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June 27, 2019

too

haute to handle!

emrata’s

big reveal

&

tory burch jonathan baker ian schrager shoshanna gruss and more!

your

chicest

moments your

camp secrets

your

wildest behavior

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GREENWICH - 372 Greenwich Ave EAST HAMPTON - 55 Main Street, suite 4 www.eresparis.com

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Mascara Collagen-infused formula. Iconic mega brush. Instant big volume.

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33 sunset avenue, westhampton beach 14 main street, southampton village

2287 montauk highway, bridgehampton 26 montauk highway, east hampton

“Saunders, A Higher Form of Realty,� is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Please refer to our website for the names under which our agents are licensed with the Department of State. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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Saunders.com 82WheatonWay.com

modern perfection Seclusion is afforded by 13.3+/- acres in this new 9,400+/- sq. ft. home surrounded by open fields with sweeping bay and ocean vistas. Outdoor living and entertaining spaces feature a covered lounge with fireplace, kitchen and infinity pool.

Water Mill South | Co-Exclusive $29.9M

Terry Cohen

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

c: (631) 804-6100 | TCohen@Saunders.com

unity.

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What is your swim Brandusa Niro look du Editor in Chief, CEO moment?

your DAILY dose SCENE

GUCCI GOES EAST!

Alessandro Michele, welcome to the East End! Gucci is teaming up with Melet Mercantile for a three-week shop at 102 Industrial Road in Montauk, from July 3–28. Gucci will sell its pre-Fall 2019 Towards Summer capsule collection, among other merch. It’s okay to obsess…and buy it all!

The Hetrick-Martin Institute kicked off the summer party season with a soirée at the waterfront estate of Lisa and James Cohen. Co-chairs Joseph Altuzarra, Fernando Garcia, and Tracy Anderson corralled guests to Range Rovers, where they were then shuttled to a live bossa nova concert at the home of Joe Hall and Martin Dagata.

“My new green Eres bikini. I’m obsessed!”

Chief Content Officer Executive Editor & Director, Strategic Partnerships Eddie Roche Ashley Baker “I’m loyal to Orlebar Brown, Onia, Frescobol Carioca, and Katama!”

Managing Editor Tangie Silva Creative Director Dean Quigley Digital Director Charles Manning

“A ’50s retro-style halter top, high-waisted bikini in turquoise with a tangerine print, natch!”

Fashion News Editor Aria Darcella West Coast Editor-at-Large, Fashion & Beauty Partnerships Jordan Duffy Contributing Art Director Teresa Platt Contributing Photographer Giorgio Niro Contributing Photo Editor Romke Hoogwaerts Contributing Copy Editor Joseph Manghise Imaging Specialists George Maier, Nola Romano Intern Thea Pekarek

Mark Tevis Senior Advisor Senior Director, Brand Partnerships Betsy Jones Executive Sales Director Carrie Brudner Fashion Publishing Director Monica Forman

with eres superfan Julie Macklowe

When my derrière and age outgrew Agent Provocateur. Favorite suit of the moment?

My birthday suit! I also love Eres one-pieces— they’re fashionable and timeless. Love the lingerie and swimwear, to be honest. What are your favorite places to wear Eres?

Peter’s Pond beach and our pool. How will you be styling your suit this summer?

News Quiz! Who is Michael Sebastian? A. Your new assistant B. The new EIC of Esquire C. The author of novel-dumoment Out East D. An advance man for The Rolling Stones PROMOTION

Eres makes great cover-ups…and I’ll wear a good hat to keep the sun off my face.

SCHOOL’S OUT PARTY

ANSWER: B

When did you first discover Eres?

RAMY’S CORNER!

Ramy Brook designer Ramy Brook Sharp shares her top tips for seasonal entertaining. Tip 1: Plan the table shape around your party size. For a small gathering, use a round table to create an intimate setting. For larger dinner parties, long tables do the trick.

Publishing & Market Research Nandini Vaid Digital Operations Daniel Chivu Manufacturing Operations Michael Esposito Amy Taylor

To advertise, call (646) 768-8101 Or e-mail: advertising@dailyfrontrow.com The Daily Summer is a Daily Front Row Inc. publication. Copyright © 2019. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Requests for reprints must be submitted in writing to: The Daily, Attn: Tangie Silva, 810 Seventh Avenue, Ste. 400A, New York, NY 10019.

