Page 1


Dean Williams

Part 2 Year 1

Progress Book

the architecture the the architecture architecture

distillery distillery distillery


the architecture distillery/ contents

contents ___

1.0/ _____

East London

2.0/ _____

The UK Higher Education System

___ ___

3.0/ _____

The Changing University

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research

5.0/ _____

University Case Studies

6.0/ _____

Programme Development

7.0/ _____

Form Development

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery

___ ___ ___ ___ ___


the architecture distillery/ east London

1.0/ _____

East London Getting to know the area The region referred to as east London is now divided into north and south sub regions. The northern sub region contains both of the main metropolitan centres - Romford and Ilford, in addition, it is also home to to five other major centres - Walthamstow, Stratford Canary Wharf, East Ham and Barking. East London has always been an area constantly under development and expansion, currently vast amounts of the region are under development under the Thames Gateway project and Olympic Park Legacy Plans. Opportunity areas have also been highlighted at various points within the region, the City Fringe, Canary Wharf and the Lower Lea Valley are all areas being targeted for development. Historically east London is no stranger to regeneration. Tower Hamlets and Hackney - the oldest parts of the region - were unified to create the County of London in 1888, the eastern boundary of which was the Lower Lea Valley and the beginning of Essex. Relaxed planning laws, industrialisation and London’s rapidly increasing population meant expansion occurred extremely quickly, leading to the fragmented and diverse east London of today. Right: Figure ground map showing the north sub region of east London meeting the River Lea and the River Thames.


the architecture distillery/ east London

1.0/ _____

East London Observing the City

Walking around east London it is possible to see elements of it’s history solidified in architecture. The region struggles to find a balance between the ‘shiny’ new buildings of modern master plans and the old industrial buildings of days gone by. Many spaces feel as though they are ominously waiting for something to happen - be this the development of the next section of the masterplan or the influx of new residents in accordance with population growth predictions at the time of construction. It is not just the buildings that present these rhetorical commentaries but the also the inhabitants, both old and new. Gated communities and private land in public clothing cause an unwritten tension, occasionally bearing its head in the form of graffiti or often witty posters, both of which completed under the radar of the private security officers watch. There is an attitude of ‘you can do what you want - just as long as it’s not on my land.’

Above: An almost full housing estate, protected by private security but lacking a sense of place. Gazebo coverings protect car parking bays. ‘The short narrow street of the slum succeeds where spacious recevelopment frequently fails.’ Alison and Peter Smithson

Left: ‘Sitting on walls getting moved on lots of hanging about’ A homemade sign placed next to a redundant and tired looking basketball hoop speaks of the tension between security and people gathering in deceptively public space.


the architecture distillery/ east London

1.0/ _____

East London Observing the City

Above: Leftover space surrounding and underneath this flyover. Perfect for a community cinema enclosure.

The layering of space and gradual development of land leaves leftover spaces dotted around the region. Developers see it as land that cannot or is not valuable enough to be developed. Spaces that would have been developed in the unplanned era of east London do not fit within the rules of modern planning criteria. The Olympic site has produced plans entailing methods of social cohesions subsequent to the removal of the boundary fence. It will be interesting to see how the new slender objects of the Olympics are intended to stitch themselves into the surrounding, well established communities.

Above: Almost finished mega structure that is the Olympic Stadium - an emblem of successful cohesion or a visiting spaceship? Right: The gradual development of east London has led to some interesting anomalies. This recently added fire exit shows the growth of the floor level inside and the intensification of planning law.


UK Higher Education Research


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

Development Quality

ÂŁ9,0 Community

Service

High Standard

Excellence

Best Experience

Inc


Procedure y Assurance

000

Corporation

What are we talking about?

clusive


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

2.0/ _____

The State of Higher Education in the UK University Futures: A Public Discussion

Does a shift toward a marketised education system really alter the way knowledge is disseminated and created? If students start to hold their tutors more accountable for the knowledge they receive at University, tutors will be pressured into ensuring the knowledge they disseminate is standardised in order to make sure students receive a ‘fair’ education equivalent to their investment. This removes the ‘open forum’ element that has proved so valuable in the history of Universities around the world, where students and tutors learn from one another as a community. A marketised education system tilts and adds pressure to this relationship, pushing it more toward that of a customer- service provider understanding. Academic thought switches to a more linear format with students being spoon fed the same information. Privatisation of higher education will lead to a gradual decrease in students recognising the importance of less or non-quantifiable influences. You are buying an education not paying for the opportunity to learn. By marketising the higher education system, employability will be marketised. Not everything learnt and taught at Universities can be quantified and nor should it be. The current transfer of government University debt to the public is a quick way to make savings. Higher education in the UK has hung in a precarious balance between government policy and the state of the economy. Is public funded University dependable? Left: The public discussion attended by University staff and students.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

The State of Higher Education in the UK Reassessing UK Higher Education

University in the United Kingdom has changed greatly over the years and this change is set to continue. The rise in tuition fees has brought questions regarding the purpose and requirement of Higher Education to the forefront of societal discussion. Education has moved away from it’s civic roots and is now headed toward a more privatised existence. Can the changes in Higher Education be attributed solely to changes in the economy, political party policy or public interest? Buying your own education is in a way, investing in your own GDP. Students are making themselves more marketable for the global economy in which they will enter upon completion of University. Both the student and the University are heavily dependent on the economy. Surely the fate of the UK’s graduates and societal emancipation not should be so closely dependent on an such an ultimately unpredictable entity. % 1.5 1.2 0.9 0.6 0.3 0.0 -0.3 -0.6 -0.9 -1.2 -1.5 -1.8 -2.1 -2.4 -2.7 -3.0 -3.3 -3.6 -3.9 -4.2

19 9 19 0 9 19 1 9 19 2 93 19 94 19 95 19 96 19 9 19 7 98 19 9 20 9 0 20 0 0 20 1 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 0 20 6 07 20 0 20 8 0 20 9 10

2.0/ _____

Year Above: UK GDP fluctuation from 1990 - 2010


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

2,2 s tu 36, de 265 nt s

19 9 19 0 9 19 1 9 19 2 9 19 3 94 19 9 19 5 9 19 6 9 19 7 98 19 9 20 9 00 20 0 20 1 02 20 0 20 3 0 20 4 0 20 5 0 20 6 07 20 0 20 8 0 20 9 10

% 1.5 1.2 0.9 0.6 0.3 0.0 -0.3 -0.6 -0.9 -1.2 -1.5 -1.8 -2.1 -2.4 -2.7 -3.0 -3.3 -3.6 -3.9 -4.2

2,0 s tu 00, de 000 n 1,9 ts s tu 48, de 135 nt s

The State of Higher Education in the UK Reassessing UK Higher Education

62 stu 1,00 de 0 nt s

2.0/ _____

Year Above: UK GDP graph against political party and student numbers.

Evolution of funding and tuition fee prices

1945-1980

LEA pays for tuition fees and maintenance loan

Free

621,000 students

1980-1996

Government cuts funding, amount dependant on performance and efficiency.

Free

2,000,000 students

1997

Fees introduced. Loans and maintenance income assessed.

£1000

1,948,135 students

2004

Rise in tuition fees. Loans and maintenance income assessed.

£3000

2,236,265 students

2012

Rise in tuition fees. Loans and maintenance income assessed.

£9000

? students


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

2.0/

Raising tuition fees may help the government to make savings and save our economy from recession but this has dangerous unseen repercussions for society. Student numbers may not fall dramatically but marketising our higher education system is a step in the wrong direction. University education should not be a symbol of wealth, nor should it be exclusively for the rich. The more students have to pay for their education the more they will start to question what they are receiving for their money - changing the University from a civic institute to a something more akin to a corporation. What is a University today? What do we expect Universities to do?


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Private Universities

Private Universities are those that work independently from government, however many receive public subsidies and public student loans and grants. Private Universities can be categorised as either private for profit or private charitable, the only two private Universities in the UK serve as examples of both funding typologies with BPP University College- a private for profit institution and The University of Buckingham- a private charitable University. In addition to these Universities, there are a number of private degree awarding bodies in the UK, but which have not been granted University status by Royal Charter. Ashridge Business School, ifs School of Finance and The College of Law are all privately funded charitable bodies. With the recent rise in tuition fees, students are looking at all avenues of education to make sure that they are getting value for their money. In some cases, a private University education is now cheaper than a public University education.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Private Institution Spending and Expenditure

Income

Expenditure Architectural Association

The College of Law

Ashridge Business School

IFS School of Finance

University of Buckingham

BPP University College

Charitable Activities

Investment

Profitable Activities

Governance

Voluntary

Other

Trading to raise funds

% profit

Profit


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

The Changing University The price of a private degree

International

Undergraduate

UK/EU

3.0/ _____

£15,000 £21,000 3 Year BA

£18,000 £18,000 2 Year BA

£22,000 £31,000 2 Year BA

£18,000£21,000 3 Year BA

£84,000 5 Year BA

£21,000 2 Year MA

£23,000 2 Year MA

£12,000 2 Year MA

£15,000 2 Year BA

£20,000 1 Year BA

BPP University College

College of Law

University of Buckingham

ifs School of Finance

Architectural Association

Postgraduate


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Student: Tutor ratios at UK Private Institutions

BPP University College 1:18

College of Law 1:10

ifs School of Finance 1:8

University of Buckingham

1:15

Architectural Association 1:8


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Average Private Institution Student: Tutor Ratios

Private Charitable 1:9

Private Profitable 1:18


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University The Captive Student

Students are key to knowledge, it is vital that a University in the new economy realises the best way to create and maintain knowledge in order to succeed. Research is as key as taught knowledge.

‘In the new economy, knowledge is a critical raw material to be mined and extracted from any unprotected site, patented, copyrighted, trademarked, or held as a trade secret, then sold in the marketplace for profit.’

Branding the student whilst they are a ‘captive market’ helps to ensure any student output or success can also be branded. Records of alumni are important to trace success.

Students and their successes are valuable to both the employment marketplace and the University marketplace. Good results = High standard of entrants = Higher fees.

The University as

marketer


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University The Captive Student

Students Funding from student loans or private funding

Tradable students

Students Output/ product to corporate sector Contribution to economy

Branded students UNIVERSITY Captive market

This does not mean that Universities will have to become ‘corporatised.’ Universities are going to have to change, but they need to remain civic institutions. How can corporate influences and pressures on Universities be managed in a civic manner?

Students Funding from student loans or private funding. Funding could be sourced from business relationships or work produced by the University.

Community involvement and participation

Tradable students Branded students UNIVERSITY Captive market

Bring the corporate sector into University Captive market New networks that intermediate between public and private sectors. Captive market Relationships with local businesses Community involvement and participation

Building relationships between Universities, the local community and local businesses will place the University firmly back in the civic sector. The boundary between work produced at the University and work produced by local businesses could be blurred, with students having the option to join local businesses after they finish their studies. Local business owners could become tutors, and tutors at the University could become part time employees of local companies.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Cooperative Education

Could a cooperative form of education be a better model for higher education?

