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Tuesday September 25, 2018 vol. CXLII no. 73

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TOWN

U . A F FA I R S

Buses to replace CPUC meeting addresses Dinky train for Hugin, grading policies three months By Isabel Ting

Assistant News Editor

During the first Council of the Princeton University Community meeting of the 2018–19 academic year, members discussed trustee Bob Hugin ’76’s controversial U.S. Senate campaign, revised grading policies, and how to deal with controversial campus speakers. The meeting was held Monday at 4:30 p.m. in Betts Auditorium in the School of Architecture. According to the CPUC’s homepage, the council is “a permanent conference of the representatives of all major groups of the University” where they can raise and be exposed to problems. At the beginning of the

Monday meeting, President Eisgruber said that the same day, he and Dean of the Faculty Sanjeev Kulkarni sent a memorandum to faculty members that clarified the minimum penalty for all cases in which faculty members are found responsible for sexual harassment. During the questionand-answer period, which was the second item on the agenda, several University graduate students expressed concern over trustee Bob Hugin’s anti-women and anti-gay views, in light of his recent Republican campaign for U.S. Senate. In 1992, Hugin fought to prevent women from joining one of the University’s eating clubs, Tiger Inn. And in 1976, Hugin told the

newspaper Home News that if a member of Tiger [Inn] were found to be gay, “he wouldn’t last long.” Eisgruber had prefaced the question-and-answer period with his positive statements about Hugin. Many concerns about Hugin had been submitted in advance of the meeting. “Hugin is a terrific trustee for this University,” Eisgruber said. “He is somebody who is an extraordinary source of judgment and counsel on the board and an important ally on a number of different issues, including issues with respect to diversity.” Eisgruber expressed that these statements are not a political endorsement for See CPUC page 2

ALBERT JIANG :: PRINCETONIAN CONTRIBUTOR

The Dinky train sits in the Princeton station.

Staff Writer and Contributor

In an effort to install an automatic braking system throughout the state, New Jersey Transit is suspending all Dinky service from Sunday, Oct. 14 through January 2019. According to NJ Transit’s website, the Dinky service will be replaced by buses on weekdays and weekends to accommodate passengers from the University to Princeton Junction. Adam Chang ’20 expressed skepticism that buses would be an adequate replacement, citing previous instances where the Dinky was replaced with bus services. “On every occasion in the past where they’ve replaced Dinky service with buses, the buses only meet the express train, which comes one in every three to five trains,” Chang said. “The buses also don’t run on an actual schedule. There’s nothing online.” Chang also noted that, previously, the buses did not run late at night or early in the mornings. Chang feared that the switch to buses would disproportionately impact University staff members and others who may not be able to afford Ubers, taxis, or other alternatives. While most staff members questioned by the Daily Princetonian do not rely on the Dinky to get to and from work, according to several staff members who do not use the Dinky

themselves, many faculty members who live outside of Princeton, N.J. — such as New York — have been affected by similar cancellations and delays in the past. The statewide transit agency is currently rushing to meet a federal deadline to have Positive Train Control — an emergency braking system that relies on GPS — installed by Dec. 31, according to the New York Times. In 2008, Congress mandated rail companies implement Positive Train Control, initially setting the deadline at 2015 before providing a three year extension. The New York Times reported that the project to implement Positive Train Control statewide in New Jersey is 65 percent complete. Lecturer in the Princeton Writing Program Catherine Young, a resident of northern Manhattan, catches the 6:11 a.m. NJ Transit train departing New York Penn Station. Young expressed particular concern for her morning commute to her 8:30 a.m. Writing Seminar class. “My biggest concern with the Dinky’s replacement buses would be their reliability because I would not want to cut it close with getting to campus on time for my class and then have to run to Blair Hall,” she said. “I like to be on campus early and spend time in my office first.” “In terms of going home, I’m sure it would be a bit annoying

ISABEL TING :: THE DAILY PRINCETONIAN

Vice President and Secretary Bob Durkee explains the origins of the CPUC.

