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Proposed Development at Burntwood Lane, Wandsworth, London

Pre-Planning Submission to Wandsworth Council by BCDH Architects on behalf of Mr John McDonnell 20 April 2011


Site Location

Site Location Map 

(aerial map courtesy of Google)


Contents

Site Design Quality

4

Housing 1-3 bedrooms

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Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy GEN7 Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy H9 Wandsworth Local Development Framework Core Strategy –Core Policies for Issues: Policy IS 3 Wandsworth Local Development Framework Core Strategy – Paragraph 4.134 Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan – Paragraph 165 Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy H10 Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy H11 Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy TBE5 Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 14 Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 15

4 4 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Housing 4 bedrooms and above Public transport accessibility

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Scale & Density

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Planning Application Committee Report on Application 2008/1922 Density Height Amenity Space Overshadowing Housing Standards Day lighting Proposed and Existing Planting Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan – Paragraph 169 Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 2 Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan – Paragraph 171

7 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 10 10 10

Privacy & Amenity

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Wandsworth Wandsworth Wandsworth Wandsworth Wandsworth Wandsworth Wandsworth Wandsworth

Unitary Unitary Unitary Unitary Unitary Unitary Unitary Unitary

Development Development Development Development Development Development Development Development

Plan Plan Plan Plan Plan Plan Plan Plan

– Paragraph 173 – Paragraph 174 - Policy T2 - Policy T5 - Policy T6 - Policy T9 - Policy T10 - Appendix 3

Parking & Transport Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph Public Transport Traffic Parking Bicycles Waste Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy TBE10 Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy TBE11 Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph

12 11 12

2 7 8

Conservation

13 13 15 15 15 15 15 16 16 16 16 16

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Wandsworth Local Development Framework Core Strategy – Paragraph 4.129

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Environmental

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Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy GEN4 Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy RDP6 Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy TBE1

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Accessibility & Lifetime Homes

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12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12




Site Design Quality

Relevant Extracts from Planning Policies / Previous Appeal Decision Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy GEN7 The layout, form and design of new buildings and the spaces around them should contribute positively to the local environment.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy H9 New housing development will be permitted on appropriate sites within existing residential areas and elsewhere on sites where a satisfactory environment for housing can be achieved except in Industrial Employment Areas, taking into account any mitigating measures proposed.

Wandsworth Local Development Framework Core Strategy –Core Policies for Issues: Policy IS 3 The layout, form and design of new buildings and the spaces around them should contribute positively to the local environment, creating places, streets and spaces which meet the needs of people, are visually attractive, safe, accessible to all, sustainable, functional, adaptable, durable, inclusive, and while having their own distinctive identity maintain and reinforce local character. Designs and layouts which make efficient and effective use of land, including innovative approaches that help deliver high quality outcomes will be promoted

Aerial view of site and context from the South West




The dwellings to Bridgeford Street, Burntwood

rather than the previous approach of mimicking a terrace of houses, an inappropriate pastiche

Lane and Waldron Road form the perimeter

of the surrounding architectural language.

to this backland site, which in the past had

In deference to the main terrace of houses that form the perimeter of the block, the proposed

served as tennis courts and a builder’s yard. Having lain unused for the last number of years it is proposed that the site be redeveloped as a small residential scheme comprising three mews style houses. The sensitive development of an otherwise unsightly wasteland to the rear of these properties will certainly contribute positively to those surrounding properties both in terms of an upgrade to the environment directly adjoining their property and additionally the increased

security

achieved

through

the

backing of gardens to each other. Two previous applications have been made on this site. Both of these applications were refused by the

development is effectively inward looking with the back gardens forming a buffer to the existing buildings. As such, this proposal has been conceived almost as a community within a community. The massing and design of the proposed dwellings has been detailed to create visual interest both when considered locally and also when viewed from the surrounding properties. In response to the TBE Policies and the comments of the Planning Committee on the previous application, the designs do not exhibit flank walls to the neighbouring properties and rather accept that they will potentially be viewed from a number of locations. This has informed the decision to create a design whereby the scheme presents itself as a composition of interlocking roofs which are clad in a homogonous material. To understand how the scheme would be read visually a number of 3 dimensional studies have been carried out to assess how the design will be viewed both from within the scheme and from the neighbouring properties, a number of these views have been included within this submission.

