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september 11, 2019

match made

in fashion!

tommy x zendaya rock the apollo

plus!

kate spade

longchamp

brandon maxwell

tory burch

& more!

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Italia

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ian style

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nothing like it!

Italy @NYC

september 15–17, 2019 JACOB K. JAVITS CENTER spring/summer 2019

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ey. “It’s a journa lot g I’m havin rned tu of fun. She ly.” u J 2 in

Chief Content Officer Eddie Roche

e Smith on —Lucky Blu daughter is h g n parenti

YOUR DAILY DOSE scene

DRINKING BUDDIES! With Jon Kortajarena

What did you think of the show? Super fun, super cool. I need a drink. What’s your drink of choice? Margarita, always! Salt or no salt? Salt, always! Favorite margarita purveyor? [Long pause] Mexico! What else are you up to these days? I’m working on a show for Netflix UK, but I can’t talk about it.

FAMILY TIES! With Nicola Glass at Kate Spade

My niece worked at a Kate Spade store this summer. Tell us about your summer jobs! When I was 14, I was waitressing. I also worked on a boat in Northern Ireland as a part of the crew. I worked at an airport, and my first job in America was in Ocean City, Maryland, waitressing at a pizza restaurant. It was great. Every time they wanted to veer from the menu to order pasta, I was like, “No!” The pizza was great; everything else wasn’t. Say hi to your niece!

“I was thinking about rock stars, synthetic music, and neon lights coming alive as outfits,” said Jeremy Scott of his Spring ’20 collection, which he showed at Spring Studios. “You have to have animal prints, crystals, metallic, leathers, all those things. That’s what makes a rock star.” • Brooklyn or bust! Brandon Maxwell enlisted the fashion set to head to an outer borough, and it was worth the journey, thanks to a super-stocked runway, an epic soundtrack (Cher, Whitney, Dolly), and a new menswear collection.

KEEPING UP! With KENDALL Jenner at longchamp There was a kerfuffle amongst the photographers outside when you arrived… Yeah, I have major anxiety, so those things freak me out. I was sitting in the car…my heart was going crazy. Do you have any tips for dealing with weird crowds like that? Honestly, I take a deep breath and zone out. I need to have someone in front of me that I’m following, and then I just look at their feet and go.

Managing Editor Tangie Silva Creative Director Dean Quigley Senior Editor Alexandra Ilyashov

“More reliable subways, to make inter-show shuffling a bit easier.”

Digital Director Charles Manning

ROCK ON! Saint Jhn has released the Ghetto Lenny’s Love Songs album, and unveiled a limited-edition, five-piece capsule alongside it that has been seen on the likes of Post Malone. saintjhn.com PROMOTION

BEAUTY BEAT!

Brands like Jonathan Cohen are increasingly turning to topperformance organic and vegan beauty brands, like INIKA Organic, to create runway looks. Among our favorite products? Their certified organic vegan lipstick. $29, inikaorganic.com PROMOTION

Fashion News Editor Aria Darcella Editors-at-Large Charlotte and Sophie Bickley West Coast Editor-at-Large Jordan Duffy Contributing Art Director Teresa Platt Contributing Photographer Giorgio Niro Contributing Photo Editor Hannah Turner-Harts

DEEP THOUGHTS!

“Aggressive male photographers could be put in time-out.”

Contributing Copy Editor Joseph Manghise Imaging Specialists George Maier, Nola Romano Interns Julie Calmes, Melissa Florio, Innara Gazizova, Nell Greer, Caroline Lane

Senior Director, Brand Partnerships Betsy Jones Fashion Publishing Director Monica Forman Events Director Alex Dickerson Publishing & Market Research Nandini Vaid Digital Operations Daniel Chivu Manufacturing Operations Michael Esposito Amy Taylor

To advertise, call (646) 768-8101 Or e-mail: advertising@dailyfrontrow.com

With Brandon Maxwell at his show

Great collection, love! I was in a dark place during my last show. I was worried in my career. But I looked at my life and realized that people are there for me. Loved the menswear. I want to touch as many people as I can. Why didn’t you announce it? Would you have read the news alert?

“More Instagramworthy sets and theatrics. Models walking down a white runway is so 2002.”

The Daily Front Row is a Daily Front Row Inc. publication. Copyright © 2019. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Requests for reprints must be submitted in writing to: The Daily, Attn: Tangie Silva, 810 Seventh Avenue, Ste. 400A, New York, NY 10019.

News Quiz!

The Instagram account @miniverfarm, which chronicles farm life in the Virginia Piedmont, appears to belong to… A. Amanda Brooks B. Cathy Horyn C. Jay Fielden D. Mickey Boardman PROMOTION

On the cover

ANSWER: B

jeremy scott

“I miss the chaotic joy of the Bryant Park Tents! Everyone mingled so seamlessly.”

Executive Editor Ashley Baker

marco ovando (9); firstview (5); getty images (1); shutterstock (1); all others courtesy

Gigi Hadid

The Daily Wonders… what’s Brandusa Niro one thing you would Editor in Chief, CEO change about NYFW?

Tommy Hilfiger and Zendaya, photographed by Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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E! NICE RID EN

AD HALIMA NEW A S E K A T ROUND BMW A URING D N W O T HE NYFW: T . SHOWS

CHRISTIAN SIRIANO

SCENE

Sarah Michelle Gellar

Ashley Longshore

Ashley Graham, Jennifer Coolidge, Alicia Silverstone, Lucy Liu, and Sarah Michelle Gellar sat front-row at Christian Siriano’s show at Gotham Hall. The occasion marked the first time Gellar had graced a show in 12 years…and it was an alltime first for Coolidge, best known for her roles in American Pie and Legally Blonde. During the show, artist Ashley Longshore painted some of Siriano’s pop culture icons, such as Coco Rocha and Laverne Cox. • L’Agence presented its collection at Roots Studios. Nodding to the brand’s love of the Mediterranean, it included couture-esque tailoring and reality-friendly silhouettes. • Meanwhile, a group of talented designers from Korea decamped to NYC to present their latest wares in a showcase at The Selects.

ryan liu (9); bfa.com (7); firstview (4); getty images (3); leandro justen (3); caroline fiss (1); all others courtesy

Jennifer Coolidge

l’AGENCE

FIRST TIMER! RESTAURANT With Jennifer RECS! Coolidge This is your first show ever? We hear that Christian Siriano has your photo on his inspiration board. I’m on his board? That’s so nice! What do you think of the backstage pandemonium? It’s not as catty as I’d hoped. There were really nice people saying, “Excuse me.” I was expecting it to be scary. I was kind of hoping for that! A slap in the face! I haven’t ever been to a show. I’ll come back! What are you working on now? I did a movie with Tiffany Haddish, Rose Byrne, and Salma Hayek that’s coming out in January. And there are rumblings of a Legally Blonde sequel happening!

With Alicia Silverstone

What connects you to Christian? The reason I came to his show four years ago was because he didn’t use any fur or leather, and he was donating to a lot of animal charities. I met Christian and fell in love with every dress. After the show, he had a dance party; Christina Hendricks was there, and everyone was dancing like wild animals. I thought, “These are my people!” Fave vegan restaurant in New York? Hands down it’s abcV. Jean-Georges [Vongerichten] does not mess around. I also really love Hangawi. My other favorites are Candle 79, Nix, and Double Zero pizza. It’s the greatest pizza on the planet.

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cygalle spA

the selects

After a long day of shows, your skin deserves a break. Our latest pampering obsession? Cygalle’s 02 Earth Masque, made of mud sourced from the Dead Sea that is famous for its rejuvenating properties. The mask also includes essential oils like lavender, as well as CBD, to ensure that you’re putting your best face forward. $87.50, cygallebeauty.com PROMOTION

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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chicMoments

Sebastian Faena, Camila Morrone, Kaia Gerber, and Mica Argañaraz

FAENA’s soirée

Michelle Salas and Alan Faena

Alan Faena, the hotelier and general impresario behind some of the most impressive properties in Buenos Aires and Miami Beach, hosted a party at his New York home along with his cousin, top photographer Sebastian Faena, at his residence to toast Fashion Week. Kaia Gerber, Camila Morrone, Suki Waterhouse, Jordan Barrett, Stella Maxwell, and more indulged in a delectable Italian buffet. (There were also cocktails, champagne, and oysters, bien sûr.)

Asia Chow

Mica Argañaraz, Suki Waterhouse, and Sofia Malamute

Helena Christensen

Poppy Jamie

James Turlington Caroline Vreeland

david x prutting/bfa.com (10); julien boudet (4); all others courtesy

Nicky Rothschild and Elizabeth Sulcer

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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Erin Wasson Sofia Richie Rick Ross

Coco Rocha

Offset

wang x bvlgari

bash

david x prutting/bfa.com (10); julien boudet (4); all others courtesy

Alexander Wang and Bvlgari turned 712 Fifth Avenue into an ’80s-rific department store to toast the launch of the “Serpenti Through the Eyes of Wang” capsule collection. Rick Ross and Normani performed for the likes of Hailey Bieber, Tiffany Haddish, Soo Joo Park, Halima Aden, and a slew of coolsters. The makeupthemed sundae station was the top attraction.

Sydney Sweeney

Alexander Wang and Hailey Bieber

G-Eazy

Quavo

Dylan McDermott

THOM TIME When Thom Browne has news, the world listens. To celebrate the launch of his womenswear collection at Bergdorf Goodman, the designer staged a piece of performance art called “The Officepeople” in the vicinity of the store. Identically dressed, this performance depicted “the remarkable of the unremarkable.” They walked, took a work break, ate a lunch consisting of PB&J sandwiches—all to the shock and awe of both the fashion crowd and the world at large.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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ChicMoments

Chloe Gosselin

Charlotte D’Alessio

heart & Sole photography bY hannah turner-harts

Sai De Silva and Grace Atwood

The Daily and Chloe Gosselin hosted an intimate dinner at Scarpetta on Madison Avenue to celebrate the designer’s Spring ’20 collection. “The shoes literally just came in,” Gosselin said. “This is the first time I’m even seeing them!” The gorgeous kicks feature ruched straps, oversize bamboo buckles, glove-soft leather, satin, suede, and a playful grayand-white checkered print, all fresh off the plane from Italy, where Gosselin’s shoes are made by hand. The event began with cocktails in Scarpetta’s wood-paneled private dining room, bedecked with stunning floral creations by Lutfi Janania Zablah. Post-cocktail hour, guests (many of whom donned Gosselin’s Fall ’19 designs) sat down to a fantastic four-course meal, including Scarpetta’s famous tomato basil spaghetti; branzino with snap peas, sunchoke, spring onion, and tarragon; and creamy polenta with fricassee of truffled mushroom. To finish? A decadent dessert quartet—strawberries with basil granita and cream; espresso budino with salted caramel; chocolate biscotti; and hazelnut gelato. A sweet ending to a glamorous affair.

