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SEPTEMBER 10–11, 2016

2016

FASHION MEDIA AWARDS Glenda Bailey Jim Nelson Katie Grand Sebastian Faena Kaia Gerber Miles McMillan Calvin Klein Derek Blasberg & Tommy Hilfiger

Self-portrait by Kaia Gerber and Sebastian Faena


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MOM STARS ALLISON JANNEY AND ANNA FARIS AT THE HÔTEL PLAZA ATHÉNÉE IN PARIS PHOTO: PATRICK DEMARCHELIER ALLISON: JACKET BY VERA WANG, VINTAGE EARRINGS AND BRACELET FROM KENTSHIRE, VINTAGE NECKLACE FROM EARLY HALLOWEEN, PANTS BY VICTORIA BECKHAM, SHOES BY GIANVITO ROSSI; ANNA: DRESS BY GIULIETTA, VINTAGE EARRINGS FROM EARLY HALLOWEEN, TIGHTS BY FALKE, SHOES BY MANOLO BLAHNIK


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MINISKIRT MOMENT!

RENOVATION DIARY!

WITH IRIS APFEL

WITH LINDA FARGO, WHO’S BEEN BUSY REIMAGINING BERGDORF GOODMAN’S NEW MAIN FLOOR. EXPECT PARTIES THERE ALL WEEK LONG.

You recently turned 95! How did you celebrate? Believe it or not, I received about 60 telephone calls. Then I went to a lovely little party for my darling friend Alexis Bittar—our birthdays are a few days apart, so we had 40 people for drinks and a picnic dinner at the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens.

How long has this project been in the works?

People seem to love it. Some things are already selling well and aren’t even in the store. Do you like it?

SCENE

Yes! Love the suede miniskirt. Me too. I wish I was about 50 years younger, though.

Congrats are in order for Leslie Price. The former Racked editor has signed on as Man Repeller’s editorial director. Leandra Medine, meanwhile, has taken the role of chief creative officer (and CEO, of course). • Speaking of new gigs, Google has enlisted Kate Lanphear to consult on its new Fashion Week product. Expect shoppable show coverage, street style, a feed of stories, and a searchable show calendar. And it’s not Lanphear’s sole gig: She also signed on as a contributing editor to The Editorialist. Darling, you were missed!

TODAY!

10 THINGS YOU DON’T KNOW ABOUT ME!

At Samsung 837, Charlotte Tilbury will unveil her new fragrance, and on Sunday, 9/11, CFDA members Timo and Gypsy Sport show off their collections at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., respectively. Think virtual reality, live streaming, installations, and loads of high-tech innovations.

WITH TOWN & COUNTRY EDITRIX STELLENE VOLANDES

1. My uniform: Marni and Manolos. 2. Where I spent my summer vacation: traveling through Greece to Milos, to the Poseidonion Grand Hotel in Spetses, and to the AmanZoe in Porto Heli. 3. I believe: South Fork for fun, North Fork to get away from it all. 4. For my new Rizzoli book, Jeweler, which comes out September 20, I profiled 17 modern masters, including Lauren Adriana and Elena Votsi. 5. I can do the full Anything Goes Reno Sweeney role in tap shoes—for confirmation, see my Poly Prep yearbook. 6. If you are looking for me, try my regular tables at Avra, Amaranth, and Sant Ambroeus. 7. I saw Hamilton—original cast—seven times. 8. I have a lot of jewelry, but I never take off my Sidney Garber rolling bracelets. 9. I taught high school English at LaGuardia High, aka the Fame School. 10. I don’t drive. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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In some ways, you could say the project started when Josh Schulman entered the building four years ago as the new incoming president and remarked about all the wasted soaring walls in the expansive jewelry areas. No one had ever thought about

rethinking the sacred cow at the very center of the store! Technically speaking, it’s been a two and a half year project.

What was your starting point, creatively? The building itself, and the legacy signatures we’ve come to be remembered for, such as the chandeliers, the elaborate plaster work, and the store layout as a series of grand salons. We just needed to improve upon history, very carefully and thoughtfully, and in an evolutionary way. Whatever we do now needs to have a modern elegance, and a form of classicism befitting the dream of Bergdorf Goodman, a design and refresh that can sustain itself beautifully over time and changing tastes.

A lot of top designers have created exclusive merchandise to toast the project. Any favorites? I might have to admit it would be the Gucci bag, which Alessandro [Michele] personally worked on. Anyone who knows me knows I have a weakness for hearts, chains and red lips.

What is your favorite room? The Jewelry Salon. It’s probably the most transformed, and shifts the dynamic of the whole main floor. It was probably the most intricate, difficult, and anxietyproducing, but it also uses the most beautiful materials, like antique glass, rock crystal, minerals, and megawatt chandeliers. I love unapologetically dramatic spaces!

B FA . C O M ( 5 ) ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

What have the reactions to your INC International Concepts line been like?


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Brandusa Niro

Editor in Chief, CEO

WHICH MAGAZINE INSPIRED YOU TO WORK IN MEDIA?

WITH DESIGNER CATHERINE HOLSTEIN

Walk us through Khaite’s aesthetic. It finds a confidence in the contrasts between masculine and feminine, strength and softness, structure and fluidity. It’s streamlined American sportswear with attention to craftsmanship and fit to invoke warmth in feeling.

How did you apply the lessons learned from your eponymous brand and previous gigs to this project?

KHAITE

I was very young—a junior at Parsons—when Julie Gilhart bought my thesis collection for Barneys. While I ended up working on that brand for four years and selling to 45 accounts worldwide, I had no real consumer-facing experience to apply to selling seasons. Thus, I was not in tune with what my customer needed from me, nor her buying patterns. I think the most important lessons I learned from working with Gap, J.Crew, Vera Wang, Maiyet, and The Elder Statesman as both director and consultant were that women across the board from mass to luxury had similar buying patterns. And that quality product is the most important, starting with fabric and yarns.

NEW EDITRIX ALERT! WITH TEEN VOGUE’S ELAINE WELTEROTH

What’s the dynamic among you, Phillip Picardo, and Marie Suter? My mother has a saying, “Iron sharpens iron.” It’s the best way to describe our dynamic. We feed off of one another’s creativity, passion, ideas—and ultimately, we make one another stronger. How are you keeping digital-obsessed teens interested in print? For teens especially, being a part of a community is so important, and subscribing to a print title like Teen Vogue is like signing up for a club that serves you on a more personal level. How does your content speak to them? We’re evolving to stay in step with readers’ interests. In the past year especially, we’ve become a destination for tackling social justice, sexual health, and race relations, right alongside relevant fashion, beauty, and entertainment coverage. We’ve managed to pivot without alienating hardcore fashion lovers because we celebrate how multidimensional they actually are.

You’ve named your three signature denim styles after two friends. The Vanessa was after [Va]Ness[a] Traina, Catherine after myself, and Kassandra was for Kassandra Lao, whom I met at Maiyet, where she was in charge of development. She came on to help me in the beginning but has taken a leave of absence to travel North and Central America with her husband in their RV!

THE DAILY+#ALDOCREW

CHICSTER OF THE DAY MARTA POZZAN @marta_pozzan, martapozzan.com What’s the story behind your website? It’s a curated gallery of images—art, fashion, cinema, design—that feature shopable products through story-telling. I’m focusing on video content, where I feature brands through mini films. How did growing up in Milan influence you? It helped me acquire that classic and chic Italian style. It was only after living in London and then moving to L.A. that my style became more international. I was then more keen to mix edgier elements, such as funky sunglasses, oversize dresses and pants, and way less traditionally structured pieces. The Eliliane,

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To advertise, call (646) 768-8102 Or e-mail: mark@dailyfrontrow.com GETTY IMAGES The Official Photo Agency of The Daily Front Row

The Daily Front Row is a Daily Front Row Inc. publication. Copyright 2016. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Requests for reprints must be submitted in writing to: The Daily, Attn: Tangie Silva, 250 West 57th Street, Ste. 301, New York, NY 10107.

SEPTEMBER 10–11, 2016

2016

FASHION MEDIA AWARDS Glenda Bailey Jim Nelson Katie Grand Sebastian Faena Kaia Gerber Miles McMillan Calvin Klein Derek Blasberg & Tommy Hilfiger

SELF-PORTRAIT BY KAIA GERBER AND SEBASTIAN FAENA

Elaine Welteroth ON THE COVER:

All available at aldoshoes.com. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

Self-portrait of Kaia Gerber and Sebastian Faena, both in Saint Laurent tuxedos. Fashion Editor: Paige Reddinger; Hair by Teddy Charles; Makeup by Valery Gherman.

B FA . C O M ( 1 ) ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

KHAITE THE GREAT!

Deputy Editor Eddie Roche Executive Editor Sassy! I cried Ashley Baker the day it Managing Editor folded. Jane Tangie Silva Pratt forever! Design Director Jill Serra Wilde W—my mom Fashion Editor always read it, and it’s always Paige Reddinger been so forwardContributing Editor thinking. Lauren Smith Brody Senior Editor Kristen Heinzinger Associate Editor Sydney Sadick Art Directors Teresa Platt, Magdalena Long Contributing Photographer Giorgio Niro Contributing Photo Editors Emma Schwartz, Hannah Turner-Harts Contributing Copy Editor Joseph Manghise Imaging Specialists George Maier, RJ Hamilton Editorial Assistant Kassidy Silva


SETTING THE STANDARD Source: 2016 Spring Ipsos Affluent Survey

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MEATPACKING MUSTS!

THE EDITORS OF BON APPÉTIT HAVE BROKEN DOWN THE TOP SPOTS TO DINE WHEN YOU’RE HEADING TO SHOWS IN THE NABE. 1. Breakfast: THE WILD SON

Hugh Grant and Meryl Streep

Juice, glorious juice! There are around 10 kinds on The Wild Son’s menu, served in a rustic space dressed with ivy plants. In addition to the juice, the grains-andgreens–loaded menu is the kind of food that will make you feel like you got up on the right side of the bed—even if you didn’t. 53 Little W. 12th St.

PAGE COUNT!

WITH ANTHONY CENNAME, PUBLISHER, WSJ. MAGAZINE Your September issue was the biggest yet. Pourquoi?

2. Coffee: BIRCH COFFEE

2

3. Lunch: UNTITLED On the ground floor of the slick Whitney Museum of American Art, designed by Renzo Piano, Untitled is comfortable and vibrantly delicious. 99 Gansevoort St., untitledatthewhitney.com

4

The vibe here is all Amalfi Coast, all the time. 820 Washington St., santinanyc.com

5. Drinks: THE JANE HOTEL With its disco ball, fireplace, and antique rugs, The Jane Ballroom looks like the set of a Wes Anderson after-hours scene, feels like a mellowedout Studio54, and tastes like Champagne. In short: It’s a ball. 113 Jane Street, thejanenyc.com

Hailey Baldwin

Meryl Streep is on the cover. Do you have a favorite Meryl movie? Doubt. She plays a nun at a Catholic school, and she reminds me very much of the nuns I had at school.

What should we keep an eye out for this fall? We have some very vibrant issues coming up, especially the Innovators issue. It’s our sixth one. Every year we raise the bar, and I want to make it our best ever. The night of the Innovator Awards on November 2 will be very telltale. We’ll fill the room with 240 of the best people. It’ll be a week before the election, and we’ll definitely trump the news that night.

In her new movie, Florence Foster Jenkins, she plays a not-so-great singer. What kind of singer are you? [Laughs] I’m a good imitator. I don’t know if I could imitate Meryl, though. I’ve never met her. I’m a big fan of Sharon Stone—I’ll be spending time in Martha’s Vineyard with her, and I’m hoping to get a shot of her holding up the magazine. The year that she didn’t win an Oscar, she lost it to Meryl!

WITH HOPE GREENBERG

What’s up with your new venture, Soapbox Strategists? 3

5

MODEL DU MOMENT! WITH HAILEY BALDWIN

You’ve had quite the busy year. How are you juggling it all? I try to find some downtime. I’ve had some good portions of it this summer where I’ve just chilled, traveled, and hung out with my friends. And a good book never hurt anybody!

You have more than 7M IG followers. Do you read comments? I shut off my comments, for the most part. I don’t want to hear them anymore…I just can’t deal. But the people who are kind and do support me are super awesome.

My partner, Catherine Cantave, and I met while we were working at Joe Fresh. We realized that we had different but complimentary experience—where my background is content, hers is digital strategy. Working on social media at Joe Fresh and meeting with a lot of digital agencies, we felt like there was something missing that we could offer brands—equally strong execution in both content creation and optimization.

What kinds of projects are you working on? Among other things, we’ve relaunched Allure’s Allure Access website, created a new e-mail program for Waterworks and relaunched their social media channels, and worked with the Architectural Digest Design Show on social media content and campaigns.

What are your thoughts on the direct-to-consumer runway show? If what I’m doing now has taught me anything, it’s that every industry has to continue to evolve. There’s no denying the immediacy of the consumer buying cycle, so if you’re a brand or designer selling clothes, you need to be making them accessible exactly when and how people want to buy them, which is as soon as they hit the runway. PROMOTION

PERFECT STRUCTURE DEREK LAM Fall 2016

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

“THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE IS UP JUST 4 PERCENT… BUT THAT REALLY BUCKED THE TREND.”

DIGITAL STORYTELLING!

4. Dinner: SANTINA Renzo Piano also designed this Italian restaurant, with a menu that stresses fish and vegetables (get the giardinia crudités or the artichokes-and-grapes salad).

All the creative was stellar, but Stuart Weitzman really stepped up to the plate. They came out with a four-page unit on 110-pound stock that was positioned between the editor’s letter and the masthead. I think Gigi Hadid shot by Mario Testino is resonating very well with our audience. Gigi is very WSJ. I also like what Demna Gvasalia at Balenciaga has done with his creative, having it shot by Mark Borthwick.

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B FA . C O M ( 3 ) ; E V E R E T T C O L L E C T I O N ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

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Birch’s singleorigins brews have grown this shop into a local chain in just seven years, but each location feels convivial. As the company’s tagline goes, “We love coffee, plants, puppies, and you.” 56 Seventh Ave., birchcoffee.com

I credit it to marketers gravitating toward a leader, and having a winning combination of people, product, place, and powerful audience—what I like to call the p’s. We’ve become this trusted, fact-based environment, and the reader comes to us for the business knowledge but also when they want to lay back with luxury. The September issue is up just 4 percent, but from what I understand, that really bucked the trend with most September issues.

What were the standout ads?


S:10.25”

S:13”

Makeup artistry by Mizu. ©2016 Maybelline LLC.


