic Church - 6603 Main St., Father Peter Riani, Pastor. Residence, 873-6760. Mass schedule: Sun., 8:30 a.m. Weekdays: consult bulletin. Email: allrises@westelcom.com WILLSBORO Congregational United Church of Christ - 3799 Main Street, P.O. Box 714. Worship and Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Church phone number 518-963-4048. United Methodist Church - Rt. 22. 963-7931. Sunday Worship Services 9 a.m.; Sunday School 9:30 a.m. After school religous education program 2:30 p.m. - 5 p.m. on Thursdays (Only when school is in session) St. Philip of Jesus Catholic Church - 3746 Main Street. 963-4524. Rev. John Demo, Admin. Saturday Mass at 4 p.m. & Sunday Mass at 10 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation: Saturday 3:15 p.m.; Sunday 9:15 a.m. WILMINGTON Calvary Baptist Church - Rt. 86. 946-2482. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. (classes for all ages); Morning Worship 11 a.m. & Evening Service 7 p.m.; Bible Study & Prayer meeting Wednesday 7 p.m. St. Margaret’s Roman Catholic Church - Mass Sat. 6 p.m., Sun. 7:30 a.m. Rev. Kris Lauzon - Pastor, John J. Ryan - Deacon, Confessions 5:15 p.m. - 5:45 p.m. Whiteface Community United Methodist Church - Rt. 86 and Haselton Road in Wilmington. Pastor Brooke Newell invites everyone to join the congregation for Sunday morning worship at 10:30 a.m. and coffee and fellowship after. Sunday School is offered during the worship service and there is an available nursery area. Church office is located in the adjacent Reuben Sanford building and is open Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 946-7757. Riverside Thrift Shop is located in adjacent Methodist Barn and is open Wednesday and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The phone for Shop is 946-2922. The Ecumenical Food Pantry is open in the Reuben Sanford building on Thursday nights from 4 to 6 p.m. Call Don Morrison at 946-7192 for emergencies. The Senior Lunch program under the director of Carolyn Kane serves lunch on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. Questions concerning the site can be answered at 946-2922 during that time only. Wilmington Church of the Nazarene - Wilmington, NY. 946-7708. Bob Hess, Pastor. Sunday School - 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service - 11 a.m.; Wednesday - Night Teen Group 7 p.m. - 8 p.m., Bible Study - Every Tuesday with Potluck at 6:00 p.m. and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Church Office hours - Tues. - Thurs. in the a.m. www.wilmingtonnazarene.org

7-24-12 • 20898

SPOONER’S IDEAL GARAGE 112-114 Pleasant Street Westport, NY • 962-4455

20905

“Your Key To Better Health”

1730 Front Street, Keeseville, NY 12944 Ph (518) 834-6090 • Fax (518) 834-7021 www.keesevillepharmacy.com M-F 8-6, Sat. 9-3, Sun. Closed

20904

field Bros., In c.

Maple St., Elizabethtown, NY

Home for Your Ford Since 1910

(518) 873-6551 • Fax (518) 873-6569 1-800-559-6551 20907

General Insurance - Mark Carpenter Kim Bessey, Melissa Smith

Water St., Elizabethtown, NY 873-2149 20903


22 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

Saturday, Aug. 11 WILLSBORO — Annual Library Used Book Sale, Paine Memorial Library, 2 Gilliland Lane, 9 a.m.- 2 p.m. LAKE PLACID — “Cinderella” childrens performance, The Lake Placid Center for the Arts, 17 Algonquin Way, 7:30 p.m. $7 or $5 for kids. 523-2512. WADHAMS — Paddle the Boquet River upstream from Wadhams Falls with Schell McKinley, BRASS Treasurer, Meet at 10 a.m. at the Dogwood Bread Company on County Route 10. 962-8346. LAKE PLACID — Second Saturday Storytime to celebrate National Picnic Month, The Bookstore Plus, Main Street, 10 a.m. www.thebookstoreplus.com, 523-2950. SARANAC LAKE — Free Eye Cans Art Class, art with aluminum cans, Adirondack Carousel, 2 Depot Street. noon. WESTPORT — Book signing with author Sara J Henry, writer of the award winning book “Learning to Swim”, and musical performance by Rob Pulsifier, Westport Marina Ships Store, 20 Washington St. noon- 2 p.m. 962-4899. LAKE PLACID — Author Signing Extravaganza, Book Store Plus, Main Street, 3-5 p.m. www.thebookstoreplus.com, 523-2950. JAY — Susan Richards & Crew to perform, Jay Village Green Route 9N, 6:30 p.m. KEENE VALLEY — Performance of the musical Irene, Keene Central School Auditorium, 33 Market Street, 7:30 p.m. 946-8323.

Sunday, Aug. 12

LAKE PLACID — Salute to Arts Day celebration, The Lake Placid Center for the Arts, 17 Algonquin Way,10 a.m.- 2 p.m. 523-2512. WILLSBORO — High Peaks Hospice & Palliative Care to hold musical fundraiser, $50 donation, Scragwood House, Willsboro Point, 942-6513, hphpc.org.

Monday, Aug. 13

WESTPORT — Free aerobics classes, Westport Town Hall, 22 Champlain Avenue, 8 a.m. WESTPORT — The Marvelous Wonderettes to perform, The Depot Theater, 6705 Main Street, 8 p.m. 962-4449. LAKE PLACID — Visual & Performing Summer Arts Camp (one week) The Lake Placid Center for the Arts, 17 Algonquin Way, 9:30 a.m.- noon. $100, 523-2512. LAKE PLACID — High Peaks Cyclery Mini tri season, Mirror lake Beach, registration at 5:30 p.m. & races at 6:30p.m. The race consists of 400 yd swim, a 12 mile bike and a 3 mile run. $20. www.highpeakscyclery.com. 5233764. LAKE PLACID — Adirondack Experience Golf Tournament, Whiteface Club & Resort, 373 Whiteface Inn Lane, 523-1718. 10 a.m. $100. LAKE PLACID — Weekly Monday Summer Storytime to celebrate Gardening, The Bookstore Plus, Main Street, 10 a.m. www.thebookstoreplus.com, 523-2950. KEENE VALLEY — Night Vision: The Wildlife Photography of Hobart Vosburg Roberts, Keene Valley Library, 7:30 p.m. LAKE PLACID — Introductory class to genealogy using

August 11, 2012

Ancestry.com, Lake Placid Public Library, 6-8 p.m. Limited class size, 523-3200 ESSEX — Poetry Slam Hosted by AAA Board Chairperson, Jeff Moredock, Adirondack Art Association, Main Street, 7 p.m. KEENE VALLEY — Night Vision: The Wildlife Photography of Hobart Vosburg Roberts Exhibit, Keene Valley Library, 1796 NYS Route 73, 7:30 p.m. 576-4335, library@kvvi.net

Tuesday, Aug. 14

KEENE — InternetXpress Computer Workshop, Keene Public Library, New York 73 , 10-11:30 a.m. 873-2341. PAUL SMITHS — Interpretive Canoe Paddle, Paul Smith’s College VIC, 8023 New York 30, 10 a.m. The cost is $20. WESTPORT — Youth Commission soccer registration, Westport Central School, 5:30 p.m., practice to follow from 6-7 p.m. westportyouthprogram@gmail.com. LAKE PLACID — Blues & Soul Night at Ruthie Foster, Mid’s Park, Main Street, 7 p.m. 524-1148.