Natalie Suarez and Jessica Wang

Nina Agdal Krystal Bick

Demi-Leigh Nel-Peters

Marianne Fonseca

Vukasin Vujic and Leyna Bloom Sophie Sumner

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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(From left) Olivia Caputo, Christie Ferrari, Demi-Leigh Nel-Peters, Nina Agdal, Chloe Gosselin, Flaviana Matata, Jessica Wang, Dylana Suarez, Natalie Suarez, Krystal Bick, and Sai De Silva

Flaviana Matata

Leyna Bloom and Chloe Gosselin

Cole Christie and Faith Lynch

Emily Luciano and Serena Goh

Olivia Caputo

Emily Luciano TK Wonder and Cipriana Quann

The Daily’s Eddie Roche and Nina Agdal

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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ChicMoments

Marina Testino and Alexandre Assouline

Rocky Barnes

Tezza Barton Cecilia Dean Hisham Qumhiyeh

Shernita Anderson

leather legacy

Lucky Blue Smith

To celebrate the launch of its Coach Originals collection, the brand opened a weeklong pop-up at 595 Madison Avenue, which will run through September 15. Hosted by creative director Stuart Vevers and created in collaboration with Sarah Andelman, founder of brand consulting agency Just An Idea and founder and former creative director of Colette, the pop-up drew a coterie of chicsters to peruse the cleverly designed space, where highlights from the new collection appeared alongside a “Rented” bar, which allows Coach aficionados to (temporarily) take home a beautifully restored vintage bag. The pop-up will also offer personalization services, as well as on-site cleaning and restoration. Elsa Hosk, Tali Lennox, Lucky Blue Smith, and Rainey Qualley were among the guests on hand to take in the festivities.

Barbie Ferreira Elsa Hosk

Rahi Chadda

Salem Mitchell

Veronika Heilbrunner and Justin O’Shea with son Walter

Rainey Qualley

Sarah Andelman and Stuart Vevers Brittany Xavier

Fern Mallis

Larsen Thompson

Suzy Menkes

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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GUTTER CREDITS tk

DJ Wemi

all images courtesy coach/neil rasmus/bfa.com

Olivia Rouyre


980 M A D I S O N AV E N U E , N E W Y O R K , N Y R A M Y B R O O K .C O M

. .

22 P R I N C E S T R E E T, N E W Y O R K , N Y @RAMYBROOK


chicMoments

Saint Jhn Margie Plus Sophie Sumner

Betsy Jones

party

time

Amanda Akin, Gabrielle Lashley, Chaz Dean, Chris Stuke, and Marcos Juarez

Honey T and Hester Sunshine

photography BY caroline fiss & hannah turner-harts Following this year’s Fashion Media Awards, The Daily Front Row hosted a blowout after-party at Up&Down in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District, featuring special musical performances by Saint Jhn and Shaun Ross. A slew of influencers donned jewels from Lagos and Just Drew’s latest creations. Guests including Andrew Warren, Serena Goh, Julia Moshy, Chloe Jane, Parker Winston, Ty Hunter, Olivia Paige, Bridget Boyd, Greivy, Kim Dillinger, Olivia Caputo, Charlotte Caroline, and Jordan Duffy danced the night away to tunes spun by DJ Isaac Likes. They also enjoyed cocktails courtesy of Two Chicks, rosé from Whispering Angel, beer from Kronenbourg Blanc 1664, and plenty of FIJI Water. Krenoir used its rainbow of handbags to create an Instagram-worthy display on the club’s back wall, while haircare pioneer Chaz Dean set up a special gifting table with some of his favorite Wen by Chaz Dean products.

Shaun Ross Chloe Jane

Steven Lagos and Kristie Nicolosi

DJ Isaac Likes

Andrew Warren and Parker Winston Hayan Lee, Selena Lee, April Roth, and Jean K Elijah Vielma

SPECIAL THANKS TO…

Gianni Paci and Jimmy Pezzino

William Haughton and Olivia Caputo

Just Drew, Lagos, Krenoir, WEN by Chaz Dean, Kronenbourg Blanc 1664, Two Chicks, and Whispering Angel

Tijana Ibrahimovic and Jeremy Lindy

FASHION W EE K D AILY . CO M

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As delicious as they are gorgeous. Founded, owned and run by women, Two Chicks Cocktails are Lovingly Mixed with natural essences of fruit and botanicals. Spirits based sparkling cocktails for connecting and sharing. Love, Two Chicks @twochickscocktails #LovinglyMixed #CocktailsforConnecting

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chicMoments

COLLECTION 411! With Nicole Miller

nicole

miller Nicole Miller’s magical show at Spring Studios brought back a slew of stars to the runway. Pat Cleveland, Claudia Mason, Frederique van der Wal, Veronica Webb, and Patricia Velásquez showed off Miller’s dazzling Spring ’20 collection, while Carol Alt and Roshumba Williams sat front row alongside new faces like Joy Corrigan.

Why did you bring these icons back to the runway? I don’t understand why [models] retire so early. There used to be this thing where when a model turned 25, she’d have to retire. I looked back at these girls, and they were all in meaningful shows for me. Tell us about the collection. I call it “Lost and Found.” I went to Japan, where I hadn’t been in 20 years. It was familiar and unfamiliar at the same time. It segued to me going through my closets from the past 30 years because I was reorganizing the office. I found droves of all this stuff I didn’t know that was there. I went with my sustainability thing. I brought back Japan, archival stuff, and models.

GOING DEEP! With Pat Cleveland

What made you decide to return to the runway? I love Nicole Miller. We’ve known each other since the beginning, and she said I should come do the show. I just wanted to see her, and see what she was doing. She’s been on a long path. She’s done well for herself, and she’s still sweet and modest and nice and cute to look at. I don’t go out so much right now because I had a extreme operation and I’m in the middle of chemo, but this week was good.

SPEAKING UP! With Claudia Mason

What made you want to do this show? It’s Nicole Miller! She was one of my favorite designers when I was doing this at the height of my career. She’s not only a fantastic creator, she’s a great person. She’s just so much fun. She wanted to bring back joy at the show. Were you nervous walking down the runway today? We all were. The kids [walking] thought we were cool, but we said we were nervous and they said, “We’re nervous, too!” The other side of nerves is excitement. Always remember that!

all the feels!

What brought you back to the runway? I love Nicole Miller! She’s a survivor and a fantastic, powerful woman. When she said she was going to revisit this young and older runway, I said, “Wow!” When I heard that girls like Pat [Cleveland] and Patricia [Velásquez] were a part of it, I thought, “Great! Why not?” What are you working on these days? I’m doing a show for NewsWireFM digital TV called Life Cycles, where I go on my bike and interview New York characters. We talk to people about why they’re still in New York and their ups and downs. I’ve interviewed people like Griffin Dunne and Liev Schreiber.

firstview (7)

With Frederique Van Der Wal

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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powerDressing

Showtime

At The Apollo

DREAM TEAM (From left) Tommy Hilfiger, Law Roach, and Zendaya

If anyone keeps the dream of fashion shows alive as unabashedly fun, immersive experiences, it’s Tommy Hilfiger. The second and final Tommy x Zendaya collection, unveiled at Harlem’s Apollo Theater on Sunday, was no exception—complete with funk-filled ’70s and ’80s looks, vintage cars, live music, and copious dancing.

The design duo, making a persuasive case for retro-tinged power suits.

ZENDAYA

What appealed to you initially about working with Tommy Hilfiger—the man, and the brand? I absolutely love fashion, and Tommy Hilfiger is such an iconic brand. I couldn’t think of a better way, or better person, to learn the ins and outs of the fashion industry from, than Tommy Hilfiger himself. It was such an incredible opportunity, and I couldn’t say no. Do you remember when you first got acquainted with the brand? I can’t say I have a single earliest memory, but Tommy has always been a major brand and an iconic figure in pop culture. Plus, I’m a ’90s baby, so I grew up with the brand and clothes. Has your collaboration with Tommy been a fashion design education of sorts? This has been the best education, especially because I got to be a part of every step, from initial concept to final execution. I got to work with such talented designers from the Tommy team, and I am so thankful for the experience.

How was your approach to design different for the second collection, compared to the first? I learned more about the design process, and about how to be more efficient at the different stages throughout product development. How did you and Tommy land on the 1973 Battle of Versailles as the inspiration for your first Tommy x Zendaya collection, presented in March? Law [Roach, Zendaya’s longtime image architect] brought the concept to the table when we found out the show would be in Paris. We’ve always been so inspired by the Battle of Versailles, and its impact on the fashion industry during that time. So when we found out the show was going to be in Paris, we knew we had to pay homage to this important moment. What was the casting process like for the Spring ’19 Tommy x Zendaya show? It was so much fun and absolutely amazing. We had two castings, one in New York and another is Paris. Seeing more than 70 women of color, of all sizes and ages, on the runway at your inaugural Tommy x

Zendaya show was a powerful statement. Why was that casting decision meaningful to you? The Battle of Versailles was the first time in history so many black women walked the runway, paving the way for young black models today. It was important for us to honor their achievements in changing the societal norms of the time. Without those women, there would be no space for me, so for that I’m grateful. What was the highlight of your debut show? I think the most memorable moment was seeing Grace Jones in the flesh. Honestly, I’m still in shock. Have you ever spotted people on the street or on Instagram wearing Tommy x Zendaya pieces? I have! I feel so honored to see people wearing my collection, and I’m so happy that they enjoy the collection as much as I do! Sometimes I just scroll through the #tommyxzendaya hashtag and smile. What’s been the greatest lesson you’ve learned about fashion from Law? If I had to choose one, it would be to not give a…you know what.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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brad barnet/getty images (3); thomas concordia (3); david x prutting/bfa.com (1); all others courtesy