WATCH& Learn

MR. TELEVISION Meet the man behind your current tush-on-couch obsession with the boob tube (and pretty much every show you’ve ever loved in this golden age of television): Starz CEO Chris Albrecht, whose vision is stylish, forward-thinking, smart, and sexy. BY MERLE GINSBERG PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA SAMPLE

THE HOT SEAT Albrecht at Starz headquarters, in Los Angeles.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


T

GETTY IMAGES (3); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

hink back on the past five months. Have you left your home for anything beyond work, or to pick up Skinny Cows/Pellegrino, or make a quick Barneys/Sephora run? No? It used to take the lure of soigné soirees, clothes, wine, and sex to zap the attention of the glitterati. Now all it takes is a new season of Outlander. Or The Girlfriend Experience. Or Game of Thrones. We’ve morphed into the Walking WellDressed Dead, thanks to the constant, charming, good-looking, high-IQ companionship of…premium cable. Premium cable will never leave you. It doesn’t talk back. And as far as we know, it has no calories. So who’s behind this mass seduction of the best and brightest eyeballs? What is the common thread behind all these well-costumed shows (plus, let us not forget Oz, The Wire, The Sopranos, Sex and the City, Deadwood, Blunt Talk, Six Feet Under, True Blood, Boardwalk Empire, Boss, Black Sails, Power, The White Queen…)? That would be Chris Albrecht, 64, current CEO of Starz and former actor/stand-up comic turned ICM agent (repping Jim Carrey, Keenen Ivory Wayans, Billy Crystal, Whoopi Goldberg) turned HBO chief, who spent 22 years there in its heyday, creating its heyday. At the helm of Starz since 2010, Albrecht has seen the company through going public in 2013 and its sale to Lionsgate for $4.4 billion this past July. In other words, there’s a lion’s-size opp for growth, and he’s in charge. Right on the border of WeHo and Beverly Hills, Albrecht’s office at Starz gives a glimpse into his personal stars: the Rat Pack. Above the sofa hangs a giant framed photo of Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin with a private plane. Boss Albrecht lives a fairly privileged, well-outfitted life too—when he isn’t working 15 hours a day, dealing with staff, showrunners, show creators, actors, writers, network execs, agents, producers…. And when Albrecht strides confidently into the room, he’s in a gray chalk-stripe suit. First impression: confident tough guy. But a mellifluous voice and well-thought-out strategies reveal he rules with an open mind more than an iron fist. Elegance and intelligence are his calling cards. But then again, with that résumé, who needs calling cards? How does it feel to be the guy who’s credited with ushering in this so-called golden age of television? Well, I don’t know if this is the fourth, fifth, or sixth golden age of television. What was the Bronze Age? [Laughs.] I like to remind myself that I’ve been associated with hundreds of shows, and they all have one thing in common: They’re all television shows. Which means, it’s nothing we should take too seriously. Well, everyone else is taking it very seriously! You have to take some credit, right? You’re only as good as the people who come to work with you. You can’t have too many smart people in the room. When people ask, “What’s your secret?” I answer, “Stay close to as many talented people as possible.” At HBO we offered talented people an opportunity that didn’t exist before, a real growth period in the premium business. We were bold and we had money. When Tom Fontana first did Oz in 1997, other writers and producers looked

THE TV GENIUS OPINES ON...

SATC’S FASHION “From the beginning we had this vision that the stuff the characters were wearing could not be what was in the stores. It had to be stuff you’d want to see in the store, but couldn’t find. That’s how the show became a tastemaker— and how luxury brands wanted their clothes on the show.”

OZ’S SEX

AND THE HUMANITY OF IT ALL “The thing about Sex and the City was if you lived in Cleveland, you got the show. But if it was set in Cleveland, you wouldn’t have watched the show. It had the aspirational, glamorous part, but what those women were dealing with—fears, hopes—were universal.”

GAME OF THRONES’ ENDGAME

“Oz had sex and violence, sure. But it wasn’t male/female sex—it was naked guys droppin’ soap. It was certainly shocking but poetic in its own way too.”

“Carolyn Strauss, my brilliant HBO lieutenant at the time, brought it to me and said, ‘We’ve never tried fantasy.' It will be interesting to see what HBO is like when that show is gone. When I was there, Thrones and Boardwalk were in development; True Blood was in production.”

at that show and went, “S**t! You can do this on television?!” Money, boldness, opportunity—not a bad combination. I recently had lunch in New York with Beau Willimon, the guy who created House of Cards. He has a new show and said, “I’m only bringing it to this guy, maybe this guy, and you—I’ve always been fascinated by your career.” A good way to start a lunch if you’re trying to sell a show! You’re known for your relationship with talent. Maybe that comes from the way you started, as a stand-up comic! Are you still funny? That depends on whether or not anyone thought I was funny! Well, I think I’m still funny. Depends on the time of the day. But as an actor, I didn’t start in comedy because I was funny. Another actor [comedy act partner Bob Zmuda] convinced me it was a great place to showcase your talent. Jimmy Walker had just gotten Good Times; Freddie Prinze, Chico and the Man. Pryor was the hottest guy around. Perhaps that explains your connection with actors? I don’t know if I’m really an actor at heart, so much as I believe anything you do is playing a role. Whether it’s the role of the outspoken younger

programming exec, the visionary, or the role of the public company CEO. What got me here were these personas. Why did premium cable come to comedy so much later than it did to drama? Comedy’s hard. You have to do everything you do— great characters, story, a great world—and be funny. That added “and” is a pretty significant challenge. But one of the staples of premium, at HBO especially, was stand-up shows. That’s how Comic Relief started. It was a great, inexpensive way of doing programming when it started. Then it all changed dramatically. The hallmark of many of the early HBO shows was tough language, violence, sex, period pieces. But premium cable’s flooded with these things now! How do you approach programming choices at Starz, which was a bit of a late bloomer? And how does social media play into it? At Starz, it was—and is—all about serving the underserved audience, right? Almost nobody was making shows for women, black people, fanboys, when we started doing it in 2010, when I got there. And we’re able to do that because social media is king of the hill. It empowers the performer and ratings too. You know, these networks say they have


WATCH& Learn

“THE DECISIONS I MAKE ARE BASED ON BUILDING A BUSINESS, NOT ON GETTING FAMOUS.” to me about Outlander! Same with the Evil Dead fans, waiting for it forever. We premiered the first American Gods trailer at Comic Con this summer. It was one of the best-received trailers of anything there, because the fans got so excited. So instead of coming up with a show and finding the group who wants to see it, go find the group, then give them the show. If you can put ardent fans together with ardent creators…it’s a good combo! And now you’re the CEO of a public company. How does that change your business strategies? It’s about learning how to take different advice from different people. Although this job’s complicated, one simple thing is: What's our goal? And the goal at Starz is to increase shareholder value. As the CEO of HBO, I wasn’t thinking about shareholder value but

about how much money I was getting, how much HBO made. But a public company CEO? You’re totally aligned with the shareholder. The decisions I make are based on building a business, not on getting famous, because being famous and making money are not the same thing. You were president of IMG from 2007 to 2008, and I hear you were very taken with the fashion world. Why not base a Starz show on it? There hasn’t been one since Sex and the City. The fashion world is starved for a show like that! When I got to IMG, the division that was really happening was fashion. It was so much fun to see what they created, get beneath that world. There’s never been a great TV show set in the fashion world, has there? We tried. Whether it’s Entourage in the fashion world, or Sex and the City in the fashion world, you’re doomed. Taking one or two ingredients from one show and just moving them, you don’t achieve that same magic. Even that documentary on Anna, The September Issue, was just okay. Now, the Valentino one? That was amazing. The fashion world in and of itself isn’t that interesting to the layman. It has to come from a particular and knowing point of view. Everyone’s complaining that there are too many shows to watch now! How do you deal with that? I don’t deal with it! I don’t watch anything! I do watch my own shows. But often I’m watching two versions of the same episode. I don’t learn anything by watching a lot of other shows. I don’t feel that I’m missing out on anything. I’m thrilled that people are so captured in all the premium cable shows. I can’t say I think it’s good for society or the world [Laughs], but it’s certainly good for me and friends of mine! ß

THE SECRET CAMPAIGN BEHIND THE WIRE

THE POWER OF THE GIRLFRIEND EXPERIENCE

“The Wire is now considered the most famous show on cable television, but only after we took it off. Nobody watched it! I kept it on because I liked it. And because [showrunner] David Simon—a passionate, smart, good guy and a pain in the ass—would write these letters at the end of every season to me and Carolyn Strauss. Single-spaced! Pages and pages. And I’d say, ‘I don’t know—I think we should just pick it up so I don’t have to read the letter. And the most painful thing about it was knowing how much angst David had and his passionate plea to keep this on. He never gave up!”

“Well, who doesn’t want to be involved with a vision that came from Steven Soderbergh’s head? The man has had some of the most original ideas in storytelling, told in the most original ways.”

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

EVERETT COLLECTION; COURTESY

a strategy—but it looks to me like they’re attempting to do shows for everyone. Well…everyone’s hard to get. Beyoncé doesn’t have everyone. Taylor Swift doesn’t have everyone. Oprah. LeBron. Well, maybe Adele has! But what you can do with social media is create this constituency. To attract people who will pay for our service, we’ve got to give them something they find worth paying for. Outlander definitely has a lot of sex. How is that different from other premium cable shows? It’s about the point of view. The empowered female protagonist that Diana Gabaldon created, the empowerment fans feel watching Claire, is a different experience…it isn’t so much sex, but what it provokes. Go back to social media—Power, Outlander—those fans are our auxiliary marketing team. They’re more credible than any review. They count when it comes to awards too. The fans of Outlander were up in arms when the show wasn’t nominated for Emmys in key categories. I’d much rather have that vocal audience, because that show is really precious to them, than a small group of people who decide it’s awards-worthy. Awards 0and making money don’t necessarily go hand in hand. The social media being done by fans really grows a show out. It’s wonderful feedback for the producers. They take that more to heart than what we say. So how do you find the next underserved audience? We’re trying to find things for the Hispanic world now. The LGBT audience. And fanboys and fangirls. We’re really trying to fulfill the fans. Those Outlander fans were out there for 20 years! When I travel, all these women approach me—they want to talk


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Makeup artistry by Carole Colombani. ©2016 Maybelline LLC.


ICONStatus

BENSIMON MAXIMUS

Legendary photographer Gilles Bensimon has been behind some of the most iconic fashion covers of all time. Now, the unrepentant jet-setter is back at French Elle and is lending his talents to Maxim, which is being reimagined by its entrepreneurial owner-slash-editor in chief, Sardar Biglari. Over breakfast at Balthazar, Bensimon filled us in.

You’ve become a creative adviser to Sardar Biglari. How is that role working out for you? I love it. When we really started to re-do the magazine, it started with the cover of Alessandra [Ambrosio], who is one of my favorite models. My idea is that every woman is beautiful, and it’s never about being naked. The idea is to look sophisticated, and always keeping sexiness in the picture. And it works quite well at Maxim, I must say. The newsstand numbers are very strong. What’s your vision for the covers? What are you looking for? A different kind of beauty, and we really want the models to participate and be excited about shooting with us. Take Sara Sampaio—we shot her floating in a pool. It was not an obvious cover, but really, it could work for many fashion titles. For Ashley Graham, I was thinking of a cover I shot a long time ago, of Inès de la Fressange naked behind a shirt. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

What are the key components of a perfect cover? It should ask a question. I don’t know if you remember the first Elle cover of Renée Simonsen— big smile, blonde, in close-up. We also did one of Elle Macpherson with sunglasses on, licking her lips. It’s like a present. Now, when you see the September issues, it’s “500 belts and shoes,” “964 looks”… Are we seeing too many of the same people on the covers of magazines? Yes. The thing about Sardar is that he’s very much an entrepreneur. He’s been working since he was 19. I must say, I like him very much. Some people say he’s not the obvious editor in chief. But no one’s a stereotype of an editor in chief. He’s an example of people being successful in doing what they do. It’s inspirational. Maxim is, in fact, about the dream—the cars, the motorcycles, traveling all over the world. What excites you on the newsstand? I don’t look at fashion magazines anymore. I love

Monocle, and I also love The New Yorker, and I would be happy if they married together—that The New Yorker becomes more Monocle. You’re shooting a lot for French Elle these days. Again! I do about 10 covers a year for them. How are you balancing all this stuff? Are you living on a plane? Yeah. Every week. But I love to escape. Escaping is my life force. I’m not obsessed with reality. I haven’t had the pleasure of being on set with you, but from what I hear, you’re pretty minimal. You don’t have 18,000 assistants or a lot of equipment… No, I just try to find the image. When I started to take pictures, I had no assistant. I had one camera, not two. Even the big photographers only had one assistant. There are some shoots that are such a production. I think sometimes the client loves that— the overproduction.

COURTESY

BY ASHLEY BAKER


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ICONStatus How much do you rely on a fashion editor on your shoots? There are different kinds. The best example is Nicole Crassat, who passed away. She was amazing. First, she was extremely good-looking, and tough—you have no idea. Also, obsessed. She was the first to put a Chanel jacket with jeans. She was the first who gave the freedom to reinvent something. Carlyne Cerf [de Dudzeele] came directly from this school. Carlyne is exactly what makes a great fashion editor—she had a classic base, but she knows what she likes, and she was able to go in a completely different direction. She also had the passion that all great editors have. From my understanding, you’re a little bit of a stylist yourself. You know which clothes are going to look good. That’s a problem sometimes—I say no, I don’t think it’s good enough. But I try to restrain myself. But I don’t want to be sure about anything. I don’t want to be convinced that I know. I’m still excited by photography, because I think I’m learning the entire time. You have a huge following on Instagram. Not huge, but pretty big for two years. At first, I refused to do it. For a long time, I’ve sent my friends two pictures a day. Why two pictures? Because they mean something to me. How many friends get these? A couple hundred. Did your daughters convince you to go on Instagram? No, it was Arthur Elgort’s agent. We were having a drink at Sant Ambroeus, and she said, “Gilles, you have to do this.” And so I started. Most of the [Instagram feeds] I see are really boring—the food, for example, I can’t stand. And the selfie, sometimes, is really annoying. Why do you think models like to shoot with you so much? Because I respect them. If you’re a model, everybody’s touching and looking at you, and I think it must be annoying. I try to make them comfortable when I work with them, and make them forget that we’re working. We just take pictures. And I shoot relatively fast! ß

COURTESY

MAXIMUM CHIC Bensimon’s vision for Maxim relies on a more fashion-centric approach to beauty and sexuality.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


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FREE GRANGER

As the longtime steward of Esquire, David Granger was a best-in-class kind of editor, delivering a mix of heart-wrenching and guffaw-inducing stories on the monthly. When he exited the title this spring, more than a few were heartbroken, but over late-afternoon drinks at Old Town, he reveals what’s next. BY ASHLEY BAKER What’s happening? When I got s**t-canned from Hearst Corporation, there was a little period of panic: What was I going to do all day? For the first two or three weeks, I took way too many meetings, because I thought I had to fill up my days. But coming into the city and going to meetings was just a drag. I decided halfway through that period that starting June 1, I was going to do nothing for as long as I could. No plans but lay by the pool, play golf, play tennis, have a beer at 10 in the morning, read all day, nap in between reading and drinking beer. It was fantastic. It became clear to me pretty early on that I’d been asking myself the wrong question, which was, “What am I going to do?” The

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question I should have been asking myself is, “What do you want to do?” I also figured out that I don’t want to work for anybody. I got my financial adviser and my lawyer to help me create a corporation: I’m an officially sanctioned New York state entity called Granger Studios, and I have taken on a few clients. I’m currently actively advising a tech start-up, a magazine start-up, a national magazine, and a mobile publishing platform. The magazine start-up—Racket—is my first pro bono client. It’s a quarterly about tennis with high production values. The other half of Granger Studios, which may end up being the bigger half, is that I’ve affiliated myself with two different literary agencies: Kuhn Projects, run by David Kuhn, and Zachary Shuster

Harmsworth. Ultimately, I want to facilitate the creation of things that have a chance to last. I want to get outside the endlessly shrinking news cycle. I’m just getting started with those two things, and I have a list of 20 projects that I’d like to get done—some are books, some are TV-related, some film-related. One, if it ever happened, could be a musical. I wouldn’t have pegged you for a musical lover. I’ve seen two that I’ve liked in the past two years, Hamilton and An American in Paris. I’m always so uncomfortable in the seats because they are tiny, and I have a little claustrophobia thing. In both cases, I forgot how uncomfortable I was. Those are pretty much the only musicals I enjoy, unless you count The Lion King, which literally changed my life. It made me want to make a better magazine and be a better human. Any interest in writing a book? My friends and my agent were up my butt for decades to write a book. I never found an idea that I was convinced I would actually do. I’m also aware how difficult writing is—I got to hire so many people who are better than I could ever be, so it’s a little daunting to think about doing that for a living. But it’s not out of the question. What kind of story turns you on the most? There’s one story that has constantly delighted me, from idea to final publication. I got an idea memo from Peter Griffin, my former deputy editor and the smartest man in the world. The entire idea was one short interrogatory sentence: $1,000 for your dog? We went to Tom Chiarella, who went on the road and he started to try to buy things from people for $1,000. He’d go into a bar and say, “Would you sell


GETTY IMAGES (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

“I ALWAYS LIVE IN DEATHLY FEAR OF BEING BORING.”

