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Homecoming

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The Daily Northwestern Serving the University and Evanston Since 1881

Online Slideshow: Missed Seth Meyers? Check out our Homecoming pictures.

Monday, October 24, 2011

DAILYNORTHWESTERN.COM

NUST remembers NU grad, sailor

www.dailynorthwestern.com

By Joseph Diebold

the daily northwestern

Campus

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Dance-cheer team are merged for the first time in NU history.

City

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Alum, city officials discuss whether U.S. could handle ‘Contagion’

Forum

4

Yoonj Kim Clinton set good example for women

Michael Kurtz Students should try different motivation

Sports

12

NU suffers fifth-straight loss, drops Homecoming game to Penn State.

Weather Monday

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Et cetera Classifieds Crossword Sudoku

Registration for the 38th Northwestern University Dance Marathon closed Friday with a recordbreaking 1,300 students signed up to participate, the public relations committee announced Sunday in an email press release. The increase in dancer participation comes after a big year for NUDM. In 2011, the organization reached the $1-million fundraising mark and was named the Most Influential College Organization by the Classy Awards, the largest philanthropic awards ceremony in the country. This year’s event will run from March 2 to 4. “I’ve been involved with DM for three years and this is definitely

the daily northwestern

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Friday

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By Ally Mutnick

the daily northwestern

By Stephanie Haines

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Thursday

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DM registration breaks group records the biggest support system that I’ve seen since 2008,” said Medill senior Maura Brannigan, the 2012 public relations co-chair. “More people want to dance; more people want to get involved in this Northwestern tradition.” This year, the more than 1,300 dancers are made up of 47 student groups and 125 independent dancers, compared to the 1,200 that registered last year. “With a record number of dancers two years in a row, we can see how excited and motivated students are for DM,” Executive Cochair and Weinberg senior Kunal Joshi said in the press release. “We’re seeing substantial, healthy growth in our organization, and I could not be happier that so many students want to be a part of a great

Northwestern tradition.” Communication junior Allison Ho plans to join the 90-hour club in her third year as a dancer. Ho, co-chair of the Communications Residential College team, said last year’s success helped spark interest for DM 2011. “I do think the Classy Awards have something to do with it,” Ho said. “People see that it’s just so exciting and so many people are involved already, and they want to be a part of it too.” Still, organizers aren’t just relying on last year’s reputation. This year, DM allowed students to register without a partner if students entered with a group of more than ten students. According to the press See DM, page 9

Rahm creates ‘NUCPS Day’

Wednesday

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See REGATTA, page 9

Daily file photo

Marathon: More than 1,300 students signed up for DM 2012.

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Tuesday

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Larry Svabek/The Daily Northwestern

In memory: Members of the NU Sailing Team held a memorial regatta in honor of their former teammate, Tyler Lorenzi, who died in May during a boating accident in Virginia.

The Northwestern University Sailing Team held a memorial regatta Sunday to commemorate former team member Tyler Lorenzi (MEAS ‘10), who died last May in a boating accident. About 125 people attended the regatta at the NU Sailing Center, which was preceded by a barbecue during which members of the NU community close to Lorenzi shared stories about his life. They were joined by his parents and sister, who tearfully thanked the gathered crowd for their kind words. Lorenzi worked as an associate research engineer for the National Institute of Aerospace in conjunction with NASA’s Langley Research Center after graduating from NU. Lorenzi died May 12 when a boat he was on with nine other people capsized in the James River in Newport News, Va.

“Coming to college I had never sailed before,” Weinberg senior Max Clemons said. “A lot of people taught me how to sail, but Ty really taught me to love sailing.” NUST holds an alumni regatta every year during Homecoming week, but it traditionally sees low attendance, said Alumni Chair Kim Wieczner. This year, the team’s executive board decided to combine the event with Lorenzi’s memorial. The Communication senior said she was overwhelmed by the turnout. “Usually we get maybe two or three boats,” Wieczner said. “We don’t have enough boats for how many people want to sail in this today. Being together in his spirit is so important because he always brought people together.” Wieczner also shared her own memories of Lorenzi’s life. “Even though he was older than me, I could sit down with

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Northwestern University Center for Public Safety, a worldwide traffic safety and police management institute, celebrated its 75th anniversary Sunday. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel named Oct. 23 as “NUCPS Day” in recognition of the Center’s contributions in Chicago, which include training more than 50,000 law enforcement and traffic safety professionals, educating 2.5 million Chicago and Cook County residents in driver’s safety and providing leadership worldwide. It also helps train members of the Evanston Police Department. “It certainly means a lot to be recognized in our home city,” NUCPS Executive Director David Bradford said. NUCPS was founded in 1936 by Franklin Kreml, a NU student

and police officer, who wanted to change the high traffic fatality rates in Evanston. Originally called the Evanston Traffic Officers Training School, it offered a one-academicyear-long training program in crash investigation. Within a year, the traffic fatality rate in Evanston decreased by 90 percent. A NU psychology professor noticed this and worked to offer a traffic institute at NU through Kreml’s program, said Roy Lucke, director of transportationsafety programs and resident historian for NUCPS. “Our founding is to make Evanston safe, literally,” Lucke said. Now, NUCPS is a worldwide institution that teaches courses in Africa, the Middle East, the Far East and South America. “We are helping countries straight out of monarchies that never had a modern police department,” Lucke said. Currently, NUCPS is creating an

online training program as a less expensive option for prospective law enforcement students. The banquet was held at Chicago’s Harold Washington Library Center. NUCPS offers courses for credit in the Northwestern University School of Continuing Studies. Though it offers no undergraduate courses, NUCPS has worked with McCormick and SESP students and faculty for safety and transportation research. Bradford and Lucke said not many NU students are drawn to the NUCPS training programs. Though NU does not offer a criminal justice program, Bradford said he is working with SESP professors to develop a curriculum for a masters’ degree in public policy, which would include some NUCPS courses. stephaniehaines2015@u. northwestern.edu

Student robbed on campus

A Northwestern student was robbed Saturday night near Shepard Residential College, according to a University emergency alert issued Sunday morning. Police are still searching for the thief, who they described as a male black, 18 to 22 years old, approximately 6-foot-1 to 6-foot-2 tall, approximately 180 pounds, having an average build, and wearing a multi-colored hat with stripes and blue jeans, according to the emergency notification. The NU student was walking south on Sheridan Road near University Place when a man approached him from behind and asked about the time. After the student referenced his smart phone and told the man the time, he continued walking, eventually turning west on University Place. While walking between the 600 and 700 blocks of University

Place, the man approached the student from behind again, this time demanding the student turn over his smart phone. The man then stated he had a knife, but no knife was ever displayed, according to the emergency notification. The man then punched the student in the face, grabbed the smart phone from him, pushed him down and fled west on University Place toward downtown Evanston. The student chased after the thief, according to the release. The student first called the Evanston Police Department, which responded to the scene along with University Police. Both departments searched the area to no avail. According to the emergency notification, the student declined medical treatment. University Police and EPD did not return calls Sunday. EPD is investigating. — Patrick Svitek


The Daily Northwestern

2 News

Monday, October 24, 2011

Around Town

The Daily Northwestern www.dailynorthwestern.com Editor in Chief Katherine Driessen eic@dailynorthwestern.com

City photo day poorly attended By Chelsea Corbin

the daily northwestern

The City of Evanston invited residents Saturday to participate in a city-wide photography challenge, A Day in the Life of Evanston: A Photo Story. Photographers of all skill levels and ages were encouraged to take pictures all day to demonstrate a typical fall day in Evanston. Despite efforts to publicize the event on the City of Evanston website, several local professional photographers said they were unaware of the event. Bill Floyd of Bill Floyd Photography said although he would not have participated in the event had he been aware of it because of the nature of his photography, he expected many colleagues would have. “Evanston is a community of pretty creative and artistic people that would love to get involved in something like that,� Floyd said. He said more advertisement in local news