BY alexandra ilyashov


brad barnet/getty images (3); thomas concordia (3); david x prutting/bfa.com (1); all others courtesy

TOMMY HILFIGER

Why did you want to work with Zendaya? Zendaya stands for the same values that I founded my brand on—individuality, empowerment, and being inclusive. For me, it has always been important to work with people who have a unique voice. She is such an inspiration to today’s generation, and it’s been incredible working with her to bring all her ideas to life. How did Zendaya’s designs relate to the heritage of your brand? Zendaya was inspired by the iconic fashion of the ’70s. She wanted to create a collection that reflected that style, but still make it modern and relevant for today. Pop culture has always been a big source of inspiration for my brand, and her designs really tie into our heritage of updating classics with our signature twist. What are your impressions of her and her approach to the project? Zendaya has always been a style icon, and after working with her, I can say that she also has a keen eye for design. When someone has that passion, the process of creating a collection becomes all the more special. She knew exactly what she wanted and was attentive to every detail to make sure it fit with the concept she had in mind. What was Zendaya’s vision for her collections with you and your team? The women of the ’70s were a big inspiration for her. They had such a strong and confident style during that time, and that was a big part of her vision. We wanted to take that look and redefine it for today’s consumers. For our Fall 2019 collection, you’ll see how we have brought the power dressing of that era back in a new way. We’ve used rich colors, unexpected prints, luxe fabrics, and I think each item is a statement-making piece. Why did you decide to return to showing in NYC? Zendaya brought up the idea of showing in Harlem, and I was immediately excited about that. It just felt right. We knew it would be the perfect setting to bring her vision and our collaboration to life. What makes it even more special is that we are back in the city where TOMMYNOW first began. Why did you choose the Apollo Theater to show the latest Tommy x Zendaya looks? Music has always been so influential in my career. When you think of the Apollo Theater, some of the most celebrated musicians come to mind, like The Supremes, Ella Fitzgerald, and Aretha Franklin, all of whom performed there. These artists also represent the remarkable women who have inspired our collection. Having our show at this legendary venue that hosted them felt like a great way to pay homage. You’ve tapped amazing talents as global brand ambassadors. How do you choose them? When picking a brand ambassador, you want someone who best represents your brand spirit. I love working with people who aren’t afraid to break conventions, are optimists, and icons in their own right. And that’s what all our ambassadors, including Zendaya, Lewis Hamilton, Gigi Hadid, Winnie Harlow, and Hailey Baldwin, stand for. Your shows are no-details-spared spectacles, all over the city, country, and world. How do you dream up new locations and concepts each season? When we launched TOMMYNOW, we wanted to bring fashion and entertainment in a way that had never

(Clockwise from left) A Tommy x Zendaya tour bus arrives at the Apollo Theater; the elaborate set evoked a ’70s New York street corner; the epic casting included Winnie Harlow, Lineisy Montero, Alek Wek (pictured, below), Halima Aden, Ashley Graham, Leomie Anderson, Candice Swanepoel, Sara Sampaio, and Soo Joo Park.

“zendaya has always been a style icon, and after working with her, i can say that she also has a keen eye for design.” —TOMMY HILFIGER been done before. These experiences are something we want our consumers around the world to be a part of. So, every season, we take our show to a new city and a new audience. We like to pick locations that showcase the unique personality of the city. We have amazing teams that conceptualize and build the most incredible runway sets for our collections. This has become signature to our brand, and our guests always look forward to our fashion shows. You continue keeping the magic of the catwalk experience alive—as many brands have scaled back or opted out entirely. Why is this important to you? The consumer today is not just looking for great product, they want memorable experiences from their favorite brands. With fashion shows, traditionally it was always industry insiders who were invited. But we democratized that format, and opened it up to include consumers as part of our TOMMYNOW shows. We have traveled across the globe to a new location every season and invited our fans to attend. An added bonus is that they get to shop the collection straight off the runway. So not only are we creating the immediate access that they’re looking for, but we’re building a deeper experience with them through our shows. You’ve also evolved the format and time frame, adapting to an ever-shifting fashion industry cadence on all fronts. What’s it been like to markedly change many aspects, while still maintaining your brand’s identity and heritage? When you look at how competitive our landscape is today, I don’t think it’s enough just to stay relevant.

(Clockwise from above) Bella and Gigi Hadid, Marina Ruy Barbosa, Sofia Sanchez de Betak, Giovanna Engelbert, and Tommy Hilfiger CEO Daniel Grieder; Hamish Bowles; Meghan Trainor; and H.E.R.

You have to be ahead of the curve and stay on the pulse of what’s coming up. And that’s something we’re always thinking about in every aspect of our business. What’s next? We were among the first brands to do “See Now, Buy Now” and completely shift our calendar. We also introduced our design collaborations with our ambassadors like Gigi, Lewis, and Zendaya through this global platform. I think the key is finding the right balance between tradition and innovation.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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9/3/19 7:25 PM


majorMilestone

30 dkny

dimitrios kambouris (2); peter don (2); hannah turner-harts (1); all others courtesy

turns

It’s hard to believe that it has been 30 years since DKNY burst onto the scene with its innovative, genredefining approach to style. Three decades in business have taught the iconic brand to always stay focused on the future—and what lies ahead is looking bright indeed. After all, with a city like New York serving as constant inspiration for the perpetually hip, youthful brand, the possibilities are endless. Here’s to the next 30!

Halsey bringing down the house at DKNY’s birthday bash (top left and right) and starring in the brand’s Fall campaign; fellow DKNY faces, the Martinez Brothers, DJ’ed the party (bottom left).

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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MAJORMilestone

winnie harlow

Janaye Furman indya moore

New Yorker since birth

Borough: Bronx You’re not a true New Yorker unless you... were born in New York

alexina graham

New Yorker since 2014

Borough: Manhattan DKNY is... young and hip

Delilah Belle Hamlin

charlotte bickley New Yorker since 2016

danileigh

(DK)NY MOMENTS

On Monday night, DKNY celebrated its 30th anniversary with a Brooklyn blowout at St. Ann’s Warehouse in DUMBO. Current DKNY campaign stars, the Martinez Brothers, kicked things off with an epic DJ set, as guests including Kendall Jenner, Suki Waterhouse, Alessandra Ambrosio, Charlie Puth, Winnie Harlow, Luka Sabbat, Nina Agdal, Soo Joo Park, Indya Moore, Ashley Benson, Alexina Graham, Saint Jhn, and many more enjoyed Don Julio, Tanqueray, and Johnnie Walker cocktails curated by famed mixologist Jeff Bell of PDT, and a bevy of fun party snacks, including every delicious flavor of Momofuku Milk Bar cookies. There was also an awesome mirror-cube video photo booth, and plenty of Fiji Water on hand to keep everyone hydrated. At 11 p.m., longtime DKNY collaborator and face Cara Delevingne took to the stage to wish the brand a happy birthday before introducing current campaign star Halsey, who performed an epic set. Before her final song, Halsey gave DKNY some more anniversary love, as waiters roamed the crowd passing out Jell-O shots. Red, white, and silver confetti rained down from the ceiling as the crowd danced and squeezed in one last photo op in front of DKNY’s massive light-up bubble installation before heading into the night with a little help from Lyft, which partnered with DKNY for the night to make sure everyone got home safe.

hannah turner-harts (17); john parra/getty images (3)

Borough: Manhattan Hallmark of a true New Yorker: Jaywalking

paige reddinger New Yorker since 2005

Borough: Brooklyn Earliest DKNY memory: Interviewing Donna Karan. Icon!

Jasmine Sanders

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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cara deleviNgne kendall jenner

Dylana Suarez

New Yorker since 2013

Borough: Manhattan Earliest DKNY memory: Buying DKNY stockings in high school—every color, and every print

Natalie Suarez

New Yorker since 2011

Borough: Brooklyn You’re not a true New Yorker until you... have lived in Brooklyn

christie ferrari

yuna cindy bruna

nina agdal

New Yorker since 2013

New Yorker since 2010

Borough: Manhattan You’re not a true New Yorker until you... leave New York for the holidays, and realize you miss it

hannah turner-harts (17); john parra/getty images (3)

Borough: Manhattan You’re not a true New Yorker until you... get a dog

young paris New Yorker since 2014

Borough: Brooklyn You’re not a true New Yorker until you... date an uptown girl

Jimmy Pezzino

New Yorker since 2013

Borough: Brooklyn New York’s best pizza is... Prince Street Pizza. Hands down!

jackson krecioch Draya Michele

New Yorker since 2017

Borough: Manhattan DKNY is... now

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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runwayReport

brandon maxwell

Daywear done right. Maxwell initially had a reputation for making some of the most elegant eveningwear around—millennial-friendly, bien sûr. But these days, he’s expanded his repertoire to provide a more seven-daysa-week approach to dressing. There was denim, as he’s shown in seasons past, but what we really liked was the not-overly-tricky takes on shirting, bright (but not too bright) jackets, groovy leather pants, and ruched minis.

longchamp

firstview (24)

Sophie Delafontaine’s approach to fashion has legs. Very long ones, in fact, and they look especially great in her striped hotpants, flyaway shirtdresses, and leather minis. Shown at Hearst Plaza at Lincoln Center, the venue was as serious and as aesthetically pleasing as her fashion, and we especially appreciated the teeny tiny Le Pliage bags, the amped-up Roseau tote, and the groovy boxing boots.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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9/9/19 4:41 PM


kate spade

Botanical marvel! Nicola Glass’s plant-powered vision made for a smashing show at the Elizabeth Street Garden. Fern and floral prints abounded—upon arrival, guests were gifted oversize patchwork shopping totes—and several models even stashed fresh-from-the-greenmarket fauna in them before hitting the runway. Cute concept aside, this is fashion for real women, living full, meaningful lives—as evidenced by the casting, which included a cool crew of supes (Grace Elizabeth), stars (Debi Mazar avec fille), and even the mature set (Accidental Icon’s Lyn Slater).

firstview (24)

tory burch

Burch’s venues get more magnificent with each passing season. For Spring ’20, a garden of delights awaited at the Brooklyn Museum. First up: a fabulously art-directed display of pastries that few dared to touch (until post-show), and then a tightly edited array of Diana Spencer–inspired fashion. Oui, it was a touch ’80s, but in a very good way. We loved the shirred little cocktail dresses, leather-trimmed trenches, and the patchwork dresses made of embroidered handkerchiefs. (We’d like to place an order for the stunner on Lexi Boling, please.)