Tip 2: Assign place settings. Not only does this eliminate seating chaos upon arrival, but it also allows your guests to set down their belongings during cocktail hour. Make sure to place yourself and your co-host(s) on the end! This allows you to move and socialize easily and gives those seats priority over the middle section of a table. Tip 3: Stick to a color scheme or fun theme. This way, you can get creative in the direction of your décor—Amazon, Party City, and Etsy are my go-to’s for decorations. Plus, everyone loves a good themed party for photo ops!

On the cover: Emily Ratajkowski in a swimsuit by Inamorata, photographed by Zoey Grossman. Makeup by Holly Silius. Hair by Sylvia Wheeler.

shutterstock (4); all others courtesy

suiting up!

“A full-body wetsuit because I can’t stop eating carbs!”

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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© 2017

BLOOMINGDALE’S

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Zadig & Voltaire

Has Arrived!

SCENE

Famished after 10 p.m. and convinced that you’ll be relegated to whatever stale chips are left in your cabinet? Fret not! The Maidstone’s late-night menu is served until the wee hours, so head over to 207 Main Street in East Hampton and indulge in the restaurant’s famous artisanal flat breads, “not so Swedish meatballs,” Bonac clam pie, a raw bar, and assorted tarts, brownies, and cookies. Ask for bartender extraordinaire Carly Drew. Say The Daily sent you!

5 ESSENTIAL THINGS TO DO ON SHELTER ISLAND Courtesy of local we love Sarah Kugelman, founder and CEO of skyn ICELAND 1. Take a morning hike through the Mashomack Nature Preserve. It’s a great place to meditate and start your day in nature.

3. Sunset Beach for cocktails and a great crowd. A destination for Shelter Island and Hamptons visitors alike!

2. Hay Beach is one of the best local beaches, perfect for bringing a picnic and going paddleboarding.

4. For dinner, head over to the Vine Street Café for the sea bass. It’s not to be missed!

5. If you want to stay overnight, The Chequit is a 145-year-old Victorian inn that has been beautifully restored. There are chic white marble bathrooms, Turkish beach towels, sun hats, and illustrated maps of the island found in every room. It really captures the spirit of the island.

THINGS TO DISCUSS: EAST END MATCHMAKING You’ve got apps to spare, but for those of vous who want to invest a little something extra in your love life, The Bevy is here to help. Founded in 2014 by Greta Tufvesson and Nikki Lewis, The Bevy hand-selects its members from highly social and selective enclaves of New York, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, and now, the Hamptons. Intrigued? More info via the-bevy.com.

SUSTAINABILITY FOR ALL!

Eco-friendly fashion goddess Nicole Miller shares her top tips for KEEPING THINGS GREEN.

CHIC CHAT!

With New York Pilates’ Heather ANDERSEN

Congrats on your new outpost in Southampton! What inspired you to open a studio there?

Our recyclables used to be overflowing at the end of the day, and now it only needs to be emptied once a week. When anyone puts plastic in their trash, it will not be emptied at night.

FIGHT THE BRAIN DRAIN!

Years ago, I started implementing better I designed a whole line of practices in my showroom, carbon-neutral ties—each one studio, and home. I stopped with a message on the back. I found buying bottled water and switched that it’s really important to get the to filtered water. We stopped word out, but it is often frustrating. buying plastic cups and dishes. I go to the gym and spin class and Everyone here uses their people are not bringing their own own reusable plate, mug, water bottles. I always bring my own and cup. reusable cup to Starbucks or any place when I am getting coffee, and my employees do the We reuse everything from same. plastic bags to hangers. We also recycle our fabric scraps—nothing goes to waste here. We have upcycled vintage cashmere and denim. We have eco-made jeans with fibers from recycled plastic and plant-based materials. Recently, we made an anti-plastic T-shirt and our own water bottles that say Bring Your Own Bottle on them. I also do an online newsletter to bring a lot of these issues into light. Recycling is important, but it’s better FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M to use less in the first place.