Schakowsky praises Obama war announcement

U.S. Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.) praised President Barack Obama’s announcement Friday that all U.S. troops will return home from Iraq by the end of December, effectively ending the nearly nine-year war. “While I believe that we must still monitor the number and activities of private contractors that the U.S. will maintain in Iraq, I am grateful that members of our armed forces will be home for the holidays and we will not have to endure another year of military action in Iraq,� Schakowsky wrote in a statement Friday. Schakowsky, a founding member of the Out of Iraq Congressional Caucus, added she has

publications and direct contact with local photographers could have proved useful in recruiting more participation. Similarly, Eric Wachmik of Modern Photography and Video Studio, which has locations in Park Ridge and Chicago, wrote in an email that he would have participated in the competition had he known about it. He said he will consider participating in future A Day in the Life of Evanston events if made aware. Residents who participated in the contest must submit their photos by Oct. 31, at which time 32 pictures will be chosen for a “Day in the Life of Evanston� photo book. Ald. Mark Tendam (6th) said the judging panel probably will be comprised of city officials to expedite the judging and production process of the books. Tendam suggested the photo book to city council after receiving a similar book from a city manager from New Zealand. He said it will serve as an inexpensive yet representative “leave-behind� to share with other cities.

repeatedly opposed President George W. Bush’s involvement of the country in an “unnecessary, unfunded war.� “To date, the war in Iraq has also cost the American people more than $1 trillion and untold burdens on military families,� Schakowsky wrote. Obama’s decision comes in the wake of his pledge to bring all troops home by the end of 2011, a commitment he said dates back to his inauguration. More than 100,000 troops have been withdrawn thus far, stated a White House news release Friday. “As we welcome home our newest veterans, we’ll enlist their talents in meeting our greatest challenges as a nation — restoring our economic strength at home,� the release stated. “Because after a decade of war, the nation that we need to build is our own.�

General Manager Stacia Campbell stacia@dailynorthwestern.com

Evanston is a community that ... would love to get involved in something like that.

Newsroom | 847.491.3222 Campus desk campus@dailynorthwestern.com City desk city@dailynorthwestern.com Sports desk sports@dailynorthwestern.com

Bill Floyd,

Bill Floyd Photography The city plans to coordinate a similar photo day each season to create a comprehensive view of a year in Evanston, Tendam added. He said submissions will provide city officials with critical information about how residents utilize city space. “The goal is to get people out, enjoying the community and giving us feedback — where they go to enjoy themselves and what they enjoy seeing in Evanston,� Tendam said. “We want to see what makes the community proud about Evanston.� chelseacorbin2014@u.northwestern.edu

Evanston offers holiday light recycling

The City of Evanston is teaming up with the Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County and Elgin Recycling to offer holiday light recycling from Dec. 1 through Jan. 31. Residents can drop off their lights at three locations: the Evanston Ecology Center, 2024 McCormick Blvd.; the Evanston Public Library Main Branch, 1703 Orrington Ave.; and the Levy Senior Center, 300 Dodge Ave. Last year, 28 communities in the Chicago area took part in the program, recycling more than 51,000 pounds of holiday lights that would otherwise fill landfills, according to the city’s website. Evanston alone recycled more than 1,200 pounds of lights.

Ad Office | 847.491.7206 spc-compshop@northwestern.edu Fax | 847.491.9905 THE DAILY NORTHWESTERN is published Monday through Friday during the academic year, except vacation periods and two weeks preceding them and once during August, by Students Publishing Co., Inc. of Northwestern University, 1999 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208; 847-491-7206. First copy of THE DAILY is free, additional copies are 50 cents. All material published herein, except advertising or where indicated otherwise, is Copyright 2011 THE DAILY NORTHWESTERN and protected under the “work made for hire� and “periodical publication� clauses of copyright law. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE DAILY N ORTHWESTERN , 1999 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208. Subscriptions are $175 for the academic year. THE DAILY NORTHWESTERN is not responsible for more than one incorrect ad insertion. All display ad corrections must be received by 3 p.m. one day prior to when the ad is run.

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TOKYO STRING QUARTET ´/HIWRQHDOPRVWEUHDWKOHVV¾ - Toronto Star

with pianist

ALON GOLDSTEIN Thursday, October 27, 7:30 p.m. Pick-Staiger Concert Hall, $22/10 0R]DUW4XDUWHWLQ*0DMRU.‡6]\PDQRZVNL4XDUWHW1R %UDKPV3LDQR4XLQWHWLQ)0LQRU2S

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The Daily Northwestern

Monday, October 24, 2011

News  3

On Campus Northwestern Memorial Hospital receives national Consumer Choice Awards

Northwestern Memorial Hospital, the primary teaching hospital for Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, received National Corporation Consumer Choice Awards for the Chicago and Lake County/Kenosha County markets, according to the Chicago Tribune. The awards were announced in the Oct. 17 issue of Modern Healthcare. Awardees were decided based on 260,000 households polled in the annual NRC Healthcare Market Guide Study, which ranks the highest hospital quality and image. The survey focused on four areas: doctors, nurses, overall quality and image and reputation. One of Northwestern Memorial’s partner hospitals, Northwestern Lake Forest Hospital, also received the award. This is the thirteenth consecutive year Northwestern Memorial has been awarded and the seventh consecutive year Northwestern Lake Forest has received the award. Northwestern Memorial was also named the Most Preferred hospital in Chicago for the 16th consecutive year, and Northwestern Lake Forest was named the Most Preferred hospital in Lake County and Kenosha County.

Professor helps discover how stars appear young

NU astronomy and physics prof. Aaron M. Geller co-authored a study with University of Wisconsin, Madison prof. Robert Mathieu explaining the origin of “blue stragglers,” old stars that appear younger than they are, according to a University news release. The professors discovered these stars burn hot and blue through a mechansim called mass transfer. The blue straggler uses up the mass of its giant-star companion, allowing the star to burn longer while the companion star is left with only its white dwarf core. This is the first study to confirm theories of blue stragglers, which were discovered in 1953

with observational data, according to the release. In about a year, the astronomers will have data from the Hubble Space telescope to confirm if the blue stragglers’ companions are white dwarfs. Data shows that each companion star is about half the mass of the sun, which is indicative of a white dwarf star. The study was published on Oct. 20 in the journal “Nature.” — Meghan Morris

PlayStation holds new 3D product event

A team of representatives from video game company PlayStation arrived Sunday morning and set up six of their PlayStation 3 gaming systems inside the Delta Upsilon fraternity house. DU gave access to the 3D games during their Sunday night dinner recruitment event. PlayStation’s 3D system, which won’t be available to the public until November, is capable of two features: a 3D single-play mode and SimulView. The SimulView feature allows two players wearing 3D glasses to play against each other — but each viewer gets a full-screen view of the game. The event showcased this feature with the new racing game Motorstorm Apocalypse. “The 3D is cool, but the splitscreen feature is revolutionary,” said McCormick freshman Matthew Albrecht. “Definitely one of the coolest things I’ve seen in a long time.” The 3D videogame technology is different from 3D movies. PlayStation uses an active 3D system with battery-powered glasses that sync with the television display, according to a representative. While the Playstation 3 console is currently 3D-capable, a television with special glasses is required to use it. The display will be a 24-in. 1080p HDTV that comes with a pair of active 3D glasses and a copy of the new Motorstorm Apocalypse game. The display will be on sale for $500. Playstation is currently on tour, showing off the 3D games at college campuses as part of their Dorm Crashers promotion.

CAMPUS CALENDAR Brown V. Plata

Monday, 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Arthur Rubloff Building

NU School of Law alum Michael Bien will speak about his recent U.S. Supreme Court victory in Brown v. Plata, which will potentially affect many state prisons.

I Wrote It, But I Don’t Own It? Keeping Your Copyright Tuesday, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Galter Health Sciences Library

Galter Health Sciences Library employees will give a presentation on author rights, copyright and open access options.

Arrival Cities: The Final Migration and Our Next World Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. 1902 Sheridan Road

Doug Saunders, the author of “Arrival City: The Final Migration and Our Next World,” will lead a discussion about “arrival cities” where urban population is increasing and shifting economic demographics.

Work/Life Matters: A Panel of Northwestern Colleagues Share their Strategies for Finding Balance Wednesday, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Norris University Center

This panel will feature NU faculty who will share advice on how to manage priorities and time.

National Theatre Live Broadcast: The Kitchen Tuesday, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Theatre and Interpretation Center

London’s National Theatre will broadcast its production of “The Kitchen” to TIC. It premiered at the Royal Court in 1959, and has been performed in more than 30 countries.