Wednesday.Aug. 15

WESTPORT — Free aerobics classes, Westport Town Hall, 22 Champlain Avenue, 8 a.m. LAKE PLACID — LPCA Green Market Wednesday, Lake Placid Center for the Arts, 17 Algonquin Way. 9 a.m.-1p.m. 523-2512, www.LakePlacidFarmersMarket.com. KEESEVILLE— Keeseville Free Library's Annual Book Sale, 1721 Front Street, 10 a.m.- noon, and 1-5 p.m. 8349054. LAKE PLACID — Lake Placid public Library Children’s Readom Room with Retired State Police officer Sean Donovan, 2471 Main Street, 1:30 p.m. LAKE PLACID — The Lake Placid Masonic Lodge Flea Market at the lodge, Station Street, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. LAKE PLACID — Adirondack Shakespeare Company's Hercules performed for Free Young & Fun Series, LPCA, 17

Algonquin Way, 10:30 a.m. LAKE PLACID — Open Mic Blues Jam, Delta Blue, 2520 Main Street, 8:30-10:30 p.m. LAKE PLACID — The Glenn Miller Orchestra performance, The Lake Placid Center for the Arts, 17 Algonquin Way, 8 p.m. $22. LAKE PLACID — Open Mic Blues Jam, Delta Blue, 2520 Main Street, 8:30-10:30 p.m. WESTPORT — Sam Balzac's Anti-Student Loan Cabaret: Tonight Only at The Depot Theatre, 6705 Main Street, 8 p.m. $15. 962-4449.

Thursday, Aug. 16

KEESEVILLE— Keeseville Free Library's Annual Book Sale, 1721 Front Street, 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. , 834-9054. SARANAC LAKE— Story Hour, Saranac Lake Free Library, 109 Main Street, 10:30-11 a.m. 891-4191. WESTPORT — The Annual Elizabethtown-Westport Garden Club Fashion Show Luncheon, Westport Inn and Tavern, 6691 Main St. 11:30 p.m. lunch begins at noon. $22, reservations required, 962-8348. LAKE PLACID — Adirondack Shakespeare Company performance of Twelfth Night, Lake Placid Center for the Performing Arts, 17 Algonquin, 7:30 p.m.$15. WESTPORT — Talk on Zen Buddhism by Dr. Alan Cole, Westport Library, 6 Harris Lane 7 p.m. 962-8219. WESTPORT — Roast Turkey Dinner, the Westport Federated Church, 6486 Main Street, serving beings at 4:30 p.m. $9, or $4 for kids. KEENE VALLEY — The Mountaineer Reopening Book Signing, The Mountaineer, 1866 NYS Rt. 73, 5-7 p.m. vinny@mountaineer.com or nick@mountaineer.com. www.mountaineer.com. 576-2281. ELIZABETHTOWN — Stream morphology and assessment following Irene lecture with Dr. John Braico, Adirondack History Center Museum, 7590 Court Street, 7 p.m.

PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE

DOUBLE OVERTIME By Elizabeth C. Gorski

1 6 11 19 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 30 31 32 34 37 40 41 42 43 44 48 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 58 61 63

ACROSS Madison Ave. figure DEA employees Convert into an anesthetic Much of Egypt Hawaiian welcome “I like your invention!” *Like Disneyland, vis-à-vis theme parks *Perform efficiently Rd. atlas listings Dessert cart array Friars Club main courses? Tokyo-based electronics giant Dancer Falana Crochet loop “Take a shot at it” Meal Amy Winehouse’s reaction to rehab, in the song British Invasion drummer Baker with the breakout album “Rapture” Oft-quoted Yogi Unwanted tabloid fame *Tryst venue Mad as __ hen Berry touted as a superfood Old Russian ruler “WKRP” costar with Gary, Gordon, Howard et al. __ Island: NY/NJ landmark Hearty partner Current designation DNA shape “May It Be” singer __ Wolf: Disney comics

kid 64 “They’ll Do It Every Time” cartoonist Jimmy 67 *Bit of campaign nastiness 69 Green course 71 Drop the ball 72 First-year law student 75 Wreck 76 Job particular 78 Letters to creditors? 80 Central Florida city 82 They may stay till closing time 84 Four-ring-logo company 88 “The lady __ protest ...”: “Hamlet” 89 Lake __, Blue Nile source 90 *Get-rich-quick buy 93 Oscar winner’s words 95 Nebraska’s largest city 96 Physicist Bohr 97 Twix or Trix, e.g. 98 “Permission granted” 100 “Juno and the Paycock” playwright 101 Boil 103 Caterpillar rival 104 Some faux outerwear 105 Routine 106 Ahab’s kingdom 109 Confirmation, e.g. 110 __TV: Court TV, since 2008 113 *Writer’s bottom line? 116 *1978 Commodores hit 120 Joined the Navy 121 Rob of “90210” 122 St. Francis’s birthplace 123 Six-pack units 124 Score notations 125 Prop for Monet

1 2 3 4

DOWN Deadly snakes Blowgun missile P-like letters Enjoy, with “up”

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9

5 Offer 6 Afternoon breaks 7 “American Gladiators” cohost Laila 8 Mythical bird 9 Patio bagful 10 Tavern 11 Nog basics 12 Traffic sound 13 *Absolutely perfect 14 Shogun stronghold 15 Score slow-up: Abbr. 16 “Remind me” 17 Not as many 18 ’50s TV adventurer __ Derringer 20 Leaning 24 Vote for 29 Like some 20th-century music 31 Indirect and creative, as thinking 32 White House entrance 33 Memo starter 35 Stick in a scull 36 Dickens baddie Heep 37 Lose control 38 Baseball’s Slaughter 39 Pocket bread 40 Light on Broadway 41 Oktoberfest purchase 43 College QB, often 45 Barn baby 46 Sylvester’s “Rocky” costar 47 Triangular sign 49 Honorary legal deg. 54 K-12 57 Bit of 48-Across talk 59 Other, in Oaxaca 60 The Bengals of the Big Sky Conf. 62 Widow in “Peer Gynt” 64 Alpine heroine 65 Forster’s “__ With a View” 66 “Honestly ...” 67 Flier 68 In “Wicked,” say

70 73 74 76 77 79 81 83 85 86 87 90

Trees favored by giraffes *“Zilch” Online greeting Ancient public walkway SFO setting Brief Fancy-schmancy Emperor after Galba Luau instruments Take-out order? Wee Lesser-of-evils situation

91 “A Book of Verses underneath the Bough” poet 92 Bump up 94 Slangy turndown 99 Seesaw 100 “I’m __ here!” 101 They may be blown or cracked 102 Low-budget lead-in 104 In good shape 107 British submachine gun 108 Wine list heading

109 110 111 112 114 115

Supreme leader? Speaker of Cooperstown It’s romantic to give one Condo expense: Abbr. __ Maria: liqueur Presidential policy support gp. 117 There are two of them in each starred ans. 118 Worked (up) 119 Flight safety org.

This Month in History - AUGUST 8th - The USSR finally declares war against Japan. (1945) 9th - President Richard M. Nixon becomes the first and only president to resign while in office (1974) 10th - “Smile, You’re on Candid Camera”. Allen Funt’s wildly popular show debuts. (1948) 14th - Japan surrenders, ending World War II. (1945)

SOLUTIONS TO LAST WEEK ’ S PUZZLES !

(Answers Next Week)


www.thevalleynews.org

Help Wanted Appliances pp

For Sale Legals General Financial Services Garage g Sales

Valley News - 23

Equipment q p

Real Estate Automotive Apartments p For Rent Wanted

theclassifiedsuperstore.com

Free

On the go?

So are we!

Scan this QR-Code from your mobile device, and search our classifieds from anywhere.