planning department on the grounds of the impact that they would have on the amenity of the existing residents. The planning authority cited that the design, scale and massing of the previous developments were excessive and would not be in keeping with the conservation area within which the site is located. This proposal has taken on board the issues raised in the previous applications and as such the scale of this application is significantly less and more appropriate to the scale of the surrounding developments than that of the previous two applications. The existing dwellings that form the perimeter of the site, separated by their rear gardens, create a secure and private space within the heart of the urban block and it is proposed that the new development on this site will heighten these qualities. In the development of the design of the proposed mews houses, design decisions have been taken to ensure that their intervention has a positive impact on the amenity of the existing residents. The scheme has been conceived of as a mews development clustered around a central shared court space




Scale & Density

Relevant Extracts from Planning Policies / Previous Appeal Decision Wandsworth Local Development Framework Core Strategy – Paragraph 4.134 The scale and density of development must be sustainable, to ensure the most effective use is made of land and buildings, particularly in accessible locations. The London Plan sets a density matrix based on the character of the area and public transport accessibility of a site, and encourages more intense development to locate in town centres and other areas well served by public transport. While the characterisation of areas in the matrix is relatively coarse grained, nonetheless it sets out an approach to ensure that development proposals achieve the highest possible intensity of use compatible with local context. This is in line with Wandsworth’s approach of relating the scale and density of development to the character of the surrounding area, the site’s public transport accessibility and capacity, and existing and proposed infrastructure.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan – Paragraph 165 New housing development will need to be carefully designed in accordance with the policies contained in the Townscape and Built Environment chapter and the Council’s policies on standards for new build housing (see policy H11). In existing residential areas development needs to be sensitive to the character and nature of the area, particularly in terms of scale, design, type of accommodation and amenity space. This is particularly important in conservation areas but also applies elsewhere. Infill, back land and back garden sites can be very difficult to develop in a satisfactory way.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy H10 Infill and back land development will only be permitted where:(a) it would be compatible in scale, design and form with adjoining property, and provide a satisfactory layout, building form and access;(b) there would not be an unacceptable effect on the amenity of existing properties through noise and disturbance or through overlooking and loss of privacy; and(c) development would not involve the loss of garden space for existing housing where this would result in an adverse impact on amenity.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy H11 New housing development will be permitted if it provides: (a) adequate amenity space;



(b) adequate floor space for the accommodation proposed; (c) adequate daylight to habitable rooms and amenity space; (d) an adequate level of privacy; and (e) an appropriate level of parking (see Appendix 3).

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy TBE5 Development will only be permitted if: (a) its density, layout, scale, mass, design and materials are compatible with neighbouring buildings and spaces; (b) the elevational treatment of new buildings provides both detailed and large scale visual interest appropriate to their scale and setting; (c) alterations and extensions to existing buildings are in keeping with the design and character of the building itself and neighbouring buildings; (d) there would not be a loss of open areas, gaps in development or trees which contribute to the quality of the local environment; (e) landscaping reflects and enhances the character of the area and surrounding buildings, and takes into account the way in which the area is likely to be used; and (f) the layout, design, paving, and furnishing of public spaces reflects the character and appearance of surrounding buildings, and is designed so as to minimise clutter, obstruction and visual intrusion.

Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 14 I have approached the question of outlook on the basis of any harm which could be caused by an overbearing development, rather than in the sense of a loss of view. I am particularly concerned with the mass and proximity of the proposed flank elevations to the rear windows and gardens of the directly adjoining dwellings in Burntwood Lane and Waldron Road.

Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 15 The flank walls of the proposed terrace would be around 15 metres from the rear elevation of the adjoining dwellings (at the closest points), and some 2 metres and 5.5 meters respectively from the gardens of the Waldron Road and Burntwood Lane properties. The outlook from these adjoining properties and their gardens would, in my view, be compromised by a combination of the proximity of the flank walls, their depth – running in many cases across the whole width of the rear gardens – and their height.


