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AGA’s Competitive position for the future

BEEF SUSTAINABILITY

AN INDUSTRY MESSAGE THAT CAN’T BE IGNORED


Source & Age Verification Program for Feeder Cattle Sired by Gelbvieh & Balancer® Bulls

BALANCER EDGE

®

$3.00/hd STEP 1: Gather calving records documenting the first and last calf born for the season. Have a head count of your cows. Have copies available to show IMI Global representative.

STEP 2: Fill out the form on www.gelbvieh.org to apply for Balancer® Edge and order tags.

STEP 3:

Send form via mail or email: IMI Global 202 6th Street, Ste. 400 Castle Rock, CO 80104 info@imiglobal.com

Value added options available: NHTC Verified Natural GAP Certification

*Additional auditing and cost may be involved

STEP 4:

Participate in a phone audit and off-site records review.

STEP 5: Market calves with the Balancer® Edge program.

www.gelbvieh.org | 303.465.2333


JRI Secret Powers 254C821

JRI Optimizer 148A24

Homozygous Black, Homozygous Polled Purebred

Homozygous Black, Homozygous Polled Balancer

BW: 78 lbs. 205 Day Weight: 819 lbs. 365 Day Weight: 1,342 lbs. Ylg Scrotal: 38.8 cm.

BW: 72 lbs. 205 Day Weight: 851 lbs. 365 Day Weight: 1,316 lbs. Ylg Scrotal: 40.3 cm.

Top 20% Calving Ease EPD strength. 2018 Dam of Merit Dam.

Top 15% Calving Ease EPD strength. 2018 Dam of Merit Dam.

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Homozygous Polled Purebred Clone BW: 74 lbs. 205 Day Weight: 705 lbs. 365 Day Weight: 1,219 lbs. Ylg Scrotal: 40.1 cm. Top 20% Calving Ease EPD strength. JRI Pop A Top 197T83 (clone).

JUDD RANCH INC. Dave & Cindy Judd Nick, Ginger Judd & Family Brent & Ashley Judd & Family 423 Hwy K-68 Pomona, KS 66076 Ph: 785/566-8371 or 785/566-3770

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JRI Secret Link 214D98

Homozygous Black, Homozygous Polled Purebred BW: 71 lbs. 205 Day Weight: 744 lbs. 365 Day Weight: 1,238 lbs. Ylg Scrotal: 41.6 cm. Top 20% Calving Ease EPD strength. 2017 Dam of Distinction Dam.

MCCA Capitol Hill 516C

Homozygous Black, Homozygous Polled Balancer BW: 84 lbs. 205 Day Weight: 738 lbs. 365 Day Weight: 1,274 lbs. Ylg Scrotal: 38.9 cm. Top 25% Calving Ease EPD strength. 2018 Dam of Merit Dam.

Judd Ranch — Home of the “Complete Package” — Calving Ease • Growth • Carcass • Fertility


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This southern Arizona rancher been breeding Gelbvieh influence

into his herd of Arizona cattle for the last 15 years and has created a moderate and efficient female that can thrive in his environment. By Rebecca Mettler

14 The Dollars and Cents of Crossbreeding

Why consider crossbreeding? The value of the improved productivity due to crossbreeding is worth $150 per cow per year. By B. Lynn Gordon

24 Sustainability and Beef’s Value Proposition

Outside influences are trying to dictate the beef industry’s sustainability story, but they aren’t getting the whole picture. It’s up to us to share the true story of beef. By Rebecca Mettler

26 Get a Jump Start on Your Gelbvieh Summer

Here’s the place for you to get the initial scoop on all the American Gelbvieh Junior Association events happening this summer! By Jake Renner

GRAPHIC DESIGN: Lynn Valentine lynnv@gelbvieh.org

Photo on the cover by Angela Vesco:

EDITOR: Rebecca Mettler rebeccam@gelbvieh.org “GELBVIEH WORLD” (ISSN 1084-5100), is published monthly except for February, June and September for $35 for one year. American Gelbvieh Association 350 Interlocken Blvd., Ste. 200, Broomfield, Colorado 80021-3993. Periodicals postage paid at Broomfield, Colorado and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER send address changes to: Gelbvieh World, 350 Interlocken Blvd., Ste. 200, Broomfield, Colorado 80021

2 | APRIL 2019

Advancing Livestock Media Professionals

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April 2019, Volume 33, Number 7

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IN EVERY ISSUE Contact Us Information Exchange

4 12-13

Events of Interest

40

Ad Index

42

BREEDERS CORNER Midwest Breeders

28-29

Southern Breeders

31

Northeast Breeders

35

Western Breeders

36

Upper Midwest Breeders

36-37

Southeast Breeders

39

Service Center

41


SUCCESS IS BUILT ON

SuperiorGenetics

TJB 149X TJB 128X

TJB 410B

ONLINE

EmbryoSale

APRIL 7, 2019

TJB 921U

go to tjbgelbvieh.com to register

TODD, ALISA, KELSIE & KATELYN BICKETT 455 Brotherton Lane Chickamauga, GA 30707 • (706) 375-6586 (423) 667-3799 • Russ Princ, Herdsman (423) 802-8347

Like us on Facebook


GW contents

INSIDE THE EDITORIAL

6

A Westerner’s Take on Nutrition

View from the Board by President John Carrel

8

A Competitive Position for Future Success

From the Corner Office by Megan Slater

16 Guide to Contemporary Grouping

Data Bulletin by AGA Staff

18 Ruminating on Nutrition

Junior Connection by Dani Stock

20 Permit to Success

Registry Tips ‘N Tricks by Taylor Buckley

22 Reproductive Losses in Beef Cattle: Diagnosing the Cause

350 Interlocken Blvd., Ste. 200 • Broomfield, CO 80021 Main phone: 303-465-2333 • Fax: 303-465-2339 www.gelbvieh.org • info@gelbvieh.org Facebook: American Gelbvieh Association Instagram: americangelbvieh ASSOCIATION STAFF Megan Slater Interim Executive Director megans@gelbvieh.org (ex. 485) Tom Strahm Commercial Marketing Director tom@gelbvieh.org 785-547-7999 Taylor Buckley Data Services Coordinator taylorb@gelbvieh.org (ex. 479) Will Fiske Breed Growth Specialist will@gelbvieh.org 540-414-4833

Lynn Valentine Gelbvieh Media Productions Coordinator/Graphic Design lynnv@gelbvieh.org (ex. 486) Rebecca Mettler Editorial Content Coordinator rebeccam@gelbvieh.org 940-255-5471 Jake Renner Member and Youth Activities Coordinator jake@gelbvieh.org 303-465-2333

Commercial Corner Post by Taylor Grussing, SDSU Cow-Calf Field Specialist EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

SALE REPORTS 30

Thorstenson’s Lazy TV Ranch 38th Annual Production Sale

32

Gustin’s Diamond D Gelbvieh Sale

34

29th Annual Taubenheim Gelbvieh Production Sale

John Carrel, President (2017) Columbus, MT • 406-322-5991 lauriecarrel@live.com Dan McCarty, Vice President (2018) Rifle, CO • 970-481-5217 mccartycattle@hotmail.com

Walter Teeter, Treasurer (2016) Mt. Ulla, NC • 704-236-7980 waltert@republicrefrigeration.com

DIRECTORS Dustin Aherin (2018) Phillipsburg, KS • 785-302-1252 dgaherin@vet.k-state.edu Todd Bickett, DVM (2019) Chickamauga, GA • 423-667-3799 todd@bickettgenetics.com

Lori Maude (2019) Hermosa, SD • 303-809-3789 lori.maude@gmail.com Andrea Murray (2019) Kingfisher, OK • 405-368-9601 murrayfarm@pldi.net

Leland Clark (2017) Barnard, KS • 785-792-6244 prcc@twinvalley.net

Lowell Rogers DVM (2018) Seminary, MS • 601-270-4152 lrdrsmiley@gmail.com

Doug Hughes (2017) Max Meadows, VA • 276-620-4271 lwhf@wiredog.com

Randy Sienknecht (2019) Gladbrook, IA • 319-290-3763 rmsink1209@msn.com

Jeff Loveless (2018) Spanish Fork, UT • 801-623-8308 olranch@aol.com

Jeff Swanson (2019) Oxford, NE • 308-290-3763 swansoncattleco@yahoo.com

Derek Martin (2018) Bucklin, KS • 620-397-6752 dmartin@kinsleyfeeders.com

4 | APRIL 2019

Klint Sickler, Secretary (2017) Gladstone, ND • 701-483-5250 klintsickler@hotmail.com


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GW view from the board

A Westerner’s Take on Nutrition By John Carrel

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UTRITION: A daunting subject in our industry to say the least. As I am sure you all do, we have access to some very qualified nutritionists to help us formulate rations for our confined cattle. We finish very few, but warm up a considerable number of both steers and heifers. By warm up I mean taking spring-born weaned or bawling calves and feeding them a growing ration from weaning to early January then selling them to feedlots out of our area to be finished. This is a bit of a balancing act, as we need them to grow and stay healthy but not get too fat. Our buyers want enough frame so they can put some weight on them and get adequate gain. If they can get a little compensatory gain as a bonus, they are all for it. The one thing that always amazes me is how different many feedlot rations are. It is usually a function of what products are available in the area. Freight becomes a big concern for everyone. In our case we are right at the edge of where dried distillers grain is a viable option. The closest plant is Richardton, North Dakota, and it is all interstate between us and there, but it still equates to 365 miles. When we need it we usually do not have time or manpower to send one of our own trucks so we must hire a truck. This, of course, adds to the cost but doesn’t take away an employee or one of us while we are weaning etc. There is also the weather variable and getting a truck and body stuck for a few days somewhere in between really defeats the purpose. Another by-product we have access to are wheat midds. These primarily come out of Billings, Montana, so the haul is considerably shorter. If the midds come in bulk they are fluffy and light so it is not economical to haul them too far. If they are pelleted they can economically be hauled further but are more expensive since they have been run through a pellet mill and nobody can do this for free. Both forms require some type of storage facility. The loose

6 | APRIL 2019

midds especially are susceptible to all kinds of weather, especially wind. It doesn’t take much of a breeze to considerably reduce a pile of exposed midds. Another product we have access to is beet pulp from the sugar beet factory in Billings. As with midds, this comes in various forms and needs to be contracted in advance. With both midds and pulp the plants produce a significant amount and it has to be hauled out on a regular basis so they don’t get backed up. Therefore, the contracts have to be fulfilled and the product has to be hauled in a timely fashion. I am sure every area has similar scenarios with all types of feed products. These are the ones I am familiar with but am sure there are many examples of other by-products I have never heard of. I visited a feedyard in Idaho to follow up on some warmedup steers we had sold them. Part of their ration was based on potato products. It was quite a sight to see loaders drive into a pile of reject french fries and dump them into the feed truck. This, of course, was just one of the ingredients in the ration but is just another example of what cattle can be fed and do very well on. This winter has been one for the recordbooks and tough on everyone. March was filled with devastation for ranchers in the West, High Plains, and Midwest with the mid-month arrival of the bomb cyclone. My condolences go out to those affected by Winter Storm Ulmer. For Montana and much of the Northern U.S. March was marked with several storms and nights of extreme cold—think -34. On nights such as those I rolled out my fair share of non-by-product good old grass hay for the pairs. It is truly amazing how much hay a cow can consume when it is cold and they have a calf nursing. D


Post Rock Cattle Co.

THANK YOU

Thank you to the many bidders and buyers who made our sale a success. In spite of weather delays and complications, 77 lots sold on the Internet and many more on the phone, and only 7 head were loaded out on sale day. Barnard recorded 12.4 inches of snow on our original sale date. A special thanks to all who made the extra effort to attend.

CED 9

BW 1.7

WW 71

YW 110

MK 22

TM 58

CEM YG 6 -0.20

CW 26

REA 0.52

MB FPI EPI 0.06 70.58 135.29

DCSF POST ROCK TOP GUN 65F8 Homozygous Black Homozygous Polled 75% Balancer We retained for in-herd use, this VLK Young Gun son out of our featured donor, Post Rock Wilma 294Z8 that topped our 2018 sale to Matthews Farms, one of the most popular bulls we’ve ever taken to Denver. We plan to use him heavily on our purebred cows.

CED 11

BW 0.8

WW 82

YW 130

MK 17

TM 58

CEM YG 7 -0.14

CW 24

REA 0.55

MB FPI EPI 0.56 90.54 124.08

CED 11

BW 2.9

WW 68

YW 90

MK 13

TM 47

CEM YG 8 -0.49

CW 12

REA 0.81

MB FPI 0.39 75.66

DCSF POST ROCK DISTINGUISHED 164F8 Homozygous Black Homozygous Polled 50% Balancer Buyer was long time friends and customers Matthews Farms in Tennessee. He combined phenomenal individual data and EPDs with a striking presence and profile that makes him an elite herdsire prospect.