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Are your enfants wiling away their summer days in front of the telly, and all sorts of meaningless pursuits? Il faut arrêter! Caitlin Meister, founder of The Greer Meister group, to the rescue. Meister and her trove of top-notch tutors will ensure that your littles do not suffer the “summer slide.” “You don’t have to be in a classroom to learn,” says Meister. “Summer provides an opportunity for learning experiences that we’re too busy for during the school year. There are wonderful ways for parents to keep their children engaged over summer; the key is doing it. It’s a long time to be out of school. We can help make those 10 weeks feel exciting rather than daunting.” Greer Meister tutors are experts in their fields of study, and they help students with a variety of skills, including executive functioning, organization, and time management—in addition to solidifying and building upon their academic skills. Get more info at greermeistergroup.com!

This is our fourth summer with the studio in Montauk. Due to the studio popularity and overwhelming response, we knew we needed to expand in the Hamptons! What kinds of classes are you offering?

Expect a lot of our Abs Arms & Ass and Burnout classes! We’ll also be including prenatal and postnatal classes in Southampton. In addition to our classes, we’re bringing in Sakara Life to take over our food program in Southampton. What makes New York Pilates so unique?

First of all, the class programming and experience is unlike any other Pilates offering. We’ve designed a program of super efficient, results-driven, strength training classes that you can’t find anywhere else. We offer small group reformer classes within beautifully designed studios set to the most inspiring playlist. We feel we re-energized the entire industry, and it’s been extremely gratifying to know our students feel the same way! Any vacation plans?

We’ll be putting a lot of time, effort, and dedication into our Hamptons and Montauk studios this summer. When we’re not in the Hamptons, we’ll be in NYC, working on additional studio openings later this year.

shutterstock (2); all others courtesy

I’ve been involved with Riverkeeper and Rocky Mountain Institute for many years, so saving the planet has always been a top priority for me.

Your favorite purveyor of Parisian chic has arrived on the East End. Located at 54 Main Street, Zadig & Voltaire’s beautiful corner boutique will be open all year round, and seven days a week this summer. Might we suggest some of the brand’s colorful silk dresses, next-level knits, and directional trousers? Shop hard! zadigetvoltaire.com

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NICOLEMILLER.COM

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SUMMER 2019

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Food

SCENE

There’s a new spot in Water Mill! The Garden at Water Mill is now serving dinner nightly. There’s an indoor dining room that seats 60, as well as an expansive backyard space that features larger tables, as well as lawn games. The food is highly shareable favorites—lobster bake, anyone?—and early reports are glowing. • T Justin DeMarco, who has owned and operated Justin’s Chop Shop butcher in Westhampton since 2011, has arrived in East Hampton. His new space, located inside Buoy One, is overflowing with quality meats, including dry-aged porterhouse steaks, hamburger patties, and kosher hot dogs.

THIS JUST IN! SWEET ADDITION Carissa’s The Bakery has a new 3,500-square-foot location in East Hampton. Enter through the work space, and do your best to resist the apricot-almond snails and delicious palmiers before snagging a sandwich or some rotisserie chicken and sidling up to the bakery’s communal table. And don’t forget to come back in the evening hours, when the full-scale restaurant offers dishes featuring products from the East End’s top farmers and fishermen.

We’ve been die-hard devotees of Splash’s Margarita cocktail mixers for the past several summers. Now, the brand has introduced a new Bloody Mary mixer to its popular line, and we have identified our new favorite. (Other delicious flavors include Mojito, Cosmopolitan, and Moscow Mule.) You can also order it off the menu at DOPO La Spiaggia in the Hamptons, and at Lincoln Center, the Met, and Yankee Stadium in the city.

is now serving breakfast daily from 7:30 to 11 a.m. On the menu? Avocado toast (of course), açai bowls, lobster Benedict, overnight oats, and mimosas and Micheladas.

We’ve all been there—you finally arrive out East on a Friday night, but all the restaurants are closed. You’ve got nada in the fridge, but after four hours on the Jitney, you’re famished. Help is here! Daily Harvest specializes in ultra-nourishing harvest bowls, soups, smoothies, and oat bowls. They arrive fully frozen, and will hang out in your freezer all season long. The brainchild of Rachel Drori, Daily Harvest’s meals are delicious, nutritious, and ready to enjoy in a jiffy. And it’s okay to stockpile! Order online at daily-harvest.com.

LOBSTER TO GO, PLEASE!