— Ben Breuner

OPENOCTOBER ACCESS WEEK 24-28, 2011 MONDAY, OCTOBER 24 The NIH Public Access Policy and Publication Management with MyNCBI 12-1pm | Galter Health Sciences Library Learning Resources Center (LRC) Classroom A class taught by Pamela Shaw, Biosciences & Bioinformatics Librarian, Galter Health Sciences Library.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25 I Wrote It, But I Don’t Own It? Keeping Your Copyright 12-1pm | Galter Health Sciences Library Learning Resources Center (LRC) Classroom Heidi Nickisch Duggan, Associate Director, Galter Health Sciences Library, and Stephanie Kerns, Head of Education & Outreach at Galter Health Sciences Library, present a fun and interactive session on author rights, copyright, and open access options.

SENATOR

RUSS FEINGOLD 2011 LEOPOLD LECTURE PRESENTED BY THE WEINBERG COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

“WHILE

AMERICA SLEEPS:

A WAKE-UP CALL FOR THE POST-9/11 ERA”

OCT 26 | 7:30 PM | HARRIS HALL AUD For more info, visit www.bit.ly/qQ9V5u

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26 Fifteen Years of First Mondays: Scholars, Readers, and Openly Accessible Research 2-3:30pm | Forum Room, Northwestern University Library A guest lecture by Ed Valauskas. The lecture will be followed by an opening reception for the new Center for Scholarly Communication & Digital Curation.

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LIBRARY www.library.northwestern.edu/openaccess Open Access Week 2011 events are sponsored by Northwestern University Library’s Scholarly Communication Committee and the Center for Scholarly Communication & Digital Curation.


forum Michael kurtz

page 4

monday, october 24, 2011

Join the online conversation at

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The Drawing Board

by Britta Hanson

Daily columnist

BJ Fogg’s behavior model offers helpful motivational tips We all have habits and hang-ups we wished we could get over. Some of us want to lose weight. Some of us want to stop smoking. All of us want to stop procrastinating on Facebook. If, as the eternally wise Carrie Bradshaw once posited, “the most exciting, challenging and significant relationship of all is the one you have with yourself,” then curbing your worst impulses is key. So, as someone always looking to keep life simple, I was glad to discover the Fogg Behavior Model, created by Professor BJ Fogg of Stanford University. The model makes crucial, intuitive insights into human behavior that students can and should incorporate into everyday life. The model contends that, to change or maintain any behavior, you need three elements. One is motivation: Individuals you must have a or a desire trying to kick reason to do something. habits ought Another is ability: you must to impair be physically or intellectually their ability capable of doing to partake in something. And there must also said habits be a trigger: you need an external and avoid or internal stimsituations ulus to compel you. that trigger Fogg’s clasnegative sic example is applicable to all behavior. of us. Imagine you’ve received a Facebook notification in your inbox saying you’ve been tagged in a photo. That is the trigger. Your motivation is built in — you need to see if you got caught doing or wearing something humiliating. And you’ve obviously got the ability in terms of Internet access to log in and take a look. So you do, and end up tumbling down that royal blue narcissisticvoyeuristic time warp. Fogg has boiled the entire mantra down to the following: Put hot triggers — something you can immediately act on — in the path of motivated people. But we can use Fogg’s insights to improve our daily lives. Imagine you are overweight and want to slim down. You’ve already got a trigger — you’re disappointed in what you see in the mirror. You’re already motivated — our culture is always imploring us to eat healthily. So you need the ability. One way to increase ability, Fogg has noted, is to decrease obstacles. At Northwestern, you might want to live on North Campus — in, say, Bobb-McCoullugh — because every time you enter the building, you will see SPAC, which is a hot (available) trigger in the path of a motivated person. And you’re just moments away from Patten as well. Last year, living on South Campus, I worked out considerably less because SPAC was a solid 15 minute walk both ways, and in icy weather it’s an especially miserable trek. And yes, I know of Blomquist but it doesn’t lend itself to such a demanding workout. Both individual students and student groups can look to the FBM to achieve goals. Individuals trying to kick habits ought to impair their ability to partake in said habits and avoid situations that trigger negative behavior. Groups seeking new members should target those already inclined to join and then make it simple and easy for them to do so. Fogg’s intuitive findings can go a long way. Michael Kurtz is a Weinberg junior. He can be reached at MichaelKurtz2013@u.northwestern.edu.

yoonj kim Daily columnist

A glimpse of femininity could help, not hurt, political girl power Why is it that each time one of the world’s most despised egomaniacs is killed, the world gets a rare glimpse of Hillary Clinton, the human, instead of the shoulder-padded pillar of brains we’re used to? Sure, it’s only been twice, first with Osama bin Laden and now with Muammar Gaddafi, but look at the rest of her colleagues. When President Barack Obama announced that bin Laden was killed, it was still with the somber, hard-faced expression that only comes from a three-year stint at Harvard Law School. And as for Joe Biden, everyone’s happy with whatever he’s doing as long as he isn’t dropping the f-bomb into a microphone. This past week, a different sort of bomb landed on Gaddafi as his former subjects mobbed him in his hometown of Sirte, Libya. Thanks to camera phones and the web, the world saw the final moments of the despot, clad in golden pants and asking his attackers what he ever did to them — a delusional fashionista to the end. Then comes the clip of Secretary Clinton, looking at a BlackBerry in between television interviews, and uttering an eloquent “Wow” to a report of his death. As a college-educated journalism student who tries to use some of the SAT words she learned to get into this school, I can’t tell you what a relief it is to hear the smartest person in the White House use a three-letter word to react to an international event. Of course, probably realizing that people like me would be feeling this way, she quickly shuts her open jaw and assures everyone that it is “unconfirmed” and “we’ve had a bunch of those before.” This wasn’t the first time she has shown that there is more to her than brains and the ability to put up with her husband’s antics. Back in May, after bin Laden’s death, a photo was released showing what has to be the country’s most stressful boys club, a.k.a. the President and

his national security team, plus Secretary Clinton and Director for Counterterrorism Audrey Tomason, watching Team 6 of the Navy SEALS take down the compound via live video. There is the President with his trademark Harvard Law glare, Joe Biden doing his job and staying awake, and Hillary Clinton, her eyes wide open and hand over her mouth, showing the only shocked expression. She later brushed off her expression of humanity by saying it was her attempt to cover an “early spring allergy cough.” With a team of the nation’s top PR experts, that’s the best reason she could come up with? It’s because of these expressions of humanity that I consider Secretary Clinton not just a model politician, but also an exemplary woman. After two high-profile political events, she has connected with the public by reacting to the emotional aspects of the killings, whether she likes it or not. I know that she is careful to stress her identity as a non-gendered politician, as seen in an interview with KTR Studio in Kyrgyzstan where, when asked which designers she preferred, she quipped, “Would you ever ask a man that question?” It’s true, nobody ever asked President Clinton what he was wearing, but that’s probably because they didn’t want to give him any excuses to take his pants off again. However, I would not think any less of her if she embraced the fact that she is not just a politician, but a darn good female one who does a better job of emoting with the nation than the rest of them. If world politics are any indication, girl power is on the rise. Take Helle Thorning-Schmidt, Denmark’s newly-elected first female prime minister, who successfully dodged an overly feminist image to garner male votes, while still being dubbed “Gucci Helle” by the media. Germany, led by chancellor Angela Merkel, is considering a bill to improve female representation in executive positions, following Norway and other EU countries’ already existing gender diversity laws. Secretary Clinton should consider these international changes, as well as the rise of fellow American ladies Sarah Palin (grizzly moms!) and Michele Bachmann (foster mom to 23 kids!), as a sign that acknowledging femininity is politically acceptable. When it comes to matters of life and death, sometimes a gasp — even one caused by a spring cold — is more comforting to the rest of us than a stone-cold glare. Yoonj Kim is a Medill junior. She can be reached at Yoonjukim2013@u.northwestern.edu.