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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Runway. All day.

new season.

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new fashion.

be first.

firstVIEW.com

1/19/18 9:13 AM


P R O M OT I O N

supima design competition

+ the next generation of chic

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9/9/19 4:01 PM


SUPIMA

Drexel University

Growing up in Beijing, China, Gina Guo was struck by the fashion bug at age 12 when she saw a collection of Vera Wang wedding dresses. With a talent for drawing and crafting already evident and the support of her parents, Guo was set on combining her talents with her love of fashion and made the decision to become a fashion designer. After graduating No. 1 in her class at Beijing Daxel High School, Guo went on to attend Drexel University, where she studied textiles for fashion design, fashion drawing, and professional portfolio. Her design specialty focuses on women’s formalwear, where she is able to express her vision through artwork and sculpture to create elegant, vintage designs with a modern aesthetic.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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getty images (6); matthew carasella (3)

For the 12th year of the Supima Design Competition, Supima has partnered with America’s leading design schools: Academy of Art University, Drexel University, Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, Fashion Institute of Technology, Kent State University, Parsons School of Design, Rhode Island School of Design, and Savannah College of Art & Design. Each school nominated one of its top graduating seniors as a finalist for the Supima Design Competition. In May 2019, each of this season’s eight designers was assigned a faculty mentor, provided fabric from Supima’s most prestigious brand partners—Albini, Brooks Brothers, Colorich, Nice Dyeing, Olah Inc., Olimpias, Rainbow, Tintex, and Uniqlo—and asked to create capsule collections of women’s eveningwear that highlighted the unique characteristics of Supima cotton. The competition required each designer to rethink familiar fabric conventions: the woven fabrications customarily used as high-end shirting; the fine jersey that goes into luxury tops and lingerie; and the sturdy denims, corduroys, and twills that make up premium jeans and sportswear. Designs were judged on originality, execution, and ability to showcase Supima, America’s luxury cotton.

THIS YEAR’S WINNER Gina Guo

on the cover: getty images (5)

DESIGN COMPETITION


getty images (6); matthew carasella (3)

HOST BLAIR EADIE

THE JUDGES

A wide range of fashion industry professionals, from journalists and retailers to designers and stylists, were specially selected to review each collection from their own unique perspective. From left: Sharifa Murdock (Liberty Fairs), Aria Darcella (The Daily Front Row), Faith Cummings (freelance writer), Avril Graham (Harper’s Bazaar), Godfrey Deeny (Fashion Network), Fern Mallis (author & Fashion Week founder), Bibhu Mohapatra (designer & SDC mentor), Buxton Midyette (Supima), Blair Eadie (Atlantic-Pacific), Laurel Pantin (InStyle), Sergio Guadarrama & Kade Johnson (Celestino Couture), Tyler McCall (Fashionista), and Carmen Lilly (stylist)

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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THE DESIGNERS

ISABEL HAJIAN

YOOHYEON KIM

RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN

savannah college of art & design

LINH LA

academy of art university

ILLENE MARTOSENO

fashion institute of design & merchandising

ISHWARI VIJH

ANDREW KWON

SHUXIAN KONG

parsons school of design

kent state university

The Sponsors olah inc.

Find out more: allaboutsupima.com/design-competition FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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portraits: matthew carasella; runway: getty images (7)

fashion institute of technology

P R O M OT I O N

9/9/19 4:01 PM


runwayReport

chelsea grays Christopher Cabalona

abby yang

Yaryna Zhuk

Hanbit Ku

Yi Pan

Qing Guo Ying Jin

academy

Yue Shen & Mingyang Zhang

of art

Under the leadership of Simon Ungless, a talented group of newly minted MFA School of Fashion graduates from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco unveiled their 2019 Graduate Fashion Show at Skylight on Vesey.

songta

peacebird MEN

rizhuo

threegun

china COOL Alibaba Group’s Tmall is the world’s biggest commerce platform—and it brought its sensibility to New York City with a showcase of five stellar designers at Spring Studios.

randy brooke (9); all others courtesy

i-am-chen

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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9/9/19 6:10 PM


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9/3/19 2:12 PM


COLORTheory

tickled

pink

MANE MUSE Sarah Bryant’s hot pink coif inspired me to try a (subtler) pink ’do.

The Daily’s Alex Dickerson’s adventures into temporary hair color with Moroccanoil, plus some guidance from beauty expert Sarah Bryant of @sarah_louwho. photography BY hannah turner-harts When I first heard that Moroccanoil was launching its new Color Depositing Mask Collection, I was immediately intrigued. As a lifelong blonde, I’ve always admired those with the courage to play with hair color, and these days, I see women (and men) everywhere sporting all the colors of the rainbow in their locks. “Why not me?” I asked myself. There’s no better time than NYFW to take a walk on the wild side and join in the fun. And, worst case, it’s only temporary! I’m a bit of a chicken when it comes to beauty, so I couldn’t possibly do this solo. I turned to my favorite beauty influencer, Sarah Bryant aka @sarah_louwho, who currently rocks a pink pixie hairstyle (also colored with Moroccanoil). Sarah was traveling the weekend of my transformation so we decided to FaceTime so she could walk me through the entire process. Under her guidance, I took the plunge, applied the mask, and watched my hair transform into a vibrant Rose Gold coif. The end result? Not only did my hair feel softer, look shinier, and smell terrific, but I absolutely adored the splash of color. It gave me an unexpected boost of confidence as I headed out into NYFW!

quick consult During our FaceTime session, Sarah talked me through the different colors and instructed me to carefully section my hair, to get full coverage and maximum absorption of the mask. Seeing her smiling face and head of bright pink hair gave me the courage I needed.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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haute hues There are seven shades to choose from; I picked Rose Gold. Sarah wears Hibiscus, which is a really vibrant pink. I was tempted to try the Platinum for a chic gray look. I’ll do that next time. Sarah advised me to wear rubber gloves and to use a wide-tooth comb, in order to really get the product applied to every strand. Brilliant and helpful intel!

rosy new ’do It turned into quite a social affair. Grace Atwood of The Stripe (below) made an appearance. I posted an IG Story about the process, and got tons of comments and questions. Pink definitely leads to popularity!

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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9/9/19 5:25 PM


shopOn

RAMY’S RETAIL

REVOLUTION

live on the Upper East Side, and my office is on West 39th between Seventh and Eighth. So the majority of my time is spent in my office with my design, sales, and marketing teams. But on the weekends, I like to go down to Soho, and I would say a few times a week I run into Bloomingdale’s to check on that space as well. How many stores are you in at the moment? We’re in all the Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus locations, and all Bloomingdale’s A stores, and some of their other select stores. We’re going to be carried in Nordstrom as well. They’re starting to carry us in some of their select stores, as well as online. And then we’re in more than 300 specialty stores around the country. Who are some of the most valuable people in your life who give you feedback about the collection? Who gives you great advice? I’ll start with my mother. I get so much feedback from my family. My mother is 79 and my daughter is 15; my sisters are somewhere in between. They’re the ones who I feel give me the most open and verbal advice— both good and bad. We all live different lifestyles, and all our needs are so different, so I listen to them. And then I have an incredible group of friends, and they’re all fashionable. They’re always sending me pictures, telling me what they liked, telling me what they don’t like, what I should have done, and what I should do

again. I’m not insulted if anyone’s critical. It’s really all learning for me. What are you feeling for Spring 2020? What I love about spring is that in my mind, it comes at a time when you really need some freshness, and I wanted something that is brighter and has a message that spring is ahead. We start to add a lot of color in Spring—it’s buy-now, wear-now. The fabrics start to become a little bit lighter and airier. We add more prints—stripes, flowers—to bring all those fun happy elements into the collection. In spring, I wear more dresses, and even maxi dresses. What’s the story with your denim launch? It’s really amazing; the fit is incredible, and they’re so comfortable. I will have new concepts that are sold only at the store, too—I want to test out some products that don’t necessarily make it to the floors of our wholesale accounts, but I know they could be successful, so I’m going to sell them here. Which denim styles are your personal favorites? The Cindy, which is mid to high rise—it’s tight on the leg but flares out. The reason I love it is because it can be worn as a nighttime jean. And then we developed another denim style called Kate, which is a low-waisted denim. For me, it’s difficult to find in the market.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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GUTTER CREDITS tk

Why Madison Avenue? We opened our first store on Prince Street in Soho. It’s not a very big store, but we wanted to learn how to do retail. That’s why we originally opened downtown—to learn the systems, inventory, sales, everything. Now, we have big clients from the Upper East Side and the Upper West Side, and I always wanted to open a store on the Upper East Side. So about a year ago, we started looking, walking up and down Madison with a broker to see where we could open. It took us a little bit of time to find the right spot, and we finally did. It’s actually my dream spot—at 980 Madison. It became available, and we jumped on it. How is it designed? We’re keeping it true to our brand—orange and gold— and for the most part, the walls and floors are white. We have gold-leaf wallpaper, mannequins, and hanging racks throughout the store. We have large beautiful dressing rooms, and when you first walk in, there’ll be a place to hang out with a charging station. It’s friendly for people with kids or a woman who is shopping with her spouse, but he wants a place to sit and hang out. The whole store is geared toward being a shoppingfriendly experience for everybody they’re with. Between your office and your stores, how much are you traipsing around the city these days? Thank God for the Q! That changed my life, because I

RAMY’S WORLD A vibrant Fall collection, and a sparkling new boutique.

all images courtesy

Ramy Brook Sharp has opened her brand’s second retail location in New York with a fabulous new Ramy Brook boutique on Madison Avenue. Time for a trip to the UES!