Planning Application Committee Report on Application 2008/1922 Refuse Planning Permission on the grounds that the proposal by reasons of its form and massing results in an excessively bulky appearance which is overbearing in form resulting in a detrimental impact on the residential amenity and would be detrimental to the character and appearance of the conservation area contrary to policies TBE5 and TBE10

Aerial view of site in context

View of proposal from semi-public court




Density

attractive addition to the local environment.

The density of the proposal is in the region of 0.33:1 and the site coverage 24%. These figures

Amenity Space

are notably very low for this location and would represent a density of 25 units per hectare,

The requirement for amenity space set out in the UDP is 40sqm per dwelling. The proposed

approximately half of the guideline contained in Table 3A.2 of the London Plan. This density would also be substantially less than the 33 units per hectare of the previous application on the site.

private amenity space is well in excess of this standard, with the actual provision of the gardens to the three properties being: 190 sqm, 260 sqm and 240 sqm respectively. Additionally the court, a shared amenity space of 165 sqm has been provided as an approach to the houses.

The decision to develop a design with such a deliberately low density of proposal reflects the

This space will in essence be semi-private as the access to the proposal will be through the secure

measures that have been taken to protect the amenity of the adjoining properties. The low

entrance on Burntwood Lane.

density of the proposed development was a very deliberate decision so as to allow the creation

The orientation of the private amenity space has been selected to maximise the available sunlight

of the large gardens which form the physical separation between the proposed development from the existing houses. These private gardens surround each of the proposed houses on three sides rather than a more traditional configuration of a front and rear garden. The result is a compact development within the centre of the site which has very high levels of private amenity space and fits very comfortably in to the surroundings.

both for the gardens associated with the dwellings in addition to the internal rooms.

Overshadowing Preliminary analysis has been carried out in line with the BRE methodology to understand the potential overshadowing of and from the existing properties to the perimeter of the site. The form of the proposals and the extensive garden space that surrounds them has the effect that there is

Height

little in the way of overshadowing resulting from the proposal on the gardens of the neighbouring

The height of the proposals has been limited to approximately 7.5 metres. In keeping with the

properties and almost no impact on the available daylight and sunlight within these dwellings.

mews approach, the proposal is less than the predominate height of the surrounding buildings of

Housing Standards

9 metres. The proposal is additionally some 1.8 metres lower than the previous application for the site. This previous application, which was much bulkier in its massing was in effect 4 storeys tall and also included basements whereas this proposal locates all accommodation at ground level and above.

The requirement of Policy H11(b) has been more than adequately achieved and these 3 bedroom houses generously exceed all of the requirements set out in Greater London Authority: Housing Space Standards for houses of this type. In addition to meeting the quantitative standards, a good quality of design means that internal circulation has been reduced to a minimum resulting

The buildings are designed, somewhat similarly to “dormer bungalows� and will thus read almost

in attractive and efficient internal layouts. This has not been at the expense of achieving that

as single storey houses. Separation distances are in keeping with the recommendations of the

accessibility standards which is covered later in this report.

UDP and the Planning Committee commentary from the previous application.

The generous rooms have been laid out in a somewhat open plan layout on the ground floor

The design of the properties whilst contemporary is in keeping with recent developments within

to promote flexibility, while retaining the ability to be subdivided as required. The more private

the Wandsworth area, including a number of properties that have been recognised in the

first floor bedroom spaces are cellular in nature and are accessed by the first floor gallery which

Wandsworth Design Commendations. The houses have their own distinctive identity; however

overlooks the main living space.

share a common and homogenous design language which is in keeping with the local pattern of development. The proposed houses will be of the highest quality and will certainly be an



Generous storage has been provided in dedicated storage rooms located throughout the house with additional storage provided within incidental spaces created within the design of the


building envelope.

provide “washes� of light internally where locating windows would have a potential impact on

Day lighting

the privacy of the adjoining neighbours.

As set out in Policy H11, a good sustainable house will navigate the fine balance that has to be

A generous clerestory has been provided over the double height main living space, providing

made between the desire to provide as much natural daylight as possible with the requirements

a sense of drama and an individual character to this space. The main living spaces also

for privacy and thermal

benefit from a high degree of glazing to the Southerly aspects providing connections to the

degrees of glazing to

maximise

provided adjoining

at

efficiency has been achieved in the design of these properties. High have been provided on the South and West of the properties

expansive private garden spaces.

the sunlight and daylight. The openings are predominately

Proposed and Existing Planting

the ground floor to ensure the privacy of the occupiers and owners.