Got something to say? Send a letter to SamanthaCaiola2014@ u.northwestern.edu

The Daily Northwestern Volume 131, Issue 157 Editor in Chief Katherine Driessen

Forum Editor Sammy Caiola

Managing Editors Kris Anne Bonifacio and Annie Chang

Deputy Forum Editor Derrick Clifton

Assistant Forum Editors Dylan Browdie and Ivan Yeh

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR may be sent to 1999 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, via fax at 847-491-9905, via e-mail to forum@dailynorthwestern.com or by dropping a letter in the box outside The Daily office. Letters have the following requirements: • Should be typed • Should be double-spaced • Should include the author’s name, signature, school, class and phone number. • Should be fewer than 300 words They will be checked for authenticity and may be edited for length, clarity, style and grammar. Letters, columns and cartoons contain the opinion of the authors, not Students Publishing Co. Inc. Submissions signed by more than three people must include at least one and no more than three names designated to represent the group. Editorials reflect the majority opinion of The Daily’s student editorial board and not the opinions of either Northwestern University or Students Publishing Co. Inc.


The Daily Northwestern

6  News

Monday, October 24, 2011

The Daily Northwestern

Monday, October 24, 2011

News  7

Homecoming Heartbreak NU alums, Seth Meyers return home for festivities By Paulina Firozi

the daily northwestern

Paul Geringer/The Daily Northwestern

photo by Sally Ryan

Mackenzie McCluer/The Daily Northwestern

Create - Innovate - Collaborate

Students, staff and alumni celebrated the end of the Purple Reign-themed Homecoming Week with a parade and pep rally Friday preceding the homecoming game Saturday. People gathered along Sheridan Road on Friday to watch as the football team, marching band, student groups and Grand Marshal Seth Meyers(Comm ‘96) passed by on foot and on floats. “It’s really fun seeing everyone so spirited,” Communication sophomore Eesha Zaheer said. “It gets better every year. Everyone comes together as a Northwestern community after a hard week of midterms.” During the week, members of the Homecoming executive board and Associated Student Government held tailgates and pre-parade activities for the NU community. ASG Clerk Elena Westbrook said more than 200 students attended, based on the number of raffle tickets given away at the tailgate. “I think it went really well,” Westbrook said. “We accomplished everything we wanted to. We gave away all the freebies we wanted to, I think there were just some leftover hotdogs.” Westbrook said the tailgate events took months of preparation. “Everything was donated except for the DJ. We had to contact Evanston businesses to get things donated and make sure we could get all the equipment. The day of, I was preparing at 12 getting tables from the Black House and the MCC (Multicultural Center), and we borrowed a grill from one of the sororities.” Communication freshman Jodi Naglie said she was most excited to see Seth Meyers. Naglie attended the barbecue Friday, where

NU drops fifthstraight game in front of packed Homecoming crowd

students mingled with Homecoming royalty before the parade. “The chili was really good and I’m really enjoying all the free stuff,” Naglie said. During the parade, alumni dressed in purple said they were happy to be back on campus for the Homecoming celebrations. “It’s so exciting to see all the people and the floats and the music,” said Deanna Charles (‘86)), who never experienced a Homecoming parade while a student at NU. “It makes me feel like I really missed out all those years. It reminds me of when we had so much school spirit and it’s at an even greater level in younger generations. Just to see Sheridan Road blocked off is amazing.” The parade culminated at Deering Meadow with the Pep Rally, where President Morton Schapiro, Coach Pat Fitzgerald and NU alums Meyers and movie director and producer Garry Marshall (BSJ ’56) spoke to the crowd about NU school spirit and pumped them up for the Homecoming game Saturday. The Northwestern Wildcats lost to the Penn State Nittany Lions 24-34. Meyers crowned the winners of Homecoming Court at the end of the pep rally. Communication senior Janna Kaplan won Queen and Weinberg senior Andrew Duble won King. “It’s a huge honor,” Kaplan said. “Everyone on the royal court is great and has made such a difference at this school. Of every year, this was the most I’ve seen people come out to the parade. Duble said he was humbled and excited to win King and to be a part of the Homecoming celebrations. “It’s a lot of fun and that’s what it’s all about, the Northwestern spirit,” he said. “It was fun sitting with all the rest of royalty and just waving at the little kids, seeing all the smiles.”

Paul Geringer/The Daily Northwestern

paulinafirozi2015@u.northwestern.edu

need lunch in a pinch? call jimmy, it’s a cinch!

Mackenzie McCluer/The Daily Northwestern

Emily Howell/The Daily Northwestern

Weekend Update: Saturday Night Live actor Seth Meyers (Comm ‘96) came back to campus to serve as the Homecoming Grand Marshal for the weekend.

Down in the Fitz: The Cats could not channel Homecoming spirit into their first Big Ten win as NU was shut out in second-half play, giving Nittany Lions’ coach Joe Paterno a Division I record-tying 408 wins.

Past Homecoming Grand Marshals

Deandra N. - Washington, IL

Northwestern University Library and the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science are proud to unveil a renovated studentcentered, collaborative workspace in the Seeley G. Mudd Library. With views of the lake and filled with natural light, the renovated library is the premiere study space on the northern end of the Evanston campus. The renovation of the main floor includes six new group study rooms controlled by an online reservation system, new desks and casual seating, more power sources for laptops, improved wireless access, student project storage, and digital signage. Please join

Sarah M. Pritchard, Dean of Libraries And

Julio M. Ottino, Dean of the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science For the re-opening of the Seeley G. Mudd Library Tuesday, October 25 3:00 pm Light refreshments will be served.

2010 : Actress Stephanie March (Comm. ‘96)

2009 : Chicago Bears’

Nick Roach (Comm ‘06)

2008 : Olympic swimmer

jimmyjohns.com Mackenzie McCluer/The Daily Northwestern

2007 : TV host Clinton

1729 SHERMAN AVE. 847.328.8858

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Matt Grevers (Comm. ‘07) - 2008 Kelly (Medill ‘93)

2006 : Comedian Stephen Colbert (Comm ‘96)

2005 : NFL running back Darnell Autry (Comm 05) ™ Paul Geringer/The Daily Northwestern

Rafi Letzter/The Daily Northwestern


The Daily Northwestern

6  News

Monday, October 24, 2011

The Daily Northwestern

Monday, October 24, 2011

News  7

Homecoming Heartbreak NU alums, Seth Meyers return home for festivities By Paulina Firozi

the daily northwestern

Paul Geringer/The Daily Northwestern

photo by Sally Ryan

Mackenzie McCluer/The Daily Northwestern

Create - Innovate - Collaborate

Students, staff and alumni celebrated the end of the Purple Reign-themed Homecoming Week with a parade and pep rally Friday preceding the homecoming game Saturday. People gathered along Sheridan Road on Friday to watch as the football team, marching band, student groups and Grand Marshal Seth Meyers(Comm ‘96) passed by on foot and on floats. “It’s really fun seeing everyone so spirited,” Communication sophomore Eesha Zaheer said. “It gets better every year. Everyone comes together as a Northwestern community after a hard week of midterms.” During the week, members of the Homecoming executive board and Associated Student Government held tailgates and pre-parade activities for the NU community. ASG Clerk Elena Westbrook said more than 200 students attended, based on the number of raffle tickets given away at the tailgate. “I think it went really well,” Westbrook said. “We accomplished everything we wanted to. We gave away all the freebies we wanted to, I think there were just some leftover hotdogs.” Westbrook said the tailgate events took months of preparation. “Everything was donated except for the DJ. We had to contact Evanston businesses to get things donated and make sure we could get all the equipment. The day of, I was preparing at 12 getting tables from the Black House and the MCC (Multicultural Center), and we borrowed a grill from one of the sororities.” Communication freshman Jodi Naglie said she was most excited to see Seth Meyers. Naglie attended the barbecue Friday, where

NU drops fifthstraight game in front of packed Homecoming crowd

students mingled with Homecoming royalty before the parade. “The chili was really good and I’m really enjoying all the free stuff,” Naglie said. During the parade, alumni dressed in purple said they were happy to be back on campus for the Homecoming celebrations. “It’s so exciting to see all the people and the floats and the music,” said Deanna Charles (‘86)), who never experienced a Homecoming parade while a student at NU. “It makes me feel like I really missed out all those years. It reminds me of when we had so much school spirit and it’s at an even greater level in younger generations. Just to see Sheridan Road blocked off is amazing.” The parade culminated at Deering Meadow with the Pep Rally, where President Morton Schapiro, Coach Pat Fitzgerald and NU alums Meyers and movie director and producer Garry Marshall (BSJ ’56) spoke to the crowd about NU school spirit and pumped them up for the Homecoming game Saturday. The Northwestern Wildcats lost to the Penn State Nittany Lions 24-34. Meyers crowned the winners of Homecoming Court at the end of the pep rally. Communication senior Janna Kaplan won Queen and Weinberg senior Andrew Duble won King. “It’s a huge honor,” Kaplan said. “Everyone on the royal court is great and has made such a difference at this school. Of every year, this was the most I’ve seen people come out to the parade. Duble said he was humbled and excited to win King and to be a part of the Homecoming celebrations. “It’s a lot of fun and that’s what it’s all about, the Northwestern spirit,” he said. “It was fun sitting with all the rest of royalty and just waving at the little kids, seeing all the smiles.”