Above: Herman Schneider

Whilst Herman Schneider (1872–1939), engineer, architect, and educator, was studying at University he realised that the traditional classroom was insufficient for technical students. Having seen that those students with employment experience while studying had achieved better results, he interviewed students and employers to gather data. His research led him to write the cooperative education framework (1901). Schneider joined the University of Cincinnati after graduating as an assistant professor and worked his way through the University ranks to become Dean of the school of Engineering. His success was largely based on his work pioneering and implementing cooperative education. Since the success of Cincinnati, various Universities and institutions have based their education framework around cooperative education. Between 1972 and 1982 world leaders in education from Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, the Netherlands, the Philippines, the United States and the United Kingdom formed the World Council and Assembly on Cooperative Education to foster co-operative education around the world.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Cooperative Education

Cooperative education models There are two models of cooperative education: 1 -Students alternate a semester of academic course work with an equal amount of time in paid employment, this cycle is repeated until graduation. 2- The day is split between school and work Both co-op models include school based and work based learning, in addition students will benefit from ‘connecting activities’ such as seminars and teacher coordination work site visits.

Cooperative education benefits Students gain: motivation, career clarity, enhanced employability and vocational maturity. Employers gain: labour force flexibility, recruitment/retention of trained workers, input into curricula. Institution gains: As above + community and business integration, wholesome curricula, high employability numbers. Society gains: As above + a working learning community, ability to influence both business and education, jobs, social economy.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Self Taught Curriculum Autodidacticism Autodidacticism is the way in which many of the most famous and influential architects were trained. The term means to teach oneself something, and architects such as Mies Van Der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright and Tadao Ando were self taught. Today, most countries do not recognise this as a form of education or training, protecting the term architect and the profession from self trained architects. I think it is important for these legislations to exist to ensure continuity in training and that the correct standards are passed on in architectural education, but with the legislation of the ARB and the RIBA it is important to recognise that the route they recognise to becoming an architect is not the sole route. Architectural education should encompass a wide variety of disciplines as the architect, especially today needs to be aware of influences from all elements of life, including politics, science, maths, history and philosophy to name a few. Jean Prouve was first a structural engineer. Le Corbusier was a decorative arts. Tadau Ando started as a draftsman. Eileen Gray studied fine art. Mies Van Der Rohe was a stone carver and designer. Frank Lloyd Wright was a draftsman.

Le Corbusier describes the practice of architecture as an ‘environment changing with new technologies, sciences and legislations. All architects must be autodidacts for keeping up to date with new standards, new regulations, or new methods.’ Vers un Architecture Le Corbusier


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Un-schooling Un-schooling is a form of education that believes you can learn through your natural life experiences, including household responsibilities, work experience and social interaction, rather than through a traditional school curriculum. This method of education involves the exploration of activities, often initiated by the student and facilitated by the tutor. The emphasis is more on maximising the education of each individual child, as opposed to ensuring a certain standard is met as wholly as possible throughout a whole class, or student group. The philosophy recognises that: not everyone learns in the same way children and adolescents are natural learners people are prepared to learn at different ages It is more important to learn how to learn than to learn a specific subject Sudbury School Model The Sudbury School model is a non-coercive, cooperative form of schooling similar to the principles of un-schooling. It believes that there is no need for a set curriculum to prepare people for the world of work. Emphasis is placed on learning as a by-product of all human activity and is self motivated and initiated. People from all age groups mix and ideas are exchanged. This provides sufficient exposure to topics for further research and learning. There are no tests or evaluations, students are the only ones designing their education - this has similar traits to the architectural education at most UK Universities.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Unschooling Room 13 is an artist run studio and cafe, recently added to Hareclive Primary School for its students. The studio acts as an autonomous space for creativity, students are allowed to enter the studio after school or during lessons if they have completed their work. The studio allows students to feel as though they run the space, there is no curriculum and students can create what they wish and have fun. The space is highly flexible, with tables, lighting and power points dictating internal arrangement.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University De Schooling Society

A discussion on the state of education systems in ‘modern’ economies ‘Universal education through schooling is not feasible. It would be no more feasible if it were attempted by means of alternative institutions built on the style of present schools. Neither new attitudes of teachers toward their pupils nor the proliferation of educational hardware or software (in classroom or bedroom), nor finally the attempt to expand the pedagogue’s responsibility until it engulfs his pupils’ lifetimes will deliver universal education. The current search for new educational funnels must be reversed into the search for their institutional inverse: educational webs which heighten the opportunity for each one to transform each moment of his living into one of learning, sharing, and caring. We hope to contribute concepts needed by those who conduct such counterfoil research on education-and also to those who seek alternatives to other established service industries.’ Ivan Illich


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University De Schooling Society

‘Schools are in crisis, and so are the people who attend them.’ ‘By turning knowledge into a commodity, we have learned to deal with it as with provate property.’ ‘Schools have lost their unquestioned claim to educational ligitimacy. Most of their critics still demand a painful and radical reform of the school, but a quickly expanding minority will not stand for anything short of the prohibition of compulsory attendance and the disqualification of academic certificates.’ ‘Data and skills an individual might have acquired shape into exploratory, creative, open-ended, and personal meaning only when they are used om dialectic encounter. And this requires the guaranteed freedom for every individual to state, each day, the class of issue which he wants to discuss, the class of creative use of a skill in which he seeks to match - to make this bid known - and, within reason, to find the circumstances to meet with peers who join his class.’ Ivan Illich Ivan Illich not only speaks of the problems with schooling but about the implications our methods of schooling have on society as a whole. He points to an autodidactic style of education, which would be balanced with organised social interaction and informal arrangements between student and teacher. He argues that by de industrialising and de-institutionalising schooling, society too will be deinstitutionalised.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Changing Education Paradigms

Public education needs to be reformed, the current system of education was designed and conceived at the time of the enlightenment and in the economic circumstances of the industrial revolution. Our education system is modelled on the insterests of industrialism and in the image of it. Schools still operate like factories - ringing bells, subject specialised, children batch educated and age grouped. Why? It was developed around the idea that there were academics and non academics, and that certain people were therefore only fit for certain careers. The way in which we teach is not in line with the way we learn - today’s society provides many more interesting things to grab children’s attention, we are attempting to distract children from these interesting sources of infirmation to teach them in a relatively boring manner. The arts are victims of this mentality. They are based on the aesthetic experience, when your senses are fully interactive - our education system attempts to shut off sensory experiences in order to learn facts in a preplanned order. Children should be woken up to learn with their senses and explore all that is available to them. We have to head in the opposite direction to standardisation, think differently about human capacity, get over the grouping of people as academics, non academics etc as this is a myth and recognise that most great learning happens in groups. Habits and habitats of education need to change to reflect this.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Architectural Education Does an architecture school need to be RIBA accredited? Does an architect need to be RIBA accredited?

Private/ private charitable

Marketing Cooperative

Education franchise and brand

Hotel franchise and brand

Different Universities, same criteria for RIBA acceptance.

Different hotels, same criteria for Best Western acceptance.

Worldwide superbrand

Worldwide superbrand

Dissemination of knowledge and prestige through RIBA University membership.

Dissemination of brand and prestige through franchise membership.

Nonprofit

Nonprofit

The RIBA brand ensures a good standard of overall teaching across the Universities teaching architecture. If a brand is capable of gaining recognition through consistent excellence, it too could thrive in a similar manner to the RIBA. Money made in both private charitable and cooperative businesses is rechannelled back into the institution to ensure it’s future. A cooperative setup allows the share holders the ability to alter through democratic vote the way in which the institution is run.

A similar franchise model could be build around a new cooperative University, where it’s purpose would be to facilitate and maintain working relationships between local businesses, the community and the University.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Architectural Education

How does the RIBA spend its money? 8%

2%

1% 12%

9% 46%

54% 19% 10%

19% 16% 6% Consolidated Income 2008 £38,428

Consolidated Expenditure 2008 £37,583

RIBA Enterprises Subscriptions Venues

How the Subscription Fee Income is Spent RIBA Membership: £365 per annum

Other Income Regional Income Building Capability to Increase Reach and Impact Interest and Rent Recievable Improving the Quality of Design Delivery Campaigning for Good Design Other

Campaigning for good design

Improving the quality of its delivery

Subscription Other income

Building capability to increase reach and impact


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Architectural Education

Final two day examination based on 2 years post part 2 experience, career evaluation, case studies and both written and oral examinations.

The current RIBA architect education process is depicted as being extremely linear. Mixing professional and academic elements will benefit the profession and the student. Once you are trained as an architect, your skills can be channelled back into educating the next generation.

Architect

Two years working in practice with a higher level of responsibility.

Part 3

Two years full time postgraduate degree furthering architectural knowledge and project complexity.

Professional Experience 2

At least one year paid work in an architectural practice. Studies recorded and checked by University tutor.

Part 2

Three year full time undergraduate degree learning a broad range of skills and architectural understanding.

Professional Experience 1

Part 1

Current RIBA Educational Process

Having attained part 1,2 and 3 you can now register with the Architects Registration Board (ARB).


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Architectural Education How do we build an architect? In order to become an architect, it is necessary for a student to absorb a variety of information, and be exposed to a number of specialist activities. The architect must be able to negate a minefield of knowledge in explaining his or her decisions without actually being a specialist in any of the subjects being discussed. The study of architecture is neither completely vocational, nor is it academic. It is vital that the architect receives a variety of academic and vocational lessons in his or her education. What would happen if you could mould your own curriculum under the guidance of professionals? Before the RIBA education architects were educated in all manner of ways. With the option for active or passive involvement in lessons on offer, a curriculum could be tailor made. Using this system of education, students could mix and match vocational and academic lessons depending on the students intended profession. This system would allow students to change their mind whilst in education if they so desired.


the architecture distillery/ higher education in the UK

3.0/ _____

The Changing University Architectural Education

Michelle

James

Year One (Active engagement compulsory for all students) -

Year One

Actively studies Building Actively studies Design Actively studies Complementary Studies

Active Building Active Design Active Complementary Studies Year Two

Year Two Active Design Active Complementary Passive Building

Active Design Passive Complementary Passive Building Year Three

Year Three Active Design Active Complementary Passive Building

Active Design Active Building Passive Complementary


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives Auburn University, Rural Studio Rural Studio is an architecture practice run by Auburn University. Each year the studio builds around 5 residential and/or community projects for poor communities in west Alabama. The studio aims to improve living conditions in Alabama whilst practically educating students. Rural Studio believe architecture should be created from within, not from outside. Materials and design inspiration are sought locally, which leads to sustainable and quite radical proposals. “Architecture, more than any other art form, is a social art and must rest on the social and cultural base of its time and place. For those of us who design and build, we must do so with an awareness of a more socially responsive architecture. The practice of architecture not only requires participation in the profession but it also requires civic engagement. As a social art, architecture must be made where it is and out of what exists there. The dilemma for every architect is how to advance our profession and our community with our talents rather than our talents being used to compromise them. People and place matter. Architecture is a continually developing profession now under the influence of consumer-driven culture… It is not prudent to sit back as architects and rely on the corporate world’s scientists and technology experts to decide which problems to solve. It is in the architect’s own interest to assert his or her values — values that respect, we should hope, the greater good. The professional challenge, whether one is an architect in the rural American South or elsewhere in the world, is how to avoid being so stunned by the power of modern technology and economic affluence that one does not lose sight of the fact that people and place matter. ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ This is the most important thing because nothing else matters. In doing so, an architect will act on a foundation of decency which can be built upon. Go above and beyond the call of a ‘smoothly functioning conscience’; help those who aren’t likely to help you in return, and do so even if nobody is watching!” “The Rural Studio” by Samuel Mockbee


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives

An example of a house built by Rural Studio for the poor community. Perry Lake Park walking bridge and tower. Rural Studio has a real world impact whilst educating its students. It has established a partnership with poorer communities - improving their living conditions whilst providing students with practical building knowledge and experience with the community. Rural Studio proves that there are more possibilities outside of a linear curriculum, opportunities can be forged at local level, and can even be specific to each student.