This has been balanced with significant

amounts of solid and heavily insulated construction t

o

the Northern aspects and the roof to minimise heat loss from the properties. Where necessary, high level glazing has been employed

to

The existing mature Hybrid Black Poplar located in the North East Corner of the site is the only tree identified in the surveyors report on the previous planning application as worthy of retaining. Additional amenity perimeter planting will be provided to provide further natural screening. The eventual private open space landscaping will be at the discretion of the owners, however the semi-private access court has been carefully designed employing hard and soft landscaping as can be seen from the artist impressions. The choice of materials will be of good quality promoting a sense of security and be hard wearing in order to reduce the requirement for maintenance.

View of proposal from rear garden




Privacy & Amenity

Relevant Extracts from Planning Policies / Previous Appeal Decision Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan – Paragraph 169 It is important that adequate amenity space and facilities are provided in new developments, that overlooking is avoided and privacy safeguarded. Outlook is another important factor in the quality of new accommodation. This is affected by the scale, amount and layout of development. Different standards may be appropriate in different areas depending on the nature and character of the surroundings and the area in general. The Council’s approach reflects these considerations and has been developed through experience of what is acceptable and workable in the Borough. Adequate amenity space should be provided. The Council seeks a minimum of 40 square metres as being an appropriate level in familysized housing (4 bed spaces or more). This reflects the character of family sized housing in the Borough and is sufficient to provide a sitting-out area combined with a modest play space for children.

Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 2 The effect on the living conditions of residents in Burntwood Lane and Waldron Road in relation to outlook, natural lighting and privacy.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan – Paragraph 171 In order to safeguard privacy and deal with the concerns of overlooking there should be a minimum of 20 metres between directly facing habitable rooms where possible, except at ground level where adequate screening is provided. The distance of blank walls from windows of habitable rooms and their positioning are important factors in achieving a satisfactory outlook. These points apply both within a new development and in relation to other existing housing.

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As highlighted already, the design of the houses have been developed to minimise the impact

attractive outdoor spaces.

they would have on the surrounding neighbours by locating the main family activities and the

Access to the site is along an established access route. Whilst the number of people using this

highest levels of transparency at the ground floor where issues relating to over looking are not of concern. Windows to the upper levels have been located cognisant of the required separation distances and integrated screening is provided to minimise the potential for overlooking.

route will be marginally increased, the access to the site will remain semi-private and will be within the installation of a new security gate. Existing rights of way along this access laneway will be retained.

A first floor terrace which is accessible from the bedrooms has been provided to each of the properties. We are aware that this can be contentious in an urban location, due to the potential for overlooking of adjoining properties; however these spaces have been located at locations which exceed the maximum separation distances for other dwellings in both the proposal and the adjoining properties. On each side, the minimum distance between these terraces and the opposing windows of the existing properties is in excess of 22 metres. In addition to the effect of the separation distance, to further reduce the potential for overlooking, the perimeter of the terraces would be provided with both solid and more permeable screening which will either fully or largely obstruct views from these areas whilst allowing these to be

Panorama of existing site

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Transport

Relevant Extracts from Planning Policies / Previous Appeal Decision Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan – Paragraph 173

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy T5

Sixteen percent of households had more cars than reserved parking spaces. However 21%

New developments will only be permitted where they provide safe, secure and direct access

had one or more reserved parking spaces but no vehicles. The level of provision for visitor

for pedestrians, connected to existing pedestrian routes in the surrounding area.

parking was the main aspect of dissatisfaction in the survey. Strategic Guidance requires

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy T6

maximum restraint based parking standards to be developed. The Council aims to achieve a balance in seeking adequate off-street car parking provision in new developments for occupiers and likely visitors, so as not worsen conditions. It will apply standards flexibly in recognition of the many different considerations that can apply. These include the nature of the likely occupants, the type of accommodation, whether parking is shared, local on-street parking conditions, public transport accessibility, the design and context of the development in terms of the character of the area, and the relationship of the site to the surrounding area. A number of small private and housing association car-free developments (i.e. with no off-street parking provision) have been approved and built. The car parking standards are shown in

If a development proposal is likely to generate significant cycle use, permission will not be granted unless provision is made for: (a) safe and convenient cycle access; (b) cycle parking facilities appropriate for likely use and demand; and (c) links with existing or proposed cycle routes.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy T9 Development will be permitted if an appropriate level of off street car parking is provided subject to the maximum levels set out in Appendix 3.