SEEKING CONFRONTATION Esquire’s visual identity went through several iterations under Granger’s watch, but a dedication to stop-in-your-tracks covers was a consistent theme.

me your wallet for $1,000?” He then moved to going into Walmart or Kmart and asked people to sell their wedding bands for $1,000—in front of their wives. The final thing was he had to ask somebody if they would sell him their dog for $1,000. The first couple of people he asked were so angry at the thought of it that he was physically threatened. He was about to give up when he saw an older woman in downtown Indianapolis walking her dog. He went over to her and asked her, and she said, “Can you give me a minute to think about it?” She then said, “I think I know what you’re doing—I think you’re trying to figure out what people value. I would never consider your question, but I’ve been diagnosed with cancer, and I know I’m not going to live much longer. So I’ve been wondering what I would do with my dog.” It went from being this frivolous little gimmick story to something really serious about what people value; it was beautiful from beginning to end. When a story takes the readers and me on a journey like that, it’s kind of amazing. Are you a visual guy? I don’t know about that, but the most fun we ever had putting out issues of Esquire was in the design and packaging process—coming up with new visual languages to express what you’re doing. A lot of that was f**king around with type or f**king up photography, making pages seem more visually interesting by writing on them or doing lots of weird things on the margins. In a limited way, I think I’m visual because I always want the pages in a magazine to be physically exciting. Do I just put pictures on a page and think that’s art? I’ve never been that guy; I’d rather have fun. My priority is always entertainment. A lot of magazines you might think are visually driven to me seem static—I always wanted our pages to be really active. There are some things that existed simply to make people laugh, or simply to thrill or inform them. Then there are other things that existed because we wanted to evoke an emotional response. You treat all those differently in terms of writing style, design, photography, or illustration. A lot of stories that I published were meant to be taken extremely seriously—some were sad, horrifying—but sometimes they were funny, sometimes they were both. Any entertainment medium’s main competition is every other entertainment medium. People aren’t going to choose your outlet if it’s boring. I always live in deathly fear of being boring. So I maybe overcompensated and make it a little more frantic than it actually needed to be. When did you start really feeling the industry’s change of focus from print to digital? Right around the time that we were trying hard to do gimmicks for our 2006 covers was when all the media started to say print was dead in all its forms. They were mostly talking about the

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newspaper industry, but also books, and they were lumping magazines in with it. I actually think at that point—2006, 2007, most of 2008—magazines were actually extremely healthy, and we had great years. Then the recession hit and everything went to s**t, but the media pundits were still going, “It’s because of the nature of print; it’s because traditional media sucks,” as opposed to [reporting] the world just ended and the nobody has advertised it. I don’t think we ever recovered from that dual blow. 2013 and 2015 were two of the best years in Esquire’s history ever. If you work incredibly hard and have the advertising support and have your expenses cut to the nub, you can actually make a really profitable magazine. The thing that has discouraged me in the last couple of years is the way that all the big magazine companies have been running away from print; they all want to be seen as agnostic content providers. I’ve always thought there was value in print, because it’s a fundamentally different experience if someone is reading a tweet, or watching videos, or reading a blog post than it is if they sit down and read “$1,000 for Your Dog?” There’s a different level of engagement—what all the magazine companies have done is equate those experiences. There’s a much more qualitative experience, for the most part, in reading a magazine, even if it’s not the deepest, most thoughtful magazine in the world, than there is in the vast majority of digital experiences that people have every day, because they’re so short. There’s also difference of intention, and what the creators are doing in creating a magazine story from creating a Facebook post. When the magazine companies decided they were going to play the digital game and say all content is the same, I think they demeaned the potential of magazines. That’s discouraging to me; I think magazines are a really special experience. One of the reason’s I’m working with Racket is because they believe in that. They are going to charge $100 a year for four issues. If they get advertising, that’s great. It’s like the Lucky Peach model—it gets a good amount of advertising; they also get their readers to pay a lot of money for every issue. What do you think about the word content? I f**king hate that word. If I ever use it, I always use the word editorial in front of it. It just means that whatever you fill your space with is of equal value. It drives me insane; I don’t believe that’s true. There are really valuable, thoughtful, ambitious attempts at journalism, and I think there are really s**tty attempts to entertain people for one millisecond. Those are really different experiences. Did you suspect you were about to get fired? Nah, because we had a really good year in 2015. What was it like on your last day at Esquire? There was a long time between when I knew I was fired and when it was announced and when I actually

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left, so it was the longest departure in the history of magazines. David [Carey] wanted me to stay because he was working on various transitions, and I said I’d be inclined to do so if I could get in a final issue. I had so many teary farewells in my office—people coming in to hug me and cry in front of me—I knew I couldn’t take too much more of that, because I was going to start crying all of the time. I gathered my senior people and we went to lunch, and then I just trap-doored, which is the way I leave everything. I have this policy against saying goodbye at a party. I’ll send a thank-you note later, but I’m not going to seek out the host and go, “I’m leaving your party now.” I told my assistant I was going to lunch and I just didn’t come back. Who was the first person you had lunch with after you left Esquire? When it got announced, people were really surprised. I got so many e-mails and texts. A lot of people wanted to take me out. Before anyone knew I was fired, I started going to talk to people who meant a lot to me. The first person I told other than my wife was a guy I didn’t know all that well, John Maeda, whom I consider a wise man; I thought he would have advice. He said, “How you leave will determine your legacy.” He was telling me to leave on as positive and gracious a note as I could. I thought that was really smart, and I tried to. So I threw a party for myself, you know? You had somewhat of an emotional moment at the National Magazine Awards, when you got a standing ovation accepting Esquire’s award for Essays & Criticism. Well, I didn’t cry or anything. I made a couple of jokes before I thanked my team. That was frickin’ amazing. I was trying to keep the news from coming out until after the National Magazine Awards, but then it started to break, and so they made the announcement. In a way it was really lucky, because all these people knew by then, and I’d never gotten a standing ovation before. It was so nice of both Adam Moss and Janice Min to say something nice about me; you don’t have a lot of time up there. It ended up being as good as a departure could be. You were born on Halloween. Any traditions? Well, last year was an anomaly, because in addition to getting fired, which was an amazing emotional experience—everyone should have it—the other emotional experience I had was that my father died earlier in the year, which was way more devastating than I thought. Then my mom had to have her hip replaced, so on my birthday I was with my mom, wife, and siblings. I had dinner with my mom at her house and the next night I went out and celebrated. Usually, we go to our friends’ house, which is like trick-or-treat central. When all our children were little, we’d go there and trick or treat. We had this little red wagon that we’d have tequila, bourbon, and beer in; we would share it with other people who were out watching their kids trick or treat. Now that we’ve aged out of walking around pretending to have [young] children, our friend Molly orders a brisket from Boston, we drink tequila, hand out candy to all the little kids, and it’s nice. These traditions come to an end, but I think we’ll do it this year. This year, you’ll turn 60, right? According to one of Esquire’s Rules for Men, you don’t start understanding life well until you’re 40. What have you figured out at 60? If you drink good tequila, and only good tequila all night long, you’ll never get hungover. ß

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TIME Travel

WHAT ABOUT BOB? As the iconic founder of Spin magazine and one of the modern publishing world’s most original voices, Bob Guccione Jr. has a few things to say about how the most ailing media companies can reinvent themselves. Listen up!

Welcome back. We hear you're launching a new travel site, Wonderlust. It’s a travel site. “Wanderlust” is cliché—I was far more interested in the sense of wonder one has when one travels. Right now, the bar is kind of low— most travel publications are very generic, with a lot of rewritten press releases and fluff. As far as I’m concerned, travel is very holistic—it’s a combination of a wonderful place to stay, a sense of momentarily borrowed luxury, and a lifestyle that’s probably unreal to consider living all the time. There’s also the exposure to the exotic and the alien—the minute you step outside, you’re in a world that you’re unfamiliar with, and you can go really anywhere. What kind of tone will the site adopt? I don’t want it to be literary—I’m very strident in that, because I think literary is sometimes too much work. Everything should be wonderfully written, impressionistic; I want the sense of place in our articles. I don’t want it to be so grand that you have to prepare yourself to read it. I also want something that appeals to people on a very visual level. Throughout my career I’ve given people a sense of the subject, whether it was science or music and youth culture. As for your team? My girlfriend, Liza Lentini, is my executive editor, and my ex-wife, Camilla Paul, is my managing editor. Liza is an award-winning playwright and Camilla is a wonderful former editorial person. We were married 30 years ago, and stayed great friends ever since. My writers and my editors are not travel people, although we are going to bring in a couple of travel experts. When I started Spin, I had almost nobody with an FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

industrial knowledge of music—it’s more about a good story and good craftsmanship. How much content do you plan to be publishing? A couple of hundred pieces a month. I would rather put up less that’s good than more that’s diluted and generic. I’m not interested in this mass LIVING LEGEND conveyor belt of content. (Clockwise from top left) I stress to my editors and Guccione Jr. at a screenwriters never even think of ing of Filthy Gorgeous: the word “content.” If you The Bob Guccione Story in 2013; in his office in think in terms of editorial, 1995; with Jane Homlish you remember the magic and Filthy Gorgeous director Barry Avrich at of the words. TIFF in 2013; with the What do you think first cover of Spin in 1985 of the industry’s frantic pace of content production? It’s suicidal. Look at the results: Fantastically large companies like Buzzfeed have never made a dollar. The notion that people are stupid and are merely just standing there with their mouths open, ready to consume whatever you put in it, is ridiculous. Digital media has followed the exact same arc as the magazine business, and before that, the newspaper business. It’s just done it in a matter of years whereas the magazine business had that arc for a matter of decades. The magazine business was fresh in the

beginning, and everything sold, then it got very voluminous. Magazines ran out of ideas, and were too congested on the newsstands, and so they started artificially inflating their circulations. Of course, it killed them because they weren’t getting any money for their product—and eventually the flaws and its inadequacies showed. The same thing has happened with the internet. In the beginning everything was exciting, everything was consumed, linked, shared, and marveled at; now we’ve started to pick and choose. What will happen? We are building a world we can’t live in. I believe that it will implode and it will rain down on us. The future has to be two things: niche and quality. Thirdly, it needs a strong business model, whereas publications and sites don’t prostitute themselves for any advertiser that wants to spend a dollar. It has to have a solid confident sense of itself. Will some of the big media brands go away? Without a doubt. It’s not the same advantage as it once was to be a very well recognized brand. Michael Wolff said to me, “You can disrupt Condé Nast from day one.” My logical assumption is that it has to come down to who is putting out the most interesting product. You can still compete with a publication like Vogue, and you can beat it. Some people are very vulnerable, because they’ve been cruising on momentum for a long time. That momentum is now useless, because the landscape of media is so changed. In the print world, it’s just crap. But I have a great respect for everyone in the business, because I know how tough it is. ß

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BY ASHLEY BAKER


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FINAL Take

THE MAGIC TOUCH

Behind nearly every striking image is a team of magic makers. Silhouette Studio’s Alex Verhave, Matthew Thompson, and Justine Foord are a unique collective of retouchers who, above all else, are after one thing: remarkable photography. BY KRISTEN HEINZINGER PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEBASTIAN FAENA