Daily fave Duryea’s Lobster Deck is now offering to do the dirty work of packing up your beach lunch. Give them a ring at (631) 668-2410, and specify your choice of The Continental (croissants, muffins, cookies, coffee, and juice for $85), The Luncheon (lobster rolls, salad, melon, potato chips for $135), The Aperitif (a serious cheese and charcuterie plate with beer, cider, or juice for $225), or The Seafood Lovers Basket ($250 for two people or $500 for four, including a blanket). daily-harvest.com

shutterstock (3); everett collection (1); all others courtesy

SPLASHY DEBUT!

The Clam Bar

FILL YOUR FREEZER!

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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oceanview sagaponack Exclusive $17,995,000 | 139SeascapeLane.com

Christopher Covert

Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker Cell: (917)

834-0635 | CCovert@Saunders.com @ChrisCovertRE

www.CHRISCOVERTRE.com

2287

montauk highway, bridgehampton

“Saunders, A Higher Form of Realty,� is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Please refer to our website for the names under which our agents are licensed with the Department of State. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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beautyMusts

maybelline new york Lemonade Craze eyeshadow palette, $10.99, maybelline.com

anastasia Dipbrow Gel in Dark Brown, $18, anastasiabeverlyhills.com

Kaia Gerber at MaxMara’s Spring ’19 show

yves saint laurent All Hours Stick Foundation in Warm Sand, $48, sephora.com hampton sun Shimmer Bronze Spray, $32, hamptonsuncare.com kÉrastase Elixir Ultime L’Huile Originale hair oil, $50, kerastase-usa.com

BEAUTY trend

Get your summer golden glow with varying shades of bronze. A slicked-back ’do makes the season’s must-have statement brows the centerpiece.

moroccanoil Night Body Serum, $62, moroccanoil.com

tom ford Boys & Girls Lip Color in Jagger, $36, tomford.com

shutterstock (8); firstview (1); all others courtesy

sunny daze

diorskin Mineral Nude Bronze in Soft Sunrise, $48, dior.com

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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CORAL REEF SAFE • ULTRA-SHEER VANISHING ZINC • VELVETY SOFT TEXTURE

Whites Apothecary • Second Nature Markets • Sag Harbor Pharmacy • Gurney’s Inn • Hildreth’s • Tenet


chicMusts JONATHAN ADLER Peruvian flatweave rug, $960, jonathanadler.com

SUB URBAN bird home, $150, Unlimited Earth Care Garden Concept Store, Bridgehampton

ALESSI Big Love ice cream bowl and spoon, $65, alessi.com

TWO TONE STUDIOS spiral glass pitcher, $185, twotonestudios.com

CRAFT ADVISORY Textured-Twist tumbler, $54, barneys.com

THOMAS FUCHS Half & Half dinner plate, $18, thomasfuchscreative.com

décor trend

ORANGE CRUSH

BOLLA, Metro clock, $115, wayfair.com

LOLL DESIGNS Lollygagger lounge chair, $575, dwr.com

EVERDURE BY HESTON BLUMENTHAL The Cube Grill, $200, williams-sonoma.com

BLEU NATURE Kisimi fluorescent driftwood-inset acrylic objet d’art, $650, barneys.com

unsplash (1); all others courtesy

Inject some serious color into your summer scene with these bright, bold accents.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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Amagansett | IN# 204253

Amagansett | IN# 288349

East Hampton | IN# 345138

SUMMER 2019 C O L L E C T I O N

Amagansett | IN# 343793

Sag Harbor | IN# 102742

Sagaponack | IN# 345295

YOUR HAMPTONS CONNECTION FOR BUYING, SELLING AND RENTING YORGOS TSIBIRIDIS Lic. Assoc. R.E. Broker Office: 631.267.7372 Mobile: 646.270.4544 yorgos.tsibiridis@elliman.com

elliman.com/hamptons

2488 MAIN ST, P.O. BOX 1251, BRIDGEHAMPTON, NY 11932. 631.537.5900 | © 2019 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. IF YOUR PROPERTY IS CURRENTLY LISTED WITH ANOTHER REAL ESTATE BROKER, PLEASE DISREGARD THIS OFFER. IT IS NOT OUR INTENTION TO SOLICIT THE OFFERINGS OF OTHER REAL ESTATE BROKERS. WE COOPERATE WITH THEM FULLY. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

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chicMoments

RJ King and Fernando Garcia Sebastian Faena and Ramy Brook Sharp

Alan Cumming Brooks Nader and Jason Morgan Betsy Jones and Katia Savchuk

Summer

spirit Gitano Jungle Room provided a gorgeous oasis for Manhattan's chicsters to fête the season, and the new issue of THE DAILY SUMMER. photography bY andrew werner

