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FEBRUARY 15, 2017

THE ROW

OSCAR

DE LA RENTA

WHICH MODEL DOES KORS LOVE BEST?

THE FUTURE IS

BRIGHT A RIOT of color at Sies Marjan


A NEW TAK E O N T E X T U R E A N O - SA LT BE AC H WAV E M O U S S E , A C L AY FO R R O U G H E D - U P GL A M A N D A SP RAY F O R TO U S L E D, U N D O N E S T YL E S INFUSED WITH NOURISHING ARGAN OIL

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ROSIE HUNTINGTON-WHITELEY

ONE BR AND: A WORLD OF OIL-INFUSED BE AUT Y

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Nicky Hilton Hanne Gaby Odiele

CAROLINA HERRERA

Jemima Kirke

PROENZA SCHOULER

Tavi Gevinson

scene

A new venue (downtown on Little West 12th), a new president (congrats, EMILIE!), and overall, a new day at Carolina Herrera. A PYT-stocked front row ogled the gorgeous goods. • For its NYFW swan song, Proenza Schouler reminded us of just how badly we’ll miss them.

ABSTAINING!

CHIC CHAT!

With Linda Fargo

Who’s stood out to you this week? Raf for Calvin. Such a thoughtful homage, saluting America when we could use a little self-love. Are you going to go to Yeezy this week? No, because I have my limits. I’m half deaf from a glamorous ski accident, and I’m not going to lose my other ear to that. Just saying!

DISH FEST!

With Graydon Carter and Fran Lebowitz

Jonathan simkhai Fashion Week 2017

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

RETOUCHED BY AN ANGEL! What if…Cass Bird and Ellen Von Unwerth

With Hilary Rhoda

What’s new? I’m still studying acting and going on auditions. I like doing comedy. The drama is great, but it’s hard. I did a Shakespeare class and that was mostly monologues. Do you have a preferred Shakespeare sonnet? Lady Anne’s from Richard III. You’re quite a ham on InstaStories. Everyone is surprised to see this side of me. How’s Sean [Avery]? He’s really good. He’s also acting! He was in the movie Patriots Day. It was a small part, but he’s loving it. He’s got the bug.

People are saying you are switched looks? reinvigorated because of Trump. True? GC: Reinvigorated might be Rag & Bone, the wrong word. Depressed $731 and reinvigorated. What was your meeting like with Trump? GC: Depressing and reinvigorating. Why was it reinvigorating? GC: Do you realize how #pretty dangerous this situation is? influential Sara and What’s the Vanity Fair Look We Love! Erin Foster party like for you? Loving the NYFW style GC: Depressing and of Sara and Erin Foster, reinvigorating. I’m exhausted who are talking fashion (and more!) in their daily NYFW by the time it comes around. show, “Pretty Influential”? Get I’m taking care of Fran for the look—and most of the night. watch the show at FL: I’m very labor intensive! THEOUTNET.COM GC: Hugely! Valentino, FL: Depressing but $732 reinvigorating!

moody lips

Hilary Rhoda

ACTING OUT!

With Cathy Horyn

What are you hoping to see from Jack and Lazaro tonight? A continuation from the past couple of seasons. I’d like to see them keep developing some of their ideas. I don’t like when they jump around too much. How much coffee are you drinking these days? I actually don’t drink that much coffee—I think I’m drinking more water these days. What shows have stood out to you most this week? Calvin Klein. Great show and really what I was hoping for, and more. The Row was also good. I like them. Are you going to Yeezy? I am. I’m just curious.

Emily Robinson

For Jonathan Simkhai’s FW 2017 collection, Yadim for Maybelline New York nodded to a bold red lip, which he said “signifies a woman’s power over a man.” To create a glossy eye-effect, he added LipStudio Shine Shot Lip Topcoat to the lids. BEAUTY MUST: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Color Sensational The Loaded Bolds in Midnight Merlot, ($7.49), maybelline.com

SelfPortrait, $225

Jonathan Simkhai, $178

SHOE OF THE DAILY These single-sole CHAINGANG sandals are revamped with a block heel and chain-embellished ankle and toe straps, which are finished with a subtle, frayed-edge detail. Crafted from seasonal textiles, including linen and the brand’s signature denim, these off-the-chain stunners will turn heads—especially when worn with a pleated midi skirt and lightweight sweater. $445, stuartweitzman.com

PROMOTION

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CATHY ALERT!