CED 10

BW 1.2

WW 73

YW 107

MK 21

TM 57

CEM YG 5 -0.25

CW 21

REA 0.66

MB FPI 0.28 77.95

EPI 87.95

DCSF POST ROCK GAME CHANGER 57F8 Homozygous Black Homozygous Polled 63% Balancer Buyer was Phil Pace from Utah. Pace Ranches are repeat buyers who arrived early Friday and had to spend several days in the motel to secure this featured son of EGL Game Changer that was very popular in Denver and on sale day.

Cowman’s Kind Bull and Female Sale February 29, 2020

EPI 34.19

DCSF POST ROCK ASTRONAUT 379E2 Homozygous Black Homozygous Polled Purebred 94% Buyer was repeat customers Holste’s Triple H Farms in Iowa. He combined outstanding growth EPDs with a 0.39 marbling EPD, which is off the charts for purebreds. He comes from a dam that records a 124 IMF ration on both her bull calves.

3041 E Hwy 284, Barnard, KS Bill Clark 785-792-6244 Leland Clark 785-392-0888 Fax: 785-792-6250 email: prcc@twinvalley.net

“Where calving ease, performance and eye appeal come together”

thought for the month

One useless man is a shame two is a law firm and three or more is a Congress


GW from the corner office

A Competitive Position for Future Success By Megan Slater

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he American Gelbvieh Association (AGA) is tasked with providing information on Gelbvieh and Balancer® cattle and assisting members and customers with the tools to be successful in today’s modern beef industry. Aside from this, another very important role of the AGA is to continue to increase breed acceptance and industry relevance of Gelbvieh and Balancer genetics, and ultimately gain market share. This is why one of the primary areas of focus in the AGA Meeting Modern Industry Demands Strategic Plan is the Gelbvieh and Balancer breed’s competitive position within the beef industry. The AGA has continued to see an increase in industry acceptance and demand for Gelbvieh and Balancer genetics. This can be seen in several different areas. For example, in spring 2018 Gelbvieh and Balancer bulls were accepted for use in the Integrity Beef Alliance program. The Integrity Beef Alliance is a program that simplifies cow-calf producer management decisions and increases the marketability of calves through the production of high-quality, uniform, preconditioned cattle. Gelbvieh and Balancer’s access into this program is a small step to not only continuing to gain industry-wide acceptance, but to also gain market share. Another example of beef industry acceptance is the popularity and growing use of the name Balancer. When I started with the association nearly five short years ago, we would often get asked, “What’s a Balancer?” and even some folks not knowing what a Gelbvieh is. Now when we interact with people in the industry we are getting comments like “I’ve heard a lot of good things about these Balancers” from producers who are intrigued and wanting to find out more information. For several years now, the AGA has grown its relationship with Superior Livestock Auction and other video marketing companies such as Western Video Market and Cattle Country Video to help promote the

8 | APRIL 2019

breed to both buyers and sellers. Through these valued partnerships, we have seen a tremendous increase in the number of lots that are listed as Gelbvieh and Balancer sired rather than just Angus-cross or black hided. We have also seen an increase of the auctioneers calling out “Balancer, Balancer” on the block on one of the biggest stages in the livestock market arena. People have gained much more familiarity with both Gelbvieh and Balancer and this has increased the awareness of the positive impacts Gelbvieh-influenced cattle can have on all sectors of the beef industry. In fact, BEEF Magazine’s 2019 Seedstock 100 list stated Balancers were one of only two breeds that were offered by more S100 operations from year to year. Seedstock 100 operations marketed 32 different breeds and composites, of those 6% offered Balancer and 5% offered Gelbvieh. One thing we have started to see in the beef industry is the overwhelming acceptance of crossbreeding in herds throughout the country. Many producers are looking for ways to add heterosis and capitalize on all of the benefits crossbreeding has to offer. More and more buyers and feedyards are wanting to know exactly what those blackhided cattle are. Feedyards are the asking more specific questions about the genetics and management of the cattle they are buying: Are they crossbred and do they have Continental influence? All of these things point toward the Gelbvieh and Balancer breed being in a very competitive position right now. Not only is our industry acceptance increasing, but Continental breeds and hybrid cattle are in high demand right now. Those producers who have been using straightbred English or even English x English crosses are now looking to add Continental into their herd, and there is no better solution than Gelbvieh. The AGA has history of being a proponent of crossbreeding and was the first cattle breed registry to register hybrid cattle. In addition, the AGA has also prided itself on maintaining commercial focus and always wanting to serve the customer. For decades, members of the AGA have been raising cattle that work for the commercial producer and now these genetics are no longer a secret. This is why the AGA and its members must not lose site of raising quality genetics and remembering whom we are here to serve, because our time is now. D


GW over the fence

Over the Fence with Kyle Best, Tuscan, Arizona By Rebecca Mettler

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ituated in southern Arizona near Tuscan, amid varying terrain that stretches from flat and open to mountainous and rocky, is Marley Ranch/KT Cattle Inc., owned and operated by Kyle Best and his family. Best has ranched in Arizona for 23 years, but the family’s ranching legacy spans six generations with the recent addition of Best’s first grandchild.

On average, Best runs seven to 10 cow-calf pairs per section, which is 640 acres. It goes without saying: Best ranches in some pretty rough and arid country. Cows exposed to that type of environment need to be the right kind in order to survive. Best has found that breeding Gelbvieh influence into his herd of Arizona cattle for the last 15 years has created a moderate and efficient female that can thrive in the environment and wean a heavy calf, thus becoming a more valuable asset to the operation.

What does it take for a cow to thrive on your operation? In Best’s ranching career he’s had the privilege of raising cattle in varied environments across the U.S. Best ranched for several years in northwest Oklahoma before he settled down in Arizona. It was in Oklahoma where he gained his appreciation for purebred Gelbvieh bulls and a Gelbvieh-influenced cowherd. Northwest Oklahoma had its fair share of snowy, cold winters and hot, droughty summers. Even in Arizona there’s a distinct difference in the topography of the land Best ranches. Between flat and open to hilly and rocky, Best’s cattle can handle it all.

The Best family (left to right): Trey, Amy, Kyle, Kaysha, and Klancy.

10 | APRIL 2019

“The main thing is that cows don’t get too big and are able to utilize what (forage resources) they have here to survive on. The ideal cow weighs 900 to 950 pounds in our environment and can wean off a 650-pound calf and do it year in and year out. Gelbvieh genetics have made it a lot easier to reach that weight.” After turning bred cows out, it’s not uncommon for Best not to see the cows until the spring after calving


over the fence GW is finished. Cows are expected to survive on their own, calve unassisted, and raise a healthy and profitable calf.

or through the stockyards at Marana Stockyards in Marana, Arizona.

“People in the area are seeing what the Gelbviehinfluenced females will do with how they adapt, their moderate size, good milk, and good fertility. And they’re seeing how well the feeder cattle perform.”

“We have good luck both places and the Gelbvieh genetics are getting more well known around here, which helps get the calves sold.”

After 15 years, Best now has a lot of cows that are half Gelbvieh. The operation utilizes a crossbreeding rotation to focus on creating and maintaining a high level of hybrid vigor in both the calves and the cows.

Where has the introduction of Gelbvieh genetics taken your replacement females? “We have seen a heck of a difference in our replacement heifers since we started using Gelbvieh genetics. We will keep 300 heifers and turn them out bred and we won’t see them until they come back in with a calf in the spring and 95 percent will come in with a baby and you don’t have to pull calves,” says Best.

Buyers from throughout the U.S. have recognized the quality and predictability Best’s calves bring to the feedyard and on the rail. He’s sent feeder cattle to Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Texas, and California.

What’s helped you improve your operation’s bottom line? “The main thing is to keep costs down. Having calves out of Gelbvieh bulls has helped us put weight on the calves, plus the cows don’t take any pampering.” Best makes sure cattle have access to salt and mineral and utilizes an extensive vaccination protocol with a good dewormer, but they receive no special treatment. “There’s absolutely no getting them up and haying them. They take care of themselves.”

One of challenging aspects of heifer development is getting a first-calf heifer bred back, especially in rough environments. It’s standard for Best to have a 90-plus percent breed-back on first-calf heifers, which he attributes to the added fertility Gelbvieh genetics bring to the table. In contrast, before Best introduced Gelbvieh into the herd they would get 80 to 85 percent bred back, and thought they were doing well. The added fertility in their herd has provided them the opportunity to net up to an additional 10 percent in cowherd productivity!

How do you manage your calves? “We have a longer calving period than a lot of places. We start calving January 15 and are done by April 15. Then we have a handful of fall calvers. With the spring calvers we start weaning the last Monday in October and are finished by the middle of December.” Calves are weaned and backgrounded for 45 days then sold through Superior Livestock Auction

Describe the genetic progress your ranch as made over the last 15 years. Best has reached a place in his herd where he’s basically fine-tuning a well-oiled machine. With low birth weights, high weaning weights, high fertility and moderate size, he doesn’t see a need for drastic changes. “For our operation the addition of Gelbvieh genetics has worked well. Down the line we want our cattle to keep getting better. I’ve been on this ranch for 16 years and we have upgraded the cattle so much. We went from probably having calves averaging 400 pounds at weaning to what we have now just because of the genetics we put in them.” D

GELBVIEH WORLD |

11


GW information exchange Take Advantage of AGA’s Incentive Program The American Gelbvieh Association (AG) is offering monetary incentives for members who participate in DNA testing bulls and females, gather feed intake phenotypes and sired-identified carcass data. DNA Testing Young Bulls: AGA members who complete a GGP-Low Density (GGP-LD) or GGP-High Density (GGP-HD) panel on a minimum of 30 percent of each year’s entire male calf crop will receive a $2 per head rebate on their entire cowherd’s annual herd assessment in the subsequent calendar year. This incentive program begins with the 2018-born male calf crop and herd assessment rebates will be given starting in 2019. Only bulls who are under one year of age when tested will be eligible for incentive program. DNA Testing Replacement Females: AGA members that complete a GGP-LD, GGP-HD, or GGP-Ultra Low Density (GGP-uLD) panel test on 30 percent of each year’s entire female calf crop will receive a $2 per head rebate on their entire cowherd’s annual herd assessment in the subsequent calendar year. This incentive program begins with the 2018-born heifer calf crop and herd assessment rebates will be given starting in 2019. Only females who are under on year of age when tested will be eligible for incentive program Feed Intake Phenotypes: AGA members that report feed intake data acceptable to the NCE will receive a $10 credit to their account for each animal record. Credit for Sire-Identified Carcass Data: AGA members that report actual sire-identified carcass data acceptable to the NCE will receive a $4 credit per animal record to their AGA account.

For more information and the incentive rebate form, please visit the Member Programs page under the Membership tab on Gelbvieh.org, or call the AGA office at 303-465-2333 with any questions.

Transferring Animals When transferring animals to their new owner it is important that the animal(s) ends up in the appropriate account on the AGA Online Registry Service. If you are unsure whether a buyer has an AGA number, simply click the blank box next the buyer field. This will pull up a separate window to enter the buyer’s zip code and then click “Find Profiles”. Review the list of members and non-members and once the correct account is found, check the box to the left of the member number. If the buyer does not already have a profile within the registry, click “Click to create new profile” at the very bottom of the page. For assistance transferring animals, please contact the AGA office at 303-465-2333.

Hurry! Complete Your Herd Assessments Today Completing annual herd assessments is an important part of being an AGA member. Although the deadline for annual herd assessments has passed, assessments still need to be completed in order for the herd to be in good standing with the Association. All females 13 months of age and older should either be assessed or disposed of as part of the total herd reporting process. One assessment is tied to one registration credit to register the female’s progeny. This credit also allows members to transfer the animal(s) as well as report performance information.

For assistance in marketing or purchasing Gelbvieh, Balancer ® or Southern Balancer ® bulls, females, and feeder cattle, contact:

12 | APRIL 2019

Tom Strahm Commercial Marketing Director

Will Fiske Breed Growth Specialist

tom@gelbvieh.org (785) 547-7999 (C)

will@gelbvieh.org (540) 414-4833 (C)


information exchange GW Herd assessments received after March 15, 2019, will be charged a late penalty according to the following fees schedule:

1-30 days = 5 percent late penalty

31-60 days = 10 percent late penalty

60+ days = 15 percent late penalty

If you have not already completed your 2019 herd assessment, you are encouraged to do so via the AGA Online Registry Service. Please contact the AGA office at 303-465-2333 if you need any assistance in completing this process.