Available in Fine Boutiques WWW.JULIEVOS.COM

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9/3/19 3:40 PM


sisterAct

SISTER ACT (From left) Sophie and Charlotte, glammed up at this year’s FMAs; perched at a NYFW show, in 2017.

how to

influence What is Fashion Week really like for bloggers and influencers? We sat down with sisters Charlotte and Sophie Bickley, co-founders of Yin2MyYang, to find out. BY ALYSSA HARDY photography by hannah turner-harts How did you prepare for NYFW this season? Sophie Bickley: Every day is jam-packed with shows, so I spent my time figuring out which ones we wanted to see and which would be best for our followers. Then, I’m getting all the beauty looks ready. I like to have extra cool hairstyles and makeup. It’s one week [twice a year] that you can be so out there, especially when you get photographed walking into a show. How do you put together your outfits? Charlotte Bickley: The process depends on whether the shows are dressing us, but the main idea is to dress in the brand’s aesthetic. Sophie: If we have a relationship with a brand, it’s important that we wear their looks. The first Fashion Week we went to, we didn’t have anyone dressing us. When there’s a show we want to go to but may not be

getting a full look, we’ll bring a bag from the brand, or something like that. What do you see as your roles in the industry during Fashion Week? Charlotte: I think for influencers now, it’s about getting the Instagram Stories up for our followers to see— that’s the huge benefit for brands. They have so many eyes on these shows without needing a magazine to be there anymore. Having a million followers can be more valuable. Also, we get to put brands, like Staud, on our followers’ radars that they don’t necessarily know. Sophie: If we’re wearing a brand’s clothes and we get put in street-style galleries, then that’s great for brands as well. Our followers see how you can wear something. It’s an honor to be dressed for the shows. Our followers are pretty engaged. They want to be part of what we’re doing; they get to see a live fashion show. It’s not just a slideshow of looks. However, it’s unfortunate that when every show starts, every phone goes up. I’ve heard other people say that it’s a shame, and I agree. Which shows do you eagerly anticipate each season? Charlotte: We love Cynthia Rowley. Coach is another one; we have a history with the brand because our dad worked there for 25 years. They have the most epic shows, and they do a good job of sharing their narrative in the show. Sophie: The Coach shows are just done so well. Their February show was amazing; it was like a maze of models. It was the most incredible show I’ve been to. We also love brands that are engaged with us, like Alice + Olivia. We talk to, and take pictures with, [creative director] Stacey Bendet. I’m excited to see Rag & Bone because I love their clothing. Staud was cool last year because they all danced down the runway. Charlotte: Sometimes we get invited to smaller shows too, and we like to introduce those brands to our followers as well.

How has the blogging landscape changed in the past five years? Sophie: I think the phone thing, definitely. With Instagram Stories, that keeps getting worse. For us personally, I think now we’re going to shows where we’re dressed and stuff, and where we feel more respected. Charlotte: The shows are more saturated, and it’s much easier to go to them. I think Paris does a better job of keeping Fashion Week more intimate. There are still elite shows in New York, like Ralph Lauren and Carolina Herrera, that will always have that more exclusive vibe. It reminds us that there are shows we still aspire to go to. What kind of feedback do you get from your followers about the catwalks? Sophie: During fun shows like Staud, people get excited to see the clothing and the action. Last year, during Zimmermann, our followers loved it because the dresses were just so beautiful and breathtaking. Charlotte: People are also excited to see what we’re going to wear. Especially because it’s the only time that I glam it up for a full week, so that’s just fun content to share. We’ll do polls to make it interactive. What are you currently working on? Sophie: Well, our role as editors-at-large at The Daily Front Row is a whole new opportunity. It’s a different way to experience and talk about Fashion Week. Charlotte: We’re also partnering with Teva for the New York shows to highlight how you can wear those types of shoes with a high-fashion look. It’s a fun, extra element to add to how we’re styling looks. Sophie: Sometimes we’ll be involved with events and promoting them as well, but often that can come up last minute. It’s always busy.

firstview (3); getty images (1)

The Bickleys’ NYFW faves include Cynthia Rowley, Zimmermann, and Carolina Herrera.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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PR MAESTRO Andrew Lister

Pitch

Perfect

What makes for a truly excellent publicist or PR firm? Just ask Andrew Lister, Purple PR’s executive vice president. He’s well-versed on the topic, and luckily, happy to share. BY EDDIE ROCHE photography by hannah turner-harts How was Purple born? Purple was established in London 22 years ago. We always positioned ourselves as a full lifestyle agency, which was a unique concept back then. The first clients were Calvin Klein, Donna Karan/DKNY, and Ian Schrager— we still work with two out of the three, to this day. What brought you to Purple? I previously worked at numerous men’s publications in London. I was speaking to one of the founders of Purple during the Milan menswear shows one season, and we began the discussion of me joining the agency, to work with men’s clients. That was 11 years ago.

VERY EVENTFUL (From top) Chic recent happenings at the Edition, one of Purple PR’s clients.

What distinguishes Purple from other agencies? I believe we enter into each project and collaboration with a bespoke way of thinking. No designer, brand, or client is alike. We pride ourselves on our creativity, business mind-set, and initiative. Everyone works incredibly hard, with a strong sense of loyalty—yet we have fun in what we do, which is important considering how much time we spend together, either for client work or traveling for events. We also get to work with some of the world’s leading creative thinkers and innovative talents, which is a privilege. What kind of clients do you work with? We have a strong and diverse roster of leading global brands and emerging talent across fashion, lifestyle, hospitality, design, talent, sports, and beauty. Our clients include Bally, Thierry Lasry, Edition Hotels, Christian Cowan, Messika, the Public Hotel, Revive, Kevyn Aucoin, Rockefeller Center, Faith Connexion, Kappa, The Face, Casablanca, and Christian Siriano. Purple has an L.A. office, too… We opened the L.A. office three years ago, soon after New York. It’s grown exponentially over the past 12 months, with the surge of creatives moving to L.A. The office led with fashion—specifically VIP and influencer services—but is now well-rounded. The fall opening of the West Hollywood Edition is our next big project. What still excites you about Fashion Week? The end! I’m joking. It’s great to see everyone again after the summer, especially those who have traveled internationally and I haven’t seen in a while.

Is there anything you dread about NYFW? As the week goes on, people’s energy levels and attitudes decline somewhat. What should brands look for in a PR agency? We offer 360-degree service. The days of just shuffling samples around and crossing your fingers for a cover are gone. It’s about being culturally and astutely aware of what’s going on in the world, and also creating connections to expand a brand’s network. How might fashion PR evolve in the future? I think it’s as relevant as it’s ever been, but people are much more socially aware and [care about] sustainability. Press and consumers alike are coming to realize that less is more, and they’re spending their money wisely rather than on throwaway purchases. Any upcoming projects you’re excited about? We have some incredible client openings this year, like the launch of [private club] Neuehouse in Downtown L.A.’s iconic Bradbury Building, and Desa Potato Head, a new creative center in Bali with an OMA-designed hotel, zero-waste restaurant, nightclub designed by DJ Harvey, and the world’s largest electronic music archive curated by Wild Life Archive. Also, the Edition is expanding into Tokyo, Rome, Reykjavik, Singapore, and Dubai in 2020. What keeps you excited every day professionally? Never knowing exactly what the next day will bring, and the ever-changing media and communication landscape, which makes you stay abreast and on your toes. How do you typically wind down from work? Not sure. I will let you know once I get to unwind!

andrew werner (2); getty images (1)

greatPress

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CRUCIALAdvocacy

Change Agents Fashion Week is always a good time to draw attention to the hard work and dedication of the runway models. One of their most passionate advocates is The Industry MGMT Group, which created The Model’s Bill of Rights. We caught up with its founder, CEO, and owner, Federico Pignatelli, who also owns Pier59 Studios.

FEDERICO PIGNATELLI often what happens is the agency places the model for a much higher fee—let’s say $4,000 or $5,000—but the model never sees the contract, so she has no way of knowing. Models have to be able to ask for authentic copies of the contract between the client and the modeling agency. [Also, regarding the payment terms] models pay agencies a commission to represent and manage them, and to collect money on their behalf. To work for someone you have to literally beg to pay you is unacceptable. And how have models responded to the Bill? Models have talked to one another and they like what The Model’s Bill of Rights is about. It has actually helped us to grow our agency in a substantial way. What’s the next biggest issue facing working models? Safety. For instance, if a model shoots at a location that doesn’t have proper permits and she gets hurt, insurance might not cover it. Many photo studios in New York are not properly licensed—even big ones—

WALK THE WALK Models repped by The Industry MGMT Group on the runway

so if something happens to a model, the insurance company can just say, “We’re sorry, but we can’t cover you.” What is a model supposed to do then? Go get a lawyer. But lawyers are expensive, and these are young people; they don’t know where to go. And then what? Sue the client, the production company, the studio, the agency. Sue everybody—then, years later, maybe she can see some money. So to avoid these kinds of nightmares, we need to make sure that models are being sent only to work in places where it is safe for them to be. That’s it.

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firstview (4); all others courtesy

What exactly is The Model’s Bill of Rights? It’s a guideline for how to treat models fairly in the most important aspects of this business. There has been a lot of talk about sexual harassment, but not enough attention has been paid to the other aspects of what models face. Many of them are not educated about the business and how to deal with clients. They are sent on jobs without knowing what those jobs entail—things like nudity—so they can find themselves in uncomfortable situations. Overall, models are just not educated about their rights, including, for instance, their right to see the contract between a client and the agency that represents them. So models are just supposed to trust that their agents are looking out for them, which is not always the case. Here’s an example: An agency tells a model go do a job. The model asks the agent, “Okay, how much it is for?” The agent says, “It’s $2,000.” The model has no way of knowing if that $2,000 is the real number or if it’s a number the agent just made up. Because very


The Model’s

Bill of Rights

ERIN LUCAS

SVP, The Industry MGMT Group You’re a modeling agency vet. What did you think when Federico Pignatelli told you about the Bill? Honestly, I was relieved. What I’m most passionate about, and why I’ve been in the industry for 20 years, is empowering and educating young women we sign. So when I started working with Federico, around the time he and Simone [Aptekman] wrote The Model’s Bill of Rights, that was music to my ears. I was literally in tears when I learned about it, because in my experience with some agencies, it’s always been the profit that drives them. They don’t look at models as human beings. We’ve heard of a model living in a two-bedroom apartment leased by her agency with seven other girls, each paying the agency $1,500 per month. We only house four girls in an apartment, and we