Series 1 Art by MOMO / Craig & Karl / Jason Woodside

© 2017 LIFEWTR and THIRST INSPIRATION are trademarks.

Introducing LIFEWTR. Inspiration on the outside. Hydration on the inside. Discover our Series 1 artists at LIFEWTR.COM


Brandusa Niro

Editor in Chief, CEO

mara hoffman Mara Hoffman

MPG

CHIC CHAT!

With Ash Modha, CEO, MPG

FASHION’S MOST INSPIRED!

With Michael Carl, who co-hosted The Daily x LIFEWTR party

What’s inspiring you? Elizabeth Warren, Selby Drummond, Calvin Klein, Stranger Things, the New York Yankees, men who still wear socks, my trainer Ray Tinneny, Miguel Enamorado, La La Land, and always, Harry Potter. What’s the best art moment you’ve experienced lately? My niece made me a drawing based on the outline of her hand. It was pretty impressive. Are you going to go to Kanye this week? Unclear. Do you want to? Unclear.

Refresher on the company, please! Mondetta has been in business for about 31 years. We got into activewear long before anybody understood what it was, and we started working on MPG back in 2002–2003. Today, it’s all about athleisure. It was like pulling teeth for many years. What brings you to NYFW? It was finally time for us to do something different with the brand. For many years, being low-key was our whole concept. We’re based out of Winnipeg—we don’t think we’re cool. Tell us a little bit about the charitable aspects of your work. I’m originally from Africa. I left Uganda as a refugee when Idi Amin kicked us out in ’73. My uncle had recently retired and decided to create the Mondetta Charity Foundation in 2004. We found a school in Kamwokya, one of the biggest slums in Africa, and basically started to fund it. We started by giving the students uniforms!

IMAGE MAKER! During NYFW in September, KITH made some major noise at Samsung 837 with a blowout show and performances by ’90s hip-hop legends Fabolous and Mase. The collab didn’t stop there—Ronnie Fieg used the Samsung Galaxy S7 to shoot his entire lookbook, which guests at KITHLAND could view on tablets. The smartphone—which is the first to have a camera with a dual-pixel sensor that comes in most DSLR cameras—was set up on a tripod and attached to a full strobe system. “Even through the editing process, the resolution of the images was barely altered at all, a major boon to our end result,” the team told us. We’ll let the images speak for themselves!

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

Mark Tevis Publisher

Executive Sales Director Stephen Savage Account Manager Cristina Graham Director of Marketing & Special Events Alex Dickerson Digital Director Daniel Chivu Publishing Manager Carey Cassidy Manufacturing Operations Michael Esposito, Amy Taylor

getty images the official photo agency of The daily front row

The Daily Front Row is a Daily Front Row Inc. publication. Copyright 2017. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Requests for reprints must be submitted in writing to: The Daily, Attn: Tangie Silva, 250 West 57th Street, Ste. 301, New York, NY 10107.

On the cover: Marjan Jonkman on the Sies Marjan runway, photographed by FirstVIEW.com.

g e t t y i m a g e s ( 7 ) ; b fa . c o m ( 5 ) ; s a s h a i s r a e l ( 2 )

things to discuss

Nicole Phelps’ review of Oscar de la Renta: “Despite their training and the many months of prep time, this was a disappointing first attempt…it lacked in finesse and a certain degree of taste. The strappy sandals were painfully difficult to walk in. Colors were often garish. And some of the pieces, well, it was a real puzzle what they were doing on an Oscar runway…” • Meanwhile, Mara Hoffman invited the leaders of the Women’s March to kick off her show. • Oh, PhiliPp Plein. In the showman’s first New York outing, he had Kylie in the front row, the “Hot Felon” on the runway, a live show from The Kills, and a mob scene at the New York Public Library. The show was scheduled to start at 9, but Madonna didn’t show up until 10:15—which gave the crowd more time to wait patiently (ish) outside to enter the one-at-a-time revolving door. So sorry you missed, right?