Memsor Kamarake and Isaac Likes

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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GUTTER CREDITS tk

Sabrina Chapman and Shelby Vert

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The Daily Front Row celebrated the start of summer and the premiere issue of this year’s Daily Summer with a massive party at the Gitano Jungle Room in Soho. Notable attendees included Sebastian Faena (who shot the cover of the new issue), Ramy Brook Sharp (who dressed cover star Camila Morrone), Alan Cumming, Fernando Garcia, Cora Emmanuel, RJ King, Mariah Strongin, Precious Lee, Marquita Pring, Andrew Warren, Jena Goldsack, Talia Richman, Garrett Neff, Grace Atwood, Jimmy Pezzino, Ashley Haas, Walter Savage, Valentina Ferrer, Milk and Poster Boy, Stephanie “Chefanie” Nass, and Gitano’s James Gardner. Danceable beats came courtesy of DJ Jenny Albright, while waiters crisscrossed the venue with trays full of yummy Tulum-inspired snacks from Gitano’s own gourmet kitchen. Bars on both floors came fully stocked with pre-mixed cocktails from Two Chicks, rosé from Whispering Angel, beer from Kronenbourg, delicious Splash Mixers, and water from LIFEWTR. Meanwhile, at the other end of the bar, hot new dating app LOKO set up a cheeky activation of its own, complete with an app tutorial, beachy backdrop, and plenty of fresh coconut water in the shell. Many guests eagerly lined up to get their ears pierced with gorgeous jewelry by Lark & Berry.

DJ Jenny Albright and Rose Smith


Julian Polak and Andrew Warren RJ King, Cora Emmanuel, and Chris Whelan

Daniel Martinez and Kim Willecke

Lisa Harbert

Tobias Sorensen and Eddie Roche Aida

Moti Ankari and Walter Savage Shameda Shah

Ashley Haas and Matthew Sinnaeve

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Mariah Strongin

Ramy Brook Sharp

GUTTER CREDITS tk

Patrick Hazlewood and Anna Zaia James Gardner, Betsy Jones, and Garrett Neff

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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chicMoments

Thomas DiCostanzo

Alan Cumming and Erin Hawker

Thijin Bol and Jonathan Valdez

Lisa Harbert and Steven Beltrani Vivek Jain and Ashley Baker Jimmy Pezzino

Delanique Millwood

Sophie Bickley and Charlotte Bickley

The Flora Brothers Tijana Ibrahimovic

getty images (3)

Valentina Ferrer

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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More than water. A canvas for artists. Art by Sara Ludy

©2019 LIFEWTR and THIRST INSPIRATION are trademarks.

Introducing Series 7: Art through Technology. Discover more at LIFEWTR.com

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CHICMoments

Carolyn Murphy

resort It’s been 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and MaxMara decamped to the city to commemorate the occasion in style. The Resort 2020 collection, which was shown at the Neues Museum, nodded to the venue’s architectural motifs, as well as some of its most celebrated artifacts. The supremely elegant Berlin Coat, as seen on Carolyn Murphy, was the star of the show.

Christiane Arp

Jack Wang, Hikari Mori, Yoyo Cao, and Xenia Adonts

GUTTERimages Getty CREDITS (6); tkAll others courtesy

maxmara

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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More than water. A canvas for artists. Art by Zach Lieberman

©2019 LIFEWTR and THIRST INSPIRATION are trademarks.

Introducing Series 7: Art through Technology. Discover more at LIFEWTR.com

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CHICMoments

Mischa Barton and Caroline D’Amore

Eugenia Kuzmina and DJ Caroline D’Amore

Claude Morais, George Kotsiopoulos, Brian Wolk, and Eddie Roche

Andy Salzer

Lexi Kaplan and Allie Kaplan Bella Harris James Rees and Shlomi Gilady

Sam Evans Crista B. Allen

Shaun Ross

global entry

Briana Ray

YiZhou

Fred Segal and The Daily teamed up to celebrate the Global Intuition line in West Hollywood.