SIMONE APTEKMAN

firstview (4); all others courtesy

Model; collaborator on The Model’s Bill of Rights How did your own experience as a model inform or inspire your work on The Model’s Bill of Rights? When I started modeling in New York, I was disappointed by the lack of financial transparency in the industry. You’d get a paycheck, but there would be no invoice or ledger of what the payment was for, so it became impossible to bookkeep. Also, payments are extremely delayed. I once did a job and had to wait 250 days, at which point [the payment] was whittled down from $2,000 to $400. That’s not a good situation. Especially in a city like New York. It leaves models incredibly vulnerable, in dire financial situations. How’d you broach this issue with Federico Pignatelli? When I came to The Industry, I told him about my

charge them exactly what we pay for rent, utilities, WiFi, maid service, and cable. We don’t turn a profit on the apartments. But not every model lives in a model apartment. There are other chargebacks that are even more horrible; things models literally cannot work without—comp cards, web charges, etc. Do models come to you to get out of their contracts with other agencies? Yes. Federico is not afraid to defend our models, and indemnify them in financial and legal ways to help them get out of terrible contractual situations [with other agencies]. Since I’ve relaunched The Industry L.A., we have models coming in on a regular basis saying they’ve heard about us from other models on set, how comfortable and safe they feel, how they’ve never felt better at another agency. Any advice for models at disreputable agencies? Talk to someone. Remember, you’re individuals and free citizens—and when you sign with an agency, you’re hiring them to work for you. Not the other way around. There are so many scared, vulnerable young women in this industry who don’t know it can be different. They’re in the driver’s seats of their careers and lives.

grievances with my previous agency, which actually reached out to The Industry because they didn’t want to let me go. But they weren’t paying me, which was a breach of contract. I studied contract law, so I was a squeaky wheel at my previous agency, always reaching out and saying, “Where is my paycheck? According to the contract you had to pay within 90 days and it has been 250.” Contracts are bilateral. Both parties can breach them. It was definitely a bit of a fight, but The Industry really protected me and once it was over, I told Federico, “I’m not the only one. I have 10 stories— girls who’ve been threatened with deportation if they complain about not being paid; girls in dire financial situations after they have worked long hours and overtime.” Federico listened to me and was passionate about this, because he runs a business that’s actually sound, pays on time, has perfect working conditions, and empowers models. So he was just like, “Let’s push the standard of the industry at large.” Did you ever worry about retaliation? In the beginning, I thought, “What if some clients start to see me as a liability or something?” But I think the good clients pride themselves on having sound business practices, and if anything, this sort of weeds out the ones I’d prefer not to work with anyway. Honestly, there’s really been minimal pushback. Also, the point of this is not to single out specific agencies or clients but to encourage models to question things, to be fearless advocates for themselves, and to know that they have support, because they can always reach out to me or Federico for help.

Federico Pignatelli della Leonessa and his The Industry Model MGMT is calling for an industry-wide fundamental change in how agencies operate and interact with models. The Industry Model MGMT is deeply committed to be a leader in changes with regulations and transparency regarding contracts, working visas, payment, and taxes so that models have more control over their career in order to protect their present and future. Furthermore, The Industry Model MGMT is committed to: Providing Models with industry-wide standardized, easy-to-understand contracts that are equitable to both parties. Copies of contracts will be provided in full and signed by both parties. Communicating clearly the scope of work for the Model and clear expectations by the Client. Making sure the Model is fairly treated by the Client and provided with appropriate rest time and food in a safe environment. Paying models within five to nine business days from receipt of payment but never to exceed 60 days from completion of invoicing, regardless of receipt of payment from Clients. No payment to models should be considered an advance, nor will Industry Model MGMT consider charging any advance fees. Providing Models with clear accounting statements with itemized payments and proof of expenses and deductions, along with complete transparency regarding what the total booking compensation is. Educating Models on their legal rights, contractually and including understanding the 0-1 Visa process and significance, in the sense that is issued to the Model for her uniqueness and “only” sponsored by the Agency. A Model’s Visa is granted to them for their professional abilities and not directly to the sponsor Agency, and therefore it cannot be canceled at will by the Agency. The Agency only has the right to revoke sponsorship. No duress of any kind will be exercised vis-à-vis the Model in regard to the outstanding Visa. The Model will have the opportunity to re-file for the same 0-1 Visa sponsored by another Agency. Advocating that Models are shooting in productions that are in compliance with City and State Codes and properly insured studios or locations to protect the model’s well being and guaranteeing appropriate coverage in case of accidents. Not charging unreasonable fees while creating a hostile work environment for any Model taking action against their agency for material breach of contract. If a material breach of contract has occurred and not cured, then allow the Model to move and or transfer the Visa to another Agency of choice. By adopting this Model’s Bill of Rights, Industry Model MGMT is committed to treating models fairly and in a professional business manner. We urge other agencies to follow suit. We are the voice of necessary change.

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SOCIALStudies

Completely Unfiltered Beca Alexander, founder and president of influencer agency Socialyte, has had quite the journey since immigrating from the Ukraine to the U.S. at age 8, to put it mildly. The perpetual, sometimes accidental early adopter shares her unusual career path and frankest thoughts on influencer culture.

How did you enter the fashion industry? I worked for my sister, an incredible custom designer, seamstress, and tailor, then went to Parsons for a fashion design degree. I quickly realized I don’t have [design] talent; I also hate sewing, so I enrolled in Parsons’ business program. There, I met someone who’d recently launched a blog—14, 15 years ago, when no one was blogging—and worked in nightlife. I became a club kid, studying during the day and going out at night, during the glory days of clubbing in New York. Butter was cool; there was a Tuesday night party at the Soho Grand. We started featuring people at these parties on the blog—younger people in the fashion industry—the off-duty models, the Alexander Wangs before he was Alexander Wang, and asking them for interviews. That became the Fashion Indie blog, basically. How did Fashion Indie grow from there? In about two years, we reached 5 million monthly views on the blog. I wrote my senior thesis on building a digital media empire, then used the thesis to raise money, to open an office, and hire writers. We had 23 writers on staff and 150 contributors worldwide. We burned through investment really quickly. I remember calling my dad for pizza money to feed our writers. He told me he brought me to America, and I had to figure out what I was doing with my life. So I actually applied for food stamps, waited for four hours at the office, told them my story about immigrating here, that I was a student, had no money, and couldn’t get a job because I was in school. They gave $120 a month for food—I’d buy rotisserie chickens at the grocery store, pull them apart, and make these disgusting casseroles for our employees with Velveeta mac and cheese, hot sauce, and pulled chicken. I felt awful. Then, a Canadian media company e-mailed to buy Fashion Indie, for the most money I’d ever seen. In hindsight, it was absolutely nothing. After selling Fashion Indie, you worked in corporate social media strategy. How was Socialyte born? No one realized I wasn’t the EIC of Fashion Indie, so I

kept getting press releases and invites to events like Louis Vuitton store openings and Gucci parties. I’d go to these events, telling everybody I wasn’t involved in Fashion Indie anymore, but if anyone had a project, I had free time. I was introduced to a blogger who had a full-time job but started gaining recognition, and brands started e-mailing for her media kit and sponsored media rates. I was like, “I know how to do that!” The first campaign I negotiated was $50; I took 10 percent. I saw it as coffee money. I quickly became known as the fairy blog mother. A brand had heard I was the fairy blog mother and needed consulting advice on who to work with, content strategy, and social channels to use. I went to my boss the next day to ask if there was a possibility of me growing in their corporate structure, and was told the chances were slim. I gave my two weeks notice, and started helping brands understand bloggers, and negotiated deals for my blogger friends—bringing the two parties together. I started making money quicker than I realized. Eight months in, I filed paperwork for Socialyte. Any thoughts on the state of influencers and bloggers today? The era of the selfie has really moved society forward. It’s given the younger generation confidence. To take a close-up photo of your own face and broadcast it to the world? We didn’t have that growing up. We just looked at celebrities and models, unattainable people we could never be. Unfortunately, there’s very much a dark, negative side people don’t talk about. This

industry has become about consumerism, and pushing product for money. Everything has become overedited, oversaturated, highly glossy. We have created FOMO [Fear of Missing Out]; this sense of, “I’m not good enough because I’m not living this perfect life.” That very much scares me for the next generation, as someone partially at fault for creating this. Also, what do they plan to do moving forward? What tangible skills have they learned along the way if this all goes to s**t, or you decide you don’t want to do this anymore? Hopefully your skill set is past “I know how to take pretty photos of myself with a pretty sunset in Tulum.” Where do you see the industry going? More influencers are going to find ways to launch products, especially after seeing the success Arielle Charnas [of Something Navy] has had with Nordstrom and her own line. In the same way all influencers start to look the same, influencer product lines will look similar to one another. I also think more influencers will break away from the content they’re creating, as they get older, buy property, become parents, and start living more 360-degree lives. I also think influencers are going to drop off more; I’ve seen a lot of people write their last posts, saying, “This is not why I got into this. I don’t like the world this is now. I don’t like what I have become in this world.“ What might your next chapter look like? I work with a lot of animal charities, and I want to save all the dogs. My goal in life is to quit all this, move upstate, and open a dog sanctuary. Any day now!

james creel

BY EDDIE ROCHE

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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H AV E Y O U H E A R D ? T H I S Y E A R W E ’ R E H O S T I N G T H E F I R S T- E V E R

POWERED BY

J O I N U S O N O P E N I N G D AY SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 TH COCKTAILS AT 5:30PM AWARDS BEGIN PROMPTLY AT 6:10PM JACOB JAVITS CENTER, NORTH CONCOURSE Come have a bit of bubbly and celebrate this fashion season with the COTERIE community! BRAND AWARDS INCLUDE: •

Stand out Collaboration/Capsule Collection of 2019-2020

International Designer to Watch

Outstanding Social Content by a Brand

Good4Fashion Sustainable Initiative

RETAILER AWARDS INCLUDE: •

Compelling Shoppable Content by a Retailer

Elevating the Store Experience

Retail Innovator of the Year

We can’t wait to celebrate this fashion season with the COTERIE community.