Processing Fee The AGA staff is happy to assist all members completing data entry. As a reminder, any function on the AGA Online Registry Service that can be completed through a member account, such as calf registrations, transfers, DNA orders, and other data entry that is instead processed by staff will incur a $2 processing fee. If you are not familiar with completing some of these functions on the online registry and would like to learn, please contact the AGA office so that staff can walk you through the process of completing these functions.

Donate to the AGF Through the Culls for the Future Program Taking an animal to the sale barn? Donate a cull animal to the American Gelbvieh Foundation (AGF) and help grow the Gelbvieh future! Simply fill out the Gift of Livestock form found on the Foundation page under the Giving to the Foundation tab at www.gelbvieh.org and have the proceeds of the sale be sent directly to the AGF. For more information about Culls for the Future or the American Gelbvieh Foundation, contact the AGA office at 303-465-2333 or visit www.gelbvieh.org

Online Payments

outstanding balance on the account for more than 30 days. Once the amount on the account is paid in full the account becomes unlocked. For assistance paying a bill or for billing questions, please contact the AGA office at 303-465-2333.

Direct DNA Testing Questions to the AGA Office Please contact the AGA office for all DNA testing related questions and/or concerns. We understand that DNA samples are sent directly to GeneSeek’s lab; however, all DNA related questions must be directed to the AGA office in order to keep the DNA ordering and testing process as efficient as possible. Please call the AGA office at 303-465-2333.

New Members The AGA would like to welcome the following new members to the Gelbvieh Associations in February 2019. AGA R&H Gelbvieh, Grand Junction, Colo. Callanhan Grund, Manhattan, Kan. MO Ranch, Staples, Minn. Bodee & Katie Nicholas, Waverly, N.Y. Kayla Reynolds, Crab Orchard, Ky. West Hills Ranch LLC, Thornton, Colo. Cousin’s Farm, Justin Brenizer, Charleston, Tenn. B&D Gelbvieh, Halfway, Mo. Pinkerton Gelbvieh, Logan, Kan. Davidson Show Cattle, Duncan, S.C. Jerktail Farms LLC, Mountain Grove, Mo. FN Ranch, Gilbert, Minn. JW5 Farms, Bonne Terre, Mo. AGJA Hailey Holmes, Manitou, Ky.

AGA members can their account balance online at their convenience using the red “Pay Online Now” button under the balance due on the AGA Online Registry Service. When paying online be sure the address that automatically populates on the credit card information screen is the billing address associated with the card that being used. If the address is incorrect, the transaction will be declined. Member accounts become locked when there is an GELBVIEH WORLD |

13


GW crossbreeding value

The Dollars and Cents of Crossbreeding Why consider crossbreeding? The value of the improved productivity due to crossbreeding is worth $150 per cow per year. By B. Lynn Gordon

W

ith the tight margins and high input costs facing beef producers today, they are more and more focused on the return on investment (ROI) of a production practice or strategy they may implement. Impacting the bottom line positively is the primary end goal. Can crossbreeding be a production practice that will provide an increased return on investment? “The impact of crossbreeding is the result of capturing non-additive genetic merit in one’s cowherd,” says Bob Weaber, Extension beef specialist at Kansas State University (KSU). Genetic merit is made up of both additive effects and non-additive effects. Additive effects are those effects reflected in EPDs, breeding values and indexes. Non-additive effects are the effects from the pairing of different genes together that result in heterosis, which is a benefit of crossbreeding. “When thinking about genetic selection, you can focus on the additive effects to make selection decisions using EPDs and indices and also get a benefit from the heterosis piece by using different types of mating systems and managing them effectively,” says Megan Rolf, assistant professor of genetics, Kansas State University. Commercial cattlemen need to focus on both additive and non-additive effects to gain the most benefit from crossbreeding, whereas seedstock producers often put a greater emphasis on the additive genetic merit which comes from EPDs and indexes in order to market superior genetics to commercial customers.

Adding heterosis to the mix “Heterosis has the ability to generate value for the cow-calf industry,” says Weaber. In a series of multiyear studies conducted at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (MARC), researchers determined the

14 | APRIL 2019

improvement in weaning weight per cow exposed, to heterosis, increased production 20-25% per cow in Bos taurus x Bos taurus crosses. Research in the subtropical regions results showed a 50% increase in percent improvement in weaning weight per cow exposed when crossing Bos indicus x Bos taurus animals. Weaber explains when comparing various production practices, producers should use a metric that captures system-level dynamics. A metric like weaning weight per cow exposed captures a breadth of data from cow exposure through weaning, providing a view of the whole production cycle. “Weaning weights of calves is a relatively poor indicator of production efficiency as it only focuses on the elements of what went right in our production system, rather than the true picture of the entire system or cycle. Weaning weight per cow exposed includes the failures in the production system, such as reporting of cows that didn’t conceive, death loss, etc.,” he says. “Crossbreeding systems generate value through improvements in a number of calf and cow traits. About two-thirds of the economic value from crossbreeding comes from having crossbred cows, so if you only produce crossbred calves from straightbred cows, you miss about two-thirds of the free lunch from heterosis.”

Financial focus Weaber and Rolf report economic advantages from the crossbred cow include increased longevity of 1.36 years over their straightbred counterparts in the same production environment, as well as nearly one calf on average more in the cow’s lifetime. The enhanced longevity and fertility yield an additional cumulative 600 pounds of weaning weight from the crossbred cow. The result is greater profitability in cow-calf production. Digging deeper, the advantages of a crossbred calf over a straightbred counterpart also reveal the impact of heterosis. Crossbred calves have 3.2% better calving rate; have 1.4% greater survivability to weaning; a 1.7-pound increase in birth weight; a 16-pound increase in weaning weight and; a 29-pound increase in yearling weight. In summary, a guideline is that there is a about a 4% improvement in growth rate for the individual calf and about a 4% maternal effect on weaning weight with a crossbred calf.


crossbreeding value GW Impact on profit “Crossbreeding is one of the few technologies that appears to demonstrate a return on investment though an increase on revenue and a decrease in costs,” says Weaber. The two KSU researchers report when the cowherd lasts longer, fewer replacement heifers are needed to maintain herd size, thus decreases replacement costs. This reduction in replacements provides the opportunity for more heifers to be marketed along with their steer mates to positively impact revenues. The individual calf advantages from crossbreeding may seem limited. However, taking the improvements of reduced death loss and increased growth, the results overall can be substantial. Using heterosis estimates from scientific literature, Weaber keeps an updated tally on the impact heterosis can have on a typical 100 head cow herd. Consider a herd with an 80% weaning rate, a 575 pound average weaning weight and over a 10-year time horizon. Then factor in the impact of weaning weight per cow exposed,

a crossbred herd’s increased annual productivity is equivalent to 18 more 575-pound calves. What does this mean to a producer’s bottom line? The value of this improved productivity due to crossbreeding in Weaber’s example is worth $150 per cow per year, using current calf prices of approximately $1.50 per pound for a 5-6 weight. For a straightbred operation to be competitive, the straightbred calves would have to generate $198 per head more revenue to be equivalent to this crossbred herd. The straightbred herd weans fewer calves so each calf sold has to proportionally generate more income. To make crossbreeding work for your operation, keep it simple by choosing a system that will work within your resources and managerial ability. Build a plan with attainable goals and stick to it. D Reprinted with Permission from B. Lynn Gordon, LEADER Consulting, LLC, Sioux Falls, SD.

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GELBVIEH WORLD |

15


GW data bulletin

Guide to Contemporary Grouping By AGA Staff

T

he AGA Online Registry Service makes herd data and EPD values more available than ever to help producers make sound genetic improvement choices for their herds. With all this information so easy to view, the AGA office often gets questions about the specifics of concepts like contemporary grouping, which producers can view in detail for each animal, or by groups of animals. A contemporary group is a group of animals that have experienced a similar environment with respect to the expression of a trait, such as birth weight. Contemporaries typically are from the same location, are of the same sex, similar age, and have been managed alike (Bourdon, 2000). Why is it important to group animals for genetic evaluation? We know that heritability of traits can be increased by adjusting for known environmental effects, and by managing animals to minimize differences in performance caused by the environment. We also know it is not always possible for animals to be managed the same, particularly if you are trying to compare animals from different herds or even different areas of the country. Contemporary grouping makes it possible to fairly compare animals from different herds when management types and physical environment are different. Correct contemporary grouping is important because incorrect groups can distort genetic predictions for individual animals. This generally occurs when some animals receive preferential treatment in the herd, but are contemporary grouped with animals that don’t receive special treatment. A good example of this situation would be show animals that are given extra feed and care apart from the herd. These animals may grow faster than the rest of the herd because of special management and feed, so they should be separated by the breeder into a separate contemporary group. If all animals are grouped into

16 | APRIL 2019

one, the potential for growth in the show animals may appear greater. In reality, the relative performance of those animals is biased upward because of being compared to the rest of the herd that received no special treatment. What factors go into a contemporary group used for genetic evaluation at the AGA? Grouping begins at birth and is done by herd. Calves are separated by a 90-day window for birth date, sex, service type, birth type, and management code. Service type means A.I. or natural service calves vs. E.T. calves. Birth type means twins vs. single births. Management code is set by the producer to denote groups of animals that are managed differently. If the producer doesn’t set a management code, all calves would have a management code of 1. If a producer wants to group calves differently, they can separate calves by management codes of 1, 2, 3, and so on. Contemporary groups are additive, which means they build on each other as time goes on. Weaning contemporary group, for example, is formed by birth CG, weaning weight date, sex, and management code. Yearling contemporary group is formed by weaning CG, yearling weight date, sex, and management code. As you can see, each group (aside from birth) is based on a previous group. If you have many groups at birth, you will have many subsequent contemporary groups as well. To view contemporary groups in your herd, log in to your home page on the AGA Registry. Contemporary groups for each trait can be viewed under the “CG’s” tab. To view a specific group for a trait, click on the PDF next to a contemporary group number. This will open a file that details the performance of each animal in the contemporary group, along with adjusted weights, ratios, and ranks within the group. For more questions on contemporary grouping, contact the AGA office at 303-465-2333. D


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A very well-balanced red purebred favorite was DDGR Renegade 140F, selling to Golden Buckle Gelbvieh of Medina, ND for $13,000. He is a son of the KKC Nobility 123Y sire and a top producing daughter of the Golden Buckle Gelbvieh 030W Winchester sire.

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GW junior connection

Ruminating on Cattle Nutrition By Dani Stock

“H

ey Dani, April is only three weeks away!” one of my friends mentioned as we were walking through campus on a cold March day. What comes to your mind when you think of April? My mind was immediately drawn to breeding season, warmer weather, and the long to-do list I need to conquer before the start of summer shows. Show season and spring means changing from a protein-filled ration to something that is a little heavier in concentrates. As a junior, one important aspect of the beef industry that we may overlook is the nutritional value our cattle gain from their rations we feed them each day. Nutrition begins the day the calf is born as it draws nutrients from its mother’s milk shortly after birth. But where do these nutrients go once they have hit the calf ’s digestive tract? Well, for the first two weeks of a calf ’s life it acts as a monogastric (simple–stomached) animal. The milk passes over the rumen, reticulum, and omasum to the abomasum through an organ call the esophageal groove. This allows for the calf to digest the nutrients in the milk without letting the milk ferment in the rumen. By the age of three to four months, that same baby calf will start to develop the stomach of a ruminant. The calf now has four functioning compartments to its stomach and has started to properly digest roughages like hay and

silage and possibly concentrates such as corn. As it chews, digestive enzymes in its saliva are mixed with the food. This is the first set in the breakdown process before the food passes through the esophagus into the reticulum and rumen. Together they’re called the rumino-reticulum. The reticulum acts as a reservoir to hold food while it is waiting to enter the rumen. Once the food passes into the rumen, the microbes start to digest the cellulose and hemicellulose that are in roughages. Rumen microbes also break down other components of the animal’s diet such as protein and starch. If the feed does not have to be regurgitated as cud, then it travels into the omasum. This organ absorbs water from the digested material before it heads into the abomasum. The abomasum is known to many as the true stomach, but it is like the stomach of a pig. The animal’s own digestive enzymes break down food in the abomasum and small intestine. The rest of the absorption of the nutrient from the feed occurs mainly in the small intestine. Understanding the digestive process in our cattle is important when deciding what feeds to feed during the different stages of the life cycle. Obviously, we do not want to try to feed our newborn calves’ grain because they will not be able to digest it. However, we also want to give them the best nutrients possible at a young age so they can perform to their fullest in the feedyard. So, the next time you think of spring, think of the next change that will happen to your calf – most likely a diet change. These are critical stages in their lives, and it’s even more important that you develop a diet for that animal that will maximize its digestive system and use it to its full potential. D