ACADEMICS

Herrera discusses identity preferences, authencity in casting theater roles

See DINKY page 2

U . A F FA I R S

U. vice president Durkee ’69 to retire By Ivy Truong Assistant News Editor

University vice president and secretary Bob Durkee ’69 announced his retirement for the end of the 2018–19 academic year. Hilary Parker ’01, current assistant vice president and chief of staff in the Office of the President, has been appointed to replace him, effective July 1, 2019. The Board of Trustees ap-

proved the appointment in a meeting on Sept. 22, according to a University statement. Durkee has been a longstanding presence at the University, serving in various roles nearly continuously since his graduation. He has served in his current role since 2004 but began working at the University in 1972 as an assistant to the president. In 1978, he assumed the role of vice presiSee DURKEE page 3

NICK SHASHKINI :: PRINCETONIAN STAFF WRITER

Herrera talked about the intersection of identity politics and theater casting.

By Nick Shashkini Staff Writer

On Sept. 24, Associate Professor of Theater Brian Herrera lectured on the importance of actors staying true to their values despite problems with identity preferences in the the world of cast-

ing. The talk was held at 4:30 p.m. in the Wallace Theater in the Lewis Arts Complex. Titled “A Conversation About the History of Casting,” the event focused on encouraging discourse about contemporary casting practices and controversies surrounding race,

In Opinion

Today on Campus

Senior columnist Jess Nyquist encourages first-years to be more spontaneous with their extra time, while contributing columnist Hunter Campbell argues that the University should switch to closed garbage and recycling cans. PAGE 4

6:00 p.m.: Men’s soccer takes on Loyola at Roberts Stadium.

gender, and sexuality in modern theater. The talk was open to anyone but was mandatory for theater certificate students. Both a scholar and an artist, Herrera has been working on a book about the history of casting after having noticed a lack of scholarly material on the subject. By his admission, the process has been challenging. “I realized as I began to write that my feelings were quite strong,” Herrera said. “Every time I wrote I felt as though I was standing outside in my underpants screaming at the sky ‘this is wrong!’” Herrera has been hosting this conversation at universities across the United States, including Yale University, in the hope of fostering discourse and giving actors and directors advice on how to deal with the power dynamics of casting directors. “When we’re talking about the history of castSee HERRERA page 2

WEATHER

By Benjamin Ball and Albert Jiang

HIGH

73˚

LOW

68˚

Thunderstorm chance of rain:

90 percent


The Daily Princetonian

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Tuesday September 25, 2018

Herrera: Casting inherently Reischl: Buses and shuttles take involves power dynamics more than three times as long as HERRERA Continued from page 1

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ing, we’re always talking about the history of power,” Herrera said. Herrera said casting directors and agencies wield lots of power over not only who stars in productions, but also the “agency” that actors have in professional unions. Herrera also lectured on the legal ambiguity surrounding job openings that require or exclude specific ethnicities or genders. He said that important moral questions might be ignored when casting decisions have to be made in short period of time. Theater students who spoke to the The Daily Princetonian said Her-

rera’s talk thoroughly complicated the way they think about their work. “I love doing theater so much that studying theater sometimes makes me worry that it’s going take the fun out of it,” said Katie Massie ’21. “But Professor Herrera does an excellent job highlighting how it’s important to study the art that you do.” “I was really interested in what Brian had to say about expediency [in casting],” Haydon John ’21 said. “It’s a problem that I have encountered a lot, but I could never pinpoint what the problem was.” Herrera finished by calling on everyone to stick by their values in times of difficulties with the casting process, despite the possibility of failure.