20915

August 11, 2012

Sell it local or sell it regionally! Call 1-800-989-4237 x201 today! or visit our self-service site at www.theclassifiedsuperstore.com APPLIANCE BLOWN HEAD GASKET? ANY vehicle repair yourself. State of the art 2-Component chemical process. Specializing in Cadillac Northstar Overheating. 100% guaranteed. 1-866-780-9041 www.RXHP.com

ELIZABETHTOWN 1 BR Unfurnished Cottage, Private Setting, No Close Neighbors. Easy 15 walk to P.O. & Shopping $420/month + Utilities. 1st month rent and security required. Please call Annemarie Denton 873-6402

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME

100%WOOD HEAT no worries. Keep your family safe and warm with an OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE from Central Boiler. Adirondack Hardware Company 518-834-9790

SENIOR HOUSING 55yrs. + in Essex County, Westport/Wadhams - 2 bedroom home with extra rooms in the Summer. Call for details. 508-839-4551, 508-845-9424, 508-612-5636.

HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED Contact Woodford Bros. Inc. for straightening, leveling and foundation repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN / www.woodfordbros.com

WESTPORT HOME FOR RENT 3 bedroom, 1 bath, Security deposit required, $650/mo., Available September 1st. Please call 518-962-8957 or 518-518-5709043.

QUALITY, DURABLE AND AFFORDABLE COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS. Free on-site consultation. Call CB Structures 1-800-9400192 or www.cbstructuresinc.com

VACATION PROPERTY

REPLACEMENT WINDOWS $179 Installed. Double Hung Tilt-ins, Lifetime Warranty,Energy Star tax credit available. Call Now! 1-866272-7533www.usacustomwindow s.com

OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

INSURANCE

COMMUNITY SALE

PERMANENT LIFE INSURANCE. Qualify to age 86. Fast. Easy. Few Questions. No Exam! 1-800-9383439, x24;

REAL ESTATE 20 ACRES $99/mo. $0-Down, Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Money Back Guarantee, Near El Paso, Texas FREE Brochure. 1-800-7558953 www.SunsetRanches.com ADIRONDACK 79 Acres, 20 min. to Whiteface, great for hunting or cross country skiing, road frontage, power, $69,000. 518-624-6055 ADIRONDACK " BY OWNER" www.AdkByOwner.com 1000+ photo listings of local real estate for sale, vacation rentals & timeshares. Owners: List with us for only $275 per year. Visit online or call 518-891-9919

APARTMENT SCHROON LAKE 2 bdrm 1st. floor Apt. in country home, $600/ mo., includes electric, W/D hookup, suitable for 2, non smoking, no pets, sec.& ref. required. 518265-9875

LIVE LIKE a rockstar Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Sean 800-716-0048.

MOVING SALE, MOVING SALE 1869 Creek Rd., Crown Point, Call: 518-594-0004. EVERYTHING GOES!

MYSTERY SHOPPERS Needed Earn up to $150 per day Undercover Shoppers Needed to Judge Retail & Dining Establishments Experience Not Required Call Now 888-380-3513

SPRUCE RIDGE, GARAGE SALE 4485 Spruce Ridge Dr, Manlius Fri 8/10-Sat 8/11, 9am-3pm Passionate shoppers cleaning house: from vintage treasures to baby items! Clothing, household, sports, toys and more! TOOL & YARD SALE Boone Residence 7964 US RTE 9 Elizabethtown, NY. Friday Aug. 10th Noon-? & Saturday Aug. 11th 9am-?

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.SCHEV certified. Call 1800-494-2785 www.CenturaOnline.com

HELP WANTED **2012 POSTAL JOBS!** $14 TO $59 hour + Full Federal Benefits. No Experience Required. NOW HIRING! Green Card OK. 1-866593-2664, Ext 107.

LOGGING LAVALLEE LOGGING is looking to harvest and purchase standing timber, primarily Spruce & White Pine Willing to pay New York State stumpage prices on all species. References available. Matt Lavallee, 518-6456351

DELMAR, YARD SALE 44 Nathaniel Blvd., 8/11-12, 9-3. Furniture, vintage clothes and linens, depression glass, glassware, kitchen items, etc. NEB

WHITEFACE RANGE HALL, GARAGE SALE 5794 NYS Rt. 86, WILMINGTON NEW YORK, Saturday August 18, 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM. WILMINGTON TOWN WIDE YARD SALE Aug. 18th. INSIDE TABLES AVAILABLE @ WHITEFACE RANGE HALL only $25.00 Contact Roy @ the Little Super Market at 946-2274 Rain or Shine.

GARAGE SALE/ BARN SALE ATTN: GARAGE SALE ENTHUSIASTS! Buying or selling second-hand treasures?The NYS Department of State's Division of Consumer Protection, in conjunction with the Free Community Papers of New York, recommends checking the following websites to help assure that the item has not been recalled or the subject of a safety warning: http:/www.recalls.gov and the Consumer Product Safety Commission at www.cpsc.gov. For other important recall and product safety information visit the Division of Consumer Protection at www.dos.ny.gov CADYVILLE GARAGE SALE 2555 Rt 3, Cadyville. Sat Aug 11 8am-5pm. Sun Aug 12 9am-3pm. To raise money for Alzheimer's Walk. Books, crafts and Christmas supplies, clothes, and more.

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS needed immediately! $150-$300/day depending on job. No experience, all looks needed. 1800-561-1762

NONPROFIT CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS - VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST American Red Cross, Volunteer Management Specialist, Plattsburgh, NY, Full Time. Exciting opportunity to help volunteers engage with an internationally-respected disaster-relief and humanitarian organization, with a chance to create, use and model volunteer development best practices! Recruitment and volunteer recognition events, leadership development, community relations, and supporting people who want to help others. Some company-paid regional travel expected. Top candidates have volunteer management experience, are outgoing, articulate, creative, and detail-oriented. BA/ BS or equivalent and 3-5 years social service background expected, with 6-12 months supervisory experience in volunteer and staff management preferred. Must clear criminal background check. Salary of $29,650 plus excellent benefits. Please visit http://www.americanr edcross.apply2jobs.com/ and enter requisition CHAP21770 for position details and to apply. EOE/AA M/F/D/V TOP PAY FOR RN’S, LPN’S/ LVN’S, CNA's, Med Aides. $2,000 Bonus Free Gas.AACO Nursing Agency. Call 1-800-656-4414 Ext. 103

THE DEERS HEAD is looking for an Experienced year round line cook, Full Time, Call Matt Baldwin 873-6514 or email thedeershead@gmail.com

DIVORCE $450* NO FAULT OR Regular Divorce. Covers Children, Property, etc. Only One Signature Required! *Excludes govt. fees. Locally Owned!1-800-522-6000 Ext. 100. Baylor & Associates, Inc. Est. 1977 ENERGY COMPANIES are scared that people will learn how to produce FREE Electricity for their homes using this unique device. Watch now: www.FreeEnergyVideo.com Power Companies HATE This!

WESTAFF SERVICES We'll find the perfect employee and make you the hero! Office /Clerical, Light Industrial Professional/Technical Managerial Call today 518-566-6061

ADOPTIONS ADOPT: A happy, devoted, married couple) stay-at-home-mom) will give your baby endless love, warmth, bright future. Expenses paid. Call Christine/John 1-855320-3840 PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring adoption expert. You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136296 Florida Agency #100021542 PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? You choose family. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 1-866459-3369

EVERY DOOR DIRECT MAIL. JUMBO POSTCARDS, $0.35 EACH. INCLUDES DESIGN, PRINTING, POSTAGE. Chase EDDM @ 1866-661-4152 or www.chaseeddm. com HUGE FESTIVAL OF CRAFTS: Hammondsport, NY on beautiful Keuka Lake.August 18th - 19th. 125+ Artisans. 1-607-569-2242 ROTARY INTERNATIONAL BUILDS peace and understanding through education. For more information visit www.rotary.org. This message provided by PaperChain and yourlocal community paper. SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. You WIN or Pay Us Nothing. Contact Disability Group, Inc. Today! BBB Accredited. Call For Your FREE Book & Consultation.1-888-587-9203

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6292, 24/7 Void/Illinois

THE ROTARY CLUB OF PLATTSBUGH PROUDLY PRESENTS... Third Annual BED RACE! Don't miss the fun! Start getting your team together now! Win one of our cash prizes. First Place $500 CASH, Second Place $250 CASH, Third Place $100 CASH Best Overall theme $150 CASH. Go to www.plattsburghrotary.org for more details and to sign up!