What are your backgrounds? Alex: I learned to retouch by drawing maps for geological field surveys. Matthew and I met working together at Steven Klein, and we officially launched the company in 2011. He was Steven’s in-house retoucher, and I was a digital tech. I left to work as Annie Leibovitz's in-house retoucher. I was there for about four years, and during that time, Matthew left Steven’s studio. We started retouching together on odd jobs after work. I started the studio out of a second bedroom in my apartment. After four years, we got some office space and opened up a real company. Justine: I was Mert & Marcus' first in-house retoucher and worked at Milk Studios, and have done several exhibits of my own work. Matt is a budding artist and photographer. He’s very Instagram-based. He calls it digital roaming. We’re all very different personalities, and we complement each other. How did you all meet? Justine: It’s quite romantic. My sister-in-law was coming back from a shoot with Matthew, whom she knew through work. They went out of their way to pick me up and took me home. I was introduced to Matt, and we connected. It was love at first sight! We were all like-minded because we had all come from high-end. Alex: We all decided we wanted to work on our own terms. Justine has worked at major retouching FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

houses in New York and London, and then created her own. This was about coming together and creating an environment where we could do the work we wanted to do with the people we wanted to work with and build something that represented who we are. I think “collective” is a good word for it. What do each of you do? Alex: For any given project, one of us is going to be team captain. That’s where our freelancers come in. We each have clients that, barring major conflict, [we] always work with because they’ve come to trust us with everything. Justine is more beauty and fashion. My strengths are sports, and compositing and construction—putting together 1,000 pieces to look like one. I’ve never seen anyone handle color quite like Matthew. He can take 40 pictures that were shot in 20 different lighting scenarios and make it look like a cohesive body of work. We all work together on almost every project. We’ll critique each other. We go through three or four rounds internally before we go through three or four rounds with photographers and clients. Our job is to keep their world moving and production spinning. You call Silhouette a boutique company—what makes it different? Justine: One of our gifts is that we have close personal relationships with clients. Alex: I see success with a client when they want to

talk to me before the job, when we’re a partner in their vision. With our longtime clients, we do everything they shoot. They’ll call us and say, “I’ve got this idea. Here’s what my vision is and I need to brainstorm how to make it happen.” Sometimes we’ll go on set with them. Everything’s a conversation. It’s not about money; it’s about creating beautiful artwork. The money and the success will flow from doing that consistently. Justine: It’s like a couture dress. At least that’s how I see it. [Laughs] If you put the extra labor of love in, you’re going to see it. Who were some of your first clients? Justine: In England, I worked with Mert & Marcus, Sølve Sundsbø, Brian Adams, Corinne Day, L’Oreal, Grey Advertising, to name a few. Alex: Lately, DVF, Nike, Emma Summerton, Sebastian Mader, Sebastian Faena, Steven Pan, and Dylan Coulter. Do you have a dream client? Justine: I always desired to work with Paolo Roversi. I worked one job with him, which was a dream come true. I like the classic photographers—Avedon and such. The newer photography is different, you know? It’s a very different craft now. Can you elaborate? Alex: There’s a level of speed that’s required now that didn’t exist 10 years ago. Retouching is still coming into its own. Over the past 5 to 10 years we’ve seen the ebb and flow of what’s stereotypically understood as retouching—the hyper-smooth, hyper-real—and there’s been a backlash against it in the public and in the photo community. You’re seeing a return to imagery and simplicity in post-production, but that doesn’t mean that less is done—it just means there’s been an elevated standard. It’s about keeping true to the photography. That’s what we’re after— photography. The less I have to do, the better the picture will be. Good retouching starts with good photography, and that will never change. It doesn’t matter how good of a retoucher you are—if the picture you’re working on isn’t great, sometimes there’s just nothing you can do. Justine: He knows I’m going to disagree on that one! [Laughs] It’s quite surprising what we can do—we can make magic happen. We do pull rabbits out of hats. But if you’ve got a good photographer, then yes, your end result will always be much better. We’re in our little wonderland here. It’s an interesting process that many people don’t really understand. How do you spread the word about Silhouette? Alex: We don’t. [Laughs] We’ve never marketed. It’s all been word of mouth—an organic thing. A photographer will have a client, and we’ll get a job with Nike because the photographer got it, and suddenly their art director is calling us for the next job. Justine: We also do dinners, events, cocktail parties. What are your typical busy seasons? Alex: The week before Thanksgiving and the week before Christmas, and right before August, when everyone is trying to take vacation and finish two months of publications. Justine: We are booked through November already. From the minute I joined over two years ago, I haven’t stopped. Last year was busy because I had an exhibition in Cuba—I’m apparently the first British solo female artist to exhibit in modern time in Cuba. Apart from that, I haven’t stopped. But we’re growing! It’s a beautiful thing. ß


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EMPIRE STATE OF MIND You may have seen Princess Astrid von Liechtenstein perched front row at a couture show, but this royal is far more than a society fixture. Liechtenstein is one-half of the force behind Mattec, a company that executes store build-outs for everyone from Gucci to Maison Margiela. That’s in addition to her robotics and pharmaceutical enterprises. We caught up with Liechtenstein and her business partner Cristian Mattec at The Mark hotel in New York to find out more about their world. BY PAIGE REDDINGER How did you get into this side of the fashion industry? Astrid: First, we do all the pharmacies around Europe. When I took over the company I was trying to figure out how to expand and someone told me that I should go into the luxury space, which is something I was always keen FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

on. So I met Cristian and I tried to convince him to work with me. It took a long time! My robotics company is going to be incorporated into our luxury stores as well, but I cannot say how yet. Cristian: I had been in the business for 10 years. Before leaving my old company, I started my own very small company, Mattec, but soon after, I met the princess and she really trusted my ideas. So we started the new company together while keeping the name. How did the two of you meet? Cristian: I had made some furniture for their pharmacies. Who was your first client? Astrid: Gucci. They came with Cristian. Cristian: Yes, they stuck with us. I’ve done projects for them for 10 years. We’ve done several stores for Gucci. Astrid: Well, yes, and they are having a huge renaissance now. Cristian: We did a new Gucci store in Costa Mesa, finished the 15th of August, and then we came to New York, because we are doing the new store for Vivienne Westwood on Fifth Avenue. Do you also design the interiors? Astrid: Not for Gucci, but if someone wants something designed, we design it! Do you ever get to put you own creative vision into a store? Astrid: We do sometimes for smaller

brands, but actually I prefer to work with the big brands and do a rollout because that’s much better from a business perspective. So I prefer to do more stores and do less of the creative thing. I’m more of a business person than I am an artist. I love beauty and quality, but the creativity I leave to other people. What does it take to create a store from start to finish? Cristian: Six weeks maximum. Astrid: Time is money, because they have the rent to pay and they want it done quickly. Everything is going faster and faster these days, but the beauty of the stores has to stay for a while. In the Gucci store, for instance, everything has changed now that Alessandro Michele is the designer, but some of the stores are still from the era of Tom Ford. The new look is very romantic and then you have Tom Ford’s pure sexuality so those don’t go together at all. It’s really important and you can see how the store affects the customers. You really feel it. Which other stores have you done? Cristian: The John Varvatos store in Westfield Place. Astrid: It was really tough with Westfield, because of all of the security and everything. It was a real nightmare. We’ve also done work for Brioni and

Nancy Gonzalez. Santiago Gonzalez is a good friend of mine. And we did the Maison Margiela store in Milan—it’s really creative and beautiful. Cristian: Vivienne Westwood will open at the beginning of October. You sometimes attend fashion shows as a consumer. Do you also pick up new clients this way? Astrid: I would love to, but Cristian won’t let me! What brands do you love to wear? Astrid: Gucci, Alexander McQueen, and Dolce & Gabbana, who are really good friends of mine. Their Alta Moda collection was stunning. I’m also friends with Rick Owens and I go to his shows, but I really only go to one or two shows per season. What is the hardest store project you’ve ever had to conceive? Astrid: They’re all hard! But the hardest was Christian Louboutin. He’s a very dear friend of mine and it was one of the first projects we did. I called him up and said, “I have this company. Do you think we can do your stores?” and he said, “Yes, no problem! Fantastic!” Everything was so easy, but then we met his CEO, who is a bit tricky—comes from LVMH—and the store planner, who was also a bit difficult. They were already not for me, because I was a friend. They had their own people and I think they didn’t want someone new coming in. But anyway, it was a very tough project and I could have bought many shoes with the money I lost over it! I think Cristian may have lost many hairs over it! But he’s been my friend for 25 years and it was a good PR thing for us in the end. I don’t think we’ve ever had an easy project. It’s like giving birth each time. ß

M E L O N I E F O S T E R H E N N E S S Y; C O U R T E S Y O F M AT T E C ( 2 ) ; G E T T Y I M A G E S

BUILDING BLOCKS (From left to right) The Gucci shop-in-shop at Dover Street Market; Astrid von Liechtenstein front row at Dolce & Gabbana; Bella Hadid holding The Daily’s Mattec-designed FLA award; Astrid von Liechtenstein and Cristian Mattec


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FASHION

School of Fashion: Design, Styling, Journalism and Merchandising Earn a degree or take classes in San Francisco or Online Academy of Art University | Founded in San Francisco 1929 | 888.680.8691 academyart.edu | Yellow Ribbon Participant Visit www.academyart.edu to learn more about total costs, median student loan debt, potential occupations and other information. Accredited member WSCUC, NASAD, CIDA (BFA-IAD, MFA-IAD), CTC (California Teacher Credential).


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©2016 Lexus


AND THE WINNERS ARE… GLENDA BAILEY (Magazine of the Year, Harper’s Bazaar) JIM NELSON (Men’s Magazine of the Year, GQ) KATIE GRAND (Best September Issue, LOVE) SEBASTIAN FAENA (Photographer of the Year) KAIA GERBER (Breakout Model of the Year)

THE 4TH ANNUAL

MILES MCMILLAN (Male Model of the Year) CALVIN KLEIN (Best Campaign) DEREK BLASBERG (TV Personality of the Year) EVA CHEN (Maybelline New York “Make It Happen” Award) & TOMMY HILFIGER (Fashion Visionary)

2016

HOSTED BY ALAN CUMMING FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


BEST SEPTEMBER ISSUE: LOVE

Once again, Katie Grand called in the big guns for her Fall 2016 issue of LOVE—Margot Robbie and Cara Delevingne duke it out on dueling covers. From groundbreaking photo shoots to inventive design and wordplay, LOVE has given the fashion world something to truly adore. During a mini break from her summer vacay, Grand explains how it all came together. BY EDDIE ROCHE Are you still on holiday? Yes—I’m currently on a sun lounger! Nice. Why did you pick Margot Robbie to front this beautiful issue? I knew she was a friend of Cara Delevingne’s, and she said she was really fun and I’d get on with her. A few other people mentioned her as Suicide Squad was coming out, and I knew she was doing some stuff with Calvin Klein. She seemed like the right person at the right time. Cara and Margot are such girl’s girls. I thought the dynamic between the two of them would be right, and it was. Their conversation is a total hoot. I didn’t brief them at all. I knew when Cara interviewed Kim Kardashian for us that she’s so cute and everyone loves her so much. When Margot was taking the photos for us, she said the interview is going to be a nightmare; she wouldn’t be switched off or cautious like she would be with a journalist. I knew it would be quite cheeky. The theme of the issue is a combo of goths and toffs. How did you create that concept? I worked intensely on two shows last season, Marc Jacobs and Miu Miu, and we started with this gothic theme for Marc, and for Miu Miu we did loads of research looking at old issues of British Vogue from the ’80s. We joked the whole time when we were doing Marc that it would be a collection that [fashion director] Panos Yiapanis would love. He’s the ultimate goth. I did more of the British Vogue romp. Bruce Weber lensed a great editorial of Dree Hemingway and Charlie Kennedy. How did you pair them together? It was Bruce’s idea. He wanted to shoot Charlie, and when Bruce is that excited about someone, you kind of believe him. Bruce ran into Dree in L.A., and decided he’d like to shoot her—she’s always been one of our mascots. He was super excited about putting them together. The golden retrievers in the piece are beyond

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adorable. We’d walk into the room, with the magazine on the wall, and every time, we’d stroke the pictures of the golden retrievers. How did you put Kendall Jenner and Kaia Gerber together? Kendall put photos on Instagram of North West, a guy at Coachella, and Kylie Jenner, and I texted [Society agent] Christopher Michael the moment they got posted and asked if Kendall wanted to shoot for us. I got an immediate yes three minutes later.

I asked who she wanted to shoot. Three minutes later he wrote, “Kaia.” It made sense to go and do these pictures together. Our plan was, we won’t send a stylist, it won’t be a big production. It would be better if it’s lo-fi. I knew Kendall was pursuing photography as a passion, but I wasn’t sure how confident she was. Everyone is going bonkers for Kaia. What do you think her career will be like? It’s a no-brainer: She’s tall, she’s got long limbs, she’s got gorgeous hair. I quite like how one of her teeth is slightly wonky; it gives one tiny bit of imperfection. She’s gorgeous and all-American. When you work with her, you see she’s really into modeling. I don’t know if it’s in the genes or she's just watched her mom [Cindy Crawford]. She’s really good. She knows how to move. She looks like a supermodel already. Was it always the plan that Cindy Crawford would tackle hair and makeup? Kendall and I didn’t want a team, and I explained to Christopher that we should do hair and makeup before Kendall gets there, so it felt quite spontaneous. Kaia's team asked if I was okay with Cindy doing hair and makeup. I said, “Yes, of course! That’s brilliant!”

DUELING COVERS Margot Robbie and Cara Delevingne interviewed each other for a combined cover story, while the newsstand featured each woman individually.

COURTESY

LOVE FEST

“I ALWAYS PUT TOGETHER MY HEROES FOR THE SEASON.”


SINGULAR VISION Katie Grand, photographed by Ezra Petronio.

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BRUCE WEBER (2); KENDALL JENNER; LIZ COLLINS; CARIN BACKOFF


KENDALL JENNER (2); CARIN BACKOFF; LIZ COLLINS; BRUCE WEBER

FASHION HEAVEN Among other things, the September issue of LOVE featured Kendall Jenner's photography debut, an Americana-themed take on Lara Stone, and a Bruce Weber editorial featuring Dree Hemingway and Charlie Kennedy.

The “Slaves of New York” editorial with Carolyn Murphy, Adriana Lima, and Estella Boersma is especially strong. We worked with Carin Backoff, who is a relatively new photographer. In the last issue she had shot Kendall, Gigi [Hadid], Emily Ratajkowski, and Jasmine Sanders. I wanted her to carry on photographing drop-dead gorgeous girls, the ones that walk into the room and you want to be them. Where did you find Carin? She’s an assistant to [casting director] Anita Bitton. I didn’t know she was taking pictures, but she posted on her Instagram about doing her photography, and I liked what I saw. She’s very easy; there’s a real lightness in her work. We had to work around her day job. Adriana was shot at 10 p.m. on a Friday night. Carin knows all the girls already, and they like her. How did Lara Stone come into the equation? I always put together my heroes for the season. We’ve worked with Lara on Miu Miu, and she was excited about working again. I wanted to see how many shoots we could do with her, and she’s in three this issue. Jasmine Sanders got a lot of love. She loves modeling. She’s like Adriana. Both of them are insanely dedicated. She’s a really nice, fun girl, and so beautiful. She walks into the room and those eyes are amazing. She makes no denial that she has to work hard to be in this shape. I admire how focused she is on modeling, how much she enjoys it, and how she's decided what she has to go through to be a successful model. What story was hardest to put together in the issue? Bruce and Panos shot very early on, and I got the pictures quite quickly. It was so easy that I knew

“CARA AND MARGOT ARE SUCH GIRL’S GIRLS. I THOUGHT THE DYNAMIC BETWEEN THE TWO OF THEM WOULD BE RIGHT, AND IT WAS.” everything was going to be a battle after that. It’s that normal thing—things fall through and you start off with your dream combinations, but then people aren’t available. I can’t think of anything in particular that was difficult, but as an issue, it was quite tricky. What did you do for fun this summer? I was in Bali for two weeks. Afterward I came to Bellport, New York, to see friends, then went hiking in Los Angeles. You and Marc Jacobs will be getting into your preshow groove again soon. We worked really intensely before the holiday, and we go back and forth with texts all through August. I know what’s going on with the accessories right now, but the clothes are still a mystery. We have our system! ß FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


SEBAST

M

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STIAN’S MOMENT CAPE BY PRADA