Paul Geringer/The Daily Northwestern

paulinafirozi2015@u.northwestern.edu

need lunch in a pinch? call jimmy, it’s a cinch!

Mackenzie McCluer/The Daily Northwestern

Emily Howell/The Daily Northwestern

Weekend Update: Saturday Night Live actor Seth Meyers (Comm ‘96) came back to campus to serve as the Homecoming Grand Marshal for the weekend.

Down in the Fitz: The Cats could not channel Homecoming spirit into their first Big Ten win as NU was shut out in second-half play, giving Nittany Lions’ coach Joe Paterno a Division I record-tying 408 wins.

Past Homecoming Grand Marshals

Deandra N. - Washington, IL

Northwestern University Library and the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science are proud to unveil a renovated studentcentered, collaborative workspace in the Seeley G. Mudd Library. With views of the lake and filled with natural light, the renovated library is the premiere study space on the northern end of the Evanston campus. The renovation of the main floor includes six new group study rooms controlled by an online reservation system, new desks and casual seating, more power sources for laptops, improved wireless access, student project storage, and digital signage. Please join

Sarah M. Pritchard, Dean of Libraries And

Julio M. Ottino, Dean of the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science For the re-opening of the Seeley G. Mudd Library Tuesday, October 25 3:00 pm Light refreshments will be served.

2010 : Actress Stephanie March (Comm. ‘96)

2009 : Chicago Bears’

Nick Roach (Comm ‘06)

2008 : Olympic swimmer

jimmyjohns.com Mackenzie McCluer/The Daily Northwestern

2007 : TV host Clinton

1729 SHERMAN AVE. 847.328.8858

AMERICA’S FAVorite sandwich delivery guys! ©2011 jimmy john’s franchise, llc all rights reserved.

Matt Grevers (Comm. ‘07) - 2008 Kelly (Medill ‘93)

2006 : Comedian Stephen Colbert (Comm ‘96)

2005 : NFL running back Darnell Autry (Comm 05) ™ Paul Geringer/The Daily Northwestern

Rafi Letzter/The Daily Northwestern


The Daily Northwestern

8  News

Monday, October 24, 2011

First season of joint dance-cheer team underway By Ava Wallace

the daily northwestern

For the first football season in school history, the Northwestern Athletic Department’sUniversity Cheerleading Squad and Ladycats Dance Team are merged in a spirit team officially known as the WildPride Spirit Squad. The squad, created in May, features 28 cheerleaders and 10 dancers. Dancers and cheerleaders now support the University’s athletic programs as a singular unit, and have the opportunity to attend home and away games. Prior to this school year, only cheerleaders were eligible to travel and support NU at other campuses. The two teams “regrouped,â€? Head Coach Pamela Bonnevier said, after the Athletic Department’s assessment of the separate squads last school year. Mike Polisky, senior associate for the Athletic Department (External Affairs), said the school decided to take a look at the Ladycats and cheerleaders as they were examining NUMB’s position in the department. “We wanted to ‌ figure out if there were different ways that different structures could be more impactful

in terms of support for our athletic programs across campus,� Polisky said. “We thought putting everybody under one coach would help reach our objectives and enhance the experience for all those involved.� Bonnevier said the biggest change for students on the Spirit Squad is all members are now expected to learn dance moves and cheers. Dancers, however, still perform specific choreography and only cheerleaders stunt. “Everybody does everything, and then there are times when we showcase special skills,� Bonnevier said. Squad members were informed of the changes after the Athletic Department reached an official decision towards the end of the 2010-2011 academic year. Spirit Squad Captain and cheerleader Kristin Bernstein said squad members heard the news after Spring tryouts. “My first reaction was surprise; (the athletic department) never talked about it with us,� the McCormick junior said. “The worry was, ‘Is everyone going to be okay with adjusting?’ It was shocking.� Spirit Squad Captain and Weinberg junior

Jacqueline Montgomery said although she now enjoys the benefits of being part of a larger squad, she said the dance team was initially worried about merging with the cheerleaders. The team previously operated without an official head coach, though Bonnevier acted as coordinator. “More than anything there was confusion about what was going to happen to us,� the dance captain said. “Losing our identity as a dance group was our biggest concern.� Squad member and cheerleader Sarah Tort agreed that identity was an issue for both dancers and cheerleaders, though more concentration on cheer may have been harder on former Ladycats. “It was a harder blow to their program, because for them it’s now more cheer and less focus on dance,� the Weinberg sophomore said. “Because they used to run their own practices and do their own choreography, they lost a little bit of their identity and independence as dancers. But then, we lost a little bit of our identities as cheerleaders, too.� Tort said it was this shift in focus that might have been a deterrent to students initially planning on

participating in the squad. Dancer Daniela CaputoNoriega said she left the Spirit Squad after deciding she wanted to strictly focus on dancing. “I was initially worried, I knew I had to give it a shot at least ‌ we didn’t know how big of a change it was going to be,â€? the Communication junior said. “I realized that it wasn’t for me.â€? Other former Spirit Squad members contacted to discuss the changes declined to comment. Despite Caputo-Noriega’s decision to leave the team, many squad participants are finding the changes to be beneficial. Bernstein, for example, enjoys the newfound companionship that accompanied the formation of a singular squad. Bonnevier said the squad has worked hard to create camaraderie in light of the regroup. That sense of unity, she said, is the best part of the merge. “There was a natural animosity, for lack of a better word, between cheer and dance before,â€? she said. “That doesn’t exist anymore ‌ it’s the best thing that could’ve happened.â€? avawallace2015@u.northwestern.edu

Medill alum discusses real-life implications of ‘Contagion’ By Marshall Cohen

the daily northwestern

Award-winning author and journalist Maryn McKenna warned Sunday the United States is not nearly as prepared for a global pandemic as it appears to be in the recent film “Contagion.� About 25 people attended the discussion panel Sunday night in Harris Hall, 1881 Sheridan Rd., which featured Medill graduate McKenna as well as Feinberg professors and Evanston health officials. “The movie is fiction, but it is surprisingly realistic and the only thing that it gets wrong is that it’s too positive about how fast our government and science can really respond to something so big,� McKenna said. “We are really not in as good shape as the movie says we are.� In the film, scientists create a vaccine for a virus within the span of four months. McKenna said in reality, that process would take closer to nine months, leading to millions of additional deaths. “We don’t even have the beginning of the research done to get us on track for that kind of speed, and there’s no funding for that research anyway,� she said. “If the movie had been completely

true to the science, it would be so depressing that nobody would want to see it, no matter how many A-list stars appeared.� Still, McKenna said the government response in “Contagion� mirrored “almost paragraph for paragraph� the guidelines of the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza, as written by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Other experts on the panel, including Feinberg professor Dr. Rebecca Wurtz, agreed the box office hit – parts of which were filmed near the NU campus earlier this year – was overall scientifically accurate. “The movie was very realistic and honestly it felt like another day at the office for me,� Wurtz said. “It was very well done, in contrast to most movies like that which really go for the sensational tone.� McKenna added the film “almost exactly copied� how the Nipah virus originally formed on a Malaysian farm 1999 and also how SARS spread throughout Asia in 2003. “People shouldn’t ask if a global pandemic could happen, since it already has,� McKenna said. “The film depicts an extremely realistic scenario based on past events.� Ren Yu, who graduated from McCormick in