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ELECTRONICS

ARE YOU A PREPER A club is forming for Skill sharing & mutual support. Call 518-5788890 Early evenings or weekends.

BUNDLE & SAVE on your CABLE, INTERNET PHONE, AND MORE. High Speed Internet starting at less than $20/ mo. CALL NOW! 800-291-4159

HELP WANTED LOCAL AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-296-7093 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -TRAIN FOR hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program.Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1-877-202-0386. AIRLINES ARE HIRING -TRAIN FOR hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program.Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1-877-202-0386. CRAFTERS WANTED. 29TH Annual Central Square Apple Festival. Sept. 29th - 30th.Contact Ellen at 1-315-675-8232 or info@centra lsquareapplefestival.com. DRIVERS: CDL-B: GREAT PAY, Hometime! No-Forced Dispatch! New singles from Plattsburgh, NY to surrounding states. Apply www.truckmovers.com or 888567-4861 HELP WANTED!! EARN EXTRA income mailing our brochures from home! FREE Supplies!Genuine Opportunity! Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net

ABSOLUTE AUCTION

CDL LOCAL DRIVER CDL Driver with 2+ years exp. with Tractor and Trailer. Petroleum trans co. does day trips only. 518298-2555 ESSEX COUNTY HORACE NYE HOME Announces a Vacancy for Supervising Nurse $25.55/Hour - full time with benefits No residency requirements. Last Date to submit applications is August 10th, 2012. For applications contact Essex County Personnel (518) 873-3360 or they are available on our website: http://www.co.essex.ny.us/pe rsonneljobs.asp EXPERIENCED SERVER, BAR TENDER AND HOUSEKEEPER Westport Hotel & Tavern Apply in person 6691 Main St. Westport, NY OTR CDL DRIVER 3 yrs experience Entry into Canada BEE LINE TRUCKING ELLENBURG DEPOT 518-907-4472

AT&T U-VERSE JUST $29.99/MO! Bundle Internet+Phone+TV & SAVE. Up to $300BACK! (Select plans). Limited Time CALL 1-800283-6371

DIRECT TO Home Satellite TV $19.99/mo. Free Installation FREE HD/DVR Upgrade Credit/Debit Card Req. Call 1-800-795-3579

CALL FOR RETAIL VENDORS AND PUGS........ Halloween PUG Party & Parade Sunday, October 14, 2012 Registration Begins at 10... Judging at 12 Noon Parade around 2 pm Free Admission, Registration and Parking 15 Categories with Awards and Certificates 518-4942722

STOP PAYING too much for TV! Satellite is cheaper than cable! Packages from $19.99/mo.-FREE movies, FREE upgrades & FREE HD: Limited Offer-CALL NOW! 800-3645192

DISH NETWORK STARTING AT $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels. Free for 3 Months! SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-888-8238160

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! Injury Lawsuit Dragging? $500-$500,000++ within 48 /hrs? 1-800-568-8321 www.lawcapital.com

FINANCIAL SERVICES

!

N

EW

ezPrintSuperstore.com

A new easy-to-use commercial printing website for all your business’ brandingg needs, at amazingly low prices!

To Settle the Estate of Carol Smith 120 McLaughlin Ave., Tupper Lake, NY From Plattsburgh take Route 3 to Tupper Lake, Right on McLaughlin Ave. Watch for signs.

Wednesday, August 22 Start 6pm • Preview 5pm to start VISIT WWW.BRIDGESTAUCTION.COM FOR FULL LISTING! NG!

BOOKMARKS • BROCHURES • BUSINESS CARDS • FLYERS BO RA RAC RACK CARDS • DOOR HANGERS • LETTERHEAD NOTEPADS P POSTERS • ENVELOPES • SIGNAGE • VINYL BANNERS AND MUCH MORE, YOU MUST SEE!!

Custom tom m design d serv se services ervices are re available ava for an a add additional fee. Visit the EZ Print Superstore for graphic design services and details, or sen send end d an a e-mail ail to ezprint@ ezprint@denpubs.com nt@de denpubs.c s.com om • EZ Print Superstore is a service of Denton Publications, Inc.

31561

BRIDGE STREET AUCTION SERVICE Steven T. Brodi - Auctioneer & Licensed Real Estate Agent www.Bridgestauction.com • 518-563-0568 No Consignment or Estate TOO LARGE or too small, we do it all! So why not give us a call? 31598


www.thevalleynews.org

FINANCIAL SERVICES CREDIT CARD DEBT? LEGALLY HAVE IT REMOVED! Minimum $7,000 in debt to qualify. Utilize Consumer Protection Attorneys. Call now! 1-888-2370388 EARN MORE $$$ with your Investments! Unique funds provide higher returns. Investment guaranteed. Get Started Now! 877-200-1411 www.loyalfinancial.com LAWSUIT CASH Auto Accident? All Cases Qualify. Get CASH before your case settles! Fast Approval. Low Fees. (866) 709-1100 or www.glofin.com

CLARINET, VIOLIN, FLUTE, TRUMPET, Amplifier, Fender Guitar $75 each. Upright Bass, Cello, Saxophone, French Horn, Drums $189 each. Others 4-sale 1-516377-7907 GARAGE DOOR 8'x16', White Aluminum, insulated, very good condition, no dents, will be available on or around August 9th. Asking $450 OBO. 518297-2241. RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT, for sale, stove, pots & chairs etc. Call for more info. 518-359-3310 after 4pm WELL PUMP Gould, 1 HP, 4 months old, $600.00. 518-5760012

FURNITURE

FOR SALE

ADIRONDACK RUSTIC Bentwood Furniture 2-Loungers 1-Tall 2 Tier Shelf Unit 1- Lge Bentwood Cradle Ideal items for Log Home 518-597-3133

1972 GRAN TORINO runs, needs work, $4000 or best reasonable offer; 7140 Hesston Chopper, hay & corn head, $1,575; Chevy Van 30 Travelmaster camper $2800. 518-962-4394

2284 Saranac Avenue Lake Placid • NY • 12946 +1 800-724-8778 • 518-523-4404 www.lakeplacidrealestate.com

GENERAL AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM (888)686-1704 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866)453-6204 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical,*Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.Computer available. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-494-3586 www.CenturaOnline.com

Real Estate Services & Vacation Rentals

August 11, 2012

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888 -201-8657 www.CenturaOnline.com CA$H PAID-UP TO $27/BOX for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! 1 DAY PAYMENT & PREPAID shipping. SE HABLA ESPANOL. Emma 1888-776-7771. www.Cash4DiabeticSupplies.com CANADA DRUG CENTER. Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1-877-743-0508 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.) CANADA DRUG CENTER. Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1-888-734-1530 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.) CANADA DRUG CENTER. Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1-888-432-1479 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping) CASH FOR CARS, Any Make or Model! Free Towing. Sell it TODAY. Instant offer: 1-800-8645784

Proudly Serving Adirondack-Champlain Valley MLS Regions Since 1979 39206

CASH FOR CARS: All Cars/Trucks Wanted. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Any Make/Model. Call For Instant Offer: 1-800-864-5960 FEELING OLDER? In men, testosterone declines as they age. Call 1866-455-0652 for a FREE trial of Progene- Natural Testosterone Supplement FINISH HIGH School at home in a few weeks. First Coast Academy, 1 -800-658-1180x130. www.fcahighschool.org HOT-TUB/SPA... DELUXE 2012 Model Neckjets, Therapyseat, Never Used, Warranty, Can Deliver. Worth $5950. Sell $1950. (800) 960-7727