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives School for Construction Trades New York

The High School For Construction Trades Engineering and Architecture in New York was established in 2006 and offers three year construction courses to school leavers. The School is separated into three academies - architecture, engineering and construction trades. Each student studies for three years. First year students explore each of the three fields and are taught accordingly. Second year students choose which academy they would like to join. Third year students will finish their studies, whilst engaging with local relevant companies. The architects planned each of the buildings multicoloured elevations to signify a different school function: the L-shaped re brick volume contains CAD and mechanical drafting labs, a grey striped precast concrete volume houses the auditorium; and a yellow insulated metal panel volume contains the library. The heart of the building is a two storey lobby that is defined by the intersection of all the different volume materials, and provides a flexible space for the display of student drawings and construction projects. The design and construction of the building enables the building to be used as a teaching tool, and highlight the various career options open to perspective and current students. View of the school, facing the auditorium and library.


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives Research and Training Centre for the Construction Trades Canada.

6

5

Entrance

4 1

3

2

7 8

9

10

11

12

16 13

14

15

The Research and Training Centre for the Construction Industries is based around the concept that construction studies need to be taught in a ‘hands on’ manner. Large space is also allocated for multi- purpose activities allowing staff and students space to exhibit their work, research and models. The social spaces are located toward the centre of the plan, around the entrance with the workshops immediately adjoining. Upon entering the building, visitors will be able to glimpse the commotion and activity as students cross between the various working spaces, past the cafe and exhibition spaces. Tutorials and seminars are held in purpose built rooms on the first floor, away from the commotion. The arrangement of workspaces and student destinations causes this area to become a critical hub of activity, a place where interaction between all students and tutors is regular. The difference in line style indicates the difference in journey function, a dashed line is more likely to be students not working on practical work and tutors travelling from their offices. 1 Multi Purpose Room 2 Reception/administration 3 Agora 4 Computer Room 5 Resource/ work 6 Teacher Office 7 General Storage 8 Kitchen /Cafe 9 Construction Workshop

10 Welding Workshop 11 Welding Workshop 12 Electricity Workshop 13 Research Laboratory 14 Research Laboratory 15 Research Laboratory 16 Research Laboratory


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives

Agora - The Agora is a ‘place of assembly’ in ancient Greek city-states. They have been used as places of gathering to hear important announcements, and more recently are used as marketplaces. The twin function of the Agora led to the invention of two Greek verbs - αγοράζω agorázō “I shop” and αγορεύω, agoreúō “I speak in public.” Agoraphobia - a fear of critical public situations. A Greek agora situated in the middle of the city centre.

An agora element could be useful in housing the expansion of various programmatic elements. This dual use space can also house circulation and increase the autodidactic nature of the building as lessons can be overseen or discovered whilst traversing the University.


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives Bauhaus House of Construction Weimar Walter Gropius Staatliches Bauhaus revolutionised the way in which design and construction was taught, approaching the subject in a nontraditional manner. Instead, the school recognised the broad spectrum of interests and disciplines that design encompassed, and as a result, needed to be included in the way in which design was being taught. The school strived to bring together all the arts, it acted as a platform for experimentation, especially after the fall of the German monarchy and defeat in World War I. The Bauhaus school is best known for it’s International Style, which revolved around the fact that there should be no distinction between form and function as all products of design should be in harmony with their function.

Exploded volumetric studies of spaces within the Bauhaus.

Basement

Architecture Department Technical School Living amenities Circulation Core Workshop Shared Student Facilities Administration

Ground

First

Second


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives The Bauhaus school is spread over three wings, north, south and east. Each of these areas are linked to the main core and entrance to the building. The technical school on the basement and ground floor uses the ground floor workshop whilst the technical school on the first floor uses the workshop space on the second floor. The design accommodates student living quarters which it refers to as studio space, situated above the single storey east block. The east block accommodates mainly shared living and student space, including the auditorium, canteen, baths, launderette and changing rooms. Living and learning are removed from one another but still physically connected. Views from the student accommodation are due east, so do not look over the school, but out of Dessau to the sprawling countryside. The architecture department was a late addition to the building, and so slightly altered the original intention of the bridge section. The bridge on the second floor would have either been more administration/school offices or a continuation of the workshop already situated in the south block.

The Bauhaus School of Construction Weimar.


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives

3

1

2

Bauhaus Basement 1 Baths/ Gymnasium / Changing Rooms / Laundry 2 Stage workshop / printing shop/ dye-works/ sculpture studio/ packing and stock rooms/ caretakers apartment/ boiler room + coal cellar 3 Laboratories/ classrooms


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives

2

2

10

1

1

6 2

2

7

9 11 12

5

8

3

5 10

19

19 25

24

22 23

13 26 15

14

16

Bauhaus Ground 1 Laboratory 2 Classroom 3 Physics room 4 Hall 5 Porch 6 Lockers 7 Toilets 8 Cloakroom 9 Display room 10 Materials 11 Master 12 Room for foreman 13 Cabinetmaking workshop 14 Machine shop 15 Veneer workshop 16 Washroom

Single-storey block 17 Kitchen 18 Pantry 19 Vestibule 20 Serving Counter 21 Student room 22 Canteen 23 Terrace 24 Stage 25 Auditorium 26 Playground

20

17

21

18


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives

4

4 2

4

3

4

1

4

5 6 7 8 9

13 15 16

12 14

11 10

25 26

26

26

26

26

26

24

17 18

23

19 20 21

22

Bauhaus - Second Technical School

Workshop building

1 Vestibule 2 Hall 3 Materials 4 Classroom

9 Lecture room 10 Vestibule 11 Studio 12 Studio 13 Galvanizing 14 Soldering 15 Metalwork 16 Master 17 Machine room 18 Smithy crafts 19 Master 20 Wardrobe 21 Washroom 22 Workshop 23Wall painting 24 Varnishing

Bridge 5 Stack room 6 Architecture department 7 Teacher 8 Office Studio wing 25 Toilets 26 Studio

26


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives

The Bauhaus curriculum, showing the progression of complexity from the basic course to building.

The Bauhaus proposed a fresh and innovative approach to creative education, allowing students to choose their subject areas and be in an environment where experimentation and cross pollination of ideas was encouraged both by the curriculum and the layout of the Bauhaus itself. This creative curriculum attracted a plethora of important artists and designers as tutors, which built a strong reputation for the school. Students at the Bauhaus took a six-month preliminary course that involved painting and elementary experiments with form, after which followed three years of workshop training by two masters: one artist, one craftsman. Students studied architecture in theory and in practice, working on the actual construction of buildings.


the architecture distillery/precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives

Bauhaus Key Dimensions and Ratios Library: 15sqm (0.09sqm per student) Studio accommodation: 4sqm (4sqm per student) Technical classroom space: 578sqm (3.4sqm per student) Workshop space: 620sqm (3.7sqm per student) Living amenity space: 246sqm (1.4sqm per student) Architecture department: 92sqm Bauhaus administration space: 92sqm Cafeteria space: 285sqm (1.7sqm per student) Prelim workshop: 160sqm (0.9sqm per student) Metal Workshop: 160sqm (0.9sqm per student) Machine rooms: 130sqm (0.8sqm per student) Wood workshops: 579sqm (3.4sqm per student)


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives Oslo School of Architecture

Library Entrance

The new Oslo School of Architecture is based in an existing building from 1938, located by the Akerselva River in the eastern part of Oslo. The school is part of a larger effort to revitalise this former industrial area for education-related use. The long-term aim is a campus for arts education along the riverbank. The ground floor is occupied by communal functions such as canteen, auditoria an exhibition spaces, workshops an library. All design studios and teaching rooms are on the 1st floor, with a view of the open interior courtyard. Offices for the research- and administration staff are on the 2nd floor. The interior is intended to retain the workshop character of the existing building. The existing concrete structure has been exposed an chalk-blasted, and all cutting surfaces are left untreated.

Library 595.8 sqm for 600 students 0.9 sqm per student.


the architecture distillery/ precedent research

4.0/ _____

Precedent Research Architecture School Alternatives View into the corridor shaped library. A sandblasted raw aesthetic surrounds the rows of architecture books.

The materiality of the University is similar to that of the style used by Lacaton and Vassal. Sandblasted concrete columns, reception desk and ceiling together with the screeded floor create a shell like feel to the library, where the space is a backdrop to the book collection.