Deputy Editor Eddie Roche Executive Editor Ashley Baker Managing Editor Tangie Silva Design Director Jill Serra Wilde Fashion Editor Paige Reddinger Senior Editor Kristen Heinzinger Associate Editor Sydney Sadick Art Director Magdalena Long Designer Sean Talbot Contributing Photo Editor Hannah Turner-Harts Contributing Photographer Giorgio Niro Contributing Copy Editor Joseph Manghise Imaging Specialists RJ Hamilton, George Maier


S:10.25”

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©2017 Maybelline LLC.


runwayReport

PRIMARY COLORS

From bright hues to reimagined basics, the core components of American style are on full display. By ASHLEY BAKER & PAIGE REDDINGER

monse

getty images (10)

We’re not really sure what was going on with the Oscar de la Renta collection— Nicole Phelps is the reigning expert on that matter—but at Monse, Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia found their footing. There were all sorts of clever iterations of the shirtdress that made the brand an insta-success, and the fresh approach to velvet added some extra oomph to what was already a highenergy collection. Even in Monse’s most basic moments, like its tweedy suits and draped silk dresses, these accomplished clothes hum with personality and verve. As for showing both ODLR and Monse together? Discuss!

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


runwayReport

Tory Burch

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What does the prep school girl wear when she’s all grown up? Tory Burch, bien sûr. Tory’s girl is always buttoned-up, but this season was a nod to uniform dressing by way of knee-length pleated tartan skirts and conservative navy blazers. There was also a strong nod to the ’70s, the era in which Burch attended Bryn Mawr’s elite Agnes Irwin School. Collegiate style monogramming adorned jackets and neckties for the Ivy Leaguers. Fast-forward to the lady who lunches, and there were plenty of gorgeous caftans for those gallivanting around Palm Beach. And there you have your Tory Burch history lesson.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


@gettyfashion

Follow the latest red carpet, runway and glamour events across the globe .com


runwayReport

ZADIG & VOLTAIRE

getty images (10)

For Zadig & Voltaire’s first show at NYFW, creative director Cecilia Bönström beautifully captured the intersection of Parisian and New York sensibilities. These are practical, pavementpounding clothes, and we mean that with total reverence. Peacoats one can rock happily for months, highly functional pants of all variations, chunky knits that will actually keep you warm (and can still be worn under an overcoat)? Yes, yes, and yes. And wisely, Bönström opted to target the millennial masses while tapping into the cool girl crowd by letting Hailey Baldwin, Bella Hadid, and Jamie Bochert ignite a few dreams.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


The Designer Collaboration Series meticulously handcrafted | impeccably packaged | flawlessly finished #ArtOfPapyrus


runwayReport

Diane Von FurstenbErg

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Jonathan Saunders’ full-scale reinvention of Diane Von Furstenberg is one of the most exciting things happening in American fashion. Few designers have managed to put their stamp on an iconic brand while referencing, ever so slightly, its origin story, but this is exactly what Saunders has done, and the overall effect is winning. Look closely and you’ll see a wrap dress, but between the knits, prints, stripes, and sequined, paillettesladen pretties, well, the dominant idea is all about newness. Spring is already selling out in stores and online, so we suggest you mark your calendars for this collection’s delivery. More proof that the turnaround will be a fiscal success? Highly covetable bags that will cost less than a weekend at Amangiri. Mansur et al.—you’ve been warned!

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


THE SHOWROOM

FEBRUARY 13-17 2017 LAUNCH COLLECTIVE 495 BROADWAY 3RD FLOOR, NEW YORK APPOINTMENT: LINH HUYNH 1-212-453-0081 linh@launchcollective.com

hktdcfashionhk

#fashion_hongkong

Fashion Hong Kong – a series of international promotional events organised by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council (HKTDC) to promote Hong Kong fashion designers and labels in the global fashion arena.