2010, still lives in Evanston and attended Sunday’s event, which he said highlighted some “real concerns.� “For me as an alum, this is a great way to stay engaged with the University,� Yu said. “I want to be on the cutting edge and stay informed and engaged, and I feel more informed now because I didn’t know a lot of this information before tonight.� The panel eventually pivoted to a discussion of the 2009 swine flu outbreak. A-Reum Han, Evanston’s emergency response coordinator, also sat on the panel and called the outbreak the “most challenging� health event since she started working for the city. “We did have a plan in place, but another big challenge was to dispel myths and getting our message out there to the public,� Han said. “We just can’t control what other people are saying.� Evonda Thomas, director of the Evanston Health Department, agreed rumors and misinformation were pervasive enough to convince city residents not to get the swine flu shot once it was made available. She said the city conducted a survey and found one segment of the population had been particularly absent from the vaccination process. “It was very clear that people of color did not

get vaccinated,� Thomas said. “When we looked at the demographics and the numbers, we saw such a huge disparity in Evanston. I don’t know if we did a good enough job of engaging the community about getting the vaccine.� At one point, Wurtz asked members of the audience if they had received their flu shot this year. “And to the people who didn’t raise their hands,� she asked, “why haven’t you been vaccinated?� Also participating in the discussion were Margaret Keeler, Evanston’s communicable disease surveillance specialist, and Dr. Sarah Lovinger, Feinberg professor and executive director of the Chicago chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility. McKenna, who graduated from Medill in 1985, currently works as a health blogger for Wired and as a freelance magazine writer. Her book, “Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA,� was published last year. Northwestern University, the City of Evanston and Chicago Physicians for Social Responsibility sponsored the event, titled “Contagion: From Hollywood to Public Health Policy.� mc2014@u.northwestern.edu

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The Daily Northwestern

Monday, October 24, 2011

News  9

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Friends honor Lorenzi From REGATTA, page 1

him and feel like I was important to him,” she said. “He was really just amazing at touching any person he interacted with.” A film crew was present at the regatta, interviewing community members for a documentary project about Lorenzi’s life. The project, tentatively titled “Life is Good,” is led by Communication senior Ben Prawer and Communication junior Jesse Swedlund. “I am so excited because we’re telling a story about a person who is really unlike any other person I’ve met and I know I’m not the only person who thinks that,” Prawer said. The idea for the documentary came from an email Lorenzi sent to the Project Wildcat email list about things to do in San Francisco. Four of Lorenzi’s friends will be journeying to San Francisco, using Lorenzi’s list to guide their experience. The film will be supplemented by biographical footage and interviews. “We’re hoping that the people who go on this trip will try to do the trip the way Tyler would have done it, which is really being in the moment, looking for adventures and looking to have a good time,” Prawer said. The regatta also marked the launch of CommuniTyler, a community service initiative in Lorenzi’s memory. The immediate focus of the group is a nationwide day of service on Dec. 3 with events scheduled in eleven different cities, including Evanston and Chicago. Dre Collier (WCAS ’09) is involved in the leadership of CommuniTyler. Collier said Lorenzi inspired the group’s creation. “We wanted to find a way for people to concert their energy and channel some of their positivity around Tyler’s life,” Collier said. Collier emphasized the importance of staying true to Lorenzi’s personality in the goals of the group. “We asked ourselves. ‘What would Tyler do?’” he said. “He loved the outdoors, he loved people, and he loved helping people. It’s all about doing community service.” Wieczner said she hopes the regatta becomes an annual memorial event. “We thought it would be a really good idea to reestablish this regatta and give it some meaning and importance, so we renamed it the Ty ‘Life is Good’ Lorenzi Memorial Regatta,” Wieczner said. “Hopefully it will be the first of many.” jdiebold@u.northwestern.edu

DM boasts record 2012 registration From dm, page 1

Kasbeer Hall Corboy Law Center 25 East Pearson Ave. Chicago, IL 60611 RSVP: DigitalEthics.org

release, students in the group must raise $400 dollars individually while each pair must raise $800. In past years, students had to drop out if their partner could not raise their part of the $800. Brannigan said the DM executive board created the new option of dancing in a group without a partner to encourage more students to continue participating in DM without having to rely on a partner to reach their fundraising goal. “It’s a lot easier for the dancers themselves,” Brannigan said. “We wanted to keep the retention rate as high as we can.” This year’s DM benefits the Andrew McDonough Be Positive Foundation, which funds medical research for childhood cancers and improvements in chemotherapy, according to the foundation’s website. NUDM’s secondary beneficiary is the Evanston Community Foundation. Ho said she believes DM funds will be put to good use aiding children with cancer. “Even just helping their families out with medical bills and helping out with the kids just having a normal life, it’s just so great to be a part of that,” she said. For first-time dancer Weinberg freshman Michell Kim, DM is a chance to help a good cause. “I always want to help out the community and give back to it, but it’s always hard to find the opportunity,” Kim said. “When something like this is presented to you, it’s a really nice, fun way to give back.” allymutnick@u.northwestern.edu


The Daily Northwestern

10 News

Monday, October 24, 2011

Defensive changes not enough to boost Cats From GAMER, page 12

on consecutive plays midway through the third quarter in Nittany Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; territory. Persa, who completed 26-of-34 passes for 294 yards, left the game midway through the fourth quarter with a left foot injury. Fitzgerald said that the injury was not serious and that Persa could have reentered the game. In stark contrast with the way the game ended, both teams exploded in the first half. Penn State never punted the ball in the opening stanza, picking up points on every offensive drive. Some of those struggles might have been due to changes in the NU starting lineup. The Cats mixed in five new defensive starters, only one of these swaps due to injury. Regulars Vince Browne, Bryce McNaul, Ibraheim Campbell and David Nwabuisi all began the game on the bench. The shakeup was to no avail as the Cats gave up 293 yards of offense in the first half. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got open competition every week,â&#x20AC;? Fitzgerald

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get it figured out and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play fundamentally better or you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play consistently, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got one of the best seats in Ryan Field. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to stand next to me.â&#x20AC;? The Cats kept pace with the Nittany Lions early as Persa scored with both his legs and his arm and Colter found running room in the option offense. Colterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 46-yard scamper in the second quarter represented nearly half of NUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rushing yards as the Cats struggled to move against Penn Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s imposing defensive line. After NU took a 24-20 lead with 47 seconds remaining in the first half on a 25-yard field goal by sophomore kicker Jeff Budzien, Penn State marched down the field in 40 seconds to take the lead for good on a one-yard plunge by running back Stephfon Green. Though it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem likely at the time given the shootout nature of the first half, Greenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s touchdown proved to be the winning score.

with mention of this ad FREE mat & towel RENTAL UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;,>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;\Ă&#x160;f£äĂ&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;VÂ?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192; Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;>Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x2030;-Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; ÂŽ UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;xĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;>Â?Â&#x17D;Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x201C;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192; UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;¸Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;¸Ă&#x160;9Â&#x153;}> UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;VĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;}Ă&#x17E; UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;/Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192; UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;VĂ&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;}Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;Â?iĂ?Â&#x2C6;LÂ&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;

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the locker room, they looked each other in the eye and said â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to do something about itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and I thought they responded pretty boldly. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the defense we need to see the rest of the year.â&#x20AC;? As the defense glistened under the lights, the offense wilted. The Cats gained a meager 125 yards in the last 30 minutes, despite running the same number of plays, 38, that they did in the first half. The offensive line, which gave up 16 yards on two sacks in the first half, surrendered 48 yards on five sacks in the second stanza. Two of those sacks came when Colter tried to escape pressure deep in Penn State territory and ended up losing 28 combined yards, knocking the Cats out of field goal range. The Catsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offense literally dropped the ball when it

info@bikramyogaevanston.com

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colinbecht2013@u.northwestern.edu



NUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uneven offensive play dooms chances at comeback From SIDEBAR, page 12

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mattered most. Down 10 points with about 12 minutes left in the game, Persa went deep to senior receiver Jeremy Ebert, who had the ball fall through his hands. Persa then found Jacob Schmidt wide open down the field, but the senior running back dropped an easy first-down grab. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anytime you self-inflict a wound, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough,â&#x20AC;? Fitzgerald said. With the Cats now needing to win four of their last five games to qualify for a bowl game, senior safety Brian Peters understands NU needs to figure out a way to get the defense and offense to gel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one has a secret recipe for it,â&#x20AC;? Peters said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You just have to go back to the grindstone, put in the work and fix what is going on.â&#x20AC;?