University Case Studies


the architecture distillery/ The University and the City

5.0/ _____

The University and the City The University of Sussex The University of Sussex is nestled in the Sussex downs, surrounded by Stanmer Park to the west of the campus. Sussex works as an autonomous learning village, benefitting from the quiet countryside but only being 4 miles from the city of Brighton and Hove. The campus is served by the A27, Falmer rail station and a regular bus service making travel to Brighton or London relatively easy. The campus is orientated mainly around the pedestrian, with car routes leading to car parks in each of the campus quarters. The University of Sussex is situated 4 miles from the city of Brighton and Hove. The campus contains everything a student technically requires to study, with student halls grouped together to form a village like atmosphere. Despite this students regularly travel into Brighton on the train or bus, which run straight from the campus into the Brighton centre. Variety of choice and the possibility of meeting non Sussex students are bound to be two of the benefits to leaving campus. Sussex University and the city of Brighton and Hove benefit from a parasitical relationship, with each sharing the benefits of the student population. Sussex is withdrawn from the metropolitan atmosphere of Brighton, instead encouraging a feeling of retreat and contemplation. The placement of the campus 4 miles out of Brighton makes a distinction between the learning realm of the students and the living realm of the public. People from Brighton do not feel drawn to the Sussex campus, but the students of Sussex are drawn to the city. Right: Figure ground map showing The University of Sussex and its geographical relationship with the City of Brighton and Hove. Statistics Total students: 12,415 Undergrad: 9,115 Postgraduate: 3,300 Part-time: 443 International: 21% Mature: 18% Male: female 43:57 Staff: 2120 Typical offers: 300-360 UCAS points Applicants per place: 8


the architecture distillery/ The University and the City

5.0/ _____

The University and the City The University of Sussex

The University of Sussex is formed of an intricate network of passageways that link courtyards and open spaces surrounded by academic buildings. Students work their way through these passageways, using them in much the same way as they would use the Laines in Brighton.


the architecture distillery/ The University and the City

5.0/ _____

The University and the City The University of Sussex

In addition to the intricate passageway network there are also main corridors which allow visitors to navigate the campus more easily. These corridors also create striking view corridors, framing certain views and/ or particular buildings. In this case, the Arts Centre A building is in the distance which contains one of the main lecture theatres.


the architecture distillery/ The University and the City

5.0/ _____

The University and the City The University of Sussex

The cloistered links between courtyards and open spaces allows students to feel as though they are moving within the University, even when they are outside. These covered walkways and lanes create an educational city within the Sussex Downs.


the architecture distillery/ The University and the City

5.0/ _____

The University and the City The University of Sussex

3

2 3 1

Above: Figure Ground Plan of Sussex Campus The intricate network of passages sprawls from the A23 to the far west of the site where the student accommodation is situated. The whole campus is situated within vast amounts of fields and greenery, beyond the passageways there are no buildings for miles. Student accommodation mimics the city in that each row acts as its own street, with local facilities. 1- Student accommodation zone 2- Events and conference buildings with associated car parking 3- Academic buildings


the architecture distillery/ The University and the City

5.0/ _____

The University and the City The University of Sussex

1 3

2

4 5 8 6

9

7

10

A ground floor figure ground plan reveals a porous and complicated network both inside and outside the academic buildings. It is almost as though students and staff can ‘bleed’ through the University from one space to another effortlessly. Each constituent part of the University appears as though it has evolved over time, knitting itself together. 1- Green Space 2- Arts Building A 3- Courtyard with pond 4- Lecture Hall 5- Arterial circulation route

6- Arts Building B, English School Offices 7- Cloister 8- Lecture Hall 9- Auditorium 10- Creative Arts Centre


the architecture distillery/ The University and the City

5.0/ _____

The University and the City The University of Sussex

Axonometric showing in more detail both the cloistered walkways that connect academic buildings and an arterial route leading from the campus entrance straight through the entire University. Students have the option to walk around the campus via the scenic route or they can cut straight through the buildings. The scenic option provides numerous locations for students to study or congregate.


the architecture distillery/ Architecture School Programme

5.0/ _____

Brighton Architecture Department The University of Brighton The University of Brighton architecture department is situated in Mithras House, to the north of Brighton city centre. Mithras House is a reconditioned electrical engineering factory building, which was re purposed by the University in the 1980’s, it is home to both the Brighton Business School and the School of Architecture and Design. The School of Architecture occupies the entire third floor, with the Business School distributed over the lower two floors. The southern half of the third floor is home to the first year architecture students and the interior architecture school, the northern half houses the remaining undergraduate students as well as those studying for postgraduate qualifications. Located between these halves is the reception area, staff offices, computer and printing facilities and the small and large galleries. These galleries are general purpose spaces which can be altered to house large seminars, crits or areas for large scale model making. The School prides itself on its creative ethos and attempts to harness the energy and environmental and social agenda of being situated in Brighton itself. The atmosphere and teaching within the school is informal and friendly, the studios are designed to reflect this. Moveable partitions allow students to expand or contract studio space dependent on their requirements at specific points in time and tutor offices open onto the studio floor allowing a free flow of student : tutor contact. Courses on Offer Architecture RIBA Part 1 BA(Hons) Architecture RIBA Part 2 MArch Architecture RIBA Part 3 PGDip MRes in Arts and Cultural Research Interior Architecture BA(Hons) Interior Design MA Architectural and Urban Studies MA Studio Space Breakdown Studio 1380m² Exhibition 254m² Computer 95m² Theatre 150m² Workshop 195m² Laboratories 0m² Administration 317m² Toilets 58m² Circulation 221m² Plant room 100m² Total 2770m²


the architecture distillery/ The University of Brighton Architecture Department

5.0/ _____

Brighton Architecture Department Programme Information

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4

Architecture RIBA Part 1 BA(Hons) Course Structure Year 1 Year 2

Architecture RIBA Part 2 MArch Course Structure Design studio Professional Placement History and Theory


the architecture distillery/ The University of Brighton Architecture Department

5.0/ _____

Brighton Architecture Department Student and Staff Numbers Personnel TOILET

CNC 3D PRINTER CNC TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER SCANNER COMPUTER PLOTTER COMPUTER PLOTTER PRINTER PLOTTER PRINTER LASER CUTTER PRINTER LASER CUTTER 3D PRINTER LASER CUTTER 3D PRINTER

CNC

Tutors 30 TOILET

CNC 3D PRINTER CNC TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER SCANNER COMPUTER PLOTTER COMPUTER PLOTTER PRINTER PLOTTER PRINTER LASER CUTTER PRINTER LASER CUTTER 3D PRINTER LASER CUTTER 3D PRINTER

Research Staff 30 TUTOR TOILET

TUTOR

RESEARCH TUTOR

UG RESEARCH TUTOR STUDENT

UG RESEARCH PGSTUDENT STUDENT

UG PGSTUDENT STUDENT

RESEARCH TUTOR

UG RESEARCH TUTOR STUDENT

UG RESEARCH PGSTUDENT STUDENT

UG PGSTUDENT STUDENT

PG STUDENT

PG STUDENT

GB

GB

GB EU

WORLD GB EU

WORLD EU

GB EU

WORLD GB EU

WORLD EU

WORLD

CNCCUTTER CNC 3D PRINTER CNC TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER PLOTTER SCANNER COMPUTER PLOTTER COMPUTER PRINTER PLOTTER PRINTER LASER PLOTTER CUTTER PRINTER LASER CUTTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER CUTTER 3D PRINTER LASER 3D PRINTER

CNC WORLD

CNC

Postgraduate Students 40 TUTOR

TOILET

RESEARCH TUTOR

UG RESEARCH TUTOR STUDENT

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT STUDENT

UG RESEARCH PGSTUDENT STUDENT

UG PGSTUDENT STUDENT

PG STUDENT GB

GB EU

WORLD GB EU

WORLD GB EU

WORLD EU

WORLD

CNCCUTTER CNCCUTTER CNCCUTTER CNCCUTTER CNCCUTTER CNCCUTTER CNCCUTTER CNCCUTTER CNCCUTTER CNC 3D PRINTER CNC TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER TOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER TOILET BOOKS PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER TOILET BOOKS PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER PRINTER TOILET BOOKS PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER PRINTER TOILET BOOKS LASER PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER CUTTER COMPUTER PRINTER TOILET BOOKS LASER PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER CUTTER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER TOILET BOOKS PRINTER LASER PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER CUTTER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER TOILET BOOKS PRINTER LASER PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER BOOKS PRINTER LASER PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER PLOTTER SCANNER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER PLOTTER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER PLOTTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER PLOTTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER 3D PRINTER LASER 3D PRINTER

Undergraduate Students 120 TUTOR

RESEARCH TUTOR

UG RESEARCH TUTOR STUDENT

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT STUDENT

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT STUDENT

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT STUDENT

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT STUDENT GB

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT STUDENT GB EU

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT WORLD STUDENT GB EU

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT WORLD STUDENT GB EU

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT WORLD STUDENT GB EU

UG RESEARCH PG TUTOR STUDENT WORLD STUDENT GB EU

UG RESEARCH PGSTUDENT WORLD STUDENT GB EU

UG PGSTUDENT WORLD STUDENT GB EU

PGWORLD STUDENT GB EU

Country of Origin TOILET

CNC CNC CUTTER CNC CUTTER CNC CUTTER CNC CUTTER CNC CUTTER CNC CUTTER CNC BOOKS TOILET (LIBRARY)BOOKS TOILET (LIBRARY) SCANNERBOOKS TOILET (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER BOOKS TOILET (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER BOOKS TOILET PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER BOOKS TOILET PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER PRINTER BOOKS TOILET PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER PRINTER BOOKS TOILET LASER PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER CUTTER COMPUTER PRINTER BOOKS TOILET LASER PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER CUTTER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER BOOKS LASER PLOTTER (LIBRARY) SCANNER CUTTER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER PLOTTER SCANNER CUTTER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER PLOTTER COMPUTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER PLOTTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER PLOTTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER 3D PRINTER LASER 3D PRINTER

CNC 3D PRINTER

UK 100

TOILET

TUTOR RESEARCH TUTOR UG RESEARCH STUDENT TUTOR UG PG RESEARCH STUDENT TUTOR STUDENT UG PG RESEARCH STUDENT TUTOR STUDENT UG PG RESEARCH STUDENT TUTOR STUDENT UG PG RESEARCH STUDENT TUTOR STUDENT GB UG PG RESEARCH STUDENT TUTOR STUDENT GB EU UG PG RESEARCH WORLD STUDENT TUTOR STUDENT GB EU UG PG RESEARCH WORLD STUDENT TUTOR STUDENT GB EU CNC CUTTER CNC BOOKS TOILET (LIBRARY)BOOKS TOILET (LIBRARY) SCANNERTOILET BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER COMPUTER PLOTTER SCANNER COMPUTER PLOTTER COMPUTER PRINTER PLOTTERPRINTER LASER PLOTTER CUTTER PRINTER LASER CUTTER 3D PRINTER PRINTER LASER CUTTER 3D PRINTER LASER 3D PRINTER

UG PG RESEARCH WORLD STUDENT STUDENT GB EU CNC 3D PRINTER

Europe 40

TOILET

TUTOR RESEARCH TUTOR BOOKS TOILET (LIBRARY)BOOKS (LIBRARY) SCANNER SCANNER COMPUTER

UG RESEARCH STUDENT TUTOR UG PG RESEARCH TUTOR STUDENT STUDENT UG RESEARCH PGSTUDENT STUDENT COMPUTER PLOTTER PLOTTERPRINTER