The Daily hosted a bevy of chicsters last month at Fred Segal in West Hollywood to celebrate Global Intuition’s new collection at the store. The L.A.-based brand was founded by multimedia artist YiZhou, who drew inspiration for the line from social media. The evening welcomed Mischa Barton, Lexi and Allie Kaplan, Christa B. Allen, Lexi Wood, Shaun Ross, George Kotsiopoulos, Rachel McCord, Sam Evans, Eugenia Kuzmina, Derrial Christon, Mini Andén, Taber Schroeder, and Bella Harris. Brian Wolk and Claude Morais of Wolk Morais and Fred Segal’s John Frierson were also in attendance. Jams were provided by the fabulous Caroline D’Amore.

Betsy Jones, Stefanie Peti, YiZhou, and Manasvi

Derrial Christon

Javicia Leslie

Rachel McCord and Caroline D’Amore

Manasvi

getty images (21)

BY EDDIE ROCHE

Matt Sarafa

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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More than water. A canvas for artists. Art by Andrew Benson

©2019 LIFEWTR and THIRST INSPIRATION are trademarks.

Introducing Series 7: Art through Technology. Discover more at LIFEWTR.com

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chicMoments

“[Hadestown] is a show about the power of the singular voice to convene community, and with each step, it has expanded that community and improved in response to that community—and that’s what brought us here tonight.” Jeremy Pope

—Jordan Roth

Robert Horn

Jordan Roth and Bee Shaffer Carrozzini

“I’m 50! I’m still trying to work it. I’m gonna die trying!”

Rebecca Luker and Danny Burstein

Anna Wintour and Richie Jackson

“It doesn’t matter what you do, it matters who you are. Everything else comes from that.”

—Kristin Chenoweth

Karen Olivo

—Judith Light

Kristin Chenoweth

Julie White Judith Light

Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Justin Mikita

The 73rd-annual Tony Awards honored Broadway’s best at Radio City Music Hall on Sunday, June 9.

James Corden hosted the 2019 Tony Awards, which featured fantastic performances by the casts of all this year’s nominated musicals, including Hadestown, which took home eight awards, including those for Featured Actor (André De Shields), Original Score (Anaïs Mitchell), and the big one, Best Musical. The Ferryman received four awards, including Best Play, while top acting prizes were presented to Elaine May (The Waverly Gallery), Bryan Cranston (Network), Stephanie J. Block (The Cher Show), and Santino Fontana (Tootsie). Numerous honorary Tonys were also presented, including one given to Judith Light for her advocacy on behalf of those living with HIV/AIDS and the LGBT+ community at large.

Erich Bergen

“I’m obsessed with being on Broadway… If somebody offers me a job on Broadway, it’s one of those things, I still can’t actually believe it.” —Erich Bergen

Performance by the cast of Ain’t Too Proud: The Life and Times of The Temptations

Rachel Sussman and Rachel Brosnahan

Warren Carlyle

pat r i c k m c m u l l a n . c o m ( 1 0 ) ; g e t t y i m a g e s ( 4 )

sing out

Brandon Uranowitz

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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55 Newtown Lane, East Hampton 451 Broome St, New York


chicMoments

Claudia Gutierrez and Martha Luna

Sydney Sadick

Lydia Fenet Kalia

Karina Bik

SUITING

UP

The Daily Summer and Eres kicked off bathing suit season with parties at the brand’s beautiful boutiques in East Hampton and Greenwich, Connecticut. The season’s hautest beach looks were on full display as a coterie of chicsters like Lydia Fenet, Karina Bik, and Kalia dropped in to sip champagne, enjoy hors d’oeuvres, and even dabble in a bit of sport, thanks to Eres’s adorable customized volleyballs and jump ropes.

Faith Logan Robyn Myhr, Lorna Dreher and Jocelyn Daly Osborn

photography bY randi alegre

Alicia Fox and Lorna Dreher

Zoe and Diandra Breen

Nancy Taylor and Marie Jo Iskander FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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Elizabeth B. Bowden "When Privacy is Paramount and Luxury is Never Compromised" Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 20 Main Street, Southampton, NY ebowden@nesteekers.com 484.653.8504

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chicMusts

TOM FORD SPRING ’19

firstview (2); unsplash (1); all otherS courtesy

VALENTINO SPRING ’19

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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ERES Comete full-cup bra, $317, eresparis.com

LOEWE Chunky acetate cat-eye sunglasses, $360, bergdorfgoodman.com

ERES Etoilée high-waisted briefs, $169, eresparis.com

RAEY Dolman-sleeve silk-blend shirt, $324, matchesfashion.com

TORY BURCH double-wrap logo stud bracelet in Light Oak/Rose Gold, $128, toryburch.com

LOEWE Puzzle mini textured-leather shoulder bag, $1,800, loewe.com

THINK PINK

This summer, why not see life through rosé-colored glasses? Some matching bags, sunglasses, and bracelets won’t hurt, either.