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEBASTIAN FAENA


SEBASTIAN FAENA PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

Since he published his first photograph at age 18, this young phenom was never scared to take risks and create his own individual visual language. Today, more than a decade later, he is one of the most original voices of his generation. BY PAIGE REDDINGER What do you love most about what you do as a photographer? The connection with the subject. I’m really shy in real life. I keep a distance from people I’m not close with, but when I’m with someone taking pictures, I become both the photographer and the subject in a way. I become them and they become me. When I’m taking pictures, the relationship with my subjects is much more intense than most of my relationships in real life. Do you think the same is true for your films? No. In films, I’m very focused on getting all the elements right. I only think about excellence. When I’m taking pictures, it’s about the relationship with the subject and getting something out of them that no one has before. I think I’ve accomplished that many times in the past. Such as? Gigi [Hadid] and Kate Upton. I shot their first fashion editorials, maybe saw them in a way other people had not seen them yet. I don’t wait for others to tell me what to like; I like what I like. Celine Dion, was already a legend when I shot her with Carlyne [Cerf de Dudzeele], but it was about getting something from her that people were not expecting. Changing their perception of the subject. I tried to do the same in my first shoot with Lady Gaga, but it was her beginning and she had a very clear vision of how she wanted to be perceived. A few years later, she was much FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

more receptive, when we shot the Bazaar September cover that ran in about 30 countries, we had a true, inspiring creative collaboration. You first started shooting your friends in high school. How did you learn the technical side? I understand natural light very well. I’m very visual and I like to be quiet, looking at things. To be honest, equipment is a bit of a nuisance to me. I tend to stumble on the cables and be blocked by the light in front of my subjects and my set. They don’t let me think. Early on, I had to find a way to get rid of that. I live in a fantasy, so for me to have cables and plugs and electricity and lights blocking my sight is a problem. I’ve had to learn to make the most out of the light that God gives us. The cameras of today can read light in a very low exposure, so I don’t need to reproduce that with lighting. It just keeps more distance between me and the subject. And it’s about what the subject is giving to you. The emotion is all that matters. It’s more about the flirt and the game and the beauty of it all. Whom did you admire when you were first starting out? Mario [Testino] and Carine [Roitfeld]. I saw them almost as one same thing at that time. They were showing something so simple—it was a world, a philosophy, a new way of portraying gender, and a way of being. As a kid, they were showing me how to be free. It was a time when I had questions about

myself, and they were depicting a world where it was the same to be a boy or a girl, super bourgeoise or a punk, a success or a mess. Why do you think the discussion about gender is such a hot topic these days? It’s not such an important discussion to me anymore, but it was when I was younger. I grew up reading Virginia Woolf’s Orlando—this idea of someone who lives half their life being a man and half their life being a woman…to me you cannot even be an artist if you are not both. I’m from Buenos Aires, and people in school or my family were always somehow intrigued in a rather positive way by me, so I never had any problems being who I was. There was never such a thing in my life as coming out, still today I can’t feel like I belong to this or that sexual orientation; it’s such a cliché to even talk about this now, but it wasn’t when I was growing up. So many people have paved the way for us to live in this world today, and I respect all of them. What is the future of fashion photography? Although people say that no one looks at magazines anymore, the truth is that while everyone might be looking at Instagram most of the time for information and images, you have to have the paper to legitimize. One can’t live without the other. You recently curated an entire issue of The Daily Summer—the first time you’ve ever done that kind of project. Brandusa [Niro] is very charming and very smart, and after all these years, I like to work in an environment where I’m going to be heard. I liked the freedom of being able to make the kind of pictures I really want to make. I was extremely seduced when The Daily told me I could shoot whomever I wanted. The experience felt like being home. How did you choose the subjects? Lara [Stone] is just perfection; Miles [McMillan] when I hold a camera is in a way my alter ego, and I love him to pieces; Hari [Nef] is such an inspiration to me; and Lindsey [Wixson] is so beautiful and authentic as a person. Carine [Roitfeld] is like my family and my teen idol, and Alan [Faena] is my cousin, but first my best friend and then my family. We shot in his hotel, and the experience felt like a movie. How could I say no to something so perfect? It was easy like a Sunday morning. You have a certain fearless charm that makes your subjects come alive for you. How do you do it? I think it comes from my family and the way I was raised. I’m fearless, because I’m not so thirsty to be a fashion photographer. It just kind of happened to me. I’m not scared of losing everything I have. I was never here to make tons of money, even though I love money, because I love to spend money. For me, it’s all about the thrill of making art, and the fun of it. We’re not doctors or lawyers—we’re just playing. If it’s a game, then I’m a player. What would you be doing if you weren’t doing photography or making films? I could be anything—a gardener, a carpenter, a housewife, a businessman, a gymnast, a hooker. My dream is to make marmalade in the country. I could also do nothing all day and watch the wheels go ’round and ’round, like the John Lennon song.


COURTESY

“WHEN I’M TAKING PICTURES, THE RELATIONSHIP WITH MY SUBJECTS IS MUCH MORE INTENSE THAN MOST OF MY RELATIONSHIPS IN REAL LIFE.”

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And I would be just as happy as I am today. Mario [Testino] once told me that when people are talented in life they are not just talented at one thing, and I do believe that. Today, someone told me I’m like an actor portraying a fashion photographer. That’s accurate— like Gena Rowlands says playing an actress in Opening Night, the [John] Cassavetes film: “I seem to have lost the reality, of the reality.” It’s a struggle and a journey to be the most honest with yourself as you can be, to do whatever comes from your gut. And that is my journey. Who would you love to photograph right now? Lana Del Rey. I listen to her songs 24 hours a day. She follows me on Instagram, at least I think she still does [Laughs] and I follow her, although we don’t know each other. We’ve never met. She’s so beautiful. Her song “F**ked My Way Up to the Top” is very close to me [Laughs]; it has to do with (one of the many) wrong perceptions that people have of me that I enjoy to play with. You are notoriously very opinionated on the fashion in your shoots. How has that worked for or against you? For most of my life I’ve worked only with Carine [Roitfeld] and Carlyne [Cerf de Dudzeele], and I would never tell them what to do, because they would f**king kill me. When I’m not working with them I have this urge to tell the stylist what to do, but I control myself and bite my tongue, because I’ve learned that the best work comes from collaboration. Saying this might sound pretentious, but I did have this schooling, so my standards are very high. Are there any other misconceptions about you? That I can be stubborn and tough maybe. But the truth is that I’m the opposite of that; I’m a real pussycat [Laughs] and anybody who works with me will say it. I’m eager to please when I’m on set. I work my ass off. Yes, I won’t stop until everything looks incredible. But I am nice, not nice in the sense of the way my mother is nice to neighbors. It’s more like that I treat people with respect—and everyone on set equally. The only time I get tough is when time is running out and I need to make quick decisions in order to achieve greatness, which is my only goal. Who do you like to have on set? I’m a rather peaceful person, so I only want sweet people around me, and I want to be sweet to the people around me as well. And you know what? Life has shown me that kind people are better at what they do. There’s so much to do already, that it’s impossible to deal with difficult personalities. I only want to work with good-hearted, hardworking people who are eager to try and make something beautiful. What have been some of the highlights of your career so far? My first picture published in V magazine, one photograph of my nephews wearing Stella McCartney for Chloé. I was 18 at the time, and studying at Columbia University. Next was “Nun-Head,” an epic story with Katie Grand for Pop. I was really new to the business and didn’t know about all the nuances, like

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why a certain purse from a certain label had to be in a shot or any of the politics. I was just trying to make beautiful images and managed to land a 40-page story and six covers that way. That was amazing— we were playing Fellini soundtracks throughout the whole shoot and got into another world. My first covers with Carine for CR Fashion Book and Bazaar were a big deal, because she continues to be such an inspiration to me. All the years working with Carlyne were not just my schooling but also such a joy. And as for what’s next? I want to make films. I bought a place in the mountains in West Cornwall, Connecticut, and I try to spend half my time there now. That’s where I hope I’m going to have time to focus on writing and be able to make films. But I want to work on that while I keep taking pictures, because it has become such a passion. Why would I ever stop doing something that makes me happy? ß

“SEBASTIAN IS LIKE FAMILY TO ME, SO I’M PROUD OF HIS NEW ACCOMPLISHMENT. IT’S ALWAYS A GREAT MOMENT WHEN TALENT IS REWARDED.” —CARINE ROITFELD, editor in chief of CR Fashion Book

“JUST WHEN I THINK I’VE DONE EVERY SHOOT IMAGINABLE, I WILL SHOW UP ON SET AND BE SURPRISED.” —CINDY CRAWFORD, on her first shoot with Faena

“I WAS STRUCK BY HIS CINEMATIC VISION, AND HOW HE IMAGINES THE WORLD AS SOME GREAT SCREENPLAY.” —IVAN BART, on signing Faena to WME/IMG


“SEBASTIAN IS A PHENOMENAL PHOTOGRAPHER WHO IS ABLE TO CAPTURE THE ESSENCE OF THE MOMENT.” —KATE UPTON, supermodel

“WE WALKED THROUGH THE STREETS MAKING UP STORIES ABOUT A GIRL WHO DREAMED TO GO TO ROME BUT WAS STUCK IN NEW YORK CITY. HE BROUGHT A CHARACTER OUT OF ME THAT I LOVED, AND THEY ARE SOME OF MY FAVORITE PHOTOS.”

“SEB IS A REAL COLLABORATOR WHO ACTUALLY LISTENS AND TRIES TO WORK TO YOUR SUGGESTIONS, WHICH ISN’T ALWAYS THE CASE ON A SHOOT. HE HAS AN INHERENT SENSE OF GLAMOUR. SEB COACHES THE MODELS INTO HOW HE WANTS THEM, WHICH IS OF COURSE VERY CUTE TO WATCH. FOR BEING SO YOUNG, HE HAS A SURPRISING SCOPE OF CULTURE AND REFERENCES. THE ONLY PERSON I KNOW WHO CAN SING THE ENTIRE SOUND OF MUSIC. I LOVE HIM FOR THAT.”

—JAMIE BOCHERT, supermodel,musician

—PETER DUNDAS, creative director of Roberto Cavalli

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KAIA’ST This page: JEREMY SCOTT leather jacket ($785), jeremyscott.com; and mini skirt ($445), fortyfiveten .com. Opposite page: JEREMY SCOTT cropped knit top ($390), shoptrafficla.com; FRAME DENIM jean shorts ($179), frame-store.com; AMERICAN APPAREL socks ($12), americanapparel.net; ALEXANDER WANG Lyndon boots ($750), alexanderwang.com FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


sTurn PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEBASTIAN FAENA Fashion Editor PAIGE REDDINGER Hair by Teddy Charles Makeup by valery gherman


KAIA GERBER

“I’M REALLY INTERESTED IN CRIMINAL PSYCHOLOGY, WHICH I’VE ALREADY STARTED STUDYING.”

He sat with me at lunch and we both just talked for a while, which is kind of rare on set, so I really appreciated it. I am so happy to be sharing a moment like this with him. We’ve seen so much of you in images this year— how would you describe your personality? In many ways, I’m your average 15-year-old girl. I like When the world first got a look at Cindy Crawford’s offspring and twin, hanging out with friends and having fun. I’m also very Kaia Gerber, the fashion industry came to a screeching halt. With a French driven, and while I do work a lot, I like to keep my Vogue cover, a fan named Marc Jacobs, and the blessing of Katie and Mario, work very separate from my life as a kid, so I rarely talk about it. this 15-year-old Cali girl is rapidly reaching super status. What are your career goals? BY EDDIE ROCHE My ultimate goal is to be on the cover of American Vogue. My mom was on the cover 17 times, so I’m How would you characterize your year? very polite and well mannered. How was this going for 18! It has been absolutely crazy! It was kind of a instilled in you? Would you like to live in New York City whirlwind, but I never took one moment for granted. My mom taught me everything I’ve learned about eventually? When and why did you realize that modeling carrying myself on set. When I was younger I used to I hope to move to New York when I graduate high was something you seriously wanted to pursue? tag along on some of her jobs and I would see how school. However, I will always be a California girl and I’ve always wanted to model. I would ask my mom nice she was to everyone around her. I think she just will probably end up moving back to the beach after a to do my hair and makeup and take pictures of me in instilled that in me from a really young age. few hectic years. her vintage Versace dresses. I can’t say it was never a You and your brother Presley call each other best Do you have plans for college? dream of mine to be where I am now. friends. Have you always been very close? I really want to go to college in New York. One of You shot with Mario Testino for French Vogue We used to fight about silly things like who got to the schools I’ve always dreamed of attending is this year. What did you learn from him? sit in the front seat like normal siblings, but we have Columbia. I’m really interested in criminal psychology, Mario is a dream to work with. There’s no doubt that always been really close. which I’ve already started studying. I never want to the photos will turn out beautiful; he’s so sweet and What’s your relationship like? limit myself. I am going to do everything necessary really a teacher. He showed me a lot about motion I can always rely on Presley to tell me the truth. We for getting into my dream college, but I will cross that and really explained what he wanted from me. don’t fight much anymore, and I feel like we can be bridge when I get there. What designers do you wear? silly with each other. What did you do this past summer for fun? Seeing as I still go to school, I don’t usually wear What models do you look up to in the industry? I spent the whole summer on a lake in Canada with designer clothes in my everyday life. However, if Karlie Kloss, because of her involvement in things my family. It was so nice to have the downtime before a special occasion comes up, I usually gravitate outside of modeling. She doesn’t let modeling limit life picked up again. towards Alex Wang, Marc Jacobs, Alaïa—honestly her at all. I respect lots of models for different What’s your favorite social media platform? I love fashion so much that I would wear every reasons, and I like to understand what it is about each Probably Instagram. I could spend up to an hour on designer for a different mood or occasion. model I like and incorporate that into my work in front it a day just seeing other people’s ways of life and How are you maintaining your school schedule of the camera. learning about what’s happening around the world. with modeling? What was it like working with Kendall Jenner Marc Jacobs is presenting to you at the Fashion I always put school first, which took me a while for LOVE? Media Awards. How does that feel? to understand due to the fact that modeling is my I’ve known Kendall for a while due to the fact that we Honestly, I haven’t even grasped the concept of true passion. But I do now get how important my are both from L.A. and have a lot of this whole thing. The fact that I’m education is and if I have to choose between a job and mutual friends. Shooting with her was GENETICALLY GIFTED Kaia just starting my sophomore year of a school commitment, I always choose school. supereasy, and the pictures turned out and Cindy on the April ’16 cover high school and getting this award in of French Vogue What did you learn from your mother about to be some of my favorite ones I’ve general is insanity. Throw in the fact modeling? ever done. I admire her for how downthat Marc Jacobs even knows my My mother teaches me a lot about being prepared for to-earth and unaffected she is. name, let alone is giving me an award, shoots. Things like being on time, what to bring, the What are your interests and is beyond. importance of being nice to everyone on set. As for hobbies outside of modeling? Who will you thank in your being in front of the camera, she told me to always I love dancing, which actually has been speech? have a thought behind my eyes, which really connects a great tool for modeling. However, I You will have to wait for my speech! to the viewer. don’t have a ton of free time for other Have you ever won anything What's your favorite image of your mom? activities between school and work. before? Herb Ritts did almost all of my favorite pictures of What was it like working with I have won essay contests and once, my mom. He was a beyond incredible photographer, Sebastian Faena for our cover? when I was younger, I was named and it’s in those pictures that I see the resemblance Sebastian is one of the sweetest student of the month. Nothing even between us the most. photographers. He is so friendly and came close to how I feel getting this You already have a great reputation as being really wants to get to know the model. award. ß

BREAKOUT MODEL OF THE YEAR

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


WHAT GOES AROUND COMES AROUND T-shirt ($750), wgacanyc.com; ACNE STUDIOS leather jacket ($1600), acnestudios .com; FRAME DENIM shorts ($179), NeimanMarcus.com; AMERICAN APPAREL socks ($12), americanapparel.net; ALEXANDER WANG Lyndon boots ($750), alexanderwang.com


MILES TO GO

FAENA’S FINEST McMillan has become a muse of Sebastian Faena.