UG PGSTUDENT STUDENT PG STUDENT GB GB EU PRINTER LASER CUTTER LASER CUTTER 3D PRINTER

WORLD GB EU CNC 3D PRINTER

Rest of World 20 TUTOR

RESEARCH TUTOR

UG RESEARCH STUDENT

UG PGSTUDENT STUDENT

PG STUDENT

GB

GB EU

WORLD EU

WORLD

WORLD GB EU

CNC

WORLD EU

WORLD

UG PG WORLD STUDENT STUDENT GB EU CNC

PG WORLD STUDENT GB EU

WORLD GB EU

WORLD GB EU

WORLD GB EU

WORLD EU

WORLD

CNC

WORLD GB EU

WORLD GB EU

WORLD GB EU

WORLD EU

WORLD


5.0/ _____

Brighton Architecture Department Student and Staff Numbers

Year 1

= 10 Students

Year 3

Year 2


the architecture distillery/ The University of Brighton Architecture Department

5.0/ _____

Brighton Architecture Department The Studio 1

2

The Architecture School The architecture department is situated on the third floor of Mithras House, it is shared by interior architecture and architecture students. 1

2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th Year Studio Space Axonometric of typical studio space for second, third and postgraduate students. 2

First Year Studio Space First year architecture and interior architecture students are assigned a desk whereas students in other years have to secure their own desk area.


the architecture distillery/ The University of Brighton Architecture Department

5.0/ _____

Brighton Architecture Department Studio Spaces

Storage Admin Office Reprographics Toilets Foyer Tutorial CAD Staff Office

Workshop

Gallery

Studio


the architecture distillery/ The University of Brighton Architecture Department

5.0/ _____

Brighton Architecture Department Department Resources

00

22 20

Studio hours 08.00 to 20.00

06

16

Library hours 08.30 to 03.00

04 Workshop hours 09.00 to 18.00

18

08 14

06

16

08

10

12

02

20

06

16

10

12

00

22 04

18

08 14

02

20

04

18

00

22

02

14

10

12

x8

x 10,000

TOILET

TOILET

BOOKS (LIBRARY)

BOOKS (LIBRARY)

SCANNER

SCANNER

COMPUTER

COMPUTER

PLOTTER

PLOTTER

PRINTER

PRINTER

LASER CUTTER

LASER CUTTER

3D PRINT

3D PRINTER

CNC

x2

TOILET

BOOKS (LIBRARY)

x 100

SCANNER

COMPUTER

PLOTTER

TUTOR

TOILET COMPUTER

BOOKS PLOTTER (LIBRARY) TOILET

SCANNERPRINTER

BOOKS (LIBRARY)

SCANNER

BOOKS (LIBRARY)

SCANNER

COMPUTER

S (LIBRARY)

CH

SCANNER

UG STUDENT

COMPUTER

PG STUDENT

PRINTER

x RESEARCH 3

UG STUDENT

PRINTER

GB

PGPG STUDENT STUDENT EU

GB

GB EU RESEARCH GB UG STUDENT

x1

NNER

COMPUTER

PLOTTER

TUTOR

PRINTER

RESEARCH

UG STUDENT

LASER CUTTER

CNC

3D PRINTER

PG STUDENT

GB

x0

ER

TUTOR RESEARCH PLOTTER

UG STUDENT PRINTER

PG STUDENT LASER CUTTER

GB

3D PRINTER

CNC

x0

RESEARCH

PRINTER

UG STUDENT

PG STUDENT

LASER CUTTER

GB

3D PRINTER

EU

CNC

WORLD

EU

WORLD

WORLD

LASER CUTTER

EU

WORLD

EU

WORLD

CNC

3D PRINTER

TUTOR WORLD

EU

CNC

CNC

3D PRINTER

PG STUDENT

LASER CUTTER

UG STUDENT UG STUDENT GB

PRINTER

CNC

3D PRINTER

PG STUDENT

LASER CUTTER

x1 UG STUDENT

PRINTER

RESEARCH RESEARCH

GB

LASER CUTTER

PLOTTER

CNC

3D PRINTER

COMPUTER

RESEARCH

PLOTTER

TUTOR TUTOR

LASER CUTTER

PG STUDENT

CNC COMPUTERLASER CUTTERPLOTTER 3D PRINTER

PLOTTER

TUTOR

PRINTER

UG STUDENT

COMPUTER TOILET LASER CUTTER BOOKS PLOTTER (LIBRARY) 3D PRINTER SCANNERPRINTER

TUTOR

LET

RESEARCH

EU

WORLD

WORLD EU PG STUDENT

WORLD

GB

EU


the architecture distillery/The University of Brighton Architecture Department

5.0/ _____

Brighton Architecture Department Student: Resource Ratios

1 plotter : 150 students

1 computer : 8 students

1 drawing table : 3 students

30 students allowed in workshops at a time

1 toilet : 8 students

1 landscape room : 100 students


the architecture distillery/ studio based building

5.0/ _____

Nantes School of Architecture Lacaton & Vassal

Lacaton and Vassal pride themselves in providing buildings at low cost and with an economy of means. Lowering construction costs by choosing cheaper materials, providing first floor car parking (avoiding costly excavation works) and sticking to their rough finish style, Lacaton and Vassal were able to propose much more floor space than the clients had originally envisaged. This additional floor space allowed Lacaton and Vassal to create interesting social, educational, operational and social possibilities and contend the way in which architects are trained. Cost is reduced by making the building extremely useful to the surrounding community, the architectural school at Nantes is not just a school, but a local music centre and a community meeting space. The building references factory architecture, and houses metal, woodwork and house building workshops. The ground floor of the building is tarmac to encourage the building to be read as part of the street. In addition an inviting walkway, open to the public and users of the building works it’’s way around the perimeter of the building to an open rooftop, perfect for large scale model making or just to absorb the panoramic views of Nantes. Most importantly, Lacaton and Vassal acknowledge that the requirements of the school will change weekly and over the years to come. Each space is categorised either ‘espace programme’ or ‘espace libre appropriable’ - space that is defined for certain activities and space that can be altered according to the users requirements.


the architecture distillery/ studio based building

5.0/ _____

Nantes School of Architecture Lacaton & Vassal

The transparent corrugated PVC cladding allows passers by to see the inner workings of the building. The workshops housed in the building compliment the rustic palette of materials used in the construction of the building, both of which help to enhance the ‘working’ feel of the building.


the architecture distillery/ studio based building

5.0/ _____

Nantes School of Architecture Lacaton & Vassal

The exterior circulation ramp leads to a roof terrace, accessible by both students and the public. Students are able to build large scale models in this space, creating a form of informal exhibition for the public.


the architecture distillery/ studio based building

5.0/ _____

Nantes School of Architecture Lacaton & Vassal

The drawings of Lacaton and Vassal show the roof terrace being used to host a circus, their vision was that this open space could be shared by the students and the public. By tarmacing the ground floor of the building, Lacaton and Vassal further enforce this vison. The ground floor feels like a continuation of the street drawing members of the public into the building.

Entrance from the ground floor to exterior circulation ramp. Car parking is raised to the first floor to avoid costly excavation works. There are three floors, each of which are constructed with concrete, mezzanine floors are hung in between and are constructed from steel.


the architecture distillery/ studio based building

5.0/ _____

Nantes School of Architecture Typical Floor Plan

1

2

3

4 5

6

7 8

External space Programmed space Alterable space Second floor plan showing the relationship between alterable and programmed space. The second floor houses the majority of the studio space, which can open into the surrounding circulation areas if necessary. Upon entering the building at ground floor, users have the option of walking to the top of the building on the outside, entering through the cafe or heading straight into the main gallery space.

1. External Ramp 2. Studio Space 3. Circulation/Gallery Space 4. Studio Space 5. Studio Space 6. Studio Space 7. Circulation Core 8. Studio Space


the architecture distillery/ studio based building

5.0/ _____

Nantes School of Architecture Long and Short Sections

North-south section and east-west sections respectively.

As Lacaton and Vassal were able to construct more on the site than the client had initially envisaged, the building contains empty spaces which are available to rent in the future, generating a source of income for the school. External space Programmed space Alterable space

1- Administration 2- Research Office 3- Research Office 4- Exhibition Space 5- Projection Room 6- Computer Room 7- Studio 8- Parking 9- Main Entrance Hall 10- Rentable Space 11- Offices 12- Cafeteria 13- External Ramp 14- External Ramp 15- External Ramp 16- Drawing Room 17- Workshop 18- Roof Terrace 19- Project Studios 20- Classrooms 21- Main Hall 22- Project Studios 23- Auditorium


the architecture distillery/ studio based building

5.0/ _____

Nantes School of Architecture Lacaton & Vassal

Axonometric showing exterior circulation route leading to open public space on the roof of the building.

A medieval depiction of the University with Lacaton & Vassal’s circus event on the roof of the building.


If an architect is required to be equipt to deal with change, it is vital that architects are trained with this in mind. An architect’s training is never complete as we live in a fast paced and ever changing world. The architecture distillery is a school which allows students to build their own curriculum, in order that they can expand on knowledge as and when required. The school will offer education in three main fields - building, design and complementary studies. A student might enter either being focused on acquiring a certain set of skills or be undecided as to what they intend to do on completion. Certain activities will require fixed spaces whilst others will need to be manipulated to create the best learning environment for the lesson being taught. Complementary studies will be provided from a mixture of sources including members of the public, local business owners, tutors and researchers from the school and other Universities. The school will be overseen by the tutors and will set it’s own level of quality in education. Boundaries will be blurred between work produced by students and work produced for local businesses as relationships grow.

stemming architectural erosion through the rediscovery of architectural discovery


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Programme Development What Spaces are required? Student Accommodation Accommodation to house all students enrolled at the University- in groups of 20. Accommodation areas will provide space to work, live and socialise with students within the group. Working space is an autonomous space. Accommodation space is removed from public involvement and is private. Student will remain in the rooms they are given for the duration of their studies. This will encourage cross pollination of ideas as students choose their study path. Researcher Accommodation Accommodation to house all researchers enrolled at the University- these are not grouped but dotted around the University accommodation. Researcher accommodation will share living and socialising space with the rest of the students. Working space is autonomous space. Researchers will remain in the rooms they are assigned at the beginning of their studies, these rooms will be of higher quality and larger in size as researchers may live in their accommodation for many more years than other students. Researchers will benefit from witnessing the progression of students through their studies, and the influx of new students. Researchers may act as ‘middle men’ between students and tutors. Tutor Accommodation Tutors at the University will live off site in their own homes, but will have offices at the University. In addition, tutors will be in charge of an assigned studio or workshop space. Tutors may be researchers, living on site. Office Space Space for adaptable office use will be provided on the University campus. This will be need strong connections with students and tutors. Companies may wish to partner with a studio group for a semester and so studio space and office space will need to become intertwined. Companies may wish to work autonomously or in partnership with other offices or students. Office space is removed from public involvement, only open to student participation. Companies may use the University facilities as they require. Auditorium The auditorium is used for lectures that address the entire school, ceremonies, conferences and public events such as small scale theatre productions and gigs. The auditoium will require a strong connection with the workshop and can perform as both an autodidactic space or a place in which one can be taught.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Programme Development What Spaces are required? Studio Space Term 1 Building

Term 2 Design

Autonomy

Term 3 Comp.