A L L A R E W E LCO M E — H O P E TO S E E YO U T H E R E ! @ C OT E R I E _ S H O W # C OT E R I E S H O W

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StyleIdentity

Sartorial

Release

Broadway super-producer Jordan Roth is riding the wave of a major fashion moment. It started with his appearance at this year’s Met Gala in jaw-dropping Iris van Herpen couture, continued through the Tonys (Givenchy couture), the opening of his latest spectacular, Moulin Rouge (custom Zac Posen), and shows no sign of stopping. But fashion, for Roth, is about more than getting his picture taken on the red carpet. It’s more, even, than a medium for selfexpression. Rather, it’s a tool he uses to explore, excavate, and actualize his truest self—and to live joyfully and openly without fear or shame. BY CHARLES MANNING photography by hannah turner-harts How does fashion create a space to explore your identity—not only via what you choose to wear, but also the self-created boundaries determining what you’re comfortable in? I think, for everyone, there are lines, and where those lines are can be surprising. Even when a person is generally accepting, there is a moment when they go, “Oh, that’s too much!” Most people likely draw that line based on what feels

appropriate personally, and anything beyond those parameters isn’t just inappropriate for them, but for everybody… In the past several years, I have become aware of the existence of lines that I thought were my own, but were actually taken on from others. Now, I remember where that came from and realize it’s not my line, because my line is way over there. Or maybe I don’t even have one. I don’t know yet. I think about what

I was exploring in fashion a year or two ago; at that time, it felt like I was moving myself forward in expression, but now I look back and 10-steps-ago me feels foreign. I take great meaning in being able to chart that—it’s a kind of map of growth. Were you afraid to take those steps? No. Each step just felt like the exact right thing to do. Sometimes, I think what we’re most afraid of is ourselves. What would happen if we really, truly lived as ourselves and didn’t just let out what was inside of us, but actually built on it, adorned it, celebrated it, shined light on it, breathed air into it, made it bigger? That’s the thing I think we’re afraid of, but ultimately, that’s how we create joy. That joy is intoxicating, right? It’s akin to what actors feel when they fully give themselves over to a character and a scene. It’s a high. That feeling is available in the performance of life as well, not just the performance stage. I have been thinking about performance professionally and personally for my entire life; I reject the notion that performance has anything to do with fraudulence. The pinnacle of performance is really about engaging with the truth, which is how I understand fashion—a daily performance of the truth of yourself. We create all of this [motions to his outfit] to express who we really are. If that feels like fantasy, well, what’s more true to our core than the fantasies we have of ourselves? Isn’t that who we really are? Who we want to be? When did fashion first help you feel this extraordinary sense of self ? I started producing when I was very young. I was 21 when I did my first show, and everybody who worked with me and for me was older than me. I got in my head that I had to present authority and maturity, so I adopted this uniform of black, gray, or blue suits with a white shirt—untucked, because I wasn’t a banker— and my hair was super-cropped. That uniform served me well for a long time, until it didn’t. I started to feel constrained by it, and fraudulent. In the LGBT+ community, we have a fundamental connection to fraudulence, because we spend the first however many years of our lives trying desperately not to be found out. Practicing all the ways we can cover, stilt, and obscure that which would find us out, that, we decide, would be the worst thing that could ever happen to us. We constantly scan ourselves and the world. But then, we come out and realize, “I can keep scanning for what is authentically me now and then share it.” How did your personal style journey evolve from there? It just became clear that those suits were not serving me anymore, and I started to take steps away from them. I had actually forgotten that this man in the suits wasn’t always me. I forgot I was the teenager who went to a flea market in London to buy a bright blue Cookie Monster fur jacket and Bowie platform heels with silver stars. I forgot I was running around Princeton [University] in dresses. That was always me. I just took a long detour that served me well, until it didn’t. I regret it somewhat, but I don’t regret it wholly. I always say fashion is an outward expression of what is inside, but it’s also an inward expression. Through it, you can tell yourself how you want to feel. You can give yourself strength. That was what I was doing, and it worked. I’m grateful for that.

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Tel: 954.578.5687 Fax: 954.578.4431 info@iftheplanet.com www.PlanetByLaurenG.com

SHOWROOMS N.Y.  CHICAGO  DALLAS  L.A.

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brightOutlook

Over The

Rainbow Krenoir’s luxury handbags poignantly bring designer Jean K’s Technicolor dreams to life. BY FREYA DROHAN

accessories, handbags, shoes, and scarves, sometimes for herself, other times as collaborations with indie brands. When Krenoir started becoming a reality, Jean harnessed her showroom experience and connections in terms of resourcing, design, and product. The only issue? Finding a company that wouldn’t balk at hand-painting animal skins in more than a dozen different colors. Silvano Biagini, a small, family-run Milan luxury handbag brand that works with luxe materials like reptile and printed full-grain leather, stepped up to the challenge. “Silvano said they could happily make all the colors I wanted,” Jean recalls with glee. With Silvano Biagini as her production support, Krenoir creations are made by skilled Italian artisans, who hand-paint the skin and execute Jean’s designs to perfection. Jean visits the workshop regularly to check in, helping with and overseeing everything from the cutting to finalizing the showstopping pieces. She often visits local Italian tanneries, inspecting and handpicking the finest skins. And yet, these impeccable materials and this craftsmanship come at relatively affordable prices for such luxe pieces, starting at $195 for key holders and ranging from $1,950 to $4,200 for handbags. “Krenoir’s strength is not only the design but the price point,” Jean explains. “It’s surprising compared to other exotic skin bags on the market.” Mere months after her first season and U.S. debut, the brand’s Kandie handbag, with its signature handpainted resin animal sculpture handle, was a finalist in the Accessories Council’s 2019 Design Excellence Awards. “I’m a big animal lover, and I want to express that beauty of nature through my handbags,” she says. “I could never pick my favorite one from the collection, they’re all my babies, but honestly, I do love that flamingo one,” (pictured, right) a style that was featured recently in the brand’s first editorial cameo, in Nylon Spain.

Krenoir’s founder Jean K mixes exotic skins, vibrant hues, and playful details, like animal-shaped handles, in her pieces, favored by chic fans like influencer Flaviana Matata (above).

Next up? Expanding to France, Japan, China, and Jean’s native Korea, with hopes that Krenoir’s stealth versatility factor resonates globally, for myriad occasions, and with customers of all ages. “I wanted to make bags that are practical, that look fancy for parties, but have detachable crossbody straps so you can wear them with white T-shirts and vintage jeans,” Jean says. “I wanted something that both 20-year-olds and 60-year-olds could wear.” Mission accomplished!

all images courtesy

In an unforgettable moment from The Wizard of Oz, the world suddenly transforms from drab black and white to color. For Krenoir founder Jean K, seeing vivid shades for the first time ultimately led to her own magical journey—a luxurious yet playful handbag label known for vibrant hues, from magenta to seafoam green. “The creation of color is meaningful for me,” Jean says. “It represents my journey. When I was 4, 5 years old in Korea in the 1960s, my family was very poor, without color TV, so I didn’t see any beautiful colors for a long time.” That changed when Jean’s father brought her colorful picture books from the U.S. featuring popular characters, like Mickey Mouse and Charlie Brown. “It was a shock to me; I’d never seen such pinks and blues in my life. It was the first time my eyes were opened to color.” Jean became “obsessed” with a rainbow of shades, and she began drawing. Even presently, when she thinks of a potential new shade to add to her line, her memories of color are all intrinsically linked to her childhood. To wit, a shade of blue on her mind currently harkens to a dress she once bought with her sister. Krenoir’s debut range of exotic skin handbags, card holders, and key holders are rendered in 20 punchy shades. The brand’s name includes the word “noir” for a reason—because when you mix all the colors, the resulting shade is black. That breadth of palette is practically unheard of for a luxury exotic handbag label. “With my colors, I keep adding and adding,” Jean says. “When I told companies I wanted 10 or 20 colors, they said I was crazy!” But her decades of fashion-industry experience have taught her a lot about what she would ultimately want from her own brand, and she persisted in finding the right partners to make that dream happen. Before launching Krenoir, Jean spent about 30 years running a bustling New York City showroom and buying office, representing brands like Just Cavalli, Vivienne Westwood, Missoni, Gianfranco Ferré, and Blumarine. In the early aughts, she began channeling the luxury-market intel she’d accrued by designing

e d i t o r i a l P RO M OTIO N FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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e d i t o r i a l P RO M OTIO N

Beauty

buzz

Cygalle Dias launched a mobile spa concept, Cygalle Healing Spa, in 2006, then created Casa de Campo resort’s spa in the Dominican Republic. Now, the beauty veteran expands her existing spa product line with three CBD-infused additions.

READY, SET, GLOW Some of the brand’s sleekly packaged products

BY AVERY MATERA photography by kofi dua

What’s your overall skincare philosophy? My natural skincare line is called ”Food for the Skin,” which was my philosophy when I was starting off in the spas. Now, I’m doing something different. I like to change things up. I’ve wanted to do a CBD product for almost three years. What interested you about using CBD in your products? I’m an advocate of CBD. I see the benefits of it on the inside and outside—and that’s my general approach to beauty. If you’re healthy on the inside, you’re going to be beautiful on the outside. If you have toxins inside your body, they come out on your skin. So you basically have to do it simultaneously. Most people don’t even know their true energy potential to feel and look good. How did you formulate your CBD products? I worked with my healer on the formulas for my CBD products. She’s a special person. She specializes in the cannabis field. She works with a 400,000-acre, 100-person farm in Colorado for big orders, and for small batches, she works in Sedona, Arizona. What do you feel CBD brings to the table that other products might not have? I believe that CBD is a miracle plant. There’s a full spectrum of healing properties in it. It’s probably one of the most innovative ingredients out there, and one of the best healing plants that you can use in skincare. Oxygen is, too. That’s why this line is so powerful. Plus, the energy that went into the skincare products from a Reiki healing person. There are so many healing properties of CBD, like reducing inflammation and cell

renewal on a molecular level. Oral CBD drops improve your organs on a cellular level; using CBD products on your skin does the same thing. Can you use these products just as often as those without CBD? There’s absolutely no restriction. You can never overdose on CBD! We put just enough in our products. It’s overkill when companies use more. What we put in is what you need. My formulator is really experienced— she’s an herbologist, in addition to being a healer. So when we made these products, we talked about what we wanted to achieve—anti-aging, getting rid of inflammation, cell renewal, improving collagen, and hydrating. How do you incorporate CBD into your daily life? I take it internally and on my skin; I see and feel the difference. Actually, I use CBD on my dog, too. He likes it! I think it makes him feel better. He’s happy, and his stomach problems get better. A lot of people use it for medicinal purposes. It’s a medicinal herb; there is actual evidence that it heals diseases. What are your essential Cygalle daily products? I like the colloidal oatmeal cleanser from my natural line because I have dry skin and a bit of eczema sometimes from stress. It’s gentle on my skin, and balances it out. I also like the cranberry antioxidant toner, alpine rose stem cell moisturizer, and the lemon basil tonic. I use the hyaluronic serum, too; it’s a popular one right now.