MALE MODEL OF THE YEAR: MILES McMILLAN

Following a sensational debut on the top runways of New York, Milan, and Paris, Miles McMillan has emerged as both an object of fan fanaticism and an advertising powerhouse. Now, as a face of Tommy Hilfiger and Just Cavalli, the 27-year-old California native is hotter than ever. BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEBASTIAN FAENA

How did you end up in New York? I’m from La Jolla, California, where I lived for 18 years. I moved to New York to study fine art and painting at NYU. Did you model as a child? No. I was approached once [by a model scout] when I was a kid, but I didn’t want to do it. Then a photographer approached me when I was a senior in college and asked me if I wanted to shoot, and I went for it. It was for a catalog for Urban Outfitters. I didn’t have an agent, and they said they’d pay me a certain amount, but I said, “No! Pay me this much,” and I got more. How much more, exactly? $700. I continued to work for Urban Outfitters for the next year, and I found out that my rate was pretty high. I didn’t do bad for myself. I was about to graduate and figuring out what I wanted to do, so it was a really good thing. I thought modeling was a good way to make money and serve my art career, and it took off. How much time do you get to spend on your art these days? In the past, not a lot, and now, it’s a lot more. I just got a place upstate, and I go up there when I can. I’ve been working nonstop. Now I’m balancing that work with modeling. I like to be creative every day, in whatever I do. It’s been an interesting time, becoming who I want to be. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

What have been some of your favorite moments over the past year? This year has had a lot of big transitions. I cut my hair and I feel more mature. Tommy Hilfiger has always been there and supportive. I’ve been friends with Sebastian [Faena] for a really long time, and he’s always seen something in me. He wanted to show the world what he sees in me, which I really appreciate and love about him. We have a really great collaborative energy together. In February, I came over to IMG Models, which I’m super excited about. They say when you are 27, there’s an astrological shift, so I’ve definitely been feeling that, and it’s taking me to the next level of what I want to do. I’m being asked questions that I wouldn’t necessarily ask myself. I’m out of my comfort zone. Have you ever won anything before? I won a few first-place fairs for painting when I was a kid, and maybe some track medals. Where did you and Sebastian meet? We met in a friend way when I was 21. I was a completely different person. I’d watch his dog when he was out of town, because I loved her and I’d take care of her. I can’t even remember our first job together. Any favorite shoots you’ve done together? The work we did for The Daily Summer really captured how I want to be seen.

“THIS YEAR HAS HAD A LOT OF BIG TRANSITIONS. I CUT MY HAIR AND I FEEL MORE MATURE.”


Do you have any interest in acting? Sebastian and I went to Buenos Aires this year, and we spent a week shooting a short film. It has very few lines, which is up my alley. Luckily, I played a nervous person, so I could channel that into the role. I’ve never really had an interest in acting, but I didn’t have an interest in modeling, either. Which other photographers would you like to work with? I’ve been really happy with the people I’ve worked with so far, but I’d also like to work with Glen Luchford. His photographs are really beautiful. How do you spend your downtime? I can’t watch reality TV anymore. I can’t stand it. It makes me so angry to watch. I’ve recently caught up with The Night Of on HBO, which is great. I’ve been trying to fill my time with painting and being outdoors. TV brings you inside. We have three dogs—Noah, Skunk, and Rocco, our new guy, who is a mix between a Great Dane and a lab. Do they wake you up every morning? I wake up at 8 every day—before them. Why the name Skunk? I adopted him through [boyfriend] Zach [Quinto], so the name was inherited. Where did you and Zach meet? At a Carine Roitfeld party after a CFDA event over three years ago. Will Zach be at the Fashion Media Awards? This is really depressing, but he’ll be in Canada working, so I’m going solo. He’s been promoting Star Trek all summer. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

What character would you play if you were in the film? I’d have to be an alien! I’m not sure why. I could also shave my hair off and be the bald man [Captain JeanLuc Picard]. What’s your fitness routine? I don’t go to gyms. I do yoga classes and club bell, which is a weighted iron bat. Nickname? People call me Miley. Do you say, “I’m just being Miley”? [Laughs] I don’t! Sebastian calls me Thomas. He’s the only other one who has a nickname for me. Why? It’s my middle name. What were you up to this past summer? I was home in California for part of the summer. My sister had a baby boy, who is my first nephew. I was there a week before he was born and two weeks after. It was an intense and special experience. I love him so much. You have a growing following on Instagram. Do you read the comments? Sometimes. When I put something up on Hillary Clinton, it was very polarizing. People were very angry and said some really rude things, but it didn’t bother me. They can be mean to me, but I don’t like seeing people be mean to others. What’s your sign? I’m a Cancer with Leo rising. Do you relate to the characteristics of your sign? I’m truly a Cancer! A hard outer shell, and I’m gooey on the inside. ß

THE MANY LOOKS OF MILES (Clockwise from top) McMillan with beau Zachary Quinto; for Purple magazine by Jack Pierson; for The Daily Summer by Sebastian Faena; and the Fall 2016 Just Cavalli campaign.

TO P L E F T: B FA . C O M ; TO P R I G H T: J A C K P I E R S O N ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

“I’VE NEVER REALLY HAD AN INTEREST IN ACTING, BUT I DIDN’T HAVE AN INTEREST IN MODELING, EITHER.”


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SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST MAGAZINE OF THE YEAR: HARPER’S BAZAAR

As Glenda Bailey celebrates her 15th year at the helm of Harper’s Bazaar, the magazine is enjoying one of its most successful phases. With a fresh approach to print, an ever-expanding digital universe, and a growing e-commerce operation, Hearst’s fashionable glossy is getting better by the minute. BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY GIORGIO NIRO What are your greatest accomplishments from the past year? I’m incredibly proud of our newsstand sales. I must be one of the very few people who can say that. Our ABC [Audit Bureau of Circulation] figures were down by only 3 percent, so we’re really bucking the industry trend—I believe the average is something like 30 percent down. So 3 percent down is the new up. What are your online numbers? In just two years, we went from 2.4 million unique monthly visitors on harpersbazaar.com to almost 10 million. In our category, we’re No. 1 on Pinterest and have No. 1 engagement on Facebook. That’s something to be proud of. We’re in the top 5 on Instagram, and I intend for us to get even higher. Why do you think you’ve had such a successful year? It’s purely about editing. Everybody goes online for their news, so for the magazine, it’s really important that we show something that is unique, something that you can’t get online easily. You come to a magazine because of the creativity, the originality, the spirit—you just can’t replicate that online. And when you do, it’s a different experience. What are your proudest moments of the year? The collaboration with Cindy Sherman. We met at the shows, and for three years I’ve been asking her if she would participate in a Bazaar story, and she finally agreed. I wanted her take on street style. We produced limited-edition covers, which went online and sold out in a matter of hours. It was spectacular. I always love collaborations with artists. Is there one story over the past 15 years that you’re the most proud of? That’s like being asked to choose your children! You’re only as good as the last magazine you produce, the same way a designer is only as good as his or her last collection. I’m addicted to what’s new. I love change and love trends—and so I’m constantly renewing. You can predict the fact that Harper’s Bazaar is unpredictable. We try to surprise and delight everyone. That’s why people keep coming back. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

Who was your first hire? Stephen Gan. We met by chance at Iman’s birthday party and started chatting. We never stopped. It was a lovely night. Then the next day, when I came into work, I got a phone call from him saying, “We have to meet. We have to meet now!” He’s a man of action. I like that! We met for lunch and chatted and chatted, and it was obvious. Stephen is a person who is very fast, and that’s my pace. He has a passion for fashion, knowledge of fashion; he has a very modern sensibility, but he really understands the history of KIM AND KANYE GET PERSONAL Kanye West kisses his Mrs. for the September issue of Bazaar.

“IT’S THE BEST JOB IN THE WORLD OF FASHION.” fashion, and he’s great fun! We laugh a lot. When you walked in the door, what were the changes that you wanted to make with the brand? The obvious first thing to do was put back the logo. Bazaar had lost its exquisite logo. What did you bring to Harper’s Bazaar that wasn’t there before? A sense of humor. Very rarely do people use the word fashion and the word humor in the same sentence. I brought a bit of wit and whimsy to Bazaar. How have you kept the job fresh? The joy of working in fashion is that it constantly changes. I love the excitement and the thrill of fashion, and I’ve always said that the day that I go to a fashion show and I feel jaded, then that will be out for me—I won’t be able to do the job anymore. But I’m still very engaged and very excited, and thrilled to be in this position. It’s the best job in the world of fashion. Are the subscriber covers more quintessentially Glenda than the newsstand ones? Yes, of course. They have to be, because they’re more fashion, and they’re more about imagery. I’m very, very hands-on, as you know, and I’m particularly hands-on when it comes to covers. But one thing I will say is I’m very, very fortunate to work with Elizabeth Hummer, who’s our design director. She’s really like the Ruth Ansel of now. We have a saying—we never let bad art get in the way of a good cover. She has a great eye. What have some of the memorable shows been over the years? It’s almost impossible to choose. Saint Laurent’s last show, the Lanvin shows, the last Valentino show of couture, Comme des Garçons in the ’80s and Karl’s Chanel shows are only a few. Any predictions for the future of fashion? As someone who loves to look at where fashion is going, I like to study people who are doing very well in the industry, and I like to study why. I also look at people who aren’t doing well and consider why. It really isn’t brain surgery. If you look at a fashion house like Brunello Cucinelli, they’re doing incredibly well. Why are they doing incredibly well? Look at Silicon Valley—the entrepreneurs there look like they’re wearing a gray T-shirt and easy pants. And well, they are. But they’re the best T-shirt and the best pants that money can buy. There’s a reason that Brunello has been asked to give talks at so many tech companies. Have you gotten into Snapchat? I love that it goes away, but I also don’t like that. I like longevity, and producing something that people can treasure for


COURTESY

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


a long time. Evan Spiegel has done an amazing job, and I’m very inspired by him. I was at a Louis Vuitton dinner when I was sat next to Miranda Kerr, and I introduced them. Now, they’re engaged. Famously, you avoided e-mail for a very long time. I hate wasting time, and the one thing I can’t stand is when everybody’s copied on everything, and nobody gives a proper answer, nobody reads it, and then you’re going round and round in a circle. I hate that. When I get an e-mail, if I can, I will call up the person and deal with it. You get things done if you can talk to people directly. And I firmly believe that the power to pick up the phone and, even better, to go and see someone is much quicker in the end. Of course, you can’t do business today without using all forms of social media. I’m the first to text my friends. I have a rule at Bazaar—after 6 p.m. on a Friday night, I hope that no one is going to hear from me until when I come in at 9 a.m. on Monday morning, and vice versa. It’s very, very important to give your team opportunity to enjoy their free time. That’s how they rejuvenate and become loyal, and we all strive for our work-life balance. You’ve been here for 15 years and over the years you’ve faced rumors that you are leaving. How have you dealt with those? Fact is way more interesting than fiction, so I never really care about rumors. Do they annoy you? No. Fashion is not a popularity contest, you know. I’m here to do a job; everybody should judge me by my results. What has the support of your main man, Stephen Sumner, meant to you? I was very lucky to meet Steve when I did, and I have so much to thank him for. In those very early years, we’d only been together for a year when my mother died of cancer, and then my father became very ill, also with cancer. We both gave up our jobs, having just come out of university, to go back to Darby and nurse my father until he died. To have that support from a young man…you never forget it. It becomes something so special, and I’ve been lucky enough to have all these years him. Next year will be our 40th anniversary. We share everything. He’s fabulous and I love him. I feel very fortunate. ß

“Glenda Bailey is one of fashion’s great stars. Her passion and enthusiasm, her eye for elegance, and her love for fashion makes Harper’s Bazaar the great magazine it is.” —CAROLINA HERRERA

“Glenda is a punk, a real one, and being a punk means being innovative. I am very happy for Glenda and her team. They deserve this award for all the effort that they have put into creating their successful magazine.”

MEMORIES Bailey was EIC of Marie Claire before joining Bazaar in 2001.

—GUCCI’S ALESSANDRO MICHELE

BAILEY’S FAN CLUB AVRIL GRAHAM, Harper’s Bazaar’s executive fashion and beauty director When did you first start working with Glenda? When she first approached the managing director of IPC Publishing Group with an idea for a fashion magazine launch, I was already working on one of their big titles. I remember being asked if I would like to work with a new, inexperienced editor in chief as an extra freelance opportunity in addition to my existing role. We got on well, and that was the early ’90s…an incredible period to be in fashion. What’s your chemistry like? There is something about Scorpio parings in the workplace that can be difficult to explain. I think intuitive understanding is key to our interaction. I have known Glenda a long time but never assume I would second-guess a decision or strategy. She is ultimately the decision-maker in the process, but the democratic voice will always FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

be heard, especially for covers. I tend to be on the road a lot, and I always feel she has a total sense of trust in my role for Bazaar. What’s the most valuable lesson you’ve learned from her? Never take the easy option. Never settle for second best. Never look back—always look forward. Be positive, even under pressure. What are you most proud of in your working relationship over the years? When I look back over the years, there is nothing more reflective than to look at the success of the brands we have worked on. From the launch of Marie Claire in the U.K. to the launch of Marie Claire in the U.S. market and watching it anchor its solid position in this country. Followed by the retooling of one of the most iconic fashion magazines ever, I feel incredibly fortunate to have been able to be part of this history. Glenda’s story is quite extraordinary when you look at what she has achieved. ß


CALLING ALL SHOPPERS

SHOPBAZAAR’S NEW FEATURES

G E T T Y I M A G E S ( 5 ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U L L A N . C O M ( 2 ) ; C O U R T E S Y