SHOSHANNA Sora dress, $429, shoshanna.com

APIECE APART Azore cotton and linenblend twill jumpsuit, $445, net-a-porter.com

MAxMARA one-piece Lycra swimsuit, $190, maxmara.com

firstview (2); unsplash (1); all otherS courtesy

AQUAZZURA Love tasseled suede espadrilles, $550, net-a-porter.com

MANSUR GAVRIEL Calf Moon leather wallet, $395, bergdorfgoodman.com OLIVER PEOPLES Avri square acetate sunglasses, $380, bergdorfgoodman.com

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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chicMusts

stella mccartney spring ’19

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michael kors spring ’19

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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alexachung striped cottonpoplin midi dress, $525, net-a-porter.com

fendi wide-leg striped cotton-poplin trousers, $375, matchesfashion.com RAMY BROOK Averie printed top in Slate Combo, $138, ramybrook.com

christian louboutin Décolleté 554 100 suede pumps, $895, bagolyshop.com

missoni mare sequin-embellished onepiece swimsuit, $795, modaoperandi.com

l’agence Scout blazer, $490, lagencefashion.com

FEELING BLEU

kalita New Poet by the Sea cotton poplin maxi dress, $575, holtrenfrew.com

Inspired by the irresistible shades of l’eau, these water colors invoke the spirit of summer, wherever you happen to be.

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gucci oval metal-frame glasses in Light Blue, $345, matchesfashion.com

JACQUEMUS Les Sandales Pisa, $610, mytheresa.com

prada eyewear cat-eye acetate sunglasses, $350, matchesfashion.com marni Pannier bag in Pale Blue, $1,990, marni.com FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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chicMusts

f i r st v i e w ( 2 ) ; u n s p l a s h ( 1 ) ; a l l ot h e r s co u rt e sy

oscar de la renta spring ’19

self-portrait spring ’19

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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begum khan Evil Eye necklace, $638, begumkhan.com

givenchy high-neck sleeveless stretch-knit top, $472, matchesfashion.com

marni printed cotton and flax-blend slim-leg pants, $207, net-a-porter.com gianvito rossi ankle-tie sandals, $486, farfetch.com

green envy

CULT GAIA X Adriana Degreas triangle bikini with side ties and tortoise detail in Green, $499, shop.adrianadegreas.com

zandra rhodes Summer Collection The 1973 Field of Lilies gown, $2,150, matchesfashion.com

Your backyard is looking positively verdant, so let your wardrobe follow suit. These darker shades add a touch of the unexpected to your usual warm-weather fare.

gucci contrast-panel square acetate sunglasses, $794, matchesfashion.com

f i r st v i e w ( 2 ) ; u n s p l a s h ( 1 ) ; a l l ot h e r s co u rt e sy

norma kamali All Over fringe tube skirt, $500, normakamali.com

erdem multi-stone drop clip earrings,$310, matchesfashion.com

wai wai Jabuticaba bag, $630, waiwairio.com

miu miu Confidential matelassĂŠ-quilted velvet shoulder bag, $2,370, matchesfashion.com

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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chicMusts

rodarte spring ’19

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balmain spring ’19

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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SAINT LAURENT EYEWEAR cat-eye-shaped sunglasses, $325, farfetch.com MIU MIU Miu Run Technical Metal sneakers, $725, miumiu.com

NICOLE MILLER NYC multicharm necklace, $148, nicolemiller.com

SILVER

SOLACE LONDON Alula stretch-Lurex turtleneck mini dress, $473, net-a-porter.com

STUNNERS

DOLCE & GABBANA paillette-embellished tulle midi dress, $2,447, net-a-porter.com

These sparkly, shimmery add-ons give a dose of very ’19 glam to your summer style. SASKIA DIEZ chain-mail clutch, $425, net-a-porter.com

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ANNA-KARIN KARLSSON sunglasses, $1,485, annakarinkarlsson.com

SAM EDELMAN glittered vinyl sandals, $72, net-a-porter.com

VALENTINO GARAVANI rockstud spike metallic leather crossbody clutch, $1,745, saksfifthavenue.com

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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SHOPPING PROMOTION

all images courtesy

chicSpree

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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Veto sapphire necklace, $1,120 halo diamond pavĂŠ trio necklace, $1,495

Veto multicolored necklace, $3,125

MODERNIST tennis bracelet, $1,675

Veto multicolored elongated earrings, $2,495

SHINE BRIGHT Amp up your summer jewelry game with these next-level baubles from Lark & Berry.