Appendix 3.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy T10

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan – Paragraph 174

Car free development without any off-street parking provision will be permitted in appropriate

It is important that car parking is located as close to dwellings as possible, particularly those that serve accommodation for people with disabilities. Care should be taken in the design of the layout of car parking areas to ensure security and a safe environment for pedestrians and cyclists. The arrangement and size of parking provided should be such so as to ensure that it can fulfil its intended function. Parking spaces should not immediately

circumstances as set out in the Appendix, including situations where: (a) levels of car ownership and/or use are unlikely to be significant; or (b) alternative provision is available, or provision is impracticable, and the site is accessible by public transport.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Appendix 3

adjoin windows of living accommodation. There should be an adequate physical separation

Housing 1-3 bedrooms

to minimise the effects of car fumes and disturbance on living accommodation. Car parking

1 space per dwelling and 1 visitor parking space per 5 dwellings.

should not become a dominant feature of a development. One way of achieving this in larger developments and to maximise the effective use of parking spaces, is to include on-street

Housing 4 bedrooms and above

provision where new streets are created as part of a development. Shared parking, especially

1.5 spaces per dwelling (may be justified where congested on street parking conditions

in mixed development schemes, can provide flexibility and increase the effectiveness of the

would otherwise be exacerbated) and 1 visitor parking space per 5 dwellings.

spaces provided.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy T2 Development, including changes of use, will not be permitted if it would generate sufficient traffic to harm the environment, or create congestion or hazards on the road network.

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Public transport accessibility A lower level of provision may be justified in: Areas well served by public transport, particularly for non-family accommodation,


live/work accommodation, dual/interchangeable business/housing use and housing for specialised needs. The physical constraints of the site, especially in the case of infill and backland schemes or changes of use. The impact on the street scene and adjoining properties particularly in conservation and other sensitive areas. Existing on-street parking conditions. Any specific characteristics of the likely occupants as in the case of specially managed special needs housing or sheltered housing. Car-free housing may be permitted in certain circumstances: a) if car ownership and/or use are unlikely to be significant, or b) alternative provision is available, or provision is impracticable, and the site is accessible by public transport.

Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 11 I appreciate the 52 Waldron Road is not in the Conservation Area, I do not consider that the demolition of that property and the use of the resulting gap as an access adds anything to the scheme. Waldron Road is currently a unified terraced street, and the proposal would be out of keeping with the street scene.

Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 12 I consider the proposal would harm the character and appearance of the area and would not preserve or enhance the character or appearance of the Magdalen Park Conservation Area. It would therefore conflict with policies TBE5 and TBE10 of the Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan 2003. These policies deal with the need for development to be compatible with neighbouring buildings and spaces, and with the approach to development in conservation areas.

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Aerial view

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Public Transport

additional provision of car parking spaces that would be associated with the proposal as

The site is very well served by public transport and is located within 1.5 miles of 3 national rail

outlined in Appendix 3 would be three spaces the impact of which would be relatively minor

train stations, 3 underground stops and the tram line. There are also a multitude of bus routes

Appendix 3 makes provision for reduced car parking provision in situations for backland sites

accessible within minutes walking of the site.

where site access would constrain the provision of car parking provision.

Traffic

Bicycles

Due to the limited number of dwellings within the proposal, it is considered that it will have

Bicycle parking has been provided within the site both in the form of a dedicated storage

limited impact on local traffic in terms of both car parking and congestion on the local transport

space within the dwellings and additionally in an external secure provision adjacent to the

network.

refuse and recycling storage.