28989

MAKE UP TO a 90% return on your Investments! Clientowned company offering above-average return rates. Investment guaranteed. www.loyalfinancial.com MEDICAL CAREERS begin here - Online training for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800 -510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1 -877-737-9447

POSITION POSTING Adirondack Community Action Programs, Inc. is looking for individuals who are willing to invest in our children’s future. Applications are being accepted for the following positions: The Head Start Program Teacher: for the Moriah site. The candidate could possess an Associate’s or advanced degree in Early Childhood Education or a related field or a plan of study leading to a Bachelor’s Degree with 12 early childhood credits or a CDA. Supervisory experience is necessary. This is a fulltime position with benefits. Teacher Aide: for the Ausable Forks site. Applicants must be 18 years of age, possess a GED or a High School Diploma and a Child Development Associate (CDA) or be in process of obtaining a CDA or have an Associate or Baccalaureate degree (in any field) or be enrolled in a program leading to such a degree. This is a full-time position with benefits. Family Workers: for the Ausable Forks, Elizabethtown/Lewis and Lake Placid sites. Candidates should possess an Assoicate’s Degree in Human Services or a related field. Previous experience with case management and pre-school children desired. This is a full-time position with benefits. Food Service Worker: For the Saranac Lake Head Start site. Applicants must be 18 years of age, possess a GED or a High School Diploma. Previous experience in the food industry and with pre-school children is desirable. This is a full-time position with benefits. The Early Head Start Program Health Advocate: for the southern part of Essex County. Applicants must possess a N.Y.S. license as a RN or a LPN. Maternal and child health care experience preferred. This is a fulltime, full year position with benefits. Interested applicants must contact One Work Source (OWS) in Elizabethtown, New York 12932 at 1-800-675-2668. Final response date is August 13, 2012. If you are contacted for an interview, please bring with you or forward a completed application and three written references. AA/EOE ACAP is an Equal Opportunity Employer SERVING ESSEX COUNTY SINCE 1965 27394

Customer Satisfaction is our trademark and our reputation.

POWER COMPANIES HATE This! Energy companies are scared that people will learn how to produce FREE Electricity for their homes using this unique device. Watch now: www.FreeEnergyVideo.com REACH OVER 20 million homes nationwide with one easy buy! Only $2,395 per week for a 25 word classified! For more information go to www.naninetwork.com REVERSE MORTGAGES -NO mortgage payments FOREVER! Seniors 62+! Government insured. No credit/income requirements. Free 28 pg. catalog. 1-888-660 3033 All Island Mortgage SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. WIN or Pay Nothing! Start Your Application In Under 60 Seconds. Contact Disability Group, Inc. Licensed Attorneys & BBB Accredited. Call 1-888-606-4790 WORK ON JET ENGINES - Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866) 854- 6156.

HEALTH IF YOU USED YAZ/YASMIN /OCELLA BIRTH CONTROL PILLS or a NuvaRING VaginalRing contraceptive between 2001 and the present time and suffered a stroke or heartattack or developed blood clots, you may be entitled to compensation. Call AttorneyCharles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

MUSIC **OLD GUITARS WANTED!** Fender, Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, Prairie State, Euphonon, Larson, D'Angelico, Stromberg, Rickenbacker, and Mosrite. Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1930's thru 1970's TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401-0440

WANTED TO BUY BUYING EVERYTHING! Furs, Coins, Gold, Antiques, Watches, Silver, Art, Diamonds."The Jewelers Jeweler Jack" 1-917-696-2024 By Appointment. Lic-Bonded. BUYING/ SELLING - gold, goldfilled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe) coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY CA$H PAID - up to $26/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. Hablamos Espanol. 1-800 -371-1136 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS Wanted We Pay More! All Major Brands Bought Dtsbuyer.com 1-866-4463009 HAVE COIN WILL TRAVEL Buying Old U.S coins,currency, commemoratives,bullion and other interesting items. Fair & Honest. Prices in today's market. Call anytime 7 days a week, ANA member Po Box 151, Jay, NY 12941 (518) 946-8387 LOOKING FOR 3-4 bdrm Home in Elizabethtown -Lewis Central School district. Please call 518-873-1022 MINERALS WANTS to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

OVER 30 MILLION WOMEN SUFFER FROM HAIR LOSS! Do you? If so, we have asolution! CALL KERANIQUE TO FIND OUT MORE 1-877-218-1590

WANTED ALL MOTORCYCLES, & Memorabilia pre 1980, $Top CASH$ PAID! Running or not. 1315-569-8094

VIAGRA 100MG AND CIALIS 20MG! 40 Pills + 4 FREE $99. #1 Male Enhancement,Save $500! 1888-796-8870

BUY-SELL-TRADE 1-800-989-4237

VIAGRA 100MG, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills +4 FREE only $99. #1 MALE ENHANCEMENT! Discreet Shipping. Save $500! Blue Pill now! 1-888-7968870 WEIGHTLOSS MEDICATIONS Phentermine, Phendimetrazine, etc. Office visit, one-month supply for $80! 1-631-462-6161; 1-516754-6001; www.MDthin.com WERE YOU IMPLANTED WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEFIBRILLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and December 2010? Have you had this lead replaced, capped ordid you receive shocks from the lead? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson. 1-800-535-5727

LAWN & GARDEN BRUSH HOG Model EFM600. Used 1 year, like new. Finish mower. 518-570-8837 $1,000

DOGS 10 WEEK OLD Boxer Puppies, all Brindle's, vet checked, $600 each. Call 518-5242947 AKC LAB Pups, 4 males, 3 females, parents on premises, shots & wormed. Please call 315-262-5865 FREE BEAGLE MIX 6 yrs. old, great with kids & other dogs, she is a good dog. Please call 518-576-9312

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY WESTPORT: OFFICE SUITES. Fully furnished w/ cubicles, desks, computer & phone hook-ups. 720 sq. ft. Lake views. Contact Jim Forcier @ 518962-4420.

HELP WANTED Mountain Lake Services is dedicated to enriching the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, their families and our communities.

Outside Sales Representative

Full time, Relief, and Awake overnight DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL positions available in Lake Placid, Jay, Upper Jay.

Earn up to $12.50 per hour. Must have a clean driving record and enjoy working with people. High School diploma or GED required. Apply to: Mountain Lake Services 10 St. Patrick’s Place Port Henry, NY 12974

Applicants must be: • Self Motivated • Outgoing / Energetic • Team Player • Good Time Management Skills • Work Well with Deadlines • Dependable • Positive Attitude Duties Include: Selling weekly advertising, special pages, sections and assisting customers Email Resume to Ed@denpubs.com

37098

United Way of Clinton & Essex Counties

MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-888909-9905

MEMORYFOAM THERAPEDIC NASA MATTRESSES T-$299 F$349 Q-$399 K-$499 ADJUSTABLES - $799 FREE DELIVERY LIFETIME WARRANTY 90 NIGHT TRIAL 1-800-ATSLEEP 1-800-287 -5337 WWW.MATTRESSDR.COM

www.mountainlakeservices.org

31679

24 - Valley News


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org NEW LAND BARGAIN’S HIGHEST QUALITY TIMBER LANDS, WATERFRONT &CABINS. 6 Acres along snow trails - $12,995. 73 Acres - gorgeous, pine forest $69,995. 5 Acres - "Hemlock lodge" cabin - $25,995. 6 Acres trout stream - $19,995.Call 1-800229-7843 Or visit www.landandcamps.com

LAND 20 ACRES Free! 60-for-40 acres price/investment $0- Down, $168/ mo. Money Back Guarantee No Credit Checks! West Texas 1-800843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com 5 ACRES SANDY CREEK FOREST, $14,900. 2.5 acres on West Bass Pond,$19,900. www.LandFirstNY.com 1-888-683 -2626