In addition to its groundbreaking editorial, Harper’s Bazaar is also a powerhouse on the publishing side. Under the leadership of Carol Smith, the brand’s VP, publisher, and chief revenue officer, it’s enjoying some of its strongest performance to date. As an early adopter of the content-to-commerce model, Smith spearheaded the launch of shopbazaar.com in 2012. This month, the site will unveil a redesign, and Smith explains its evolution. What will visitors to shopbazaar. com first notice about the redesigned site? How would you describe its refreshed aesthetic? I think the first thing users will notice is that we’ve put the editors front and center. We’ve married the site to the magazine in a way that we hadn’t before. The aesthetic now truly mirrors our magazine; the homepage flows just as the print magazine does—from a “Hero” item to the fashion well stories. We’ve also added a host of personal touches designed to bring the user more highly edited, shoppable content than ever before. And we’re now giving consumers an inside look at the editor’s inspiration behind the fashion stories from the magazine. What factors go into the selection of “The Hero” item? Each week, our editors will handpick and highlight one special item that is guaranteed to transform a woman’s closet—it’s the piece for the season. Not only telling her what to buy, but how to style it in different ways. The site will also feature a section that allows consumers to directly shop advertising campaigns. Will those orders be fulfilled directly from ShopBAZAAR, or will they redirect to the individual brands’ e-commerce sites? The “Shop the Campaign” feature will click out to the advertiser’s website; a Chloé ad campaign image will click out to chloe.com. These purchases are not fulfilled through ShopBAZAAR. In what new ways will ShopBAZAAR bring the magazine’s editorial pages to life? Now, in addition to shopping directly from our fashion stories, you can also get a guided tour of the inspirations behind them, and the ability to buy additional pieces the editors love that didn’t make it into the magazine. You’ll also be able to use the Moodboard to gather the items and looks; or take a look at what our editors are purchasing for themselves at the moment. A new Editors Index will also allow users to literally shop by Bazaar editor and see their individual style profiles, seasonal wish lists, styling tips, Instagram feeds, and more. How frequently will the site’s content be refreshed, and how often will new items be added to its e-commerce offerings? “The Hero” is refreshed once a week. The remaining homepage content—The Issue Highlights, The Feature—will be refreshed monthly with each new issue release. The product assortment on the site will be updated seasonally, and as certain items are delivered. We will also add additional items based on market trends. Are there any plans to add to ShopBAZAAR’s mix of core retailers—Kirna Zabête, The Webster, Hampden, and Neapolitan? We’re starting with the core four and will see what the future holds. But right now, no, there are no plans to add. How will beauty be integrated into the site? We will integrate beauty through marketing partnerships, as we have done in the past. We’re also in discussion with a small boutique retailer known for its collection of both niche and well-known brands for a possible partnership in 2017. How was the new site designed with a mobile-first mentality in mind? The site translates beautifully to mobile. It almost feels like an app and is incredibly easy to navigate. When we first met with [creative agency] Wednesday about overall strategy, we were all in agreement that the new ShopBAZAAR had to be mobile-first. What was the inspiration behind the site’s

new logo? Throughout the new site you see the editors' signatures; we wanted to infuse personality into the new experience—our editors as your personal stylists. The new logo, with “Shop” in a handwritten font, speaks to the personal experience that shopping is, even on a digital platform. ShopBAZAAR’s Instagram has nearly 70K followers. How do you plan to grow that number? The ShopBAZAAR and bazaar. com teams work hand-in-hand to grow the store’s social footprint. We’re also planning to collaborate with designers and our partners on Instagram takeovers, as well as third-party partners to grow awareness. When you and your team are out on sales calls, how do advertisers react to Bazaar’s unique

e-commerce offerings? They’re very intrigued and most often interested in learning more about how it works. ShopBAZAAR puts us in a unique place in the market where we are able to offer expansive editorial coverage in the magazine, and then extend online to drive commerce and traffic for their brand. That’s something no other publication is able to offer at the moment. Is the audience international, or mostly based in the States? That is, can you fulfill international orders, and if not, are there plans to do so? Our audience is mostly based in the U.S., although we do see consistent international traffic and orders. And yes, we do ship internationally. The site is currently receiving more than 350K average monthly visits. Are you able to share traffic goals? More so than traffic, engagement is our top priority. It’s all about getting the right woman. And as the number of shoppers grows, traffic and engagement will grow organically. Where would you like to see ShopBAZAAR in five years? The worlds of fashion and e-commerce have changed so drastically in the past five years. Who’s to say what’s next? It’s almost impossible to predict. But that’s the great thing about the digital world—it’s constantly evolving, and we will grow with it. How have advertisers reacted to the September issue, featuring Kim Kardashian and Kanye West? We’ve had a very positive response. Kim and Kanye are provocative, but our clients know the value of 1 billion impressions before the issue has even hit the newsstand. Does Harper’s Bazaar have any plans for a dedicated channel on Snapchat? We are exploring our options for an expanded Snapchat partnership. ß

THE HERO One item selected weekly by the editors as a key product for the season. This feature is similar to how the magazine’s front-of-book pages “hero” gorgeous accessories each month.

STYLED BY This feature shows “The Hero” item styled by three different Bazaar editors, giving shoppers multiple perspectives on how to wear it.

THE FEATURE A multi-page fashion story featured in the magazine, or custom shot for shopbazaar.com. Typically the stories featured here will look and feel like well stories—all at least 50 percent shoppable.

THE MOODBOARD The stylist’s inspiration behind the Feature—an insider’s look into the editorial process behind the Feature. The Moodboard can include color swatches, landscapes, a lip color, metallics, and will always feature a quote from the stylist about the shoot. The technology itself is dynamic—fully interactive, clickable, and socially shareable.

THE TRUNK Showcases additional products that were sent to the shoot but didn’t make it into the Feature story. The Trunk will include trends and categories—for example, “The Bomber”—allowing visitors to shop a certain style by brand and/or price point.

WE’VE ALWAYS WANTED TO ASK! Glenda, what are you allergic to? Grass pollen. You once appeared on the cover of The Daily as a member of ABBA. What’s your favorite ABBA song? “The Winner Takes it All.” Who would play Glenda Bailey in a movie? Bette Midler.

What do you watch on television? I’ve just finished catching up on the last episode of The Good Wife. I miss it! What’s your favorite breakfast food? I don’t often have breakfast. On the weekends, I suppose eggs Benedict—actually the salmon version.

Do you have a favorite place that you get it at? It depends where we are. I live on the Upper West Side and go to Café Luxembourg or Isabella’s. I also love ABC Kitchen! When did you last visit a bazaar? During a visit to Tangier with Alber Elbaz and his partner, Alex.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


THE ULTIMATE GENTLEMAN MEN’S MAGAZINE OF THE YEAR: GQ

After nearly 20 years at GQ, Jim Nelson’s status as the king of cool remains uncontested. BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIC RAY DAVIDSON You’ve got a guy in a Superman shirt on your September cover. We’re riding high on the September issue—[Carolina Panthers quarterback] Cam Newton is on the cover. We always think of September as the moment when the fashion calendar, and the year, begins. We want to have somebody on the cover who represents that, in their manhood and style. Mario Testino shot the story, and their energy was perfect. We’re living in this maximalist era: People are allowing their inner peacock to come out a little more. We’ve lived through a period of minimalism in the past 5 to 10 years, and I see that shifting. Guys want to bust out a little more, and misbehave. That’s a good thing. Kim Kardashian’s first GQ cover, which came out in July, generated a lot of attention. What took you so long? Sometimes we wait for the right moment to make it “our” moment. It was the 10th anniversary of our Love, Sex & Madness issue, and she represents female beauty and where we are as a culture. She and Kanye West have increased and expanded their brands by being together. I had also wanted to work with Mert & Marcus for a long time, and it felt like we could make an event out of having them all together. What I love about Kim is that when she does something, she embraces it 100 percent. We broke records online—we had 2 million unique visitors in 36 hours. In the interview, Kim essentially called Taylor Swift a liar, and the story went nuclear. Did you anticipate all the hullabaloo? I knew it would be news, but I didn’t know it was going to be as big as it was. We had to be fair to Taylor, whom we also love, and she gave a really great and thoughtful response. We knew the internet would do whatever it always wants to do with any kind of FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

dispute. There’s some part of it that feels like public comic opera. We’re doing our part to support that. Is she still selling? She is! When you put someone like Kim on the cover, you are going to get some real haters on social media. People are always saying, “Cancel my subscription!” which never really happens, but you’re also going to bring in some new people. You have to mix it up. Some of our readers had a problem with Justin Bieber; we were convinced by the music. He finally put up or shut up, and put out a great record. He looks great in clothes, too. You’ve put a lot of effort into rethinking GQ.com this year. We made it sleeker and faster. That was really important to us. I’m proud that it looks bolder. We have a new homepage. For some people, in the age of social media links, it’s not as important, but we have a very sizable audience coming to us through the homepage. The site has gone up 20 percent in traffic. We’ve concentrated on being careful of what our reader truly wants. We’re spending more time with voice and wit, with writers who showcase GQ. I hired Caity Weaver from Gawker. I would basically go there just to read her stuff. I had a new website position, and I was meeting all kinds of people, and I ended up promoting Jon Wilde from within. He was the best example of what I call “printagration”— bringing print and digital together so each of us gets stronger. For years Jon had edited the Manual section of the magazine, and he put his name in the ring to run the website. I’ve been delighted how he took to it so naturally. The web team has somebody who has really grown up in the GQ voice. What other projects have you tackled? We launched GQ Style, which is for the reader who wants luxury. We’re creating a lot more video content

on our site. At the NBA Draft, we hooked up with Instagram and did style celebrations of the youngest talent. In the year ahead I want to concentrate on how to make digital look bold and different. And I was just in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on the set of a movie based on a GQ article. It feels more like a media brand than just a magazine. Details folded. It’s a new day at Esquire. Why is GQ still standing strong? I believe it has to do with putting the reader first. We always begin with every story by asking what the reader wants out of it. I want to affect people. I want them to come away from a story entertained, or think it’s the most heartbreaking piece they’ve read. From the beginning, I’ve always had a keen sense for reduced attention spans. I recognize the reader has a lot of things coming for him or her, and I want to reach them right at the moment of their curiosity. I tried to do that with fashion at the beginning. I didn’t want to put people in clothes, in fields, looking into the distance. Guys want clear messaging and clothes styled for their lives. Which designers are you into these days? I’m very eclectic. I wear a lot of high/low. I’m loving Gucci and Valentino right now—also Michael Bastian, Todd Snyder, Gitman Brothers, and Saturdays. I love Common Projects shoes. Virgil Abloh is a really talented designer. In the past year, we’ve been celebrating designers who are truly making a mark. I’ve been here for almost 20 years, and the reader is more advanced about the style world. Men have come a long way. What do you think about the changes at Calvin Klein? Italo Zucchelli is a friend, and I was pained for him, but I also recognize that Raf Simons is a genius. I expect it will bring a level of energy and critical


company has changed over the years to the fact that we are all one company. That’s been something that [Condé Nast CEO] Bob Sauerberg has talked a lot about, and Anna believes in thoroughly. She’s also a great proponent of transparency and communication. I appreciate that so much—having someone who wants to have conversations about whatever the issues are. She’s a sounding board, and a great listener. Nobody is better at follow-up than Anna Wintour. We’re all so busy, and it’s great to have somebody who keeps things moving and clear. It’s been great. She’s such an icon. Do you ever get awestruck? Of course. I’ve never met anybody whose public persona is more different than what they’re like in real life. She’s very easy to talk to. She’s direct, and I appreciate that. She’s a problem-solver. How much longer do you think you’ll want to stay here for? That’s a great question. As long as they’ll have me? [Laughs] Everyone needs to have a side hustle, so I think about that. Should I write a script? Should I write a book? But I want to have this as my main hustle for a very long time. ß

COURTESY

“VISION IS RARER THAN YOU THINK, AND SOMETHING TO BE CELEBRATED. I’M EXCITED WHEN I SEE A FASHION HOUSE BET BIG.”

attention to that house that will be very exciting. I expect some beautiful things to come down that runway. Raf is what everybody wants in fashion. He has an uncompromising vision. I’m excited whenever that is celebrated. Vision is rarer than you think, and something to be celebrated. I’m excited when I see a fashion house bet big. What do you think Italo will do next? He’ll come back in exciting ways. He’s just too talented not to. I don’t know where he’ll crop up, but I’m rooting for him. There isn’t a lovelier guy out there in the fashion world. Next year will bring the 60th anniversary of GQ. How will you celebrate? We’re going to feel proud and go into the year feeling good. It’s rare that a magazine has this much history and is stronger than ever. We’ll devote one of our fall issues to some 60th anniversary celebration. I always say that I don’t think readers care so much when you’re just celebrating yourself. We’re thinking about distilled knowledge, and trying to suss out what in fashion still endures. The rest is secret! How closely do you work with Anna Wintour? A fair bit, partly because the conversation of the

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


HAIL TO THE HILFIGER FASHION VISIONARY: TOMMY HILFIGER

Almost 40 years in, the American designer gone global is redefining the game for everyone, with instantly shoppable shows, social media genius, and…Gigi.

Your new direct-to-consumer model is making big news. What inspired it? In this day and age, the consumer wants immediate gratification. The consumer does not want to wait six months after they see it on the runway. They will have seen it on celebrities, in magazines, on Instagram. And they may be tired of it by the next season. I wanted to be more of a democratic brand. So you can watch a fashion show, click and buy, then have it shipped that day. Is there any hesitation about having two fall collections, essentially? Oh, yeah. It’s a big discussion. I’ve been talking about this for quite a few years. It’s a manageable prospect with a small brand, but you’re global. What was the biggest challenge? Well, you know, we have a very big machine, and when you tinker with the machine, it doesn’t just affect one part. It’s a chain reaction: the design, the sourcing, the delivery, the seasonality. We wanted to make sure we could really execute it, before diving in. What was that research process like? We did our homework, got our factories onboard, re-established our design and manufacturing calendars. Our partners worldwide were very supportive, because anyone in the fashion business understands that if you don’t change with the times, you’re left behind. Gigi Hadid is not only the face of your brand, but she also designed a capsule collection. Why was this the right time to execute such a fullscale partnership with her? Models have been muses for designers for many years. But they’ve never been handed the pencil and told, “Okay, go for it. Give us your ideas.” When Gigi walked into the design studio, she knew exactly what she wanted. We showed her all sorts of different FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

fabrics, buttons, colors, sketches; she did all the fittings. You’ve known her since she was a little girl. What made you realize there was something special about her?

REQUIRED READING Hilfiger’s memoir will be published by Ballantine Books, an imprint of Random House.