Autonomy

Year 1

20 Students

20

Low

20

High

Year 2

20 Students

20

Medium

20

High

Year 3

20 Students

20

High

20

High

Each school within the University will have its own studio space, students will experience each school in first year, and can choose where they wish to study in second and third year. This is where seminars and tutorials will occur. Complementary studies is undertaken away from the studio and studio group members. Third year studio space is controlled mainly by students and can be arranged or even located where the students feel necessary in order to achieve the best learning experience. Long Term Gallery The long term gallery space is where the University will showcase the work produced at the end of each year. This gallery will run for the whole year and will serve as a space in which the University can showcase its potential, and even the services on offer. Short Term Gallery The short term gallery is where students from each of the studios will present their work. This is where students from other studios can see what other studios are doing during the year. Members of the public and office workers not otherwise involved with the studio will also be able to see the studios weekly output. This could be a gallery experienced by chance, on route to a destination. Library The library is the most autodidactic space within the University, as students are guiding their own study. The library is open to the public and could be a placed where work from previous years is stored for reference. The library is of high importance to the researchers and those studying complementary studies. Supermarket The supermarket is a resource available to the public and the students living on campus. The supermarket will sell food and amenities for the local community and the students and could also sell furniture or other products produced by the University.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Programme Development What Spaces are required? Workshops The workshops are available for use by all at the University. Workshop 1 - Mainly used by architecture design and building students at early stages of project development. This workshop will contain all tools required for small scale model making and experimentation. The building students will be able to make use of testing areas to learn about building elements and services. Workshop 2 - Mainly used by students in the middle to final stages of their projects. This workshop will allow large scale model making and is focused toward building final products and finishing models. This workshop is visible to the public but not accessible. Both workshops will allow studios to partner with them to aide workflow. Social Space As students are living on the campus, they will need an area in which to relax and meet fellow students outside of the work environment. The social club could be a major source of revenue for the University, opening to the public and other University students at points during the year. Resources for the social club can be drawn from the supermarket. Cafe The cafe is a key intermediate space which can blur boundaries between other programmatic elements. It is also an important feature to help bring members of the public and visitors to the area. The cafe may be used to hold informal tutorials or meet friends during the day. Gymnasium The gymnasium is to be used by both members of the public and the students living on the campus. The gym will also provide a revenue stream for the University and encourage the autodidactic ethos within the school. Parking and bicycle storage Parking will be allocated for staff, researchers and visitors to the University. Bicycle and public transport use will be encouraged by students, and bicycle storage will be offered by the University.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Programme Development

Mutual Relationships Grouping private programmatic elements to create public areas with semi private circulation routes. The galleries provide a reason for people to circulate around the building - the galleries create an exhibition.

Certain spaces are more important to each school. This could help to dictate their relationship. Building school students are more likely to need the workshop and seminar spaces than the library on a day to day basis. Design school students will use the studio/seminar space the most, frequenting the workshop less often. Those studying complementary studies will spend the majority of their time gathering information from the library or in tutorials or autodidactic study.

Centralised Attraction Central space to be used for expansion of periferral activities. When this space is not being used to house academcic activities, it will be used for public gatherings - enabling autodidactic education and chance encounters.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Programme Development Relationship with the public ‘street’

When programmatic elements are un-grouped it is possible to see relationships between spaces that might have not been obvious originally. Expandable workshops can open to the passing public or relate to the gallery. In this diagram, spaces open to the public are separated from spaces open to students.

Shifting student programme into the circulation routes will allow public visitors and passers by the opportunity to witness University lessons. Using circulation space as usable space will increase chance encounters. Further incorporating public and private spaces along the circulation routes will help the University to feel truly community based.

A blend of public open spaces and alterable circulation routes will further increase chance encounters and experiences. People can be drawn in from the most public extremities of the site to the heart of the University. Programmatic elements need to be further interwoven to blur student/public boundaries.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Programme Development

A combination of alleyways, streets and open spaces between programmatic elements will help to create spaces in which people feel comfortable to gather and share knowledge. A main circulation route which traverses past all or most of the programmatic elements will enable passers by to witness the activities occurring within the spaces along the route.

With autodidacticism in mind, certain spaces will require the ability to expand, contract and join with other programmatic elements at certain times. Some spaces will not wish to have public interaction all the time. Some spaces are therefore reflexive and others locked. The circulation space can house expansion or even be closed off in sections. The circulation web will allow circulation to continue.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Programme Development The Iterative Education Process


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Programme Development Spaces, visitor mix and opening times Certain spaces when paired will contribute to the autodidactic ethos of the University. The pairing of other spaces contribute to the working logic of the building. Public circulation can be restricted according to the opening and closing times of areas.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Programme Development Rearranged according to proximity potential Certain spaces when paired will contribute to the autodidactic ethos of the University. The pairing of other spaces contribute to the working logic of the building. Public circulation can be restricted according to the opening and closing times of areas. Student and researcher accommodation is removed from the adaptability of the other elements, almost overseeing the University. Activities in the workshops, and studios provide autodidactic learning experiences for visitors and non participant students. Views into these spaces from peripheral spaces such as the gym, auditorium and cafe will enable people to witness different activities each time they visit. Circulation and viewing galleries between these spaces will mean all activities are inclusive. Long term exhibitions will be located near the main visitor attractions and local amenities to encourage exploration of the University. Short term exhibitions will be located where studios choose. The bicycle storage and parking area will be useful for supermarket and social club deliveries. This space can be utilised as an external area by the social club at night time.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Pre and Post Crit Thoughts Pre-Crit Thoughts - history tells us public University is ultimately unreliable - RIBA architectural education is not necessarily the best way to make an architect. - many successful architects started their careers in other disciplines - the University should be a pedagogic tool - the University should be a civic institute - the University should provide the opportunity to be educated in a number of disciplines, from which the student can build their own curriculum through passive and active exploration - Education will be based around building, design and complementary studies but with an overall emphasis on encouraging an autodidactic way of thinking - Research is key for achieving funding through grants and encouraging autodidacticism - the University building teaches it’s users, it’s users teach the University - the community teaches students, the students teach the community - corporate sector and University to merge to help one another - University to integrate with local communities, encouraging a natural relationship - the University will produce both trained people and products

Post Crit Thoughts - approval of Humboldtian University education ethos. - sophisticated brief, autodidactisicm and architecture needs to be explored. - what does a pedagogic building that attempts to encourage an autodidactic education look like? - ‘maybe you are just designing a shed?’


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Autodidactic University as metaphor

If the University is a pedagogic tool, and the overall aim of this University is to encourage an autodidactic way of thinking and learning, the architecture needs to respond accordingly. The autodidact is capable of learning by themselves, but it is vital that they source knowledge and experiences from outside of their autonomous learning environment.

The autodidactic mind contains a wide range of sometimes not obviously connected learning material. The outsider may not see the relevance between subjects as they appear chaotic. Brain synapses are strengthened on an ad hoc basis. The building is a place to get lost, however from the inside it makes more sense, ways in and out of knowledge areas are clearer. Armed with this language the outside of the University can be translated.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Autodidactic University as metaphor

Flexibility of both the framework and the spaces within is key as the building must be able to create the best learning relationships for what is being taught. The building must provide a device for the movement of space. Some spaces might switch from being completely autonomous to requiring input from the public or corporate sector.

The University might want to open sections for a period of transparency or it might need to shut down for a period of self reflection. The autonomous framework needs to be able to respond to this requirement.


the architecture distillery/ programme development

6.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Autodidact Spaces

Autodidactic

Library Bookshop Gallery Cafe Social Supermarket

Gymnasium Studios

Public

Auditorium Finishing Workshop

Research Accommodation School Offices Ideas Workshop

Office Space Development Workshop

Private

Taught

Openable

Office Space

Gallery Finishing Workshop Development Workshop Supermarket Social Studio 1+ Auditorium Cafe

Fixed

School Offices Research Accommodation Library

Studio 3 Ideas Workshop Gymnasium

Moveable

Locked


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Form Development The Public/ Private Divide

Collecting the volumetric mass of both the public and private areas enables a comparison of overall ratios.

Public Private

The public and private spaces are pulled apart to investigate their relationship. Activities from both the private and the public areas will need to be facilitated in a semi private area.

A ‘wall’ divide creates separation and fragmentation between the public and private areas. The distinction is too strong and all lines of sight are blocked.

When turned through 90 degrees, the obstructive wall becomes a filter for private and public cross programming. As all private space in the building is autodidactic, it is best placed higher up, away from public life and distraction.


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Form Development Building Student

Student Room Student Eating Building

Building and Testing Student Room Sourcing Books

Tutor

Students live in studio groups away from the public.

Building studio is next to workshop for ease of access.

Students retreat to autodidactic spaces when required.

Home

Home Kitchen Lecture Preparation Building and Testing Work Exhibition Building

Watching Workshop

Eating/ Reading

Buying Dinner

Buiding

Student Room

Research

Keeping Healthy Socialising Student Room

Students and members of the public share amenities.

Tutors live off campus and travel through the campus to their offices and then studio of workshop.

Sourcing Books Home

Galleries on route between spaces encourage accidental exploration and chance encounters.

Tutors circulate between their tutor groups and places they can passively learn new things.


Researcher

Researcher Room

Public Visitor

Researchers live in student residences.

Sourcing Books

Student Kitchen Local Businesses Student Integration Sourcing Books Work Exhibition

Home

Work Exhibition Researchers place themselves according to what they feel necessary to aide them in their research, following their own curriculum and lesson timings.

Watching Students Eating/ Integrating Lecture Students

Eating/ Socialising

Keep Healthy

Local Businesses

Home

View Lecture

Socialising

Researcher Room

Home

Members of the public will visit the University for a variety of reasons, circulating among researchers, students and tutors. Members of the public may visit to use public facilities, but be drawn into University activities.

There are private and semi private spaces, but no sole public areas. Semi private areas range in the required privacy, and for some areas this is variable. The semi private areas are where all different types of people will intermingle, it is here where flexible space needs to be manipulated to enable cross programming.


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Form Development Learning Typologies

Learning Autonomously Learning autonomously and sharing information at an institution. Connected through membership not physically.

Learning whilst Working Attached to a work environment, overall guidance by an institution. Institution provides learning material and lectures to help in learning in the work environment.

Learning Collectively Students living together, learning together. Institution provides learning material and lectures. Work produced and checked on site.

Hybrid Typology

+

+

Each of the above learning typologies has positive and negative aspects. Combining the positive aspects of each will provide a more well rounded education with an understanding of learning autonomously, in work and in academia.


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Form Development

Spaceframe technology will allow the most flexibility and manouverablity for spaces that require the option to alter their location and appearance. Autodidactic or autonomous spaces will be moved by students and tutors of the building dependant on the needs of the studio. This movement may occur several times during the day. In order for these spaces to be moved correctly they need to be overseen and controlled from above.