Presented by:


hktdcfashionhk www.fashionhongkong.com.hk


chicDuo

the maker and his muse As a 15-year-old model-in-themaking, Taylor Hill took in her first fashion show from the back row at Michael Kors. Three years later, Mario Testino is shooting her for the designer’s line. Hill and Kors discuss the beauty of living the American dream. By Paige reddinger

Tell us about your interest in Taylor... The most interesting people are not one-dimensional. When I look at Taylor, she is the bombshell next door. She is sexy but sporty. She’s full of optimism. She’s nice to work with, and she is obviously very beautiful. She’s excited to travel, and she loves the whole [fashion] experience. I never feel that she’s blasé about things. That whole combination makes her very much a Michael Kors girl. Does she remind you of anyone? This sounds like a contradiction, but she kind of reminds me of a sporty, all-American version of Sophia Loren. If Sophia grew up riding horses in Colorado, she might be Taylor. You shot a show teaser with Taylor called “Kors Commute.” What did she bring to the table? She’s lit. I love her enthusiasm. I found out things that I had never known before. The first fashion show she went to was a Michael Kors show with her mom! She said she had a “pinch me” moment a few years later, when suddenly, she’s in the campaign and walking down the runway. How cool! How long does it take to put those videos together? Unfortunately, everything that’s good always looks like it comes together quickly—like we just turned on our phones and said, “Let’s film this thing.” But I am not exactly shy, and someone like Taylor is not shy. So we have more footage than we need! We all need a little joy these days. What’s doing it for you? I am here to admit that I am addicted to La La Land. I have seen the movie three times and if I could sing and dance, I could jump on screen with Emma [Stone], because I know every word to the songs. We listen to the soundtrack endlessly. The movie is full of charm, romance, and a lot of things that people are really lacking and craving right now. A lot of designers have been showing in La La Land this season. Would you ever consider doing that? My mom lives in La La Land, so she would be happy. I have spent a lot of time in Los Angeles. I love it out there. But for the time being, we are happy showing in New York. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

You’ve been working with Mario Testino for quite some time. Why do you work so well together? We have been collaborating with Mario for well over a decade, and I think Mario understands joy and light. He really understands how to project that on the page. Together, we have this back-and-forth, simpatico storytelling…it’s kind of like a tennis match that always ends perfectly. Any other models who are rocking your world these days? There is such a great array of girls right now. I love Selena Forrest. She has personality. She’s got edge and bite. She has a lot of energy, which I always think is important. I love Mica Argañaraz. She is the ultimate elegant tomboy. Everything she puts on always knocks me out. And, of course, Carolyn Murphy. She is truly just like the best American wine—she gets more fabulous every year.

Who did you cast in your first ad campaign? Iman was my first muse and in my first show. She was also in my first ad campaign with a model named Joan Severance, who later became an actress. When you put the right clothes on the right model, it all comes to life. But listen—for my first show I think we had six pairs of shoes, total, and we rotated them backstage. All the models were barefoot waiting for the next pair of shoes. Who are some of your nonmodel muses? When I think of Michelle Obama, I think of elegance, intelligence, style, and all with the public eye on her the whole time. And I think the same of people like Blake Lively: She’s a great mom, obviously beautiful, but also very stylish. She dresses herself, no stylist. Of course, she’s a great actress and fun to be with, and a wicked cook. Women who do a lot of different things and do it really well—those are the women who really inspire me. ß

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Michael EXPLAINS!


“My mom said, ‘Oh, look at that girl. One day it will be you.’ And I was like, ‘No, it won’t.’ ”

h i l l a n d r o m e e st r i j d : m a r i o t e st i n o ; m i c h a e l ko r s s p r i n g 2 0 17; g e t t y i m ag e s ( 1 ) ; c o u rt e sy