SPRINGFIELD VT 4 acres on the CT River, 743 ft River Frontage, All State and Local Permits for Well and Septic have been filed and approved. Access to River Possible for Great Fishing and Boating $150,000 call 802885-1725 or email robertsnorth@vermontel.com

DEAL FELL THRU @ $49,900! 11 ACRE- NOW JUST $39,900 Jaw dropping views! 2 1/2 hrs NY City! Fields, woods, spring! Terms avail! Call (888)905-8847 or NewYorkLandLakes.com

LAND FOR SALE 4ac+/$10,900. Buyer representation available. Other land also available. Eagle River Realty LLC, Cabela's Trophy Properties. 1-413 -477-4776

1980 18 1/2 FT. Century Cuddy Cabin, 120 HP I/O, trailer, GPS depth finder, down rigger, plus. $2900. 518-963-8220 or 518-569-0118

2001 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE Black 2 door. New tires, rotors, brakes catalytic converter. $4,500 Call: (518) 946-7550

CASH FOR CARS AND TRUCKS. Get A Top Dollar INSTANT Offer! Running or Not! 1-888-416-2208 (888) 416-2208

2001 SUPRA SANTERA low hrs., mint cond., great ski wake board boat, beautiful trailer included, $25,000. 518-354-8089

BUILDING, 211 N. Franklin Street,Watkins Glen, NY 14891. One block from lakefront. $209,000. Call Ken Wilson at Keller Williams Realty Southern Tier & Finger Lakes. 1-607-7388483

GET CASH for your Junk, Damaged, or Salvaged Car! FREE car removal + TOP DOLLAR for your unused and unwanted vehicles. Call Now!! 800 -341-0939

2005 WHITEHALL SPIRIT rowing/sailboat. Classic boat, rare find. Must sell! Asking $9000 OBO. 845-868-7711

VACATION PROPERTY

SELL YOUR Car For CA$H RIGHT NOW! We pay Top Dollar for your junk and salvaged cars. For an instant quote CALL NOW! 800-419-3454 TOP CASH FOR CARS, Any Car/ Truck, Running or Not. Call for INSTANT offer: 1-800-454-6951

BOATS

AUTO DONATION A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR! Breast Cancer Research Foundation! Most highly rated breast cancer charity in America! Tax Deductible/Fast Free Pick Up. 1-800-771-9551 www.carsforbreastcancer.org

LENDER SELLING SHORT! 40 acres - $69,900. 3 properties for the price of one! Near Cooperstown, NY. LOW taxes, incredible views, trophy deer! Call NOW! 1888-775-8114 www.NewYorkLandandLakes.com

1997 DODGE INTREPID 6 cyclinder, 127,000 miles, Good condition. $1,300 Call: (518) 594-5015

AUTO WANTED

EXTENSIVE LISTINGS IN CENTRAL New York, including Delaware, Schoharie, Otsego,Chenango and Madison counties...go to www.townandcountryny.com

LENDER SELLING SHORT! 40 ACRES- $69,900. 3 properties for the price of one! Near Cooperstown, NY. LOW taxes, incredible views, trophy deer! Call NOW!(888)701-7509 NewYorkLandandLakes.com

DONATE A CAR - HELP HOMELESS PETS! Free Next-Day Towing. Tax Deductible. Non- Runners OK. Receive $1,000 Grocery Coupons. Call National Animal Welfare Foundation 1-888-3333848

1977 156 GLASTRON Boat with 70 HP Johnson motor, with trailer, excellent condition. $3000. 518-359-8605

1985 17 1/2’ open bow, full canvas, in/out board motor, new seats, battery, interior, Shoreline trailer included, great condition,needs voltage regulator $2500 OBO. 518-5630983 or 518-593-5408

REAL ESTATE AUCTION

DEAL FELL THRU @ $49,900! 11 acres - NOW JUST $39,900! Jaw dropping views! 2 &1/2 hrs NY City! Fields, woods, spring! Terms avail! Call 1-888-701-1864 or www. NewYorkLandandLakes.com

DONATE A CAR - HELP CHILDREN FIGHTING DIABETES. Fast, Free Towing. Call 7 days/week. Nonrunners OK. Tax Deductible. Call Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 1-800-5780408

Valley News - 25

16FT MAD RIVER Canoe $400; Sun Fish Sail boat $500. Piercefield, NY 518-3592558

2007 PORSCHE BOXSTER Burgundy/Beige Excellent condition. 5,6000 Miles, 6 cylinder, 5 speed automatic w/ Tiptronic Transmission, loaded w/many options, in show room condition. 315-447-0888 $35,500 OBO. MUSTANG 2010 convertible, V-6, auto, leather interior, runs great, 45,000 miles, loaded. Asking $17,000 OBO or trade for a classic car. Call 518962-8539

Classified Superstore 1-800-989-4237

CARS FARM EQUIPMENT 95 CHRYSLER New Yorker solid body, good tires will not pass inspection $1500 Call: (239) 989-8686

MOTORCYCLES 2002 HONDA VTX 1800, mint condition, many extras, $5000. 518-492-2348 2010 HONDA STATELINE 1200 Miles, Black, 1312cc $8,500 518-569-8170 WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLE KAWASAKI 19671980 Z1-900, KZ900, KZ1000, ZIR, KZ1000MKII, W1-650,H1500, H2-750, S1-250, S2-350, S3400 Suzuki GS400,GT380, CB750 CASH PAID. FREE NATIONAL PICKUP. 1-800-772-1142, 1-310721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES COLEMAN POP UP Rarely used, like new, complete ready to camp, sleeps 5, stove, ice box, sink, AC/DC power, awning, $2000. 518-585-3226.

TRUCKS 1981 INTERNATIONAL single axle dump truck, runs great, inspected and on the road. $4000 OBO. 518-834-9088.

1952 DESOTO White/Blue, no rust, small Hemi,, great project car. Serious inquires only. $3500. 518-962-4688 1989 TOYOTA SUPRA fully loaded, all electric, all power, 5 spd., hatch back, sunroof, runs good, $4500. 113 Flat Rock, Morrisonville, NY. 518-563-9967

1964 FORD 4000 4 cyl., gas, Industrial loader & industrial Front End, 12 spd., Sherman Transmission, Pie Weights, $4200.00. 518-962-2376 Evenings.

2000 RANGER 2000 Ranger XLT 4x4 Super Cab, camper top, liner, tonneau cover, 6 cyl., auto, AC, stereo, 130K, $3995. 518-576-9042

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We're Local! 7 Days/ Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-4162330

BUY-SELL-TRADE with the Classified Superstore 1-800-989-4237

L OANS A VAILABLE NO CREDIT? BAD CREDIT? BANKRUPTCY?

Hometown Chevrolet

152 Broadway Whitehall, NY •

(518) 499-2886 • Ask for Joe

36766

31597

Turn Your Unwanted Items Into CASH!! Run Your Item Until It Sells! GUARANTEED SALEE $ *

4 LINES 1 ZONE E 37090

Manufacturer’s Recall Just Announced Are you suffering after being implanted with a

STRYKER REJUVENATE

29

ADD AN EXTRA ZONE FOR $

19

$$2 EACH ADDITIONAL LINE

Personal Classified Ads Only - No Commercial Accounts. One Item Per Ad - Ad Must Include Price. Ad Must Be Prepaid - Cancellations Acc A Accep ccept p ed At Any Time, No Refund After Ad Is Placed. Ad Will Run For Eight Weeks And Will Be Renewed At No Charge If Item Not Sold. Accepted * 4 Lines is approximately 15 words

Adirondacks South - Times of Ti, Adirondack Journal, News Enterprise Adirondacks North - North Countryman, Valley News, The Burgh Vermont - Addison Eagle, Green Mountain Outlook Capital p District - Spotlight Newspapers • Central New York - Eagle Newspapers