Using a grid system in conjunction with a space frame will generate a system in which moveable spaces can ‘dock’ as well as provide constraints within which partitionable spaces can operate. The gird will allow flexibility but not the same extent as the spaceframe.

The outer layers of the grid are open for connection with more autonomous spaces. Partitions could be opened on both the exterior and interior sides of perimeter spaces allowing permeability. The grid allows floors to appear removed from other levels increasing the appearance of autonomy from public eyes.


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

Community of autodidactic researchers and students retreat away from the public sphere of life when required. Looking down through the building will allow the University students and staff to oversee internal partitioning alterations.

Office space is given the ‘mid height’ perimeter space, removing it from public access, but maintaining visibility. Access is permitted by students, with the possibility of physical studio connections.

The lower levels house public visible and public accessible spaces. University staff alter spaces in relation to access and visibility requirements. Control is achieved with moveable partitions and access, orientation and materiality.

Moveable studio units would allow students and tutors to move their working space to best suit their needs. Studios can be placed in public and private locations and can be autodidactic or involved in a taught programme.

Exclusivity can be increased or decreased with alterable circulation nodes. Circulation upwards may allow views into studio or workshop spaces and not necessarily access into these areas.

The Architecture Distillery Form Development


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Form Development

Grouping of spaces according to level of flexibility and connections required.

Workshop 2 is visible but not accessible to the public and requires direct circulation routes to offices and students. Outside space is available when required. Student connections between workshops required.

Office space requires equal divisions, with the possibility of student studio connections. Grid system allows a limited, organised connection pattern. Space can be rented according to the users requirements.

Workshop 1 is permanently visible - passers by can look inside all year round. Access is granted for lessons on the higher level from exterior circulation.

Level changes differentiate zones for expansion and limits of flexibility level. Student and researcher accommodation oversees completely flexible space.

Raising the public border surrounding the library creates a hub of activity to be used for public gathering. Alley way and open pockets mimic the cities urban grain.

Public circulation routes allow views into or over space which has alterable programme.


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The space surrounding gridded and locked programmatic elements is over-arched by a space frame system offering maximum flexibility. Studio space can be raised and lowered and connected to locked space such as the workshops. Steel tension cables could be used by students to manoeuvre partitions, lighting and ceiling panels.

Studio space located next to office space allowing an easier partnership. Once the studio has benefitted adequately from the offices, it could relocate to the workshop, form an open gallery for public inspection or retreat for autonomous study.

Retractable and extendable elements of the space-frame structure would allow users to create areas of learning. These extendable elements would connect with ground connections and form sheltered ‘pop up’ enclosures between programmed spaces.

The Architecture Distillery Form Development


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

Controlling flexibility from the ground truly allows students complete control of how they are learning. The flexible area of the University is a chaotic hub of activity, changing every day.

Elements might be positioned to alter lighting conditions. Large scale and small scale flexibility required.

The positioning of partitions and structure could be partially controlled with a network of connection points situated at key locations. These would be accompanied by power points and tool bays to allow work to occur away from locked spaces. Partitions can be used to create work pockets, which cluster around power points and floor connections in order to be close to the programmatic elements required. Spaces do not have to return to the way they were at the end of every day.

The Architecture Distillery Form Development


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Form Development

Users of the University can arrange spaces adjacent to programmatic elements for ad hoc learning environments. Instead of a flexible structure which is controlled from above, a ground based user appropriated system would be preferred. Control from above diminishes the autodidactic capabilities of those not controlling the structure - therefore building a hierarchy. Everyone should have the same control over their education and their University. By predicting points of intensity in and around the University, allowance for spatial rearrangement can be loosely predicted and accommodated giving users all of the choice. Areas of intensity would be provided with a higher volume of power points and partition anchor points enabling a network of alleyways to be created where a vast range of educational lessons can be learnt.


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Usage Scenarios

Student Public 09.00 10.00 11.00 12.00

Public Room

09.00

Private Office

Building Workshop

10.00

Testing Workshop

12.00

Testing Workshop

11.00

Exhibition

14.00

14.00

Cafe

15.00

Sourcing Books

15.00

16.00 17.00 18.00

Building Workshop

Time

13.00

Room

13.00

Time

Tutor Private

16.00 17.00 18.00

19.00

Food

19.00

20.00

Room

20.00

21.00

Healthy

21.00

22.00

Social

22.00

23.00

Room

23.00

24.00

24.00

Building Workshop Auditorium


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Usage Scenarios

Researcher Public

Public Public

Private 09.00

09.00 10.00

11.00

12.00

12.00

15.00 16.00

Office Building Workshop

14.00

Exhibition

16.00

18.00

Food Sourcing Books

19.00

Office

17.00

13.00 15.00 Time

14.00 Time

10.00

Room

11.00 13.00

18.00

Food Exhibition Building Workshop Excercise

19.00 20.00

21.00

21.00 Room

Sourcing Books

17.00

20.00 22.00

Private

22.00

23.00

23.00

24.00

24.00

Socialise


the architecture distillery/Form Development

7.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Usage Scenarios Having plotted the use patterns of four of the main users of the University it is possible to see that these experiences are linked but will be different upon each visit. The flexibility of privacy within some spaces means that a visitors public/private involvement can only be predicted daily. There are no solely public spaces, as all facilities are shared between the public and the University. This mutual relationship creates and environment where members of the public can become involved in the University as a by-product of visiting the area for non-University related activities such as visiting the supermarket. Looking at which spaces require the most flexibility in order to alter their autodidactic capabilities and privacy will allow me to understand which spaces are best accommodated in each of the buildings of note on the site. Certain spaces - like the workshop, work yards and studios can be used to form interesting backdrops to restaurants and cafes both at night and in the daytime. In the daytime, these backdrops will provide learning experiences and opportunities.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Site Analysis The east of London has been chosen as the starting location for the Architecture Distillery. In particular, the island sites collectively known as the Lower Lea Valley. These islands have been formed by the canal and road network which works its way through the area. At the heart of these islands sits the Olympic park development site. Each of the islands have been earmarked for mass development, some as part of the Olympic legacy plan and others as initiatives of their own. These islands straddle the London Boroughs of Newham, Hackney and Tower Hamlets with Greenwich on the periphery. The Lower Lea Valley used to mark the end of London, and is now situated close to its heart. Development proposals aim to establish this former border as the integral constituent part of London it has become.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ ____

The Architecture Distillery The Lower Lea Valley Islands Hackney Wick Fish Island Olympic Site Sugar House Lane


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Transport Infrastructure

B- Roads and Paths Railway Tracks Motorways and Dual Carriageways

The area is extremely well connected with tube, rail and DLR stations in all directions and Stratford International in the north east corner of the map. The area is well connected with its road network too, with the A11 and the Blackwall tunnel approach running through the centre of the map. The canal flows south providing a slower less regular form of transport. The many transport connections help to connect the area with the rest of London, but restrict the mix of people and activities in the local area.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Olympic Legacy Masterplan Location of listed buildings to be retained Legacy masterplan developments


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery New and Proposed Green spaces

Proposed green space Existing green space Legacy masterplan developments Existing context


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Sugarhouse Lane Urban Grain Study The figure ground relationship highlights the fragmented development history of Sugar House Lane. Larger units can be seen to take up most of the island, suggesting factory and large scale uses. The Legacy masterplan has earmarked most of the buildings to be demolished. Any redevelopment should take note of the courtyard and alleyway system of circulation that has evolved in the area.

This inverted figure ground plan identifies key courtyards and arteries the island. The island is highly permeable and could maximise this attribute alongside canal accessibility.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Building Uses

Light Industrial

Local Small Businesses Schools

Churches

Residential Areas

Sugar House Lane island is mainly comprised of light industrial companies - with work yards and little or no attention paid to public access or visibility. Either side of the island are residential communities, they are dis-connected from one another by the A11, the canal and the light industrial landscape. The University would benefit from public/residential links, but also the autonomy of the island itself.

Rolling Bridge - Heatherwick Studio


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Work yards and Buildings of Interest Main Access routes into the island Work yards and walking routes of interest Buildings of interest

Negative Space

The further south you pass through the site, the less noisy and more private the area becomes. Walkways connect views of the important buildings and chimneys and should be used to provide space from which they can be admired. Conservation and restoration of the original work yards preserves the areas original, organic architectural language. The three chimneys are simple, functional structures but each is slightly different in height, profile and silhouette so they form important markers on the skyline. Their purpose is believed to be to provide boilerhouse updrafts and for the escape of noxious fumes - the result of coal powered businesses. All date from the late nineteenth or early 20th century. The chimneys are important to the legibility and understanding of the site, visible from numerous vantage points, including the Blackwall Tunnel approach, Tesco and the Pudding Mill Lane DLR station.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Key View Corridors Views from Tow Path Views to Chimney 1 Views to Chimney 2 Views to Chimney 3

Chimney 1 - Red engineering brick with a simple cylindrical shaft, the most conspicuous and the tallest of the three chimneys. Chimney 2 Red brick with a square plan, plain shaft. Reinforced with metal banding. Its original function is unknown.

Chimney 3 Located to the rear of 119 High Street. It is constructed in red brick on a square section, with a corbelled brick cap.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Autonomous Islands within the Island

Sites of interest Potential new pedestrian connections Autonomous island locations Areas of high noise Vehicular access routes Buildings of Interest

The island borders face onto industrial back lands (to the south west) and residential back garden walls (to the east). These areas could provide areas that feel the most autonomous - spaces along these borders could maximise the controlled access points and views over the canal. The listed buildings and chimneys are of interest as they could be used to hosue the fixed and locked spaces within the architecture distillery. The workyards could provide space for the flexible elements of the programme.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Urban Grain Desire Lines and Trajectories Urban grain desire line Trajectories created by roads

Plotting desire lines formed from the existing urban grain helps to identify perimeters for development within the island. The site is entered from the north, along the A11, circulation within the island follows a mainly horizontal axis.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Buildings of Importance

1 2

1 1

3

1 Warehouse at 133-135 Stratford High Street These warehouses are the best preserved industrial buildings in the Sugar House Lane area and are believed to have been part of the Sugar refinery that once stood on the site. The high-street building is four storeys high, with an attic. Constructed with London stock brick, with cast iron windows with segmental openings, these are triple banded and have yellow brick headers. The roof, originally constructed with slate is now covered with corrugated steel. Loading doors are situated to the rear. Signage and openings to the high street facade have been altered but the windows and features above are original.

2 The Sugar House The asymmetrical gables of the Sugar House and its prominent height on the skyline make it an important landscape within Sugar House Lane. The building was originally used as a warehouse but has housed many small businesses over time - including a cooperage, where wooden staved vessels would have been produced. The building is six storeys high constructed from red brick with a double ridged roof. The strong vertical buttresses emphasise its industrial function. The building has been modernised to accommodate small businesses modern sash windows and a new ground floor have been added for this pupose.