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DINKY

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to wait for the bus, but I wouldn’t be upset about the inconsistent schedule because I would be done with my work day and I would just listen to a podcast or something,” she added. Professor Carolyn Ureña ’08, also a lecturer in the Princeton Writing Program, emphasized the the necessity of building in extra time for commutes to account for delays. “I would often only learn of a Dinky cancellation when I was already at Princeton Junction, and it was usually unclear how soon the next bus would arrive to take us to campus,” she said. She said she hopes that since the upcoming Dinky suspension is heavily anticipated, the situation won’t be detrimental to travelers. “I hope that there can be an increase in regular shuttle service, especially as the weather gets colder, so commuters aren’t left shivering,” she said. Professor Katherine Reischl

says she expects the new bus services will have a huge impact on her commute from Trenton. “The busses and shuttles from what I’ve experienced before take more than three times as long to get to Princeton,” Resichl said. Reischl acknowledged that though the usual system of commuting by Dinky was certainly already flawed, normal cancellations only made the system worse. Some student reactions were more mild, with students claiming that repairs and modifications to NJ Transit would overall be beneficial. “They said it’s to replace the brake system, which makes sense since it’s an old train,” Bensu Sicim ’19 said. Students who use the Dinky more regularly to go home for breaks, however, felt much more indignant, believing that the timing of the installation was very poor and would be hard on students and faculty alike. “NJ Transit should have thought of everyone as a whole,” Sally Ruybalid ’21 said. “I think it’s great that they’re repairing

the train in order to make sure we are all safe. Don’t get me wrong, safety is first, but someone should really plan.” Daily ridership on the Dinky was around 814 passengers in fiscal year 2017. Other affected routes on the Northeast Corridor include the temporary discontinuations of Trains 3832 and 3857 — the 10:42 a.m. and 3:42 p.m. from New York Penn Station to Trenton, respectively. Union regulations for NJ Transit workers forbid individual operators from commenting on this matter. The Times reported that a lack of engineers is also cause for a number of cancellations throughout the state. Total cancellations throughout the state consist of 18 daily trains on five of NJ Transit’s lines and weekend service on the Gladstone Branch of the Morris and Essex line. While the repairs take place, NJ Transit is offering 10 percent discounts on all rail tickets from November through January.

Calhoun: Students and organizations should not rescind invitations to speakers CPUC

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Hugin. He also said that he disagrees with comments that Hugin made over 25 years ago. Eisgruber pointed out that Hugin has said that he regrets the comments he made and that he recognizes that he was in the wrong. “I can assure you that he is a trustee of good standing, and we are very fortunate as a university to have him as a trustee here,” Eisgruber concluded. Several undergraduate and graduate students of the Wilson School questioned whether the University’s values regarding diversity and inclusion would be compromised if “men like Bob Hugin were propped up into positions of power.” Students emphasized that the University is supposed to a safe space where women and members of the LGBTQ+ community can feel welcome and comfortable. Others asked about how the trustees have handled the Hugin controversy and whether there are processes that determine when a trustee member is in poor standing. Eisgruber responded that these questions are inappropriate for him to answer. One man, who said that he was in an openly gay relationship, came to Hugin’s defense and said that he has never sensed homophobia from Hugin in the dozens of years that he has known him. Eisgruber struck down

more follow-up questions on Hugin. Later, Dean of the College Jill Dolan spoke about grading trends. In October 2014, a University mandated target for 35 percent A grades was removed from grading policy . Now, grading policy encourages departments to develop their own assessment measures and grading standards. Dolan noted that the grade point average for academic year 2017–18 is .107 higher than it was in AY 2003–04 and .071 higher than it was in AY 2014–15. Furthermore, since 2014, the most significant shift has been an increase in A grades and a proportional decrease in B+ grades. Dolan added that GPA has increased across all departments since AY 2004–05 and AY 2014–15. However, the AY 2017–18 report noted that the increase in A grades has caused “compression at the top of the class,” making it difficult to “differentiate among the highest performing students when awarding departmental honors and prizes.” Increased requests for grade changes accompanied the GPA increases, Dolan said. Responding to a request from a graduate student, Dolan said that she will work to make the grading trends known to the graduate student body, since many graduate students act as preceptors and graders for courses. Vice President for Campus Life W. Rochelle Cal-