taylor Tells all! The first fashion show you ever saw was Michael Kors. Tell us more! It was really exciting! I was 15 and I was the test model for Maybelline. I was at Lincoln Center and my agent said that I didn’t have any other shows to do that day. They said I could go backstage to any show I wanted, and they sent me the list and the only designer whose name I knew was Michael Kors. We sat in the back. I remember my mom said, “Oh, look at that girl. One day it will be you.” And I was like, “No, it won’t.” What was it like to finally walk his runway? I was in awe. I had shot the campaign with Mario Testino in Las Vegas before the show. It was a really surreal experience because Michael Kors himself was there on the photo shoot. When we did the fitting, I already knew him. He is such a friendly person, and he makes it a point to get to know the girls. It was really fun and exciting, and there was a really great energy. It felt like an invitation into a bigger part of the Michael Kors brand. What was it like working with Mario Testino? It was one of my first shoots ever. Mario Testino is so kind. He shoots really quickly because he already has this vision. He understands Michael really well. They have worked together for a really long time and when you are with them, you can feel that. He’s really great at capturing what Michael wants, and as a model, it really helps, because sometimes it can be intimidating to work with such amazing people. You know, I was 19 at the time. I was like, “What am I doing here?” What was your knowledge of Michael before you worked for him? I’m from Colorado, so growing up, we didn’t have a good sense of what fashion even was. When I thought of modeling, I honestly thought it was like America’s Next Top Model. When I was scouted, everyone on my gymnastics team was like, “Are you going to audition for America’s Next Top Model when you’re 16?” I recognized the name from my local mall. It was fancy, and the store smelled good. I was a 13-year-old

and I couldn’t afford the jeans, so I was like, “Wow, this is fashion.” And it is! The biggest top models in the world walk the show. Mario Testino does the campaigns. I didn’t even have a grasp of what it meant to be a brand that big. I just knew it because it was there in my mall. What surprised you about Michael when you first met him? He’s an actual person. I was meeting the man that is behind such a global, huge empire. I mean, even I knew who he was when I was living in Colorado. He was one of the first big designers I ever really worked for, besides Versace. My first runway show was Versace and I met Donatella, and that was kind of the beginning of the whole grasp of realizing these are real people who do this. So I just kind of freaked out a little bit. I was like, “What the heck is going on? Michael Kors is a person! I’m meeting him! He’s really nice!” Do you have a favorite memory with Michael? We work a lot with [creative director] Paul Cavaco; they’ve been working together for so long. Mario, Paul, and Michael are just such hilarious people. When I’m in a fitting before the photo shoot the stories that I hear…I could be there for hours. Usually fittings last 45 minutes to two hours, and we will be there for three or four hours just talking. They show

me their old photos of these crazy things they used to do and the people they worked with. As a young woman in the industry, you look up to those people, like Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington, and Naomi Campbell. They knew them when they were my age and doing what I’m doing, and it’s so crazy to hear the stories from the people who started their careers. These are the people who made those women. What’s it like being Michael’s muse? It’s really exciting. Before, I was on the outside looking in, being like, “Oh, I wonder what it’s like walking in his show. I wonder what it’s like to be around him.” And here I am and I’m like, “What?” He really understands my appreciation for it as an American girl. How did you get ready for Fashion Week? It kind of sneaks up on you­—all of a sudden, it’s Christmas, and the next thing you know, you’re doing shows again and you’re like, “Where’d the time go?” It’s more of a mental game. You have to make sure you stay rested and aware of what you’re doing because it can become very lonely. What are you looking forward to this year? The idea that anything can happen, which has kind of been the whole theme of my entire career. I’m just going with it, and it’s been kind of great. It’s been a really wild ride. It’s a crazy business! ß FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


feet forward

Meet Daianara Grullon Amalfitano, Aldo’s VP of global footwear, who was brought on to lead design and product management for the brand just over a year ago. With more than two decades of experience at Steve Madden, the shoe aficionado breaks down her career and what we can expect from Aldo’s shoe haven this spring, next fall, and beyond. BY SYDNEY SADICK “I have close to 400– 500 pairs [of shoes], but it’s what I do for a living.”