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joshuawalfish2014@u.northwestern.edu

this week in music

@ P I C K - S TA I G E R TUESDAY THURSDAY 27 25 Contemporary Music Ensemble Pick-Staiger, 7:30 p.m. $6/4 Timothy J. Robblee, conductor A program featuring Webernâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Concerto for Nine Instruments as well as compositions written in response to it. Anton Webern, Konzert Konzert, Op. 24 Sean Shepherd, Metamorphoses GyĂśrgy Ligeti, Kammerkonzert fĂźr 13 Instrumentalisten Michael Daugherty, Snap! Derek Bermel, Continental Divide

26

WEDNESDAY

OCT. 24 - 28, 2011

28

FRIDAY

Tokyo String Quartet with Alon Goldstein, piano Pick-Staiger, 7:30 p.m. $22/10 Martin Beaver and Kikuei Ikeda, violin; Kazuhide Isomura, viola; Clive Greensmith, cello Since its founding more than 40 years ago, the Tokyo String Quartet has established itself as one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great chamber ensembles, garnering seven Grammy nominations and countless awards. Joining the quartet is pianist Alon Goldstein, hailed by the Houston Chronicle for his â&#x20AC;&#x153;thunderous technique.â&#x20AC;? W. A. Mozart, Quartet in G Major, K. 387 Karol Szymanowski, Quartet No. 1 Johannes Brahms, Piano Quintet in F Minor

Tokyo String Quartet Master Class Regenstein, 10:00 a.m. Free The award-winning Tokyo String Quartet coaches talented Bienen School string students.

Symphonic Band: Inspirations Pick-Staiger, 7:30 p.m. $6/4 Timothy J. Robblee, conductor Michael Djupstrom, Homages Sergei Prokofiev, March in B-flat Stephen Gryc, Masquerade Variations Carter Pann, The Bach Buch Scott McAllister, KRUMP

Lisztomania: Jerome Lowenthal, piano Lutkin, 7:30 p.m. $10/6

Small Jazz Ensembles Regenstein, 7:30 p.m. $6/4 Victor Goines, conductor

Performances by combos from the Bienen Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jazz studies program.

Tokyo String Quartet

Following the recent release of his critically acclaimed recording of Lisztâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complete AnnĂŠes de pèlerinage, legendary pianist Jerome Lowenthal returns to Northwestern with an allLiszt program, including a rare performance of the B Minor Sonata as arranged by Saint-SaĂŤns.

BIENEN SCHOOL OF MUSIC

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSIT Y TICKETS: 847.467.4000

O R W W W . P I C K S TA I G E R . O R G


The Daily Northwestern

Monday, October 24, 2011

News 11

Thriller in East Lansing tilts Spartansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; way The relative serenity of the Big Ten postseason picture was all shaken up Saturday, as Purdue upset No. 23 Illinois and No. 15 Michigan State upset No. 4 Wisconsin. Penn State is now in the driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seat of the Leaders Division. By Rebecca Friedman

the daily northwestern

No. 13 Nebraska 41, Minnesota 14

No. 15 Michigan State 37, No. 4 Wisconsin 31

Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s woes continued through Week 8 as the Golden Gophersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense had no answers for the Cornhuskersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; aggressive offense. Up 34-0 at halftime, Nebraska (6-1, 2-1 Big Ten) cruised to an easy victory. The Cornhuskers piled up 515 yards of total offense, 346 of which came on the ground. Running back Rex Burkhead led the rushing attack with 117 yards and a touchdown. Meanwhile, Minnesota quarterback Marqueis Gray completed only 50 percent of his passes, although he did run into the end zone for one of only two Minnesota scores on the day. The Golden Gophers (1-6, 0-3) have been outscored 144-31 in their three Big Ten contests this season.

The Spartans handed the Badgers their first loss of the season in what will certainly become a Big Ten classic. Following back and forth play through the opening three quarters, Wisconsin (6-1, 2-1 Big Ten) found itself behind 31-17 early in the fourth quarter. Quarterback Russell Wilson led the Badgers on a fourth-quarter comeback, and Wisconsin seemed to have forced overtime with two touchdowns in the final nine minutes of regulation. However, Spartans quarterback Kirk Cousins had other plans. With four seconds left on the clock, Cousins sent a Hail Mary pass 44 yards into the end zone. The Wisconsin secondary got to the ball first, tipping it into the hands of wide receiver Keith Nichol, who barely managed to push the ball across the goal line. Originally, the quarterback-turned-wide receiver was ruled down at the Badgersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; one, but after a lengthy video review, the referee ruled otherwise. The last-second victory places Michigan State (6-1, 3-0) atop the Legends Division and demotes Wisconsin to second place in the Leaders Division.

Iowa 45, Indiana 24

Led by quarterback James Vandenberg, a high-powered offense led Iowa to a triumph over Indiana. Vandenberg threw a career-high four touchdown passes, three of which were caught by wide receiver Marvin McNutt, who became Iowaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career touchdown receptions leader with his first score. Running back Marcus Coker added to Iowaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impressive offensive outing with two touchdowns. The Hawkeyes (5-2, 2-1 Big Ten) scored five touchdowns in the first half, giving them a solid 35-14 lead heading into the locker room. Quarterback Tre Roberson led the Hoosiers (1-7, 0-4) with 197 yards and a touchdown through the air along with 84 yards on the ground.

STANDINGS

LEGENDS Michigan State Nebraska Iowa Michigan Northwestern Minnesota

Purdue 21, No. 23 Illinois 14

(3-0, 6-1) (2-1, 6-1) (2-1, 5-2) (2-1, 6-1) (0-4, 2-5) (0-3, 1-6)

Make history.

Penn State Wisconsin Purdue Illinois Ohio State Indiana

(4-0, 7-1) (2-1, 6-1) (2-1, 3-3) (2-2, 6-2) (1-2, 4-3) (0-4, 1-7)

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What role will you play?

LEADERS

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible to provide a great education to all kids, despite the challenges of poverty. It begins with committed individuals teaching and leading their students to success.

Quarterback Caleb TerBush led a previously unheralded Purdue squad to an impressive upset over No. 23 Illinois. TerBush finished with 178 yards passing and two touchdowns. The Boilermakers (4-3, 2-1 Big Ten) sped out of the gate early, scoring all three of their touchdowns in the first half while shutting out the Fighting Illini (6-2, 2-2). Illinois, led by quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase, rallied in the second half, but finished one touchdown short. The loss will likely strip Illinois of its Top 25 ranking and downgrades the Fighting Illini to fourth place in the Leaders Division.