3 7 Sugar House Lane, Dane Group Building The Dane Group Building is constructed from London stock brick and is situated on the initial bend of Sugar House Lane, un-missable upon entering the island. The lower windows are original whereas the upper windows are modern replacements. There is a double height loading bay at ground floor.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Buildings of Importance

4

5 5

4 107 and 109 Stratford High Street Industrial offices and workshops built in post war style, with prominent horizontal glazing along the high street facade. Large lettering to the front of the building is intended to gain the attention of passing motorists. This building style is becoming rare, despite being commonly found on many of the approaches into London. These buildings are of interest but are not to be regarded as ‘buildings of note.’

5 Sugar House Yard Buildings These buildings are two and three storeys in height and are characteristically industrial in their detailing - with bullnose engineering bricks used on the window sills and red brick construction elsewhere.

5 Sugar House Yard Sugar House Yard surrounds the Sugar House buildings mentioned above and has an interesting flow of spaces, anchored by chimney number 2. The flow of spaces and the presence of the chimney help to reinforce the industrial character of the area.


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Buildings of Importance

4 1

5 3

1

2

257 sqm each floor

353 sqm each floor 1059sqm total floorspace

514sqm total floorspace

2

3

130 sqm each floor

4

373 sqm each floor

5

456 sqm each floor 912 sqm total floorspace


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

M ain

fo

ot t

ra ffi c

The Architecture Distillery Buildings of Importance

Public Noise

A op ctiv po e fa rtu ca ni de ty

8.0/ _____

Private Less noise

Buildings earmarked as ‘buildings of note,’ coupled with boundary trajectories created by the canal, A11 and Sugar House Lane begin to divide the landscape into pockets for regeneration. Although some of these lines are not physical boundaries, they demarcate lines of sight, ideal walking routes and help to connect important buildings and work yards to build and maintain the industrial value of the site.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

Student Room

Building

Testing ideas

Information source

120 rooms @ 12.5sqm

828sqm expandable

2 x 60sqm expandable 3 x 85sqm locked + partitioned

Active facade

Chance learning 500 seater auditorium

390sqm min.

740sqm

Researcher Room

Space for business

Buy/view products

Exercise

20 rooms @ 12.5sqm

450sqm partitioned

160sqm expandable + 320sqm of gallery

4sqm rooms among flats as reqd.

1500sqm total Buy amenities 100sqm residential anchor

250sqm total Buy literature

Meet friends

Bar

90sqm expandable

50sqm expandable

50sqm expandable


the architecture distillery/Site Analysis

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

The desire lines helped to produce a curtain wall enclosure which aides in creating a boundary to the northern tip of the Sugar House Lane Island. This wall will house the students of the University, providing them with views of both the ‘insides’ and ‘outsides’ of the University. The spine will respond both internally and externally to the varying conditions it meets as it works its way through the site.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

Student and researcher accommodations will run around the perimeter of the development. Within the accommodation there will be units available for adaptation, as the students and users of the University require. Where units are not adapted, they will become part of the student flat. Light will filter into the central circulation walkway from these perforations.

Watch the workshops

Workshops/ alterable space below

Live/work

Courtyard/Library/Live Cafe/Workshop/Think

Excercise


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

The middle of the proposal mixes accommodation with viewing galleries with the main auditorium. The viewing galleries can be used to house all sorts of programme types, including gym facilities. Lectures may be watched whilst exercising, these areas will need to be sound protected. The auditorium backs onto the testing and development workshop, which can be opened up for ad hoc lessons when the auditorium is not in use.

The Sugar House contains units for local businesses, these units could be very beneficial to the University. The proposed connections to the Sugar House at ground and first floor bring student and researcher living quarters, office workers and library facilities closer. High partitionable adaptability will allow a permeable and ever changing work/live environment.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

The area at the foot of the new pedestrian footbridge will serve as an attraction for local residents. Once drawn into the University area, members of the public may be tempted with ad-hoc lessons or may witness studio life whilst drinking a coffee. A mutual relationship is formed between the cafe and social area. The social space provides seating for the cafe in the day. By night the cafe provides food for the social space. The areas between and around the studios can be appropriated as seating, outdoor studio space or be used as an enclosed gathering space. Members of the public and students not involved in studio sessions may see and hear what is going on in the studios but are not in the studio space. Users of the studio can alter the level of inclusion within studio events as required with internal and external partitions.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

The courtyard created in the centre of the proposal can be altered to accommodate any programmatic function, but will mainly be used by the surrounding programme. Seating can be expanded from the cafe, power and partition locking points located around the University will allow workshop functions to also sprawl into the courtyard. The permeable facade will allow filtration from the high street and the University shop/gallery into the courtyard.

The facade fronting onto Stratford High Street will be animated with its permeable entrances and commotion generated by people searching for books, models and information housed in the gallery/library housed at ground floor and throughout 133-135 Stratford High Street.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

Student Room

Building

Testing ideas

Information source

Chance learning

Buy amenities

Researcher Room

Space for business

Buy/view products

Exercise

Buy literature

Meet friends

Bar


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Autodidactic Scenarios The purpose of the following models is to investigate the ways in which architecture can lend itself to autodidactic situations. I have chosen a number of key elements from the previous proposal, trying to understand the extent of adaptation required to alter a space from being a private taught space to one which can accommodate more learners in a moment. Determining the extent of adaptation and development required will provide me with a better understanding of how to treat the site at Sugar House Lane, and in particular how to treat the buildings of note found at the site. The auditorium is a key space within the University. There are 140 students, but with lessons open to the public and various subjects on offer throughout the day/ month/year, flexibility is key. The auditorium would benefit from a close relationship to the workshops, library and cafe. Views into the auditorium from circulation routes and accommodation will provide opportunities for ad hoc learning.

The corner spaces could house workshops or studio space. Partitions at the front of the auditorium would allow lecturers to decide the level of privacy required and whether workshop interaction is required. Seats can be removed to allow the steps to be used for informal gatherings and a place to watch the surrounding activities. Walkways above provide views into lecture halls that have their roof space open, this could be controlled with a low tech folding insulation blanket.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Autodidactic Scenarios A central walkway at the centre of two lecture halls provides passers by with an opportunity to enter either lesson. When lectures are not active, the stairs could be used as circulation or even to house exhibitions. Circulation widens at lecture hall perimeters to allow for seating. Viewers would lower a soundproof screen to involve themselves in the lecture.

Where extra capacity is required, two auditoriums can be used to view the corner space which can be manipulated to accommodate workshop lessons or a more standard projection set up.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Autodidactic Scenarios This model investigates a number of opportunities and relationships which could be beneficial for the University. Roofscapes, the ability to use the University architecture as learning material and a flexible primary/secondary structural system all benefit autodidacticism.

Some studio spaces will require flexibility to alter their relationship with the surrounding space and members of the public and passing students. The studio will also need to accommodate crits and exhibitions. A simple sliding skin surrounds the central studio table, around which students work and tutorials occur. Ancillary work spaces surround this raised deck and can be ‘built’ by students as and when required. Student accommodation benefits from views out of the University as well as views into interesting events within the campus. Views out of the campus will create a sense of autonomy and individualism aiding reflection and creativity. Views inwards will allow for inspiring moments to be witnessed. Plumbing and electric is exposed as it runs into the rooms to be used as a learning material for students.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Autodidactic Scenarios

Workshop space is distributed around the campus, with links to studio and auditoriums where required. Workshops with dangerous machinery will be enclosed in safe zones where views are possible but access is limited. Dropping these areas as pits will allow safety to be maintained and views to be maximised from the perimeter - which could be cafe seating.

Structural columns will demarcate programmatic zones. Primary columns will be locked in place, and will be structural. Secondary columns will be user appropriated and can be set up around the campus with permission. Secondary columns can be used in conjunction with primary columns or used to create new spaces for study, exhibition or for social activities.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Further Desire Line Analysis

Overall desire lines of the site created by the urban grain help to highlight islands within the Sugar House Lane Island for development as well as identify potential pathways through the site.

Analysis of desire lines created by buildings to be retained within the area will provide opportunities for the creation of view corridors within the segments of the site. This also helps to identify nonnegotiable borders created by buildings to be retained.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

This proposal seeks to blend the further analysis into both desire lines on the site and the autodidactic scenarios modelled previously. Several of the tactics employed in the autodidactic scenario models can be found around the proposal, with requirement for expansion matched with the adaptability of the host buildings already on site.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

The main body of student accommodation is situated along the canalside, each room has its own view of both the canal and the University. Students can decide if they want to focus on autonomous study or be involved with the happenings of the University. Circulation cores between accommodation segments are extended to serve as non-moveable or primary structural elements which arch over the workyard and can be manipulated by students. Secondary structural elements can be added by students as and when required. Viewing decks are provided to allow the public views of the University and the canal. These may be appropriated and connected as required.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

The canal is also where the first of two cafes is situated. This cafe is located to the rear of the auditorium and can be used to serve the public or closed to serve just the auditorium. The circulation around the University is generous to allow passers by to choose to listen in on a lecture. The viewing gallery would be partitioned from the main concourse for noise purposes. The re are two auditorium spaces, either side of a work yard. This work yard is viewed from the circulation walkways and can be altered with the addition of secondary structural elements such as screw in columns and moveable partitions. The auditoriums can be used together to view this work yard.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

Electric and plumbing at the University will be accessible by guided students for study purposes. For this reason pipes and electricity will be on show throughout the University. To the west of the site, the University will maintain the electricity sub station, around which a work yard and material delivery space has been created. This is also where bicycles can be stored. This work yard is for students only, and the viewing gallery can only be accessed through the student accommodation. Below, to the left is a main spinal connection between chimney 1 and the canal, along which views of the University open up and places to sit are provided.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

The ground floor on the corner of Sugar House Lane and the A11 contains a blend between finishing workshop and shop, where products made at the University may be purchased. Strolling through the shop you are in a workshop environment able to see glimpses of products being finished. The mezzanine level and first floor accommodation overlook the outside world and an alterable work yard at the heart of the University. The mezzanine level can be appropriated as a reading room (with its connections to the library) or a viewing gallery for the workshops beneath. The street is animated with the busy activities within the gallery, workshop shop and archive storage spaces where people looking for research can be witnessed from the street. These spaces are punctuated with alleyways into the heart of the University.


the architecture distillery/Proposal

8.0/ _____

The Architecture Distillery Proposal on Site

A primary (fixed and designed) and secondary (user appropriated) structural system will allow the University to change daily providing a unique experience on each visit. Expansion of the secondary structural system can be predicted to some extent with the careful provision of power points and a screw in structural system. Students will also be allowed to build off certain primary elements and circulation routes.


The Architecture Distillery Progress Book  

Year One Postgraduate Thesis

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you