Grace Vehige, President (2017) Billings, MO • g_vehige@hotmail.com Jake Renner Member & Youth Activities Coordinator 303-465-2333 • jake@gelbvieh.org Emily Schilling, Adult Advisor Kendallville, IN • 260-242-1552 ejgriffiths.eg@gmail.com Andrea Murray, Adult Advisor Kingfisher, OK • 405-368-9601 murrayfarm@pldi.net

18 | APRIL 2019

Grady Hammer, Vice President (2017) Wallace, KS • gradyhammer@yahoo.com Colton Ivers, V.P. of Leadership (2018) Austin, MN • coltoniverscattleco@gmail.com Anna Ring, Secretary (2017) Oregon, IL • amring121@gmail.com Danielle (Dani) Stock, Treasurer (2018) Waukon, IA • danielle.m.stock@gmail.com

Jacob Barwick (2018) Orleans, NE • jacob.barwick99@gmail.com Wyatt Forbes (2017) DeSmet, SD • wyatt.forbes@lakeareatech.edu Kallie Mattison (2017) Lamberton, MN • kallieamattison@gmail.com Alexx (Lexi) Starr (2018) Stapleton, NE • lexi.starr@icloud.com Jesse Henson, Ex-Officio (2018) Canton, N.C. • hensonjlee@gmail.com


Support the AGJA and become a sponsor for the 2019 AGJA Music City Showdown! Sponsorship opportunities include booth space, champions, divisions, classes and contest winners. All sponsors will be recognized during the show at the banquet, on the AGA website and in the August Gelbvieh World. Sponsorship deadline is May 15, 2019. Contact Jake Renner, Junior Coordinator 303-465-2333 | jake@gelbvieh.org or an AGJA Board Member


GW registry tips ‘n tricks

Permit to Success

• Both AI sires and donor dams must have the Genomic Option 1 (GGP-HD) profile and be tested for all monitored genetic conditions, which the AGA offers through our bovine conditions panel. This ensures that all highly influential animals are tested with the AGA’s highest density DNA test and tested for all genetic conditions pertinent to the Gelbvieh and Balancer breed.

By Taylor Buckley

A

s genetic technology advances in the beef industry the American Gelbvieh Association (AGA) also makes it a priority to keep up with the latest trends in advanced technology. After all, the AGA’s mission statement reads: “The American Gelbvieh Association (AGA) is a beef cattle breed association dedicated to recording, promoting, and improving Gelbvieh-influenced cattle.” With the goal of improving the Gelbvieh and Balancer® breed in mind, overtime a series of guidelines has been implemented to provide additional data on highly influential sires and dams. This is beneficial not only to the producers utilizing those elite genetics, but also helps to improve genetic evaluation for the entire population. The AGA requires a series of testing be completed on AI sires and donor dams before their progeny can be registered. The following is a breakdown of what DNA testing is currently required in order to register AI calves or ET calves:

AI sires and donor dams also need to be parent verified, which means they need to qualify by DNA to their sire and dam on file. In order to do this, the AGA will need parentage markers on file for the sire and dam of the AI sire or donor dam needing a permit.

This brings us to the next point in the topic of permits. To prevent delays in the registering process of ET calves or AI-sired calves, the AGA encourages members to always pull one or two DNA samples on any animal that may be considered for AI or donor dam status. This spring when you are turning bulls out or processing females is a great opportunity to do that. The sample does not need to be sent in for DNA testing, however if you happen to find that high-performing female or bull, later on it will be much easier to permit the animal if there are samples available to submit for testing. The AGA advises breeders to complete DNA testing before females are flushed or bulls are collected. As an additional note, before natural service sires are turned out this spring/summer, please take the time to gather a DNA sample on any sire that has not been DNA tested. The AGA requires a low-density DNA profile on all walking herd sires of calves born 2016 and later in order for progeny to be registered. For questions on DNA testing requirements or ordering DNA tests, please contact the AGA office at 303-465-2333. D

20 | APRIL 2019


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GW commercial corner post

Reproductive Losses in Beef Cattle: Diagnosing the Cause Taylor Grussing SDSU Extension Cow/Calf Field Specialist Additional Authors: Russ Daly

R

eproductive losses account for $1 billion dollars in lost revenue to the beef industry each year. All the way from conception to birth, we depend on a lot of things to go right, whether we are talking about natural or artificial breeding programs. Nevertheless, reproductive failure whether presented as early or late term abortions (miscarriages) result in those animals

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22 | APRIL 2019

never being born and having a stark effect on the operation’s bottom line. Utilizing proper health and nutrition programs are ways we can try to reduce reproductive failure from occurring. Yet, if failures occur, diagnosing the cause can be helpful in preventing the issue in the future.

Possible Causes It is often difficult to pinpoint exactly what went wrong when abortions occur. All livestock producers expect a certain degree of late-term abortions or stillbirths. It is generally accepted that any cattle operation will have 1-2% of “normal” pregnancy loss after a month or two of gestation. With spring calving herds, January and February are when many abortion cases are submitted to the SDSU veterinary diagnostic laboratory. In about half of the cases submitted to the SDSU Diagnostic lab, no abnormalities are detected (Table 1). There are many reasons for this, such as that the infectious agents are often not detectable anymore by the time the fetus is expelled, or stillborn calves were aborted due to abnormal presentation or twin pregnancies. In the rest of the cases, something abnormal is found (Table 1). A frequent finding is inflammation in the placenta that may or may not be traced to a specific germ. The placenta in a pregnant animal is the gateway from the mother’s blood supply (carrying nutrients and oxygen, but possibly bacteria and viruses) to the fetus. If something affects that critical tissue, then the fetus may become starved from oxygen and die. When germs are found, they are often more environmental than contagious in nature, and very few cows experience problems. Lastly, sometimes infectious agents such as IBR, BVD, or leptospirosis are identified, for which effective vaccines are available.


commercial corner post GW TABLE 1. ABORTION DIAGNOSES, SDSU DIAGNOSTIC LAB, 2006-2016. No.

% of total

Idiopathic (no diagnosis)

1540

53%

Non-Specific Placentitis

815

28%

importance and should be included whenever possible. Significant microscopic changes and germ identification often stem from examining the placenta. Other samples to submit if you do not want to send in the whole fetus include, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, brain, skeletal muscle (tongue or diaphragm), fetal stomach fluid and fetal thoracic fluid or heart blood. A veterinarian will likely collect and send these samples off for you; however, the herd history information should be given to them to assist with choosing diagnostic tests. Information to include:

T. pyogenes (pus-forming non-contagious bacteria)

170

6%

Fungal - Mycotic

90

3%

IBR Virus

79

3%

Non-specific Bacteria

66

2%

Neospora

44

1%

Other

110

4%

2914

100%

Number of animals in the herd, including recent purchases or movements

Number of abortions and previous diagnoses, if any

Age and breed of dams

Gestational age of abortions

Pertinent treatment or vaccinations

Using Results Depending on the results, your veterinarian will follow up and advise you on potential herd management changes. If an environmental cause such as mold is identified, examining feed sources is a necessary intervention to determine what feeds are contaminated. In addition, if infectious agents are found, implementing a sound pre-breeding vaccination program for next year’s heifers is a must, Cow vaccine boosters to prevent early and late term abortions should also be considered.

Abortion Diagnosis

The Bottom Line

So what should a cattle producer do when a lateterm abortion is encountered? Start with your local veterinarian to discuss the details of your issue and whether there are similar problems in other neighboring herds. When the number of abortions in a group exceeds one or two, it’s generally time to get a diagnosis.

With reproduction, focusing on what we can control and diagnose is the key to helping avoid these losses within our herd. For more information contact your local veterinarian or extension field specialist. D

Sample Submission Diagnostic success can be improved by promptly submitting the proper samples. While the following recommendations are likely sufficient for most veterinary diagnostic laboratories, your veterinarian should confirm these with their particular lab. When possible, the entire fetus and placenta – chilled but not frozen – is the most desirable specimen. The placenta is of particular GELBVIEH WORLD |

23


GW cattlemen’s college

Sustainability and Beef’s Value Proposition By Rebecca Mettler

O

utside forces of influence are coming at the beef industry from several angles. Politicians like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) are attacking our industry with the Green New Deal aimed at eliminating greenhouse gas emissions and their, albeit laughable, “farting cows.” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio recently announced “Meatless Monday” for the entire NYC school system in the 2019-2020 school year, which will impact 1.1 million school children. Coincidently, this announcement happened on the day that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced the results of new research that finds that beef cattle are not a “significant contributor” to longterm global warming. Plus, let’s not forget the rising popularity of fake meat. The beef industry’s image of sustainability continues to get painted with broad sweeping and illfitting brush strokes from artists who have minimal understanding of how the beef industry really works. Sadly, we know this will continue as the U.S. population becomes further and further removed from the source of their food. It’s up to beef producers, industry affiliates, and anyone involved in beef production to tow the line

and speak the truth. The truth of the industry as told by the people who are involved in the day-today activities. It’s up to us to find the fact-based, yet compelling tidbits of information regarding our industry’s story. Sara Place, Ph.D. is the senior director of sustainable beef production research with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA). Her role is to oversee the Beef Checkoff funded sustainability program, including using life cycle assessment to benchmark the U.S. beef industry’s sustainability. Place is also tasked with preaching to the beef industry choir by telling beef ’s uplifting sustainability story represented by immense research. She speaks to cattle producer groups throughout the country to equip them with facts to soundly articulate our beef sustainability story. Place was on the speaker lineup earlier this year at the NCBA Cattlemen’s College held at the Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show. There she spoke of the amazing upcycling power of beef. According to Place, the sustainability debate about livestock is something that seems to repeat itself every generation; so unfortunately, the topic isn’t going away any time soon. Upcycling is the act of taking something of literally no value and making a higher value product. The whole concept of beef production fits neatly into the upcycling definition because the overriding majority of feed resources in beef production are not human-edible. Essentially, cattle upgrade lower-value plant proteins into higher-quality proteins. Cattle take solar energy that’s locked up in mostly human inedible plants and create a desirable, nutritionally high-quality product packed with protein, B vitamins, iron and zinc. “This is super important because most of the solar energy that hits planet Earth and actually gets captured by photosynthesis ends up getting locked up in cellulose, which is a complex molecule, but we cannot digest it,” Place said. “The only microbes that exist to break down cellulose are microbial enzymes. There just so happens to be a lot of those in the rumen of cattle.” In fact, 82 percent of what cattle eat is forage, whether it’s grazing grass or harvested forage. Another 7 percent is made up of by-products. Byproducts come from the human food industries, fiber

24 | APRIL 2019


cattlemen’s college GW production (cottonseed) and from biofuels (distiller’s grains is a huge resource for the beef industry). Only 11 percent of what cattle eat in their lifecycle is actually grain, and of course, in the U.S., most of that is corn. “At the end of the day, the beef industry is unique because it is a forage-based industry. That’s what sets us apart from pigs and chickens.” Most of the land resources that support beef are not going to be used for cultivated agriculture, thus the misconception that beef production is taking away potential land for human food production is just that, a misconception. Roughly 40 percent of the land in the Lower 48 cannot be sustainably cultivated. “There’s no way for us to generate human food in a sustainable manner from those acres without the fourlegged critters that are cattle, sheep, and goats. That’s super important from a standpoint of arguing the case of why we even have livestock in our food system.” Land utilized for grazing cattle can also be categorized as a multifunctional land use because the land is being used for food production and as natural wildlife habitat. “This whole idea that it’s either plant versus animals is obviously very reductionist. It’s kind of missing the bigger picture.” Cattle not only upgrade protein and utilize land not suitable for crops, but they also consume by-products from several other food-related industries. In fact, for every 100 pounds of human food generated, 37 pounds of by-products are produced globally, according to recent UC Davis research. Most of these by-products are utilized by the livestock industry. As mentioned earlier, the beef industry continues to catch flak regarding greenhouse gas emissions, specifically methane emissions. Enteric rumination of all ruminants is the number two source of methane emissions in the U.S., which follows the natural gas and petroleum industry at number one. Landfills are number three, according to Place. Total greenhouse gas emissions from cattle often come up in the media, too. Roughly 2 percent of greenhouse

gas emissions come directly from cattle; all of agriculture accounts for 9 percent of emissions. Electricity, transportation and other sources make up the majority of the greenhouse gas production in the U.S. “What’s also important is that things aren’t static. Emissions have gone down over time in the U.S. beef cattle industry, and really it’s been driven by productivity.” From 1975, when the U.S. cattle herd was at its largest, to 2016, greenhouse gas emissions per unit of beef has gone down 33 percent, according to information gathered from the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization. “We’re producing the same amount of beef with over a third fewer animals. That’s really what’s driven down those emissions.” Facts such as these are impressive, and again, the types of facts that we need to be sharing with people, according to Place. Bringing the topic of upcycling and greenhouse gas emissions full circle is the topic of “Meatless Monday.” Place mentioned a 2017 study published in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Essentially two animal scientists looked at the concept of reducing the nation’s meat consumption to zero. That meant no livestock, a vegan American population and a vegan pet population. The result would lead to only a 2.6 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. On a global scale it would equate to less than one half of one percent. “We would produce more calories, but we wouldn’t have enough essential micronutrients to actually nourish everybody in our food supply if we had no animals,” Place said. Bottom line, the message at hand for the beef industry is to promote the value proposition of beef in light of all of these negative outside forces. What does beef bring to the table, how does it reflect a sustainable future and how do we project beef ’s tremendous and ever-changing story of sustainability to a more distant consumer? According to Place, the value proposition for beef is the ability to transform lower value resources into higher value protein, micronutrients, and all the ancillary products produced from cattle, all of which needs to be shouted from the rooftops! D