NEXT DEADLINE: October 26

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Sports page 12

ON DECK

Monday, October 24, 2011

Women’s Tennis ITA Midwest Regional Championships, Columbus, Ohio, Monday Men’s Soccer NU vs. Rockford, Lakeside Field, 6:00 p.m., Thursday

ON THE RECORD

I went to bed last night and said, ‘Jeez, if we win tomorrow, I’m going to be tied with Eddie Robinson.’ — Joe Paterno, Penn State football coach

No. 21 PENN STATE 34, NORTHWESTERN 24

Mackenzie McCluer/The Daily Northwestern

Scoreless second half stymies Cats By Colin Becht

daily senior staffer

Northwestern has developed a bad habit of letting second-half leads slip away. On Saturday, it was Penn State that left the door open for a comeback; the Wildcats just didn’t take advantage. NU (2-5, 0-4 Big Ten) was held scoreless in the second half, falling 34-24 to Penn State (7-1, 4-0) for its fifth-consecutive loss. “You look at our performance tonight, it’s a tale of what-ifs,” coach Pat Fitzgerald said. “We had plenty of opportunities, especially in the second half to do the things that winners do, but unfortunately we weren’t able to accomplish that.” The win was the 408th in coach Joe Paterno’s career, tying him with former Grambling State coach Eddie Robinson for the most in Division I football history. “I went to bed last night and said, ‘Jeez,

if we win tomorrow, I’m going to be tied with Eddie Robinson,’” Paterno said. “Eddie Robinson was one of the greatest guys to ever coach.” After both offenses exploded in the first half for a combined 51 points, the defenses took over as the Nittany Lions came up with stop after stop to deny the Cats any shot at a comeback. While NU put up points on four of its six drives in the first half, the Cats ended the game with four punts, an interception and a turnover on downs, wasting the best second-half performance by the NU defense this season. “We didn’t execute when we needed to,” senior wide receiver Jeremy Ebert said. “Big players make big plays when they need to, and we didn’t do that tonight.” The Cats gained just 125 yards of offense in the second half after racking up 281 before halftime and failed to put points on the board despite getting inside

the Nittany Lions’ 30-yard line twice. On the opening drive of the second half, NU drove to the Penn State 22 before defensive tackle Jordan Hill tipped senior quarterback Dan Persa’s pass, causing the ball to float into the hands of linebacker Gerald Hodges. “Persa was getting the ball off low on a lot of those plays,” Hill said. “(Defensive line) coach (Larry Johnson) told us, ‘Get your hand up when you see him leaving the pocket and going to throw the little crossing routes.’ I saw it, and I came over the top. I was going to try and make the sack, but I saw he was going to throw and I put my hand up and hit the ball.” Hodges’ interception return to the NU 19 set up running back Silas Redd for the lone score of the second half. Redd dominated the Cats on the ground as he bounced off tackles to pick up 164 yards on 18 carries for an average of 9.1 yards per carry.

“Missed tackles don’t win you games,” senior safety Brian Peters said. “Missed tackles don’t get the ball back in the hands of the offense.” Sacks consistently halted promising NU drives as Persa, sophomore Kain Colter and redshirt freshman Trevor Siemian were sacked a combined seven times. “We just had to close the pocket, me and (defensive tackle) Devon (Still) were getting upfield a lot,” Hill said. “(We were) working away from the middle of the field a lot. We just worked on getting straight up field and then working back inside.” No two sacks were more crushing than when Colter was brought down behind the line on back-to-back plays midway through the fourth quarter to knock the Cats out of field goal range. Those two plays dropped NU back 28 yards from the Penn State 13 to the 41, preventing the Cats from closing the gap to one score. “We had an opportunity to cut it to a

You look at our performance tonight, it’s a tale of what-ifs. Pat Fitzgerald, NU coach

one-score game with about eight minutes and change left,” Fitzgerald said. The defensive stop marked the first time this year that Penn State held an opponent scoreless on a drive that reached the red zone. The Nittany Lions’ sacks often came in pairs, like the two on Colter, killing budding NU drives. Persa was sacked twice in a row with the score tied 7-7 in the first quarter to kill a chance for the Cats to take an early lead. He was brought down again See GAMER, page 10

Defense and offense out of step, out of luck against Penn St. By Josh Walfish

the daily northwestern

Northwestern could not get its offense and defense to play well at the same time Saturday night. The Wildcats (2-5, 0-4 Big Ten) scored 24 points and racked up 281 yards of offense in the first half, but trailed at halftime as a result of a defense that surrendered nearly 300 yards and 27 points. The defense settled down in the second half, limiting Penn State to 88 yards and seven points, but the offense could not take

advantage, getting shut out in the final stanza for the second straight home game. “It’s tough,” sophomore quarterback Kain Colter said. “This whole season: offense is playing good, defense is playing bad; defense is playing good, offense is playing bad. We’ve got to be able to come together and put it all together. ” NU implemented five new defensive starters against Penn State in hopes of shaking up a struggling defense. The changes paid no immediate dividends as the Nittany Lions (7-1, 4-0) scored the most points they have in a half all season,

while the Cats gave up more yards in the first half than they had in a single half all year. The personnel changes included the demotion of All-Big Ten defensive end Vince Browne to third down duty, where he has had success in the past. “We’re trying to find combinations,” coach Pat Fitzgerald said. “It’s not necessarily demoting guys, it’s more trying to put guys in roles that might spark them a little bit better.” While its defense struggled, NU’s offense flew out of the gate, converting a fumble on the opening kickoff into seven

points. The Cats scored on four of their six first-half possessions, with senior quarterback Dan Persa lighting up the box score with 180 yards and a score through the air to go along with a quarterback sneak into the end zone on fourth-and-goal from the one-yard line. Colter also shined, catching his first career touchdown pass and running for 61 yards and a touchdown, including a 46-yard scamper in which he split the Penn State defensive line and ran down the sideline before stepping out at the seven. When the teams entered the locker

room after 30 minutes of play, a Freaky Friday-like switch occurred. Persa was picked off on the Cats’ first drive after halftime, while the defense buckled down after giving up the early score off the interception return. After a 19-yard touchdown run by running back Silas Redd put Penn State in the lead, NU gave up only 69 yards over 27:39 and 27 plays. “In the first half, we looked like a defense that was pressing,” Fitzgerald said. “Once they settled down, the guys got to See SIDEBAR, page 10

Dashed dreams haunt Evanston after fifth-straight loss JONAH ROSENBLUM Daily sports

It’s hard to watch a dream die. After three consecutive years of bowl losses, this was the year in which Northwestern would break through. The program was trending upward. You could scrutinize Pat Fitzgerald’s first five years as head coach and see continual improvement. There was his inaugural 4-8 campaign, followed by a promising 6-6 record in 2007 and then the stunning 9-4 finish in 2008 that saw the team nearly win its first bowl game in 59 years. 2009 saw continued success as the Wildcats knocked

off ranked Iowa and Wisconsin teams. And then in 2010, even as NU finished with three consecutive losses and a 7-5 record, NU fans knew it wasn’t fair — knew that if quarterback Dan Persa hadn’t ruptured his Achilles, the season would have gone in a loftier direction. But, he was coming back in 2011, so we knew that this was going to be a magical season in Evanston, that this would be the season in which the upward progress of Fitzgerald’s tenure as head coach would mix with the unrealized promise of 2010 to create the most blessed of years for Cats football fans. We dreamed big here in Evanston. Dan Persa was a Heisman Trophy candidate. The Cats were Big Ten championship contenders. And maybe, just maybe, we would cry tears of joy as NU celebrated its first

bowl victory in 62 years. Now, the Cats would be lucky to make a bowl game. Unless they can defeat either Nebraska on the road or Michigan State at home, every single one of their lofty dreams for the 2011 season will be dashed. Given the way Michigan State played against Wisconsin, and the prospect of that highpowered Spartans’ offense going up against a very susceptible Cats’ defense, it’s hard to imagine NU taking down Michigan State. So, this season will come down to a victory in Lincoln. Living on a prayer, indeed. Yet, ultimately what hurts the most, beyond five straight losses, is that this was the season in which all the cards were stacked in NU’s favor. A highly favorable schedule, an All-Big Ten quarterback, one of the best wide receivers in the conference,

a heavily experienced offensive line and a secondary backed by two all-conference type competitors had everyone dreaming big. It was the perfect equation for a bowl victory, and yet somewhere along the line, the math went wrong. And the troubling question is, if they can’t win now, when can they win? NU will get painful reminders of its dashed dreams over the next couple of weeks. Empty sections will dominate the Ryan Field landscape for home games against Minnesota and Rice. The stands might be full for the season finale against Michigan State, but they’ll be full of green and white — not white and purple — as the Spartans compete for a Big Ten championship. That game between Michigan State and Northwestern could have turned into

a showdown for the Big Ten Legends Division championship. One of those teams lived up to that promise. The other didn’t. In place of big dreams lie burning questions. After years of thriving on the nohuddle offense, it is worth asking whether the Cats can ever become serious winners when they continue to get manhandled in the trenches week after week? Can NU win without a big-time running back? A long time ago, poet Langston Hughes asked what happened to a dream deferred. It will be interesting to see what the answer to that question is in Evanston. Sports editor Jonah Rosenblum is a Medill senior. He can be reached at jonahrosenblum2012@u.northwestern. edu


The Daily Northwestern — Oct. 24, 2011