Well, Gigi’s not only an incredible model—she’s a social media phenomenon. She has around 20 million followers. She is the ultimate Tommy girl: chic when she’s at the gym, out at night. When she’s traveling to Europe, she looks like an international movie star. When she’s out with her friends at a basketball game, she can eat popcorn and wear jeans. I mean, she has it all. I also think there’s this whole sort of tornado coming out of Southern California—the style, the vibe, the cool factor, the celebrity quotient. She really checked all the boxes for us. Tell me a little bit about your plans for the show. What inspired the carnival-on-the-pier vibe? You know, we’ve done football, we’ve done nautical, we’ve done rock ’n’ roll. This theme has more of a street vibe—Coney Island meets Santa Monica Pier. But it’s really about the favorite things of New York. A hot dog stand, a tattoo parlor, a vintage shop. Are you going to get a tattoo? I have one. You do? What’s your tattoo of? Actually, I have two: my wife’s name [Dee] and my children’s initials. I got them about three years ago. See, my son has a lot of tattoos, and he said, “You’re probably afraid to get one, Dad.” And I said, “No, I’m not.” He said, “Come with me!” Your memoir is out this November…. Yeah, Alina [Cho] brought me to Random House, because she’s working for them at large. And she said, “You should really do a book.” And I said, “I really want to be older when I do it.” But then I started thinking, I should do it while I still remember stuff. What was that process like? Well, I sat with Peter [Knobler, the writer] for hours, telling him stories about my life from as early as I can remember. It took a year and a half. He came to my house in Connecticut, and we would just hang out and talk. Very relaxed. He would ask me a question,

COURTESY

BY ASHLEY BAKER PHOTOGRAPHY BY GIORGIO NIRO


FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

GUTTER CREDITS HERE

and I would answer, and he would then repeat it in his way: “So what you’re telling me is that you were at Michael Jackson’s house, and when you arrived you saw his giraffes and camels….” What was the most illuminating conclusion you came to after reading your life story? So I’ve been in business for almost 40 years. I started my first jean shop when I was still in high school. And from then until now, it seems like time just flew by. But at the end of the storytelling, I came to the conclusion that a lot happened in those years…there are stories about Mick Jagger, Britney Spears, and Jennifer Lopez, and stories about sometimes being on top of the world and sometimes not. Do you have any fears about any of that coming out? Yeah. The press sometimes will maybe twist it a bit. But I guess that goes with it. Let’s talk about the sets for your shows—they have become so extraordinary. They’re designed in-house, correct? How do the ideas come together? There’s only so much you can do with clothes that are wearable and sellable; we’re not making couture gowns. But if you do a stage set, you can incorporate the look of the clothes into it. It’s almost like making a film. Well, you’re creating a marketing event too, right? How have you seen your business affected? The reach is much larger because of the sets. We do things with Instagram, partnerships with Facebook and Periscope. When we sent Gigi and Kendall down the runway, we were getting close to a billion hits. I got 984 million hits in the Jamaica show. Do you remember that one? At the end of the show, they walked through the water, and it went viral. How do you respond when someone from your team comes to you and says, “I'd like to build a very large boat in the middle of the Armory”? The crazier, the better? Yeah. I love it. ß

“THERE’S ONLY SO MUCH YOU CAN DO WITH CLOTHES THAT ARE WEARABLE AND SELLABLE; WE’RE NOT MAKING COUTURE GOWNS. BUT IF YOU DO A STAGE SET... IT’S ALMOST LIKE MAKING A FILM.”


MAGIC MOMENTS (Clockwise from top left) Mark Ronson and Aaliyah for a 1996 Tommy Jeans campaign; The Spring ’16 women’s runway show; the Fall 2010 “Meet the Hilfigers” campaign; Gigi Hadid; Hadid and Hilfiger after the Fall ’16 runway show; Tommy Jeans’ “Sons and Daughters” campaign from Spring 2003; the set of the Fall 2016 women’s runway show.


SURELY YOU KNOW HIM?

TV PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR: DEREK BLASBERG

Who better than Instagram superstar and bona fide bon vivant Derek Blasberg to carry on Elsa Klensch’s legacy? This year, Blasberg assumed hosting duties for a fully revamped CNN Style, and he’s already lined up interviews with fashion’s A-listers like Karl Lagerfeld, Emma Watson, and Jessica Chastain. With a Rolodex to die for, everybody’s bestie is bringing fashion to the masses.

Was being on CNN always a dream? Growing up, my parents refused to get network cable, so my access to CNN, MTV, HBO—all that programming most kids of the ’90s take for granted—was a covert operation. I can remember sleeping at friends’ houses on Friday nights so that I’d be over when Style With Elsa Klensch would be on CNN on Saturday mornings. At the time, I’d dream of one day being on that show—but I’d also be dreaming of being in Madonna’s “Vogue” video! How did that gig come together? I assume you mean the CNN gig, because I’m still waiting for Madonna to call. [Laughs] CNN Style came together when CNN International decided to revamp the genre of programming that Elsa Klensch pioneered, fashion industry journalism on TV. Awhile back, cnn.com introduced the Style vertical, which peels back the layers of art, architecture, design, and fashion that affect the world at large. The website’s momentum kicked off the TV show, which certainly pays homage to Klensch, but also has a fresh, bold take on the larger world of creative arts. I don’t take for granted how fortunate I’ve been in my career to work with some of the people and brands that I’ve long admired. CNN is iconic, and to be a part of a show that speaks to a world I find inspiring is literally a dream come true. Do you work closely with the producers? Journalism is teamwork, whether it’s working on a story for Vanity Fair or a segment for CNN. My high school English teacher had a T-shirt that said, “Behind every good writer is a great editor,” and I could make the same T-shirt for the CNN team that says, “Behind every good host is a great producer.” What stories have been the most memorable? For the episode in Paris, Karl Lagerfeld let us film in Coco Chanel’s apartment on the rue Cambon, which was surreal. It’s all been meticulously maintained since she died in 1971. For the episode in Rome, we watched Sofia Coppola direct her first opera, La Traviata, and Valentino did the costumes. We were perched in a box at the Teatro dell’Opera di Roma during rehearsals. And oh, in our latest episode in Copenhagen, the architect Bjarke Ingels took us on top of this industrial power plant where he’s building a giant ski slope on the roof. I’m afraid of heights, so FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

COURTESY

BY EDDIE ROCHE


that was pretty memorable. The show covers territory far beyond fashion. What stories are you wanting to tell? Fashion is only part of the programming—we like to look at the art and architecture of these destinations, too. You can’t go to Copenhagen and talk about style without mentioning that city’s historic design presence. What I think is great about CNN Style is that it approaches the topic in a broader, more complex way. Speaking of Mademoiselle Coco, she once said something—and I’m paraphrasing here— that style is in the sky, in the street, that it has to do with the ideas and the way we live and what’s happening in the world. That’s the definition of style I have in mind when I think about this show. What did you learn from interviewing Carine Roitfeld? I’ve known Carine for years, but what’s great about being a journalist is sitting down with friends and having the capacity to grill them. Carine is always game. Her book was called Irreverent, which is a great word for her. Even though she’s best known for sexually provocative imagery, she’s actually quite playful. In our chat, she was talking about French style and she said the trick is a small, mysterious imperfection. She pointed to a hole in her fishnet stockings and winked, “Don’t you wonder how I did that?” Who would you like to interview in the future? I’m drawn to women whose style transcends what they wear. Michelle Obama comes to mind. Maybe we can do an entire episode that flushes out the history of the pantsuit anchored to an interview with Hillary Clinton? Will you be filming during Fashion Month? The October episode is all about London, so we’ll be

“THE WORLDS OF ART AND FASHION ARE IN SUCH A TIME OF… DISRUPTION, WHICH I THINK IS AN OVERUSED BUZZWORD, BUT IT’S OVERUSED FOR A REASON”. filming at London Fashion Week. How are you managing your time with all your different projects? Time management can get tricky. I feel like my phone battery is always dead and I get my best sleep on an airplane. But the worlds of art and fashion are in such a time of…disruption, which I think is an overused buzzword, but it’s overused for a reason. It’s a fascinating time to be chasing these stories and meeting these new personalities. How does it feel to be compared to Truman Capote by New York magazine? It’s flattering—I think. It didn’t so end well for

Truman Capote. Is it a fair comparison? Depends on what you mean by fair. He was super social, and, yeah, I like to go out. But he was by far more accomplished in a strictly literary sense—he was around my age when he published Breakfast at Tiffany’s—and he was also very short and had this high-pitched voice that probably wouldn’t do so well on CNN Style. He could also be cruel, and betrayed his friends. When he died because his liver failed, Gore Vidal smirked that it was a good career move. What did you do this summer? The haute couture shows were a highlight. For the past decade, people have been claiming that couture was a dying art, but this summer, I traveled to Paris, and then Rome with Fendi and Naples with Dolce & Gabbana for eight days of couture shows. Looks like there’s still some life in there! How do you feel about watching yourself on the show? Oh, I cringe the entire time. When will the next episodes start airing and what will be featured? The next episode of CNN Style is focused on Copenhagen and features interviews with the model Freja Beha Erichsen, the artist Olafur Eliasson, and the architect Bjarke Ingels. It airs on September 10. What do you want to conquer next? That’s a long list. The show hasn’t gone anywhere in Africa yet, which I’m dying to explore. And I’d like to look at more familiar cultures, too. For my 30th birthday, I did a birthday party back home in Missouri and had a big barn dance: Wouldn’t it be nice to explore cowboy couture with CNN Style? ß

GUTTER CREDITS HERE

TALK TO ME Blasberg has interviewed (clockwise from top left) Emma Watson, Jessica Chastain, Naomi Campbell, King Karl, and Anna Wintour for CNN Style.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


INSTA-BLAS

COURTESY @DEREKBLASBERG

One thing we’ve come to know is that ladies love their Blasberg. Katy! Kendall! Karlie! His IG feed is a who’s who of the most fab women in the world.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


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BEST CAMPAIGN: CALVIN KLEIN

Even those fashion insiders who have memorized the greatest ads of all time were likely to be stopped in their tracks by Calvin Klein’s Fall campaign. Starring Kate Moss, Grace Coddington, Frank Ocean, and dozens more, the Tyrone Lebon–lensed project was the season’s blockbuster. While we wait for the Raf Simons era to begin, Calvin’s CMO Melisa Goldie details how it came together. BY EDDIE ROCHE CAMPAIGN TRAIL Calvin Klein’s Melisa Goldie (right); model Bella Hadid (left).

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

COURTESY

THE AGE OF CALVIN

What was the concept for the campaign? We wanted to deepen our commitment to personal storytelling. We did this through a large collection of digital and video content, editorial interviews with campaign cast members, and behind-the-scenes material that is running throughout the Fall season. The goal of this content is to create an emotional and intimate platform for our cast to share their stories and themselves with Calvin Klein’s audience. How many people are in the campaign? We have a truly diverse cast of talent that encompasses more than 30 actors, musicians, cultural icons, athletes, fashion idols, social media heavyweights, artists, and professional and street cast models. What was the criteria to be a part of it? We wanted to continue to evolve what we started with our Spring campaign earlier this year, and really focus on people who are provocative and are pushing boundaries in their respective fields. Where was the campaign shot? The majority of the campaign was shot earlier this year in Los Angeles, with additional locations in London and Madrid. Did you work with an agency or was this done in-house? This campaign, as well as our Spring campaign, was all done entirely in-house. How did you launch the campaign? This season we actually took a totally new approach with our launch. In March, for the first time, we allowed our viewers to experience the campaign production in real time on our brand’s Periscope channel. Fans were granted early access to the shoot with behindthe-scenes videos of campaign talent including Bella Hadid, Cameron Dallas, Selah Marley, and street cast members. For the actual launch this past July, we also tried something new for the brand, revealing the remaining talent on our Snapchat channel. What was your digital strategy? Digital is a strong part of our media mix for the season, which also includes mobile, print, and outdoor advertising. This season, as an added layer to the advertising campaign, we also launched an immersive digital hub on ck.com that kicked off with a 24-hour integrated video takeover on our U.S. site, ck.com/mycalvins. The takeover was comprised of a collection of more than 50 videos featuring campaign cast interviews, behind-the-scenes content, and unique talent performances. Viewers were able to visit the site to experience a constant stream of this dedicated video footage from the campaign, a selection of which was exclusive to calvinklein.com. For the duration of the Fall season, ck.com’s digital zine will continue to provide an audiovisual stream of stories, updated regularly, that the user can explore to more fully engage in the campaign and learn more about its cast of characters. Our approach is digital-first, video-led and socially powered, providing our audience with an authentic and intimate experience that they can consume and share. Do you have a favorite image from the campaign? I couldn’t possibly pick a favorite; they’re all special! Let’s turn the tables. Fill in the blank: You _________ in #mycalvins… I am honored in #mycalvins! ß


FINALVerdict

ASK OUR NEWSSTAND GUY! Our long-term relationship with Manish Golchha from 37th Street’s Magazine Café needed a little fire, so with a little help from David Hart, we gave him a makeover! And asked him to judge you and your glossies, of course. BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY ZACH ALSTON

MAKEOVER EDITION! Thoughts on your new chic-over? I love it. I hadn’t heard of David Hart before. He knows what he’s doing. I look good! Were you offended or perhaps afraid that we wanted to switch up your look? Knowing you, I wasn’t worried. Aww, thanks. This is our seventh time interviewing you! It’s the seven-year itch! We are spicing up our marriage with the makeover, which is exciting! Let’s get to it! How’s business? We’re doing very well with September. We sold out of Harper’s Bazaar. Elle was sold out and we restocked, and Marie Claire sold out. How many copies did you order of Bazaar? About 200, and we sold out in 10 days. Kim Kardashian is such a sensation. Everything she touches turns to gold. Look at her emoji app! What else is doing well? Kendall Jenner is on Vogue, and the cover is superhot. Why do you say that? For obvious reasons! She’s wearing nothing under the jacket. Who has impressed you this month? The W with Rihanna is very exotic. InStyle looks different. They look like they are going for a new audience. Porter has done very well for themselves. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

TIME FOR A LITTLE CHANGE Golchha traded in his holey jeans and denim shirt for two looks from former CFDA/Vogue finalist David Hart.

They’ve become a household name in the fashion industry. Are magazines too expensive? Absolutely. The prices should be much lower. Vogue is $9.99 now! Elle is $5.99, Cosmo is $3.99, and InStyle is $7.99. What’s your sweet spot? $3.99 is an awesome price for all magazines. People would buy more. Do your customers ever complain about the prices? They don’t. They know we have nothing to do with it. They swallow the pill. Everybody in fashion buys from you, even Anna

COURTESY

SPECIAL

Wintour. How much of the business comes from the industry? I’d say 50 percent of our business comes from expense accounts. [The editor of Fashion Avenue News walks in and compliments Manish on his new look.) What do you think of Kaia Gerber on the cover of Pop? It’s an amazing cover. Very girl-next-door. The cover line is “The Most Beautiful Girl in the World.” Do you think she is? That’s really tough. I’m married. My wife is the most beautiful girl in the world. Do you know that’s Cindy Crawford’s daughter? No way! I see the resemblance. How’s the DuJour issue performing? Melania Trump is on the cover. DuJour has never been an amazing seller. This issue has been doing fine, because Melania is in the news, for better or worse. What else is impressing you? The British edition of Esquire looks great. The girl [Cara Delevingne] has this sexy over-the-edge look. How’s the Official Tribute to John Wayne issue doing? It looks a little dusty… It’s been on the shelves for a few months. We’ve sold one or two copies. Maybe it would do better in Middle America or down South. Maybe! Are there any magazines that you miss? Domino was a great seller. We were surprised to see that go. We miss Zinc. Nylon Guys was another popular one that we lost. We’ve never seen so many magazines stop publishing. How do you feel about that? It’s not a very good sign. I’m scared. We’re a niche business and there are few stores like us that sell print magazines in such volume so it’s a little scary. We don’t worry about our customers’ loyalty, but we worry that we won’t have the right products to sell in our store. It’s your livelihood! Exactly! Is it bad that we have to inform you that you can’t keep the suits? Yes. I’m devastated! ß


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Victoria Dipiazza ‘16 Fashion Merchandising Interned at Anthropologie, Marc Jacobs, John Varvatos, CollegeFashionista

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