GELBVIEH WORLD |

25


GW junior news

Get A Jump Start on Your Gelbvieh Summer! By Jake Renner

I

t’s hard to believe it’s April already and summer is just around the corner. Before we know it, we’ll be knee deep in lush grass, soaking up the sun and preparing for weekend trips packed with livestock shows, family vacations, and memories to be made. While you’re planning those fun-filled weekends, be sure to add a few of the American Gelbvieh Junior Association (AGJA) events to your calendar. You won’t want to miss out on these opportunities to exhibit all your hard work, possibly run for the AGJA board, see some old friends, and surely make new ones. Check out the list of AGJA activities you can take part in this summer!

AGJA Regional Shows We are excited to see you in Springfield, Ohio, for the 2019 Eastern Regional Show. The Buckeye Bonanza is scheduled for May 30-June 2. You can find the entry form and hotel information on the Regional Shows page under the Juniors tab at Gelbvieh.org. Eastern Regional Show entries are due May 17, 2019. Beatrice, Nebraska, will play home to the 2019 Western Regional show June 7-9. Be sure to get calves entered in time to join us for a weekend in Nebraska! Entry information will be posted on the Regional Shows page under the Juniors tab at Gelbvieh.org.

2019 AGJA Music City Showdown You certainly won’t want to miss out on the 2019 AGJA Music City Showdown in Lebanon, Tennessee, July 7-12. Entries forms, hotel accommodations, contest rules and everything you need to prepare for a week in Lebanon are also posted on the AGA website. Book your hotel early to take advantage of the discounted rate! Be sure to read the rule packet carefully for contest rules, ownership and entry deadlines and much more. For those AGJA members interested in taking the next step in their “cattle career” should consider running for

26 | APRIL 2019

the 2019-2020 AGJA Board of Directors. We’re looking for dedicated members 16 to 20 years of age as of January 1 who are ready to represent the Gelbvieh and Balancer® breed in the most positive way. For information on how to run for the board of directors, please review the AGJA Rules & Bylaws for information on eligibility, responsibilities, nomination criteria and much more. All AGJA summer show details can be found by visiting Gelbvieh.org under the Juniors tab at the top of the homepage. We are excited for these summer events and want to thank the state associations who work tirelessly to prepare them for our AGJA members. It takes a village and we appreciate your dedication to the next generation of Gelbvieh and Balancer breeders. Feel free to contact me at 303-465-2333 or via email at jake@ gelbvieh.org with questions about getting involved with the AGJA, hosting future regional shows or junior classics, or running for the AGJA Board of Directors. We are here to help you make the best of your time as a member of the AGJA. D

AGJA Summer Events Calendar AGJA Eastern Regional Buckeye Bonanza May 31-June 2, 2019 Champions Park • (Clark County Fairgrounds) 4401 South Charleston Pike Springfield, Ohio 45502 AGJA Western Regional June 7-9, 2019 Gage County Fairgrounds 321 Logan Street Beatrice, Nebraska 2019 AGJA Music City Showdown July 7-12, 2019 James E. Ward Agricultural Center 945 Baddour Parkway Lebanon, Tennessee 37087


GW breeders corner KANSAS

MIDWEST BREEDERS Judd Ranch Inc.

Harriman Santa fe

Dave & Cindy Judd Nick, Ginger Judd & Family Brent & Ashley Judd 423 Hwy. K-68 • Pomona, KS 66076 785/ 566-8371

Top of the breed sales (every day)

#1 Active Balancer Sire “B006” Marb & Feeder Profit Index (feedlot performance, carcass merit)

Balancer & SimAngus Bulls & Females

Bar Arrow Cattle Company Stuar t Jar vis

26 E. Limestone Rd. • Phillipsburg, KS 67661

e-mail: bararrow@ruraltel.net • 785/543-5177

S

Gel

bvie

LIZ OSWALD 620.662.0862 (h) ANDY OSWALD 620.662.5489 (o) 620.664.4692 (c)

HUTCHINSON, KS

CORY HOFFMAN Herdsman 620.960.1189 (c) oswald.j@sbcglobal.net

h

“Where workin’ cattle and eye appeal come full circle” John & Carla Shearer 2815 Navajo Rd. • Canton, KS 67428 circle_s@hometelco.net 620.628.4621

620.654.6507 (John Cell) • 620.654.6731 (Johnny Cell)

Annual Production Sale 1st Saturday in April

Timothy Mulroy • 785-640-6401 Mayetta, KS • tim@blackgoldinc.biz

1210 G Rd. Stockton, ks 67669 785.737.3319 diamondv@live.com Building Gelbvieh Genetics since 1989

bharriman39@hotmail.com

Committed to raising quality seedstock Registered Gelbvieh and Balancer® Cattle Elmer, Brenda, Brad & Benny McWilliams Asbury, MO 64832 • 417-842-3225 • 417-529-0081(cell)

POST ROCK CATTLE COMPANY 3041 E. Hwy. 284, Barnard, KS 67418 Bill Clark: 785.792.6244 Leland Clark: 785.792.6208 Fax: 785.792.6250 Email: prcc@twinvalley.net

diamond v gelbvieh Randy odle

Bob Harriman (660) 492-2504

Private Treaty Listing www.bhsf.us

Purebred A.I. Seedstock Bulls and Heifers Available. Al & Mary Knapp Cell: (913) 219-6613 18291 158th Street H: (913) 724-4105 Basehor, KS 66007 www.triplekgelbvieh.com e-mail: knappa@swbell.net

NOWACK

Cattle Company Owensville, MO

Registered Gelbvieh & Balancer Cattle

Jared, Caisie, Brooke & Cameron 573.280.4633

Gilbert & Debra 573.646.3477

Bulls and Females for Sale by private treaty year round.

MISSOURI

B/F Cattle Company

Specializing in Forage Raised

Balancer® Bulls on K-31

Holle Gelbvieh

Orrin & Kevin Holle Oberlin, KS 785.626.0081

WWW.KANSASBULLS.COM

28 | APRIL 2019

Culling practices on cows/bulls second to NONE! For information, contact:

Route 1, Box 407 • Butler, MO 64730

660 • 492 • 2808

Promote for Success! Upcoming Advertising Deadlines: May Gelbvieh World Ad deadline: April 3

Call 303-465-2333 today!


breeders corner GW

MIDWEST BREEDERS NEBRASKA

ROCKING GV GELBVIEH

Mark & Patty Goes

Polled Fullblood Gelbvieh Cattle

39414 SW 75th Rd. Odell, NE 68415 (402) 766-3627

Dr. & Mrs. Glenn Wehner 22533 Spencer Lane Kirksville, MO 63501 660-665-7502 GELBVIEHV BALANCERV ANGUS

RogeRs Valley FaRm gelbVieh

Private Treaty Bull & Heifer Sales • Orchard, NE Val Livingston • www.88ranch.com • 402-655-2288

Gelbvieh Bulls Black

Breed for Tomorrow’s Cattle Today!

Kyle & Lori Kuker Shubert, NE

Balancer Females Red

402-883-7246

402-883-2366 402-245-7512 sqblkfarms.com Facebook.com/sqblkfarms sqblkfarms@gmail.com

A Breed Leader in Tenderness & Marbling–

www.rogersvfg.com P.O. Box 51 Mendon, MO 64660 (660-375-7266 (C)

Squeakin’ By-LK Farms

J. J. Boehler

70948 L Rd. , Orleans, NE 68966 308-473-7342 • 308-999-0207 Ronald RogeRs

email: rogers_valley_farm_feedlot@hotmail.com

Jeff Swanson • 308/991-0727 10908 724 Road • Oxford, NE 68967 www.swansoncattleco.com

Cedar Top Ranch

Consistent Genetics Adding Pounds & Profit

Myron & Valerie Bahm 21640 Lawrence 2192 Aurora, MO 65605

Scott & Raberta Starr 212 Starr Drive • Stapleton, NE 69163

Annual Sale—Last Saturday in February

GELBVIEH

BALANCER

(H): 308-587-2293 • (C): 308-530-3900 cedartopranch@gpcom.net Eldon Starr: 1-800-535-6173 or Rich Johnson: 402-368-2209

417-576-0687(c)

email: whiteoakfarms@live.com

Registered Gelbvieh & Balancer®

F LY I N G H G E N E T I C S

Nebraska & Missouri Kyle Helms – NE Cody Helms – NE/MO 308-962-6940 303-842-9071

Stay Connected! Keep up to date with shows, sales and other events by visiting

www.GELBVIEH.org Be sure to Like us on Facebook And look for new videos on our YouTube channel

Missouri Office 417-309-0062

Visit us at– www.flyinghgenetics.com Flying H Genetics

Scott Wolf Travis Wolf 308.537.3588 308.529.3733 Gothenburg, NE • wolfgelbvieh@gmail.com www.facebook/wolfgelbvieh.com Bulls For The BeeF Business Gelbvieh F Balancer F Red Angus F Angus F Angus Hybrids Randy & Leslie Lemke 1757 Road 2500, (H) 402-756-7090 Lawrence, NE 68957 (C) 402-469-2284 rllemke@gtmc.net www.lemkecattle.com

Looking for a sale or event?

Check out Upcoming Events on the website: www.GELBVIEH.org GELBVIEH WORLD |

29


GW sale reports

Thorstenson’s Lazy TV Ranch 38th Annual Production Sale Saturday, March 2, 2019 At the Ranch, Selby, South Dakota Owners – Vaughn & Wendy Thorstenson, Brian & DeDee Begeman Auctioneers: Lynn Weishaar, Seth Weishaar Reported by Vaughn Thorstenson Sale Averages: 80 Black Balancer® Bulls ..........................................$4,325 49 Red Balancer® Bulls..............................................$3,853 49 Black Angus Bulls.................................................$3,762 Total: 178 Bulls...........................................................$4,090

A

crowd of dedicated customers braved icy roads and negative wind chill to be on the seats for the Thorstenson Lazy TV Ranch 38th Annual Bull Sale at the ranch near Selby, South Dakota. Internet bidding warmed up the sale’s atmosphere and dispersed bulls to buyers in eight states. The sale was hosted by Vaughn and Wendy Thorstenson and Brian and DeDee Begeman. Lot 1 – Lazy TV Dividend F402, a black Balancer® sired by Sitz Dividend 649C posting WW and YW EPDs in the top 10% of the breed along with a BW EPD in the top 25% of the breed led off and topped the offering at $14,500. Also ranking in the top 10% of the offering for feed efficiency and homozygous black and homozygous polled, he was purchased by longtime customer Todd Goetz of Selby, South Dakota.