®

Modular Hip Implant? Have you experienced failure of your Stryker Rejuvenate hip implant, resulting in pain and other complications that may have required revision surgery? If so, please know that we are investigating these injuries – and those caused by other brands – for possible legal action. On July 4, 2012, Stryker Orthopaedics

&

announced a voluntary USA Recall of certain models of its Rejuvenate and ABG II hip implants, leading to increased concern. Weitz & Luxenberg can help you understand your legal options. For a free consultation please call us today at 1-800- LAW-6789 or visit us on the web at www.HipDeviceRecall.com

WEITZ LUXENBERG P.C. ASBESTOS

|

DRUGS/MEDICAL DEVICES

LAW OFFICES |

ENVIRONMENTAL

|

NEGLIGENCE

700 BROADWAY | NEW YORK, NY 10003

We are also investigating

BRANCH OFFICES IN NEW JERSEY & CALIFORNIA

METAL ON METAL HIP REPLACEMENTS & FOSAMAX FEMUR FRACTURES

1.800.LAW.6789 | www.weitzlux.com

Name: ________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________ Phone: ________________ E-mail (Required): __________________________________ Amount Enclosed:________Card #: _________________________ Security #: _________ Exp. Date: ___________________ Signature: __________________________________

ATTORNEY ADVERTISING. Prior results do not guarantee a future outcome. We may associate with local firms in states wherein we do not maintain an office. No aspect of this advertisement has been approved by the Supreme Court of NJ. If no recovery, no fees or costs are charged, unless prohibited by State Law or Rule. Gary R. Klein, Esq.

(Up to 15 words $29) (Up to 20 words $31) ®

(Up to 25 words $33)

37091

Nobody Does It Better! Valley News

All Ads will appear on our classified network site at NO ADDITIONAL COST!

Add a Picture for $5.00

Add a Border for $2.50

Add Shading for $3.00

Add a Graphic for $2.00

Deadline: Mondays at 3pm Mail to: The Classified Superstore - P.O. Box 338, Elizabethtown, NY 12932 FFax: 518-873-6360 • Phone: 518-873-6368 • Email: adirondacksnorth@theclassifiedsuperstore.com

31590


26 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

31582


August 11, 2012

www.thevalleynews.org

Valley News - 27

DON’T MISS THE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11

IT’S THAT TIME AGAIN FOR THE BETTER-AND-BETTER EVERY YEAR AND WILDLY EXCITING

AT THE FAIR! - AND -

ESSEX COUNTY FAIR

WE ARE DEMOLISHING PRICES!

August 8 - 12, 2012

2012 FORD FOCUS SE

NEW!

AUTO,, AIR,, CRUISE,, SYNC,, SPORT PK A PKG., STK# EN514

$ $

OFFER ENDS 10/1/122

Miles per year 10,500 Lease Rate* 0.75% Purchase Op $14,738 Cash Down $1,500 Due at Inception $1,796.50 Ford Retail Cust. Cash $250 Included *Tax, Title, Registration Extra

19,914 or

199 mo. / 24 mo. lease

2012 FORD EDGE SEL AWD

NEW!

SYNC SYSTEM, SIRIUS, REAR-VIEW CAMERA, 6 SPD. AUTO, STK# EN310

$

2012 FORD FUSION SE AUTO, AIR, CRUISE, PWR. WINDOWS/LOCKS/SEAT, STK# EN526

$ $

22,901 or

206 mo. / 24 mo. lease

$

189 mo. / 24 mo. lease

22012 FORD F150 SUPERCAB 4X4 XLT RRED RE EEDD CCANDY ANDY & SILVER 2-TONE, 5.0 V8, PWR. SEAT/WINDOWS/LOCKS/MIRRORS, CHROME C GRP, STK #EN387

MSRP Ford 5.0 Bonus Cash Ford Retail Cust. Cash Ford Trade Assist. FMCC Cust. Bonus Dealer Discount D

S! GORGEOU

$

31,999

OFFER ENDS 10/1/12

Miles per year 10,500 Lease Rate* 0.75% Purchase Op $15,475 Cash Down $1,500 Due at Inception $1,803.50 Ford Retail Cust. Cash $2,258 Included *Tax, Title, Registration Extra

AUTO, A AU UTO, AIR, SYNC, PWR. WINDOWS/LOCKS/ WINDOWS/LOCKS/MIRRORS, / CRUISE STK# SEN420

$34,505 -$2,000 -$1,000 -$1,510

29,995

OFFER ENDS 10/1/12

2012 2 FORD FIESTA SE

NEW!

OFFER ENDS 10/1/12

MSRP Ford Retail Cust. Cash FMCC Cust. Bonus Cash* Dealer Discount

NEW!

NEW!

OFFER ENDS 10/1/12

Miles per year 10,500 Lease Rate* 0.50% Purchase Op $12,045 Cash Down $1,500 Due at Inception $1,786.50 Ford Retail Cust. Cash $500 Included *Tax, Title, Registration Extra

2012 FORD 2012 FO F250 F25 4X4 NEW!

6.2L V8, AUTO, AIR, PW, PL, CRUISE, TRAILER TOW, SPRAY IN BEDLINER STK#EN377

OFFER ENDS 10/1/12

MSRP Ford Retail Cust. Cash Ford Retail Bonus Cash FMCC Cust. Bonus Cash* Dealer Discount

$38,075 -$500 -$2,000 -$750 -$1,000 -$1,826

$

Or choose 0%* for 60 mos.!!

$36,180 -$1,500 -$500 -$1,000 -$1,190

31,990

31939

*Requires Ford Motor Credit approval. approval All customers may not qualify. qualify

LEGALS Valley News Legal Deadline Monday @ 3:00pm Please Send Legals By EMAIL To: legals@denpubs.com

SUPREME COURT ñ COUNTY OF ESSEX NBT BANK N A T I O N A L ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff against THOMAS D. MURRAY, SR., et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on July 13, 2012. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Essex County Courthouse, Town of Elizabethtown, N.Y. on the 11th day of September, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. Said premises known as 5856 Route 86, Wilmington, N.Y. 12997.

Tax account number: SBL # : 26.7-2-9.000. Approximate amount of lien $ 102,376.10 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 1100-08. Matthew E. Douthat, Esq., Referee. Fein Such & Crane, LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 1800 First Federal Plaza Rochester, N.Y. 14614 VN-8/11-9/1/12-4TC27371 ----------------------------1970 SARANAC AVENUE LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 06/12/12. Office Location: Essex County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 8 Stanwich Rd., Greenwich, CT 06830. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. VN-7/28-9/1/12-6TC-

27274 -----------------------------

VN-8/4-8/11-12-2TC27377

NOTICE OF FORMATION of LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. DO-ZEN, LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 7/12/12. Office location: Essex County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 1586 NYS Rt. 22, Essex, NY 12936. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. VN-8/4-9/8/12-6TC27368 -----------------------------

-----------------------------

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that license #2186366 has been applied for by the undersigned to sell wine/beer at retail in a tavern, during Summer under the alcoholic beverage control law at Whiteface Operating Tenant LLC 2331 Saranac Ave., Lake Placid, NY 12946 for on-premises consumption.