houn concluded the meeting by discussing campus speakers. She explained that the purpose of inviting speakers to campus should be to increase free expression on campus. Calhoun offered six solutions in the face of speakers who invoke protests or controversy: conduct “due diligence;” reach out to the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students; offer an opening statement; “stay the course;“ “lead;“ and “lean on” campus resources. “The goal of [campus speakers] is to broaden perspective and to engage in dialogue,” Calhoun said, while explaining her first solution, due diligence. “Make sure that the speaker is actually able to deliver on that goal,” she said. Calhoun added that students and organizations should not rescind invitations once speakers have been invited to speak. “If you’re going to be bold enough to invite a speaker that is going to cause dialogue, be bold enough to lead,” she said. According to University vice president and secretary Robert Durkee ’69, CPUC consists of 51 members: six officers of the University, the President and the Provost, 15 faculty members, 12 undergraduates, seven graduate students, four alumni, and seven general members. The President also presides at meetings of the Council, which meets six times a year. The next CPUC meeting will be held on Nov. 12.

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The Daily Princetonian

Tuesday September 25, 2018

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Durkee: Thankful for opportunities to learn, grow, and work DURKEE

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dent of public affairs, which he held until February 2018. He added the responsibilities of vice president and secretary in 2004. “For my four years as an un-

dergraduate and my 47 years in Nassau Hall, Princeton has given me almost daily opportunities to learn, to grow and to work with students, faculty, staff, alumni, presidents, trustees, neighbors and others to help shape and strengthen this university, in support of the values for which it stands.

For this I am deeply grateful,” Durkee said in the statement. Parker’s appointment marks a reorganization in the University that will merge the Office of the President and that of the Vice President and Secretary. In her new position, Parker will maintain some her responsibilities for the Office of the

ROSE GILBERT :: THE DAILY PRINCETONIAN

Bob Durkee ’69 served at the University for 47 years. After his retirement, the Office of the President and the Office of the VIce President and Secretary will be combined.

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President, such as advancing University strategic priorities. As a result, her current position as assistant vice president and chief of staff in the Office of the President will be eliminated with the consolidation of the two offices. Parker’s appointment was made on the recommendation

of University President Christopher Eisgruber ’83. Before assuming her current role in 2015, Parker previously served in the Office of the Executive Vice President, the Office of the Dean for Research, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science, according to the statement.


Opinion

Tuesday September 25, 2018

page 4

{ www.dailyprincetonian.com }

My advice to freshmen: Stay late Jess Nyquist

Senior Colmnist

P

rinceton students are infamous for meticulously structured free time — get coffee with Amanda 10– 10:30 p.m., call a friend from home 4–4:15 p.m., hang out in Carly’s room 9–9:50 p.m. With demanding schedules as well as academic, extracurricular, and career pressures, students often feel anxious about wasted time or un-optimized schedules. But in the first few days on campus before our workload escalated, we let ourselves reunite with friends and settle in slowly. Without a routine, we let our days fill up — or not — without the commanding Google Calendar notifications dictating our every minute. And we need to do this more often. Princeton students need to let themselves be spontaneous. For many of us, our summer offered a healthy balance of productivity and relaxation. But within the first few days of school I was f looded with the familiar campus sensation:

Whenever I find a moment to catch my breath, I feel immediate pressure to fill the time productively. At the New Year, I wrote my resolution on a poster in our dorm room: “stay late.” My reputation for a horrendously erratic sleep schedule preceded me, and my roommates almost crossed out my goal, replacing it with “stay up no later.” But “stay up” is a lifestyle I wish I had adopted from my first steps on campus. We spend four years on campus, and while some call it a bubble, it is also a haven. You’re a six minute walk from some of the most important people in your life. You have the luxury of being selfish with few people or tasks truly dependent on you. You’re surrounded by the communities you’ve built yourself and those that have taken you in. Staying up means appreciating and taking advantage of all the Princeton that happens when you look up from your studies. Staying up means using free moments as gifts to be used as you want in that moment not as extra time needed to be filled some with other tasks. Every great night in college is an accident. And maybe every night in life