Lot 158 – Leading off the Angus offering was Lazy TV Weigh Up F944 sired by Plattemere Weigh Up K360 and out of the dam who also produced their high-selling Angus bull in 2017. He posted a 122 WW index and a 116 YW index. North Fork Gelbvieh Ranch, Wilmot, South Dakota, claimed the bull at $11,000. Lot 106 – Another popular red Balancer was Lazy TV Profitbuilder F439 who boasted EPDs in the top 10% of the breed for WW, YW, and FPI and was also in the top 30% for feed efficiency. Longtime buyers Merle and Adrienne Hicks, Martin, South Dakota, chose this H2R Profitbuilder B403 son at $10,000 as well as claiming six other high-selling Balancer bulls. Lot 13 – Neil Schnabel, Ashley, North Dakota, had the final bid at $10,000 on Lazy TV Prime F430. Sired by Lazy TV Prime F430 and out of a very productive cow family, Lot 13 also featured carcass EPDs ranking in the top 25% of the breed. Lot 107 – Another popular red Balancer out of H2R Profitbuilder B403 was chosen by Jim Houck, Akaska, South Dakota, at $9,500. F441 boasted EPDs ranking in the top 10% of the breed for BW, WW and YW. Lot 15 – Neil Schnabel struck again purchasing Lazy TV Comrade F421 at $8,500. The black Balancer was sired by 2M01 Comrade and out of a first-calf heifer. D

Lot 105 – Lazy TV Hard Drive F457, a red BA38 sired by Bieber Hard Drive Y120 and out of a Dam of Merit ranked in the top 2% of the breed for both WW and YW EPDs along with indexing 116 at weaning. Repeat buyer Scarborough Ranch, Marc and Pam Scarborough, of Hayes, South Dakota, had the final bid at $13,000. Lot 4 – Lazy TV Boulder F404, a black BA25 sired by KCF Bennett Boulder and out of a first calf heifer, was chosen by another longtime customer, Larry Thompson of Glenham, SD, at $11,500. He posted a 1377-lb. yearling weight to index 117 and indexed 114 at weaning, while still being above average in the feed efficiency test.

30 | APRIL 2019

Jim Houck, Akaska, SD, served up tasty pork loin sandwiches and also purchased one of the high-selling red Balancer bulls for $9500.


breeders corner GW

SOUTHERN BREEDERS Koehn Cattle Co.

ALABAMA

Patrick Koehn

Kittle Gelbvieh Farms Q u a l i t y B l a ck & R e d G e l b v i e h C a t t l e

TEXAS

73243 Carter Rd., Goltry, OK 580-541-2633 koehncattlecompany@gmail.com

Gelbvieh Genetics at Work

Dustin Kittle

Jim & Pat Dromgoole

816 Co. Rd. 36 Geraldine, AL 35974 Cell (256) 996-5822 www.kittlefarms.com

4403 Winding River Dr. • Richmond, TX 77469 Home

(281) 341-5686 • Ranch (979) 561-8144

www.dromgoolesheaven.com Show Cattle Managers: James & Shannon Worrell • (325) 258-4656

EXCEPTIONAL BULLS & HEIFERS

TRUCKING AVAILABLE

ARKANSAS

H ODGES R ANCH

Neal

(870) 426-4469 or (870) 704-9450

15702 Hodges Rd., Omaha, AR 72662 Hodgesranch@live.com

Quality Gelbvieh & Balancer Genetics Available Private Treaty Sales

Martin Cattle Company David & Rita Martin

256 Boyce Road Judsonia, Ar 72081 C: 501.278.7614 www.martincattleco.com

Private Treaty Sales Available Year Round

Duane Miller

Cell: 870-84405664 duane83@centurytel.net www.millergelbvieh.com

OKLAHOMA LeGRAND Ed & Alberta LeGrand

809 S. Redlands Rd. • Stillwater, OK 74074

405-747-6950 • alane@c21global.com

Homo. Black, Homo. Polled • Breeding Stock Available

GELBVIEH WORLD |

31


GW sale reports

Gustin’s Diamond D Gelbvieh Sale February 21, 2019 Mandan, North Dakota Auctioneer: Jay Elfeldt Reported by Dennis Gustin Sale Averages: 71 Gelbvieh and Balancer® Bulls .............................$4,996 23 Gelbvieh and Balancer® Bred Heifers................$2,204

G

ustin’s Diamond D Gelbvieh was blessed to host their annual production sale on February 21, 2019, one of the few nice days of the month, with a large crowd of past and new customers on hand.

DDGR Outlier 42F, a homozygous polled black purebred, for $11,500. He posted growth EPDs and a FPI™ index that rank in the top 1 percent of the breed and had an 84-pound birthweight and 807-pound weaning weight. Longtime customers, Brentt and Todd Eslinger of Elgin, North Dakota, took home DDGR Revolution 389F at $10,000. He is a high performance son of the PHG DaVinci sire. A red purebred, he posted an 802-pound weaning weight and had a 104 ratio on his yearling weight. DDGR Full Power 46F, a black purebred son of JOB Danell Choco 53B, was chosen by Lost River Livestock of Clearbrook, Minnesota for $8,750. A higher performance bull, his growth EPDs are in the top 10 percent and marbling EPD in the top 20 percent of the breed. Twin View Livestock of Parkbeg, Saskatchewan took home DDGR Thunderstruck 8F at $8,500. He is a purebred son of the FHG Flying H Grand Slam 128D ET sire out of a first calf heifer that started at 84-pound, weaned at 780 pounds, and had a yearling ratio of 108.

CMR Revelation 37E

Top selling bred heifer was DDGR Flower 132E, a red Balancer that went for $3,200 to the Schock Ranch of Carson, North Dakota. She is a daughter of VRT Lazy TV Calvary B067 and bred to the MCCA Cornhusker Red sire. D

Topping the bull offering was CMR Revelation 37F, a super deep bodied son of BNC At Ease A357. A red purebred, he had a 78-pound birthweight, an 840-pound weaning weight and a CED that ranks him in the top 1 percent of the breed. He sold for $17,000 to Davidson Gelbvieh of Ponteix, Saskatchewan. A very well balanced red purebred favorite was DDGR Renegade 140F, selling to Golden Buckle Gelbvieh of Medina, North Dakota for $13,000. He is a son of the KKC Nobility 123Y sire and a top producing daughter of the Gldn Bkl 030W Winchester sire. The CCRO Leverage 3214A sons were sought after and Handel Farms of Menno, South Dakota purchased

32 | APRIL 2019

DDGR Renegade 140F


It's time to book your Summer & fall Sale Dates!

Visit GelbviehAuction.com, BalancerAuction.com, or call Rance Long 918.510.3464 or Jeff Stansberry 615.479.1852 for details.


GW sale reports

29th Annual Taubenheim Gelbvieh Production Sale February 4, 2019 Auctioneer: Tracy Harl Reported by Justin Taubenheim Sale Averages: 87 Gelbvieh and BalancerÂŽ Bulls.............................$4,833 39 Bred Heifers ........................................................$2,169 17 Open Heifers........................................................$1,335

T

aubenheim Gelbvieh, Amherst, Nebraska, held their 29th annual production sale February 4, 2019, at the ranch. It was a great day for the beginning of February and the sunny day brought out many customers from seven states to evaluate the powerful set of herd sires and attractive group of females.

34 | APRIL 2019

Top Selling Bulls: TAU Money 62F ET, is a 3/8 Gelbvieh homozygous black and homozygous polled son of GGGE 3G Ez Money 209Z out of the elite donor TAU Ms. Gridiron 131Y. 62F was a standout at the National Western Stock Show, and after catching the eye of many cattlemen, Money found a new home with Cedar Top Ranch for $12,500. TAU Limitless 34F ET, a homozygous black and homozygous polled herd sire was purchased by Eric Schipporeit, a great repeat customer. 34F ET is a soggy middled, powerfully constructed son of Infinity 47C, and an impressive donor female 131Y. After active bidding TAU Limitless 34F ET sold for $11,000. TAU Lightyear 111F was the next high selling lot at


sale reports GW $10,000. 111F is a homozygous black and homozygous polled son of TAU Infinity. He demanded a lot of attention for his mass and stoutness. 111F made a lot of friends on sale day and when the auctioneer said, “sold” he found a home with Swanson Cattle Company of Atlanta, Nebraska, at $10,000.

Top Selling Bred Females:

TAU Mr. Leverage 335F ET is an easy fleshing and stout featured homozygous black and homozygous polled son of Carolina Leverage 3214A. Mr. Leverage was highly sought after for his performance and power; when the bidding was over he found a new home with T & B Genetics for $9,500.

Richard Kranawetter bought multiple bred heifers that found a home in Missouri.

Our top selling purebred bull TAU Mr Gunnison 64F is a homozygous black and homozygous polled bull out of Rupple Gunnison N31, and a magnificent first calf heifer. Mr. Gunnison is the type of purebred that could change a cowherd and Greg McFarland noticed his quality and purchased him for $8,750.

Cedar Top Ranch bought the high selling bred female, TAU Ms Outright 752E ET for $3,200. T & B Genetics bought the second high selling bred female, TAU Ms Payweight 781E for $3,100.

Top Selling Open Heifer: Richard Kranawetter bought the top selling open heifer, TAU Ms Leader 8060F for $1,400. D

breeders corner GW

NORTHEAST BREEDERS ILLINOIS J & K GELBVIEH FARM, INC. Jerry & Karen Wilson 335 Gelbvieh Lane, Ava, IL 62907 618-521-8620 • jkgf88@frontier.com

OHIO

INDIANA

3 G Ranch

Gelbvieh Cattle For Sale Carl, Rebecca & Emily Griffiths

1577 N 600 E • Kendallville, IN 46755

260/897-2160 • ggge3g@embarqmail.com

REGISTERED GELBVIEH AND BALANCER

®

Your call or visit is Always Welcome

Promote Your Operation

Advertise with a State Round-up ad in the the two issues of the Profit Picture and the Herd Reference issue of Gelbvieh World

For information about advertising, call Lynn at the AGA office • 303.465.2333

GELBVIEH WORLD |

35


GW breeders corner ARIZONA The Prosser Family

WESTERN BREEDERS UPPER MIDWEST BREEDERS IOWA

Barry & Dena Bolton

406.538.5280 H 406.366.0162 C 515 Knapp Lane PO Box 826 Hilger, MT 59451 dena@boltondoublebranch.com www.boltondoublebranch.com

928/289-2619•928/380-5149cell Winslow, AZ

GS

www.bartbar.com • info@bartbar.com

RFI Tested Balancer®, Gelbvieh & Angus Bulls Sell Annually in April at the Ranch

Ridge Top Ranch

Gelbvieh-Angus-Balancer

Neola, Iowa

Black & Polled Private Treaty Sales

Breed-leading Performance from Quality Genetics

Kevin: 402-510-8103 Al: 402-676-5292

COLORADO Ricky Linquist th Street inquist 1135 190 inquist

NEVADA

Dave & Dawn Bowman

Fonda, IA 50540

arms (712) 288-5349 arms

55784 Holly Rd. • Olathe, CO 81425

(970) 323-6833 www.bowkranch.com

Gelbvieh & Red Angus

Email: rickylin@ncn.net www.linquistfarms.com

Dick & Jean Williams

Jim Roelle 38330 CR 49 Peetz, CO 80747

(C): 970-520-1224 jr.plateau@hotmail.com www.plateaugelbvieh.com

P.O. Box 156 Orovada, NV 89425 775•272•3442

“Pounds Make Profit in Your Pocket” Bulls & Heifers Private Treaty

WASHINGTON

LONE OAK C AT T L E

Eric Ehresman 20963 30th St. Mechanicsville, IA 52306

hornsandthorns@netins.net

(319) 489-2275 (319) 480-1564

LEDGERWOOD GELBVIEH Gelbvieh • Red Angus • Balancer® Pete & Samee Charriere

FL

2633 Hwy 12 East • Clarkston, WA 99403

509-566-8805 • LedgerwoodGelbvieh@gmail.com “Seedstock that work for the commercial cattleman

MONTANA Quality livestock that Work for you Gelbvieh Carcass Quality Calving Ease Tenderness Docility

Quarter Horses Want to Please Strong Bone Intelligent Athletic

1496 Goose Creek Rd. • Raynesford, MT 59469 Ranch Phone: 406.738.4220 • BarJRGelbvieh@3rivers.net BarJRGelbvieh.com

36 | APRIL 2019

WYOMING

9/9

Nine Bar Nine Gelbvieh Wesley Brown

3794 Rd. 215 • Cheyenne, WY 82009 307-351-6453 • ninebar9@hotmail.com Purebred Bulls, Heifers & Select Embryos Performance BRED in, Not FED in!