LEGAL NOTICE The Zoning Board of Appeals of the Town of Willsboro will be holding a public hearing on August 21st, 2012, at 7:00pm, at the Willsboro Town Hall, to hearing the variance request of: Eugene Shlatz & Robin Ranon with a project site of 95 Corlear Drive, (Tax Map # 21.9-2-4.000), in the RL-1 district, for restoration and lot size requirements. Members of the public are encouraged to attend or send comments in writing to the secretary. Ashley Ryan Blanchard Secretary ñ Zoning Board of Appeals Town of Willsboro PO Box 370 Willsboro, NY 12996 V N - 8 / 11 / 1 2 - 1 T C 27381 ----------------------------REQUEST PROPOSALS

FOR

The Town of Essex, New York is issuing a Request for Proposals for property-casualty insurance for the 2012-2013 year. Agencies submitting proposals must be licensed to transact business in New York State and must have a A.M. Best rating of Aor better. Proposals must be received in the Office of the Town Clerk located at 2313 Main Street, PO Box 45, Essex, NY 12936, not later than 5:00 p.m. on September 20, 2012 and opened at the Regular Board meeting at 7:00 p.m. Proposals MUST be marked ìESSEX NY I N S U R A N C E PROPOSALî. Proposals received after this date will not be considered. Questions, required coverage specifications, premium quotation forms, should be directed to the Essex Town Clerk at (518) 963-4287, at the above listed address o r , townclerk@willex.com

, or downloaded from our website at www.essexnewyork.or g. The Town of Essex reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Catherine DeWolff, Town Clerk 7/30/12 V N - 8 / 11 / 1 2 - 1 T C 27384 ----------------------------PLEASE TAKE NOTE ñ RFP The Town of Essex, NY, is requesting proposals for repair/restoration work of the Town Hall building. Contractors submitting proposals must have experience in h i s t o r i c preservation/restoration. Specifications may be picked up or viewed at the Essex Town Hall, 2313 Main Street, PO Box 45, Essex, NY 12936, or viewed online at www.essexnewyork.or g. Proposals must be received in the Office of the Town Clerk, at the above listed

address no later than 3:00 pm on August 21, 2012. Responses to this RFP must be marked ìESSEX TOWN HALL PROPOSALî. Proposals received after this time will not be considered. The project will be awarded after the 6:00 p.m. Public Hearing on August 23, 2012, at the Essex Town Hall. The Town of Essex reserves the right to reject and or all proposals. Catherine DeWolff, Town Clerk 8/1/12 V N - 8 / 11 / 1 2 - 1 T C 27383 ----------------------------ADIRONDACK C O M M U N I T Y A C T I O N PROGRAMS INC., The Head Start Program has two 2001 Dodge Grand Caravans for Sale. Vehicles will be sold as is. Vans can be seen at 7572 Court Street, Suite 2, Elizabethtown, NY 12932. Interested parties will need to call to make an

appointment to see the vehicles between 8am and 4pm. For further information and more specifications, please contact Adirondack Community Action Programs, Inc. - Head Start Program at 518-873-3207 and ask for Dianne. All bids need to be received no later thank 1:00 pm on Friday August 17, 2012, at which time all bids will be opened. All bids must be submitted in writing with name and contact information. Bids to be clearly marked on outside of envelope ìSealed bid for Head Start-Van 2 or Van 3î. ACAP, Inc. reserves the right to reject any and/or all bids. Awarded bidder will be responsible to remove the van from current location. V N - 8 / 11 / 1 2 - 1 T C 27382 T T- 8 / 11 / 1 2 - 1 T C 27382 -----------------------------


28 - Valley News

www.thevalleynews.org

August 11, 2012

Route 9 Elizabethtown, NY

Dealer #7085874

518-873-6389 www.adirondackchevrolet.com

2012 BUICK REGAL

2012 CHEVROLET T MALIBU A BU 4DR SEDAN AN LS S

$

179

$

299

PER MO. 39 MONTHS HS

W/$1,619 D.A.S.* $650 ACQUISITION FEE • $0 SECURITY RITY RIT YD DEPOSIT EP POSIT PO SIT MSRP DEALER PARTICIPATION CUSTOMER DOWN GM LEASE CASH GM SUPER TIER CASH NET CAP COST:

$22,870 -$778 -$790 -$2,650 -$570 $18,082

229

HIGH MPG!! 2012 CHEVROLET 1500 EXT CAB

$

393

PER MO MO. O. 39 MONTHS ONTH ON TH HS

W/$1,579 D.A.S.*

††*

$22,125

2012 BUICK VERANO FWD

2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE 4DR SEDAN L LS S

$

159

$

316

PER MO. 39 MONTHS

W/$1,829 D.A.S.* $18,590 -$409 -$1,020 -$175 -$775 $16,200

††*

PER MO. 39 MONTHS

CR144, LOADED, 6 SPD. AUTO, RED

$650 ACQUISITION FEE • $0 SECURITY Y DEPO D DEPOSIT EPO EP PO OSIT SIT SI MSRP DEALER PARTICIPATION CUSTOMER DOWN GM LEASE CASH GM SUPER TIER CASH NET CAP COST:

PER MO. 39 MONTHS

CR80, LT, 4X4, “ALL C STAR EDITION PKG.”, S 5.3L, Z71, RED, FULLY LOADED!!

$650 ACQUISITION FEE • $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT EC CURIT TY D EP EPO E PO OS SIT SI IT T MSRP $24,335 $300 GM Lease cash and DEALER PARTICIPATION -$730 $500 GM Super Tier cash CUSTOMER DOWN -$700 (LS model only) to be used GM LEASE CASH -$300 as cap cost reduction. GM SUPER TIER CASH -$500 NET CAP COST:

PER MO. 39 MONTHS

CR49, C R FULLY LOADED, 6 SPD AUTO, BLACK

$2,650 GM Lease cash and $570 GM Super Tier cash (LS model only) to be used as cap cost reduction.

2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX 2WD 4DR WAGON LS

$

††*

$175 GM Lease cash and $775 GM Super Tier cash (LS and ECO models only) to be used as cap cost reduction.

HIGH MPG!!

CHECK OUT THESE HOT SUMMER SAVINGS ON THESE QUALITY USED VEHICLES. 2012 Chevy Impala LT

2012 Chevy Malibu LT

2011 Chevy Tahoe LT

2011 Dodge Grand Caravan “Crew”

CP244, OnStar, XM Radio, Moonroof, Fully Loaded!

AM280A, Fully Loaded, XM Radio, OnStar, Moonroof

CP241, Leather, Fully Loaded, XM Radio, OnStar

CP253, Stow & Go, Sat. Radio, Fully Loaded

19,480 OR $312/MO* 2010 Dodge Caliber SXT

20,880 OR $318/MO* 2009 Pontiac Torrent AWD

2009 Chevy Traverse LT

21,480 OR $338/MO* 2007 Chevy 1500 Ext Cab LT

CP230, Fully Loaded

CR219A, Moonroof, OnStar, XM Radio

CR114A, AWD, Fully Loaded, XM Radio, OnStar!

CP238A, 4x4, Fully Loaded, XM Radio, OnStar!

14,986 OR $228/MO* 2006 GMC Canyon SLE Crew

17,980 OR $285/MO* 2004 GMC 2500 Crew Cab 4x4

21,980 OR $349/MO* 2003 Chevy 500 Ext. Cab 4x4 LT

CR218A, 4x4, Fully Loaded, Low Miles!

CR173A, 8’ Box, Leather, 6.0L V8, Fully Loaded!

CR130B, Fully Loaded

$

$

14,980 OR $286/MO*

$

$

$

$

15,680 OR $296/MO*

*Tax not included. †10,000 miles per year, 39 month lease. All leases approved by ALLY. Must have a FICO Credit Score of 700 or more.

36,880

$

$

11,880 OR $279/MO*

$

$

15,980 OR $259/MO*

GREAT SELECTION OF PRE-OWNED VEHICLES. CALL 518-873-6389

Give Buzzy, Bruce or Bucky a call today for more great everyday savings! 518-873-6389

31942

$

31941

*TAX, TITLE, REG. NOT INCLUDED. †† 10,000 MILES PER YEAR/39 MONTH LEASE. ** MUST OWN GM PRODUCT. ALL LEASES APPROVED BY ALLY. MUST HAVE A FICO CREDIT SCORE OF 700 OR MORE. INCENTIVE PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTIFICATION. SEE DEALER FOR COMPLETE DETAILS.


TL_08-11-2012_Edition