Parking

Waste

The site of the proposed development is a backland site with an existing restricted access

Secure provision will be provided on site for the storage of refuse and recyclable waste. A

which would be insufficiently wide to provide vehicle access. The UDP states in Policy T10

small out building has been provided on the hard landscaped approach to the central court.

and Appendix 3 that car free developments without any off-street car parking will be permitted

A site waste management plan will be put in place which will require the monitoring of waste

where it would be impractical to provide off-street car parking. In this example it would be

on the site and set targets to promote resource efficiency.

impossible to provide car parking within the site boundaries without having a significant impact on the surrounding buildings. The existing access to the site on Burntwood Lane is located within a conservation area. Appendix 3 of the UDP makes an allowance whereby a lower provision of car parking spaces may be provided in backland schemes on conservation grounds where the impact of providing car parking would have a negative impact on the street scene. In the previous planning application on this site it was a point of concern raised by the Planning Committee and the Planning Inspectorate (paragraphs 11 & 12 of the Appeal Decision) that a property was proposed to be demolished on Waldron Road and the impact that this would have on the “character and appearance of the area.� Additionally an earlier application proposed that a property would be removed to facilitate car access to the site. Appendix 3 allows for a development to not provide off-street car parking where there is ample provision of alternative forms of transport within close proximity to the site. In this location as outlined above, there is significant alternative public transport provision in lieu of the provision of private car parking. It should be further noted that the level of car ownership would be low and the required


Conservation

Relevant Extracts from Planning Policies / Previous Appeal Decision Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy TBE10

The site is a backland site and is located within the conservation area defined in the Magdalen

Development will not be permitted if it would:

Park Conservation Area Appraisal and Management Strategy. The proposed development will

(a) harm the character, appearance or setting of a conservation area; or

enhance the local conservation area through the increased security and improvement of an unsightly wasteland to the rear of both the properties on Burntwood Lane that are located within

(b) fail to respect the grain of the area.

the conservation area in addition to the other properties forming the perimeter of this site.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy TBE11

The proposed development does not involve the demolition or works to any existing structure

Development involving demolition in a conservation area will only be permitted if:

within a conservation area, save the dilapidated “shed” associated with the previous use as a

(a) the structure to be demolished makes no positive contribution to the character or appearance

builder’s storage yard.

of the area or is incapable of further useful life; and

The proposed development is consciously different in design and organisation to the applications

(b) detailed proposals for the re-use of the site, including any replacement building or other

previously refused planning permission on the site. The site specific design has been developed

structure, have been approved.

Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 2 The effect of the proposal on the character and appearance of the area and whether it would preserve or enhance the character or appearance of the Magdalen Park Conservation Area.

Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 7 I understand the appellant’s approach to the development, which is effectively to seek to replicate the Victorian terraced properties which dominate the area. However, in this back land context I am unconvinced that this is a form of development which would sit happily with its surroundings. One of the defining characteristics of a Victorian terrace is the manner in which they are frontage buildings facing directly onto the existing street – which would not be the case in the appeal proposal. As a back land form of development, I consider the general approach would be inappropriate for its context.

Appeal Decision Ref: APP/H5960/A/08/2083145 – Paragraph 8 Even if the general approach were considered acceptable, I am concerned with some more detailed elements of the proposal. Although I realise that components of the development, such as plot sizes, the overall ridge height and other numerical parameters, have been designed to reflect the surrounding area, there are other elements which significantly depart from the form of development which characterises the area

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to respond to the specific site conditions and react to the concerns raised over the design of the previous applications. This proposal certainly does not dominate its surroundings and this type of mews development is very much secondary in both scale and presence to the surrounding terraces. The Planning Report on the previous application refers to the design as being an overdevelopment of the site. As has been outlined in greater detail above the proposed development is both sensitive in design and of low density. It should be noted that the proposed development, by nature of its scale and being set back within the urban block will not be visible from any of the surrounding streets within the conservation area. The visual impact from the rear of the existing houses will be minimal due to the generous separation distances and the sensitive nature of the design approach.