Martens Gelbvieh

Gary Martens 2126 500th St • Walnut, IA 51577 712.764.5007 (H) • 712.249.5744 (C) martensgl@yahoo.com Annual Bull and Female sale in March with the Southwest Iowa Gelbvieh Group

HH H

Triple H Farms Roy & Nancy Holste 3113 260th Street Clarinda, IA 51632 712-303-0263 • 712-303-1947 tripleh1@unitedwb.coop

Bulls and Heifers for sale Private Treaty


breeders corner GW

UPPER MIDWEST BREEDERS MINNESOTA

u Brandywine Farm

u

Dennis & Sherry Gustin Family Al and Peggy Gustin Mandan, ND • 701/663-7266

Tom Scarponcini

Richie & Sarah Heinrich 701/320-6484 (cell) email: gustindd@wildblue.net www.gustinsdiamondd.com

30474 Brandywine Road Rushford, MN 55971

507-864-2063

Gelbvieh

SFI Schafer Farms, Inc.

Balancer®

37740 240th Ave., Goodhue, MN 55027 Brian Schafer Lowell Schafer 1-888-226-9210 651-923-4587 brian@schaferfarm.com www.schaferfarm.com Private Treaty Bull Sale — Last Sat. in February Annually

SwenSon Gelbvieh

Dean Swenson

17513 Hwy 10 Little Falls, MN 56345 swen@centurylink.net (h) 320.632.5848 • (c) 320.630-5536

Polled • Purebred • Red • Black

NORTH DAKOTA

Thorstenson Gelbvieh

Selby, South Dakota Annual Bull Sale 1st Saturday in March

SOUTH DAKOTA

Brian & Dee Dee 605-649-9927

ADKINS GELBVIEH

Vaughn & Wendy 605-649-6262

www.Balancerbulls.com

Gelbvieh & Balancer Performance Genetics Bulls and Heifers for sale by private treaty (605) 354-2428 Cell gerald@adkinsgelbvieh.com Gerald & Sarah Adkins www.adkinsgelbvieh.com 41606 195th St., Carpenter, SD 57322

Beastrom Gelbvieh Ranch Registered Gelbvieh & Balancer Cattle Bulls • Heifers • Embryos • Semen

Chimney Butte RanCh

Jim & Barb Beastrom Brandy Ludemann, Brittney Spencer

Ph: 605-224-5789 • 605-280-7589 (Cell) jimbeastrom@mncomm.com • www.beastromranch.com

Keith, Janice, Dustin & Britney 605-852-2131

kvolek@venturecomm. net

Doug & Carol Hille

3320 51st Street, Mandan, ND 58554 701-445-7383 or 701-220-2083 Email: chimneybutteranch@westriv.com Website: chimneybutteranch.com Annual Production Sale 1st Friday in March

lori.maude@gmail.com

Lori Maude 303.809.3789 (C) Julie Maude 605.381.2803 (C) Hermosa, SD

Annual Bull Sale 3rd Saturday in December.

Get ready for upcoming sales!

6700 County Rd. 19 S. Minot, ND 58701 (701) 624-2051 (H) (701) 720-8823 (C)

Rob Arnold

Email: RLAGelbvieh@aol.com

Registered Gelbvieh & Balancers®

34261 200th Street, Highmore, SD 57345 AJ Munger 605-521-4468 Commercial Sales Andy LeDoux 785-527-3188 Registered Sales 1-855-303-BULL • www.eaglepassranch.com

Advertise in Gelbvieh World or the Profit Picture

GELBVIEH WORLD |

37


GW economics

Ways to Stretch Cash Flow Robert Tigner, Agricultural Systems Economist, Nebraska Extension Educator and Austin Duerfeldt, Agricultural Systems Economist, Nebraska Extension Educator

O

ver time, negative cash flows will put farm and ranch businesses, and the lifestyle of the owners, at serious risk. The following suggestions for additions to cash flow are adapted from Iowa State Extension AgDecsionmaker C3-58, Farm Financial Management: 16 Ways to Stretch Cash Flow, written by William Edwards, retired extension ag economist. 1. Cancel or renegotiate leases that are unprofitable. Not all cropland is worth the same as other land. Rental rates should fit the productivity of the land. Flexible cash rents or a crop-share lease can be proposed in place of fixed cash rent. 2. Use financial reserves. These may include savings, liquid financial assets such as stocks or bonds. However, consider the taxes that may accompany selling investments. Review current market prices and your basis to determine capital gains tax owed. 3. Sell current assets. Current assets include stored crops and market livestock. But don’t simply sell off market livestock that might be discounted as they are not yet market ready since the discount could be too steep. 4. Use credit reserves or unused borrowing capacity. Analyze the decision to use more debt first and have a realistic plan to repay that borrowing. 5. Refinance debt by using equity. Lengthen repayment terms or refinancing loans with balloon payments. Here again look at the ability, if needed, to refinance the balloon payment. 6. Defer capital asset purchases. Sometimes making a purchase or leasing could reduce costs by lowering repairs that use more cash than the lease or purchase payment. Analyze carefully which strategy best reduces cash flow.

38 | APRIL 2019

7. Utilize Farm Service Agency (FSA) Guaranteed loans. 8. Utilize FSA low interest marketing loans. Placing grain under loan can be used to pay off high interest rate loans. 9. Increase non-farm earnings. Even if one member of the farm family is already working off the farm now, all may need to at least for a time. 10. Decrease non-farm and family living expenditures. Set and use a family living budget. The budget needs to prioritize expenditures to those necessary such as utilities, food and health insurance. Defer expenditures such as vehicle purchases, vacations, recreation expenses and discretionary expenses. 11. Sell assets that aren’t earning their keep. Farmland that is consistently unprofitable, machinery that costs more than custom work, or assets that no longer have a use on the farm or ranch meet this definition. Consider selling them to raise cash. Funds gained from the sale can be used in a more productive manner such as paying down existing debt, or investing into an asset that will provide returns. Capital gains tax will be owed on any business property that is sold for more than its reported basis. For assets sold that were held longer than one year, that capital gains tax rate can be 0%, 15%, or 20% depending on your taxable income and filing status. 12. Consider joint machinery ownership. This can work but communication and periodic compromise may be necessary for success. Spending time in the beginning creating a written agreement can avoid unnecessary fallouts later on, and periodic reviews of the agreement insure that it remains relevant. 13. Seek outside investors or lenders such as family. Think through lending to or borrowing from family. It can be a difficult situation for all involved. D Source: University of Nebraska-Lincoln


breeders corner GW

SOUTHEAST BREEDERS KENTUCKY

TENNESSEE

Coles Bend Cattle Company

Raising registered Gelbvieh and Balancer® cattle since 2000. Trent Jones Smith Grove, KY • 270.590.5266

NORTH CAROLINA

Quality Gelbvieh & Balancer® Cattle

ClinCh Mountain Gelbvieh

John & Liz Loy (865) 687-1968 (865) 235-8869 (C)

7611 Dyer Rd. Luttrell, TN 37779 j.b.loy@att.net

Bulls & Heifers for Sale

“Superior Gelbvieh and Balancer Cattle”

Chris & Jordan Hampton • Charles & Sue Hampton

Quality Gelbvieh, Angus & Balancer Cattle

839 Davistown Rd. Celina, TN 38551 931-243-3213 H 931-510-3213 C hamptoncattlecompany@gmail.com

www.knollcrestfarm.com knollcrest@knollcrestfarm.com Office (434) 376-3567 Fax (434) 376-7008 James D. Bennett 434/376-7299 Paul S. Bennett 434/941-8245 Jim G. Bennett 434/664-7935 Brian R. Bennett 434/664-8309 Dalton G. Bennett 434/664-7946 PO Box 117 • Red House, VA • 23963 Total Performance Bull Sale • Nov. 29, 2019

W L

H

F

Registered Bulls & Replacement Females

DUANE & WENDY STRIDER, OWNERS

(336) 964-6277

QUALITY GELBVIEH CATTLE

LITTLE WINDY HILL

Farms Doug & Sue Hughes 6916 Peppers Ferry Road Max Meadows, VA 24360 C 276/620-4271 lwhf@wiredog.com

ccrosscattle@yahoo.com • ccrosscattle.com

Tucker Farms Gelbvieh & Balancer Cattle CCRO CAROLINA EXCLUSIVE 1230Y

CCRO CAROLINA LEVERAGE 3214A

THE HERD THAT CONSISTENTLY PRODUCES CATTLE WITH PERFORMANCE, CARCASS AND EYE APPEAL.

ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE 2ND SATURDAY IN NOV.

BULLS FOR SALE 640 McAdams Loop Jacks Creek, TN 38347 TuckerFarmsTN@gmail.com

Private Treaty Sales Available Year Round.

Milton Tucker 731-608-5274

We want to Keep up with AGA members.

Producing Black, Polled Genetics for Today & Tomorrow.

Please send in information to be included in the Gelbvieh World and on our website:

VIRGINIA Walter & Lee Teeter 1380 French Belk Rd. • Mt. Ulla, NC 28125 (704) 664-5784

Promote Your Operation

REGISTERED POLLED GELBVIEH C.H. Morris & Sons, LLC

Roger Morris • C.W. Moss 928 Morris Road Appomattox, VA 24522 434.574.6592 Roger Morris C.W. Moss 434.315.4294 434.391.4458

Advertise with a State Round-up ad in the the two issues of the Profit Picture and the Herd Reference issue of Gelbvieh World

SPECIALIZING IN COMMERCIAL BALANCER® FEMALES

Call Lynn at the AGA office • 303.465.2333

276.233.0999 • grippey@embarqmail.com

Gale Rippey Farms Galax, Virginia

• • • •

Items for Events of Interest News for Information Exchange Dates for upcoming shows and field days. State Association news

Plus, add us to your mailing lists when sending out sale catalogs. Send all items to: Gelbvieh World 350 Interlocken Blvd., Ste. 200 Broomfield, CO 80021 lynnv@gelbvieh.org

GELBVIEH WORLD |

39


GW events of interest April 2019 Apr. 6

B/F Cattle Company with Cleland Cattle Company Maternal Integrity Gelbvieh and Balancer Bull Sale, Butler, MO

Apr. 6

Circle S Gelbvieh Annual Going to Grass Bull Sale, Canton, KS

Apr. 7

TJB Gelbvieh & Balancer Online Embryo Sale

Apr. 13 Knoll Crest Farm 49th Total Performance Bull Sale, Ranch House, VA Apr. 13 Bar T Bar Ranches Annual Bull Sale, Winslow, AZ

Oct. 25 T Bar S Cattle Company Focused on the Future Bull and Female Sale, Billings, MO Oct. 26 Flying H Genetics 23rd Grown on Grass Bull & Bred Heifer Sale, Butler, MO Oct. 26 Warner Beef Genetics “Genetic Opportunities” Female Production Sale, Arapahoe, NE Oct. 30 – Nov. 2 National FFA Convention, Indianapolis, IN

November 2019 Nov. 28-29 AGA Office closed for Thanksgiving

Apr. 20 SoKY Select Gelbvieh Sale, Bowling Green, KY

December 2019

May 2019

Dec. 4-6 49th AGA National Convention, Billings, MT

May 11 Middle Tennessee Gelbvieh/Angus Invitational, Centerville, TN May 11 Kittle Farms Building a Legacy Sale, Rainsville, AL May 11 T Bar S Cattle Company Missouri Field Day, Billings, MO May 11 Harriman Santa Fe Complete Female Dispersal, Windsor, MO May 24 AGA Office closed for Memorial Day May 27 AGA Office closed for Memorial Day May 31 – Jun. 2 AGJA Buckeye Bonanza Eastern Regional Show, Springfield, OH

June 2019 Jun. 7-9 AGJA Western Regional Show, Beatrice, NE Jun. 18-21 BIF Research Symposium & Convention, Brookings, SD

July 2019 Jul. 4

AGA Office closed for Independence Day

Jul. 7-12 AGJA Music City Showdown National Classic, Lebanon, TN Jul. 22

AGA National Convention Registration Opens

September 2019 Sep. 2

AGA Office closed for Labor Day

October 2019 Oct. 12 Judd Ranch 29th Annual Cow Power Female Sale, Pomona, KS

40 | APRIL 2019

Dec. 24-27 AGA Office closed for Christmas Visit the online version of Events of Interest at www.gelbvieh.org for additional dates on upcoming sales and more information on each event. Editor’s Note: If you have sale or event information for this listing, please email the information to rebeccam@gelbvieh.org. This includes tours, expos, field days and other Gelbvieh events. Events of Interest at www.gelbvieh.org contains additional contact information for each event.


breeders corner GW

SERVICE CENTER All your A.I. needs!!