Daianara, how did you get involved in this side of the fashion industry? I’ve been in the footwear industry for 23 years. I started with Steve Madden in retail, which then led to design. As the company started to acquire and license brands, I took over those departments. Most recently, I was the international brand manager. When did you realize you wanted to get into fashion in the first place? As young as 7 or 8 years old! I would always try to make clothes for my Barbies. I went to FIT, where I initially focused on ready-to-wear. As much as I was obsessed with footwear, I didn’t realize it until the first time I stepped foot inside a shoe factory. What was it like to work with Steve Madden from the beginning stages? Incredible. It was a fast-paced environment, especially in the early years. We all wore multiple hats because the team was so small, so I did everything from designing to costing out the products…even as far as speaking to magazines and a little bit of PR. Anytime I went to a place like Dubai, for example, I’d visit Steve Madden stores and then right next door was an Aldo store, so it was a natural transition of understanding the Aldo brand. Over the years, it’s a brand that I’ve always looked at and studied. Do you keep in touch with Steve? Yeah, of course. No matter what, he was a big piece of my life and I wouldn’t be where I am without him. What’s the best piece of advice he’s given you? FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

FINISHING TOUCHES Aldo offers a comprehensive take on the hottest trends.

Timing is everything. As designers, we want to be first and to deliver products that are fashion-forward, but timing is everything and understanding your consumer and what your consumer needs is No. 1. What intrigued you about the opportunity at Aldo? Meeting with Aldo Group, especially Mr. Bensadoun. I feel aligned with the company’s values of love, respect, and integrity. It’s amazing coming here to Montreal—I was born and raised in Brooklyn as a first-generation American. At Aldo, everyone is motivated and lives through that on a daily basis. What was your vision for Aldo when taking on your role? Naturally, the retail and fashion businesses are changing. For Aldo, we realized it’s an opportunity to reignite the passion for our brand, and we’re looking

at everything from our ad campaigns to our social media to the products. To me, Aldo is young in its spirit, urban in its mind-set, and aspirational in terms of a personal lifestyle. We’ve spent a lot of time and research looking at our customer—we are reinventing ourselves, and I’m leading the team in doing that. Which trends are we seeing in the Spring/ Summer 2017 line? There are a lot of retro silhouettes, but with a modern twist. It’s all about platforms and blocky heels in fun combinations. Transparency is important, and treatments like beading and embroidery—anything that feels somewhat opulent. Have you gotten more shoe-obsessed throughout your career? I have close to 400-500 pairs, but it’s what I do for a living—I’m obsessed with shoes. I’ve purged a lot since my move to Montreal. My favorites are absolutely heels, whether it’s a platform or a single sole. I’ve recently switched from stilettos to more of a block heel, which I’m loving, and I also love ankle booties. I can’t help but collect them! Some of them will become a part of my archive, so even if I’m not wearing them anymore, I feel like I’ll circle back to them one day. What was it like moving from NYC to Montreal? Honestly, I spent more time worrying about the transition than the actual transition. It was really easy. I feel like the culture and the diversity that this city has reminds me so much of New York and even parts of Brooklyn. The food is incredible; the people are incredibly welcoming and friendly. I’m a big runner, so I love running in Mount Royal Park, which was designed by the same person who designed Central Park. The aesthetic feels familiar to home. Tell us about your running team! Born Guerrera is one of my other passions. It means warrior in Spanish. It’s a running team that a friend of mine and I co-founded. The goal is to bring people together, whether you’re a beginner runner or a runner who’s extremely advanced, but another big piece of it is to help raise money and get people together to run for charities. One of the charities that we worked with last year was SOS Children’s Villages and the goal was to run the distance from New York to Santiago, where there is a village that my parents were born and raised in. We did a run streak for 60 days and slowly, as word spread, we had people in New York, Los Angeles, London, and Florida running, and it became a team of 40 people. We raised $20,000 in 60 days, so it was a huge accomplishment. On day 60, my running partner and I went to the village in Santiago, in the Dominican Republic, and handed over the $20,000 check. Aldo works with a lot of influencers. Who’s your favorite to follow? Chiara Ferragni of The Blonde Salad. She’s amazing. I’ve worked with her in the past. I think she’s an incredible talent and so grounded and down-to-earth. She’s a natural when it comes to influencing fashion. What’s it like looking back at your first year at Aldo? The most exciting thing has been working with the teams. I have a large global team that I lead, and they’re extremely talented and experienced designers and product developers. Getting to know them and setting them up in a way to succeed and continue growing has been one of the best parts of my job. ß

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INSIDERS’ LOOK From backstage to the front row, intimate moments of fashion heaven are everywhere—for those who put down their Daily long enough to look. PHOTOGRAPHY BY SASHA ISRAEL

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