is the same way, but I won’t presume to know that, at least not yet. When you shotgun a Red Bull with your COS group at 4 a.m. in Sherrerd Hall. When you wonder the limits of freedom of speech and stay up with your roommates to never find an answer. When you’re headed to bed and get a better invitation: two roommates headed to the movie of the week. Take it. Train yourself to untrain all the discipline and rationality that got you here. You’ll never make it to sunrise on purpose. You’ll make it to sunrise because you’re in pajamas on a Monday night but your friend came down the hall from Foulke Hall and needed advice, and chocolate, and you had both and then suddenly it’s light outside. Your friends (who know no bedtime) will come over after Shabbat dinner, and you can fake sleep or you can get out of bed and entertain the clockless. You’ll stay up at reunions, not wanting to leave the seniors, and the night will leave first. The big nights will never be the big memories. Dean’s Date won’t be worth the exam hangover. The club will go member’s only before you get there on Princetoween. And some frosh

weeks you won’t make it out of Carly’s single because you arrived on campus and wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. Sometimes you’re going toward Firestone but your friends need a fourth player in Spikeball — stay in Henry Courtyard. If you stop in the quad down the hall on the way to the library, you might as well stay and binge watch “Game of Thrones.” And if your day is then shot, you may as well let it be. Carson’s 21st won’t be great until you leave Prospect and alcohol and crowds and run through Robertson Fountain. Your meticulously planned perfect first legal drink may be thwarted by an under-construction Triumph Brewery, so just let it be replaced by a first Hoagie Haven sandwich instead. I promise you study enough. I promise you work hard enough. I promise you deserve more breaks than you would ever give yourself. Stay late. End up wherever the day takes you. Make plans if and only if you are willing to break them. Jessica Nyquist is a senior concentrator in computer science from Houston, Texas. She can be reached at jnyquist@princeton.edu.

vol. cxlii

editor-in-chief

Marcia Brown ’19 business manager

Ryan Gizzie ’19

BOARD OF TRUSTEES president Thomas E. Weber ’89 vice president Craig Bloom ’88 secretary Betsy L. Minkin ’77 treasurer Douglas J. Widmann ’90 Kathleen Crown William R. Elfers ’71 Stephen Fuzesi ’00 Zachary A. Goldfarb ’05 John Horan ’74 Joshua Katz Kathleen Kiely ’77 Rick Klein ’98 James T. MacGregor ’66 Alexia Quadrani Marcelo Rochabrun ’15 Richard W. Thaler, Jr. ’73 Lisa Belkin ‘82 Francesca Barber trustees emeriti Gregory L. Diskant ’70 Jerry Raymond ’73 Michael E. Seger ’71 Annalyn Swan ’73

142ND MANAGING BOARD managing editors Isabel Hsu ’19 Sam Parsons ’19 head news editor Claire Thornton ’19 associate news editors Allie Spensley ’20 Audrey Spensley ’20 Ariel Chen ’20 Ivy Truong ’21 associate news and film editor Sarah Warman Hirschfield ’20 head opinion editor Emily Erdos ’19 associate opinion editors Jon Ort ’21 Cy Watsky ’21 head sports editors David Xin ’19 Chris Murphy ’20 associate sports editors Miranda Hasty ’19 Jack Graham ’20 associate street editors Danielle Hoffman ’20 Lyric Perot ’20 digital operations manager Sarah Bowen ’20 chief copy editors Marina Latif ’19 Arthur Mateos ’19 Catherine Benedict ’20 head design editor Rachel Brill ’19 cartoons editor Tashi Treadway ’19 head photo editor Risa Gelles-Watnick ’21

NIGHT STAFF JON ORT :: THE DAILY PRINCETONIAN

Replace the outdoor trash cans Hunter Campbell

Contributing Columnist

I

f someone asked you, off the top of your head, to describe the wildlife you see at our University, you would undoubtedly think of the seemingly ever-increasing squirrel population. From day to day we tend to pay them little mind, unless of course you happen to spot a black squirrel on your way to class. You may be surprised, however, to learn that our little neighbors are quite literally living in trash. The culprit of their dangerous and unsanitary