Bull Barn Genetics 35 Years in business

• Gelbvieh • Angus • Red Angus • Simmental • Club Calf • Salers • Shorthorn • Dairy • Charolais • Hereford

• Sheaths • Gloves • Cito Thaw Units • Tanks • A.I. Kits • Arm Service

Ronn Cunningham AUCTIONEER P.O. Box 146 • Rose, OK 74364 918-629-9382 cellular

Eldon & Kathy Starr

210 Starr Dr • Stapleton, NE 69163 bullbarn@bullbarn.com 800-535-6173 www.bullbarn.com

Dan McCarty • Auctioneer • • Professional Ring Service • 970-481-5217

Cattlemen’s Connection

Specializing in

• Gelbvieh Semen Sales • Consulting • Order Buying (all purchases guaranteed) Roger & Peg Gatz (785) 742-3163 Call Toll-Free:1-800-743-0026

Visit our Web Site: www.cattlemensconnection.com

Are you a livestock photographer, an auctioneer, aspire to be a sale manager or graphic designer? Put your ad in Service Center and promote your services! Place your ad today!

303-465-2333

Subscription and Advertising Information SUBSCRIPTION RATES: A one-year subscription to Gelbvieh World may be purchased for $35. Members of the AGA pay $35 of their membership dues to receive a subscription to Gelbvieh World. Gelbvieh World mails on or around the 25th of the month prior to publication date. Canada and Mexico - $60 U.S. for one-year. Other foreign - $85 U.S. for one-year.

Gelbvieh World Advertising Rates

CLOSING DATE: Ad materials and editorial deadline is the 25th of the month two months prior to publication date. (December issue deadline is October 25th). Ads for sale dates prior to the 15th of the month of publication are discouraged.

Full Page $780 1/3 Page $392 Column inch $30

For Feb./Sept. (Commercial Editions) and June/ July (Herd Reference Edition) please call for deadline information.

STANDARD ISSUES: Full Page $717 1/2 Page $454 1/3 Page $347 Column inch $30

2/3 Page 1/2 Page Isand 1/4 Page

$562 $482 $268

Feb./Sept. Commercial Profit Picture 1/2 Page 1/4 Page

Color: Four Color $300 additional One Additional color $150 additional

$504 $309

ADVERTISING CONTENT: The Graphic Designer and/or the Director of Administration reserve the right to reject any or all advertising on any reasonable basis. Gelbvieh World and/or American Gelbvieh Association assumes no responsibility for the advertising content as submitted. Advertisers assume all responsibility for the accuracy and truthfulness of submitted advertising containing pedigrees or statements regarding performance. Advertisers shall indemnify and hold harmless Gelbvieh World and American Gelbvieh Association for any claims concerning advertising content as submitted.

Call today: 303-465-2333

GELBVIEH WORLD |

41


GW ad index 3 G Ranch............................................................................. 35 ABCS Gelbvieh.................................................................... 36 Adkins Gelbvieh.................................................................. 37 AGA....................................................................................IFC AJGA..................................................................................... 19 B/F Cattle Company............................................................ 28 Bar Arrow Cattle Company............................................... 28 Bar JR Gelbvieh.................................................................... 36 Bar T Bar Ranch, Inc........................................................... 36 Beastrom Gelbvieh Ranch.................................................. 37 Boehler Gelbvieh................................................................. 29 Bolton Cattle Ranch............................................................ 36 Bow K Ranch....................................................................... 36 Brandywine Farm................................................................ 37 Bull Barn Genetics......................................................... 22, 41 Canadian GV Assn.............................................................. 41 Cattlemen’s Connection.................................................. 5, 41 C-Cross Cattle Company................................................... 39 Cedar Top Ranch..........................................................29, BC Chimney Butte Ranch......................................................... 37 C.H. Morris & Sons, LLC................................................... 39 Circle S Ranch...................................................................... 28 CJ&L Livestock.................................................................... 37 Clinch Mountain Gelbvieh................................................. 39 Coles Bend Cattle Company.............................................. 39 Covington Gelbvieh............................................................ 43 Cranview Gelbvieh.............................................................. 37 Cunningham, Ronn............................................................ 41 Danell Diamond Six Ranch................................................ 36 Diamond L Farms............................................................... 31 Diamond V Gelbvieh.......................................................... 28 Dromgoole’s Heaven........................................................... 31 Eagle Pass Ranch................................................................. 37 Flying H Genetics................................................................ 29 Gale Rippey Farms.............................................................. 39 Gelbviehauction.com.......................................................... 33 Green Hills Gelbvieh........................................................... 39 GS Ridge Top Ranch........................................................... 36 Gustin’s Diamond D Gelbvieh..................................... 17, 37 Hampton Cattle Company................................................. 39 Harriman Santa Fe........................................................ 21, 28 Hart Farm Gelbvieh............................................................ 28 Hilltop Farms....................................................................... 28 Hodges Ranch...................................................................... 31 Hojer Gelbvieh Ranch......................................................... 37 Holle Gelbvieh..................................................................... 28 J&K Gelbvieh Farm............................................................. 35 J Bar M Gelbvieh................................................................. 28 Judd Ranch, Inc............................................................... 1, 28 Kicking Horse Ranch.......................................................... 36

42 | APRIL 2019

Kittle Gelbvieh Farms......................................................... 31 Knoll Crest Farm................................................................. 39 Koehn Cattle Co.................................................................. 31 Land of Oz/ John C Oswald............................................... 28 Lambert, Doak..................................................................... 41 Ledgerwood Gelbvieh......................................................... 36 Lemke Cattle........................................................................ 29 Linquist Farms..................................................................... 36 Little Windy Hill Farms...................................................... 39 Lone Oak Cattle................................................................... 36 M&P Gelbvieh..................................................................... 29 Markes Family Farms.......................................................... 31 Martens Gelbvieh................................................................ 36 Martin Cattle Company...................................................... 31 McCarty, Dan....................................................................... 41 Miller Gelbvieh.............................................................. 15, 31 Mitchell Marketing Service................................................ 41 MLM Gelbvieh..................................................................... 29 Mulroy Farms....................................................................... 28 Nine Bar Nine Gelbvieh...................................................... 36 Nowack Cattle Company.................................................... 28 Plateau Gelbvieh.................................................................. 36 Post Rock Cattle Company............................................ 7, 28 Prairie Hills Gelbvieh.......................................................... 37 Rocking GV Gelbvieh......................................................... 29 Rogers Valley Farm Gelbvieh............................................. 29 Sawtooth Gelbvieh Cattle & Hay....................................... 60 Schafer Farms, Inc............................................................... 37 Seedstock Plus Genetics................................................. 9, 41 Seedstock Plus...................................................................... 41 SoKY Select Gelbvieh Sale.................................................. 44 Squeakin’ By-LK Farms...................................................... 29 Sullivan Supply..................................................................... 27 Swanson Cattle Company.................................................. 29 Swenson Gelbvieh............................................................... 36 Taubenheim Gelbvieh................................................... 29, 34 T Bar S Cattle Co................................................................. 20 The 88 Ranch........................................................................ 29 Thorstenson Gelbvieh......................................................... 37 Thull Gelbvieh Farm........................................................... 37 TJB Gelbvieh & Balancer.......................................................3 Triple H Farms..................................................................... 36 Triple K Gelbvieh................................................................. 28 Tucker Farms....................................................................... 39 Volek Ranch......................................................................... 37 Warner Beef Genetics ......................................................IBC White Oak Farms................................................................ 29 Wildwood Acres.................................................................. 35 Wilkinson Gelbvieh............................................................ 36 Wolf Gelbvieh...................................................................... 29


SoKY Select Gelbvieh Sale

SATURDAY, APRIL 20, 2019 • 1:00 PM CT United Producers • Bowling Green, KY

Selling 40 Gelbvieh & Balancer® Females Selling 22 Gelbvieh & Balancer® Bulls

This Tenderloin son sells!

Heifer excitable bulls like this one sell!

CONSIGNORS: Daryl Tilford Miller Gelbvieh Rumfelt B Gelbvieh George Gribbins Dunnavant Farms Padon Farms Brendy Hill Farm S & S Gelbvieh Green Hills Gelbvieh R&D Owen Farms Jeremy Emmert Silver Farms Sugar Creek Farms GLC Farms Stinson Farms Highview Farms

This Bennett Ideal daughter sells! Sale managed by

Slaughter Sale Management For catalog or information contact:

David Slaughter

Phone: (270) 556-4259 E-mail: hmslghtr@aol.com

Like us on Facebook at Slaughter Sale Management


Semen available FROM WARNER BEEF GENETICS CED BW WW YW MILK YG 12 -0.9

65

103

CW REA

MB

FPI

17 -0.04 19 0.38 0.43 78.76

DLW FOX NEWS 020F

38% Balancer® Bull Homozygous Black, Homozygous Polled SEPT Copperfield ET x XXB Miss Tenderloin 020X Upcoming sire sensation. 2019 Balancer® Futurity bull and the most exciting Copperfield son to date. Backed by the tremendous Hypnotic cow family. Maternal excellence and unmatched quality.

CED BW WW YW MILK YG 8

0.0

62

98

CW REA

MB

FPI

24 -0.08 26 0.58 0.29 72.54

SEPT COPPERFIELD ET

CED BW WW YW MILK YG 15 1.0

70

102

CW REA

MB

CED BW WW YW MILK YG 11 3.2

74

111

9

CW REA

MB

FPI

-0.21 40 0.88 0.33 76.53

DLW SAND TRAP ET

38% Balancer® Bull Black, Polled GGGE 3G Smoke B’ Mirrors x SEPT Razzmatazz ET

63% Balancer® Bull Homozygous Black, Polled CTR Sandhills 0065X x DLW Ms Matron 802U

Bulletproof Balancer® herdsire. Consistently sires the moderate, phenotypic standouts with exceptional structural quality. Females in production look amazing.

Performance and Product leader. A homozygous black, homozygous polled Sandhills son that is out of the great Matron 802U donor. Siring the stout made high performance progeny that ranchers love.

CED BW WW YW MILK YG

CED BW WW YW MILK YG

FPI

34 -0.40 22 0.77 -0.10 69.89

DLW ARAPAHOE 207A

94% PB Gelbvieh Bull Red, Homozygous Polled DCH Hille X102 x DCSF Post Rock Rhonda 207M2 The Red Purebred outcross! Diluter free, homozygous polled beef bull. Use to inject muscle, volume and “look” in a high percentage package.

8

3.3

72

104

CW REA

MB

FPI

14 -0.20 26 0.56 0.22 71.64

SKYS ENCORE 7086E

CED BW WW YW MILK YG 16 -1.6

66

100

CW REA

MB

FPI

18 -0.01 36 0.46 0.71 87.94

BTBR DURANT 6296D

38% Balancer® Bull Black, Polled TMMW Bismarcks Mr Govenor 3N x BTBR Ms Black Cross 2023 Our upcoming Calving Ease specialist. Homozygous polled Balancer®. Our pick of Bar T Bar ranches 2017 bull sale. Tested in our herd for two calving seasons. Photo coming soon!

50% Balancer® Bull Red, Polled SKYM Foreman 2002Z x HMR Cherry’s Delight 29Y 2019 National Champion Balancer® Bull. Truly exciting sire to add foot size, mass and extension.

20 -2.7

60

89

CW REA

MB

FPI

29 0.01 34 0.36 0.58 84.74

DCSF POST ROCK HIGHLY FOCUSED

50% Balancer® Bull Black, Polled KCF Bennett Quality Focused x DCSF Post Rock Sandy 273W2 The proven Calving Ease and carcass leader. Homo black, homo polled balancer. High accuracy sire with years of acceptance in the industry.

Contact us today

to order semen.

Real rancher bulls that will work for you. WARNER BEEF GENETICS Dan and Kate Warner 42198 Road 721, Arapahoe, NE 68922 Dan Warner: 308.962.6511 Monte Warner: 308.962.6136 Darren Warner: 308.824.2950


Cedar Top Ranch offers a LIFELINE for your breeding needs

EGL

LIFELINEB101

AMGV 1298079 • BA50 • Homozyougs Black • Homozygous Polled CED 17 15%

BW -1.0 25%

WW 73 15%

YW 108 25%

MK 17

TM 53 45%

CEM 5

HP 6.13 30%

PG30 -1.34

ST 13

DMI YG 0.068 -0.28 20%

CW 11

REA 0.55 40%

MB 0.10

$Cow FPI EPI 94.01 77.77 137.84 40% 15%

2016 National Western Stock Show Grand Champion Balancer Bull Co-owned with Eagle Pass Ranch and LeDoux Ranch Semen available through Bull Barn Genetics 800-535-6173

Cedar Top Ranch

Scott & Raberta Starr 212 Starr Drive • Stapleton, NE 69163 308-587-2293 • 308-530-3900 (C) email: cedartopranch@gpcom.net

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