Sustainability

Wandsworth Local Development Framework Core Strategy – Paragraph 4.129 There is a wide range of measures which developers can incorporate, where appropriate, to make their developments more sustainable. These may include passive solar design, natural ventilation, green and brown roofs, sustainable drainage systems (SUDS) and rainwater harvesting, the sustainable use of building materials and the management of construction

In order to achieve a good level of sustainability, the selection of materials will be to achieve a high thermal performance and will use transparency where possible to allow the harnessing of solar energy in addition to utilising the building’s embodied thermal mass to retain this free energy. A preliminary solar analysis of the proposal has been carried out to assess the potential solar gain to the properties and the detailing will further develop this potential.

waste. The Code for Sustainable Homes sets out standards for energy, water use and

The layout of the site and the orientation of the dwellings and the positioning of glazing have

other elements of sustainability for new housing development. Minimum levels of the 6-

been determined to best utilise the free energy available from the sun. Internally the location of

stage code are scheduled to become mandatory for new homes under future changes to

the main living rooms within the dwellings has been determined using the same principles.

building regulations. Level 3 of the Code is equivalent to a reduction in carbon emissions

The large areas of private open space surrounding these dwellings may allow the integration

of 25% beyond that already required by building regulations. This is technically feasible to achieve without the use of renewable energy but would require exceptional standards of design and build quality. In most cases an element of renewables will have to be included to meet the target. The Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) is a similar measure of sustainability which can also be applied to non-residential developments.

of geothermal technologies into these areas and the feasibility of this will be considered in the development of the design proposals. Likewise, shared solutions such as CHP will also be considered in design development if these make environmental and economical sense. The applicant is very keen to create a development of high design and sustainable value and would welcome the input of Wandsworth Council on their policies in relation to the integration of these technologies. Rainwater attenuation through the employment of SUDS drawings solutions will be integrated in to the proposal to reduce the impact that the surface water will have on the local infrastructure. In line attenuation will be provided to both the first floor roof terraces and the shared court space and feed in to separate grey water systems.

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Accessibility & Lifetime Homes

Relevant Extracts from Planning Policies / Previous Appeal Decision Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy GEN4 New development should be accessible for people with disabilities.

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy RDP6

Each house has been designed to be future proof with the consideration of the guidance of Lifetime Homes. The designs promote the concept of lifetime housing which will result in longer building lifespan through better adaptability for different functions by making provision for possible alterations at a later date to accommodate the changing needs of occupants which

Development will only be permitted if it provides appropriate access and facilities for people

might be brought about by older age, ill health or accidents. The following non-exhaustive list

with disabilities and does not reduce the existing standard of provision.

of measures have been included within the sketch design:

Wandsworth Unitary Development Plan - Policy TBE1 New development will only be permitted when: (a) it is physically integrated with its surroundings; and (b) it provides safe and convenient access for cyclists and pedestrians, within the development and to the surrounding area.

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A generous ground floor bedroom has been provided to facilitate the flexible use of the house in the future for elderly or more immobile occupants. An accessible WC has been provided at ground floor which has been designed with the potential that a level access shower could be installed in the future if this were required. The 1200mm wide entrance route is suitable for access by persons in wheelchairs with turning circles provided at appropriate locations. The approach, route and entrance court are hard landscaped, will be level and fitted with tactile surfaces. Discreet lighting will enhance the accessibility of the site approach. Each house will be fitted with a well lit and level threshold entrance. Within the houses 1500mm turning circles have been provided at key locations with the principal circulation to the ground floor being at least 1200 wide. To facilitate navigation of person in wheelchairs, a 300mm width has been provided at leading edge of doors. A half landing has been provided on the staircase for rest purposes. Services and sockets will be provided at appropriate levels to provide accessibility and in particular areas including the kitchen,.


Ground floor planning illustrating accessibility checks

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Aerial View of Site 20


Site Plan 21


Example Ground Floor Plan 22


Example First Floor Plan 23


North Elevation

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South Elevation

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East Elevation

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West Elevation

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bcdh architects 4 Grand Canal Wharf

Rath

30 Underwood Street

Dublin 4

Ardee Road

London

Tel:

+353 1 618 5055

Dundalk

N1 7JQ

Fax:

+353 1 618 5090

County Louth

E-mail: dublin@bcdh.com

Tel:

+353 42 9335284

Tel:

Fax:

+353 42 9337769

E-mail: london@bcdh.com

E-mail: dundalk@bcdh.com

+44 560 302 1093

Pre-planning Report - Site at Burntwood Lane  

Report by BCDH Architects prepared on behalf of John McDonnell