housing predicament is clear: uncovered trash cans around campus. The University has a wide variety of recycling and trash can models in use around campus. Some models, like those stationed outside Corwin and Robertson Halls in Scudder Plaza, are covered and have handles which must be pulled down to open them. However, other models, like the cans near Blair Arch, have no lid. Trash cans without lids not only give squirrels easy access to trash but also are overall less sanitary than cans with covers on them. Like bird feeders, the height of the cans is little deterrence to the small rodents, who with ease can jump into a can, grab a piece of trash, and carry it

off to its nest. The dangers posed to animals by trash are plentiful. According to the Humane Society of the United States, sharp objects like bottle caps can be ingested and cause internal cuts. Animals trying to get liquid out of an aluminum can may be scraped by the sharp edges. Plastic can choke animals or cause intestinal blockage. Suffice to say, the fact the critters living in dirty, f limsy plastic bags should be concerning to us. The only way to keep the squirrels from accessing the trash cans is by putting on lids they cannot open. If changing the cans to help out the squirrels does not convince you, then think about how bad open trash cans are for us as well.

As trash piles up, the wind can blow lighter objects like plastic bags out of the can and around campus. This is more work for facilities workers who have to go around and pick up loose trash. It is easy to accidentally litter by carelessly throwing a piece of trash toward the can without realizing you missed it entirely. If you feel that having trash blowing around campus is nasty, think about what happens when it rains into an open can. These issues can be alleviated by the simple switch to closed cans. Wind will no longer be able to blow out plastic bags and other light debris, and rain will not get inside the can. You will have to actually open the can and directly place your trash in-

copy Hannah Fried ’21 design Quinn Donahue ’20

side, not throw it in from several feet away, preventing lots of trash from ending up on the ground right next to the trash cans. On top of all that, the cans will be less of an eyesore without the garbage exposed. The switch will make our University more attractive and enable us to be better stewards of the environment on campus. For the sake of the squirrels, and for our own interests as well, the University should replace all outdoor lidless trash cans with other models that feature a lid or cover. Hunter Campbell is a sophomore from East Arlington, Vt. He can be reached at hunterc@ princeton.edu.


Tuesday September 25, 2018

Opinion

page 5

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thoughts grace koh ’19

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Sports

Tuesday September 25, 2018

page 6

{ www.dailyprincetonian.com } FIELD HOCKEY

Tigers smother Dartmouth in Ivy Play By Molly Milligan Staff Writer

The No. 5 Princeton field hockey team (6–3 overall, 1–0 Ivy League) beat Dartmouth (3–4, 0–1) 3–0 Saturday afternoon to open the 2018 Ivy League season with a convincing victory. The game was broadcast on ESPN+ as part of the Ivy League’s new package deal with the sports programming giant. The Tigers began their dominant display in the ninth minute as first-year midfielder Hannah Davey recovered a Dartmouth turnover before finding senior striker Sophia Tornetta in front of the cage for a goal. By the end of the first half, Princeton had 13 shots compared to just one by the Big Green. Around the midpoint of the second half, the Tigers earned a corner and sophomore midfielder MaryKate Neff netted a point, finishing off a shot by sophomore midfielder Julianna Tornetta. With only four minutes left to play, Princeton added one more insurance goal when senior midfielder/striker Jane Donio-Enscoe scored on the rebound from a shot by first-year striker Ali McCarthy.

Princeton has lost to the Big Green just twice since 1988. The win brings the matchup’s all-time tally to 30–8–2 in favor of the Tigers. In an interview with The Daily Princetonian, junior midfielder/fullback Carlotta von Gierke analyzed the team’s outlook and attitude. “The ultimate goal for

our 2018 season is to win a national championship,” von Gierke said. She said this would take more than hard work, requiring the squad to “be great and compete every single day until then.” Thankfully, she said, Tiger field hockey benefits from a “very special” culture that will no doubt go far in supporting this goal. “We are not just team-

mates, but one big family that truly loves and selflessly supports each other, on and off the field,” the junior added. To be best prepared come NCAA tournament time, von Gierke said the team will focus on maintaining motivation and a strong work ethic while keeping expectations high during practice. So far, the Tigers