Sampling Cygalle's luxe skincare formulations

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CHIC Feast DINING FINELY John Meadow, LDV Hospitality’s president

Scarpetta is taking its tantalizing menu and cozy-chic ambiance abroad with its newest restaurant, Sette, at the fabulous Bulgari Hotel London. The Daily spoke with John Meadow, president of LDV Hospitality, to find out more about the brand’s latest expansion.

Why did you choose London for your latest outpost? London was the ideal first international location for us as there is a real connection there to New York, and it’s the European social and cultural nexus. Why did you name the new restaurant Sette? “Sette” means seven in Italian, and this is our lucky number-seven location of Scarpetta. We also wanted a unique name for Bulgari London. What about Sette will Scarpetta devotees find familiar—and different? The restaurant is Scarpetta at its core, and carries the brand’s DNA of effortless elegance and an overall highlow balance of elevated comforts. What’s specific to London is the truly international staff, and the unique local and Mediterranean ingredients we get to work with in the kitchen.

let's dish! A few of Sette’s scrumptious appetizers and cocktails.

or incorporate. We learned microgreens are a thing of the past in London, and truffle oil and salted foods are not as popular there as in the States, so our dishes have been modified. Our main courses have rotated with some dishes that we felt would be more desired by the British palate, with more of an emphasis on meats. Do you work with local farms in the U.K., as you do in the U.S.? We’ve been excited about the local seafood—it’s spectacular and has enhanced our crudo offerings. My favorite is the arctic char with sun-dried tomato and trapanese pesto. In proper British fashion, we have a local rack of lamb with artichokes, fava, and mint. What’s most exciting about working with British farms is their absolute commitment to sustainability. It’s not just a marketing buzzword; they are fully engaged in making the supply chain better for the earth. Outside of local producers, the proximity to France and Italy has allowed us to carry the brightest, sun-kissed Mediterranean ingredients. What’s next for Scarpetta? We’re excited to focus on further international growth. We look forward to opening in other exciting destinations. I’m truly enjoying traveling the world scouting locations.

all images courtesy

London Calling

What can guests expect from the downstairs bar and lounge, Nolita Social? Nolita Social is the sister experience to The Seville, our lounge below Scarpetta New York. It’s a seductive and intimate space with an infusion of New York glam and grit unique to London. We have an eclectic mix of local musicians performing live, and DJs playing feel-good classics. We’re proud of our cocktail program, too. Any fun plans for London Fashion Week? We’re hosting a variety of events for London Fashion Week, and have had an incredible response from models and bloggers who want to visit. We’re kicking off with a dinner for Cult Beauty, then doing a special Fashion Week event by Jade Jagger, and hosting David Koma’s after-party. There are a few other surprise guests as well. We’re also hosting the official afterparty for the London Design Festival. The décor is lovely. How did you achieve the look? For both Sette and Nolita Social, we worked with Thomas Juul-Hansen, who also did our New York design. The approach for Sette was to create the Scarpetta dinner party vibe, but in a more refined fashion. The materials are less rustic than New York, the space is more intimate, and ultimately it captures a nice harmony between the spirits of London and Scarpetta. For Nolita Social, the dream was to bring ’70s New York glam and decadence to life, and we did! We have a collection of pieces from Spanish pop artist Domingo Zapata, and the plush room feels like a grand entertaining salon, with a bit of reckless decadence. Are any dishes unique to Sette? We carefully crafted the menu to have the same ethos as Scarpetta’s menu, but we took a lot of feedback from a few locals who guided us on specific ingredients and composed dishes that we should try to refrain from—

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cleanComplexion

e d i t o r i a l P RO M OTIO N

Sophia El-Hayek and Alexandra Haigis

Fresh Faces

Whether you’re an avid cleanbeauty devotee or just getting interested in a more natural, less chemical-laden skincare routine, Phenic is a new brand worth checking out. Meet Phenic’s co-founders, Sophia El-Hayek and Alexandra Haigis. her grandmother, and was in her family for generations. We tweaked it by swapping out a few ingredients, taking great care to preserve authenticity, but also increasing its efficacy and sustainability. We believe it’s special and effective, with a holistic, Mediterranean feel. What kinds of ingredients do you use? El-Hayek: Each ingredient is thoughtfully chosen for a specific purpose. We’ve selected real power players that multitask, such as rose hip seed, vitamin E, olive oil, honey, shea butter, jasmine, and rose. Haigis: The base ingredients in all our products are olive oil and squalane oil. Squalane oil, a clear lightweight oil, is highly nourishing for skin because it’s close in composition to skin’s natural oils, and as we age, our natural production of squalene declines. It also provides anti-aging benefits, such as fine-line reduction, improves skin elasticity, and fights sun damage, giving skin a more youthful glow. How do you formulate your products? El-Hayek: We still look back fondly on when we started out, cooking our Oil Cream in our home kitchens. Our product formulas result from countless hours of research and personal trials. Haigis: We’re proud we don’t test on animals. We put together recipes using nature’s most beneficial ingredients for clean solutions to common skin issues, such as dryness, dullness, and hyperpigmentation. We formulate in our lab in Worcester, Massachusetts, and have a distribution center in Florida. What was your first big success? El-Hayek: This past spring, we launched Phenic Skincare at Beautycon. It was our first national-level exhibition; we didn’t know what to expect. We were thrilled with the turnout and couldn’t believe how well our products were received. We quickly sold out of our Coconut Rose Face Mask on the first day!

Phenic’s gentle, cleanly formulated products are all available at phenicskincare.com.

How do you hope to grow the business? El-Hayek: As holistic living and clean skincare become more mainstream, we plan to expand Phenic’s reach and distribution within the market. We aim to grow Phenic into an accessible clean skincare brand that can be found at beauty retailers nationwide. Our products are versatile and gentle for all skin types, so we hope to be able to bring them to a wider audience. We want to make it easy for customers to find the products for themselves. We also plan to expand our line so that it encompasses all steps within a skincare ritual— cleansing, moisturizing, treatment, and sun protection. Where would you like to see the brand in five years? Haigis: We’d like to be featured nationwide in major skincare retailers, such as Sephora, Ulta, and Target. We’re also developing mineral-based sun protection with SPF, as well as a men’s line—shaving and beard oils, cleansers, and moisturizers, with masculine scents. How about in a decade? Haigis: We aim to build on the success we have earned in the domestic market and continue on to an international scale, by entering Western European markets first, then rolling out in the rest of the world. Skincare is a global need, and all our products are currently designed to satisfy strict international regulations.

all images courtesy

What were your backgrounds before starting Phenic? Sophia El-Hayek: I worked as a project manager in the creative department of a consumer-goods company. I have a bachelor’s in International Business and an MBA. Alexandra Haigis: I have a bachelor’s in international business, and am currently pursuing my MBA. I’ve worked for four years marketing the architecture, engineering, and construction industries. How did you become interested in skincare? El-Hayek: Attaining a clear glowing complexion was always a dream of mine growing up. I struggled with acne for most of my life, and because of that I developed an extensive skincare routine. Taking care of my skin is something that I’m passionate about. Our skin is with us our entire life, so we need to nourish it continuously. My mother taught me at a young age about how important it is to use quality skincare products daily to build healthy skin for the long run. Haigis: I’ve always been blessed with clear skin. I know this is not the case for many people, and I wanted to bring clean products into the industry that would help, and not merely act as a band-aid. Health and wellness have always been of great interest to me. Your skin eats whatever is put on it, so I wanted to develop products without any chemicals that we don’t fully know the long-term effects of. What was the first product you created? El-Hayek: The product that started it all is our Oil Cream Facial Moisturizer, with a blend of some of nature’s most skin-nourishing ingredients, such as olive squalene oil, shea butter, and honey. It has a rich texture that melts as it is applied and gives skin such a wonderful hydrated glow. Applying it before bed adds a bit of luxury to our daily skincare routines. Haigis: The recipe is meaningful to us. It’s an adaptation of one that was passed down to Sophia from

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essentialViewing

Kors with Bella Hadid at the 2019 CFDA Awards

Chic looks from the designer’s Fall ’19 catwalk

The of

Kors Perfectly suited to our ever-shrinking attention spans, the new mini-documentary Michael Kors: A Portrait impressively manages to feature the highlights of the designer’s career in just under eight minutes. Launched last week on YouTube’s new fashion vertical, the film begins with Kors’ childhood, filled with plenty of vintage footage from his formative years spent growing up in the suburbs of New York, as an only child surrounded by strong women. The quick flick is peppered with fun facts about Kors. One such morsel? Kors redesigned his mother’s wedding dress at a mere 5 years old. Director Alison Chernick then brings us to the designer’s early years in the Big Apple, at the height of the Studio 54 era. “I came to New York in the late ’70s. The city was gritty, it was rough, but I was full of optimism and thought that everything was limitless,” he says in the film. Kors landed a job at Lothar’s, where he sold jeans to customers such as Jackie Kennedy and Goldie Hawn. While working at the Midtown boutique, Kors caught the eye of Dawn Mello, Bergdorf Goodman’s longtime fashion director and president, who offered to help the aspiring design talent if he ever wanted to start his own line. Kors instantly began sketching and created his own line before taking on the role of creative director at Céline in 1997, where the experience opened his eyes to the magnitude of global fashion. Eventually, Kors’ namesake label skyrocketed to success, and the rest is history. “I am here to make people feel their best self,” Kors says at the end of the film. “It’s a gift that you get to love what you do and get to create things that excite you, be around people who inspire you. The greatest thing for a designer is to say…there are no limits. Whatever you’re dreaming of, we can make your fantasy come true. Fashion people should smile more, because they’re lucky. It’s the greatest joy in the world.”

(From left) Kors with Gigi Hadid at the 2109 Met Gala; with fellow sunglass aficionado Anna Wintour

firstview (4); getty images (3); patrickmcmullan.com (1); all others courtesy

Course

Kors shows off his playful spirit at the July launch of his latest fragrance, Wonderlust.

The doc is packed with vintage gems—(from above) Kors flashes his famous grin backstage, and hard at work sketching.

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Find your perfect fit at LIMcollege.edu/NYC

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Profile for DAILY FRONT ROW INC

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