COURTESY OF BEVERLY SCHAEFER, PRINCETON ATHLETICS

Senior Sophia Tornetta scored the first goal for the Tigers en route to their 3–0 victory over Dartmouth.

have enjoyed playing a “difficult schedule,” including a stretch of five games in 10 days that featured wins against then No. 5 Penn State (6–3) in double-overtime and then No. 4 Duke (7–3) just three days later. “These two games showed us that we not only had the ability to compete with the top teams but also beat them,” von Gierke said. Moreover, she said, the team saw its hard work during the offseason and preseason paying off. For now, the Tigers are focused on going undefeated in Ivy League play. The most decisive game in that slate will come against No. 20 Harvard (7–1), the only Ivy program ranked in the national top 25 besides Princeton, on October 20. “We are going to play them on home turf this year and we are very excited to face them, especially given how strong our team has been so far,” von Gierke said. Princeton is now 6–3 on the season and No. 5 in the country as they look toward this Friday’s game at Yale. The Bulldogs sit at 4–3 (0–1 Ivy League), having lost 6–0 to Harvard in their first intraleague test.

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Women’s tennis concludes busy week featuring two tournaments By Miranda Hasty

Associate Sports Editor

The No. 5 Princeton field hockey team (6–3 overall, 1–0 Ivy League) beat Dartmouth (3–4, 0–1) 3–0 Saturday afternoon to open the 2018 Ivy League season with a convincing victory. The game was broadcast on ESPN+ as part of the Ivy League’s new package deal with the sports programming giant. The Tigers began their

dominant display in the ninth minute as first-year midfielder Hannah Davey recovered a Dartmouth turnover before finding senior striker Sophia Tornetta in front of the cage for a goal. By the end of the first half, Princeton had 13 shots compared to just one by the Big Green. Around the midpoint of the second half, the Tigers earned a corner and sophomore midfielder MaryKate Neff netted a point, finishing off a shot

by sophomore midfielder Julianna Tornetta. With only four minutes left to play, Princeton added one more insurance goal when senior midfielder/striker Jane Donio-Enscoe scored on the rebound from a shot by first-year striker Ali McCarthy. Princeton has lost to the Big Green just twice since 1988. The win brings the matchup’s all-time tally to 30–8–2 in favor of the Tigers. In an interview with The Daily Princetonian, junior

midfielder/fullback Carlotta von Gierke analyzed the team’s outlook and attitude. “The ultimate goal for our 2018 season is to win a national championship,” von Gierke said. She said this would take more than hard work, requiring the squad to “be great and compete every single day until then.” Thankfully, she said, Tiger field hockey benefits from a “very special” culture that will no doubt go far in supporting this goal.

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Junior Tiffany Chen advanced to the final day of action at the Cissie Levy Invitational before falling to Penn’s Mimi Levine.

“We are not just teammates, but one big family that truly loves and selflessly supports each other, on and off the field,” the junior added. To be best prepared come NCAA tournament time, von Gierke said the team will focus on maintaining motivation and a strong work ethic while keeping expectations high during practice. So far, the Tigers have enjoyed playing a “difficult schedule,” including a stretch of five games in 10 days that featured wins against then No. 5 Penn State (6–3) in double-overtime and then No. 4 Duke (7–3) just three days later. “These two games showed us that we not only had the ability to compete with the top teams but also beat them,” von Gierke said. Moreover, she said, the team saw its hard work during the offseason and preseason paying off. For now, the Tigers are focused on going undefeated in Ivy League play. The most decisive game in that slate will come against No. 20 Harvard (7–1), the only Ivy program ranked in the national top 25 besides Princeton, on October 20. “We are going to play them on home turf this year and we are very excited to face them, especially given how strong our team has been so far,” von Gierke said. Princeton is now 6–3 on the season and No. 5 in the country as they look toward this Friday’s game at Yale. The Bulldogs sit at 4–3 (0–1 Ivy League), having lost 6–0 to Harvard in their first intraleague test.

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The Tigers field hockey team improved their all time series record against Dartmouth to an astounding 30–8–2 with their win Saturday.

September 25, 2018  
September 25, 2018  
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