Veto multicolored bracelet, $1,495

BLue dune drop earrings, $850

all images courtesy

VETO sapphire crescent labret, $395

Dune diamond band, $1,150

Halo diamond stud earrings, $985

All available at larkandberry.com FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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chicSpree

SHOPPING PROMOTION

Larson Shoe You Can Swim In in Navy/ Bluestone, $185

Laughton tailored-fit silk T-shirt in Pale Birch, $295

Terry Towelling Resort polo in Waterfall, $165

Stafford tailored-fit single-breasted blazer in Navy, $545

summer homme

Griffon tailored-fit trousers in Navy, $275

Edgar two-tone tailored-fit single-breasted blazer in Navy Wash, $495

all images courtesy

Get your summer suitcase packed with an array of swim looks and casual ensembles from Orlebar Brown. Campbell slim-fit stretch chinos in Shell, $275

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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Giles denim tailored-fit shirt in Indigo, $245

Giles linen tailored-fit shirt in Birch/ White, $245

Ethan cashmere lightweight classic-fit crew-neck jumper in Shell/ Gray Melange, $595

Skyfall Setter shorterlength swim shorts in 007 Sky Blue, $295

Bulldog mid-length swim shorts in Kaufman Cocktail print, $345

Bulldog midlength swim shorts in Rob Wyn Yates Prism print, $345

all images courtesy

Skyfall Setter mid-length swim shorts in Rainforest, $345

Bulldog mid-length swim shorts in Rob Wyn Yates Spectrum print, $345

Bulldog mid-length swim shorts in 007 Moonraker print, $395 Haston cork flip-flop in Black, $75

All available at Orlebar Brown, 55 Newtown Lane, East Hampton, and online at orlebarbrown.com FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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chicSpree

SHOPPING PROMOTION

Offtheshoulder stripe dress, $138

Scalloped eyelet dress in Ivory, $138

Lemon print sundress, $138

CHELSEA Wide Leg Crop Jean in Louie Wash, $98

LIGHT AS AIR Don’t let the heat get to you this summer. Instead, keep cool from day to night with these breezy summer styles from Sam Edelman!

RUFFLE GINGHAM A-line dress, $128

LOTUS shorts in Laney white wash, $88 A l l i m ag e s co u rt e sy

MILLIE basket shoulder bag in Whiskey, $148

All available at samedelman.com FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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DEENA wedge sandal in Natural, $130

GALA sandal in Golden Yellow, $80

GENOVIA woven sandal in White, $90

GILES knotted flipflop in Black, $50

NATALYA slipper in Gold, $90

YOANA block-heel sandal in Havana Coral, $130

CATEYE logo sunglasses in White, $85

GUNNER beaded sandal in Black Multi, $100

A l l i m ag e s co u rt e sy

BECKIE slide sandal in White, $90

ANDY slide sandal in Molten Gold, $90

GIGI thong sandal in Saddle, $70

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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chicSpree

SHOPPING PROMOTION

Designer pool float, $70

Duck Duck floating lantern, $200

PZL-SLOT puzzle lamp, $350

Handmade rustic artisanal birdhouses, $150

River Stone coffee tables, $800 each

Realistic sheep sculptures, $1,000 each

Designer pool float, $70

UNLIMITED EARTH CARE Angel’s trumpet chair, $125

Sub Urban bird home, $150

Chic-ify your outdoor décor with these inspired chairs, pool floats, and other assorted accessories from the boutique of Frederico Azevedo, one of the East End’s most esteemed landscape architects.

Praise Yellow handmade glass vase, $120

all images courtesy

All available at the Unlimited Earth Care Garden Concept Store, Bridgehampton

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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THE PICTURE-PERFECT M O D E L O F R E F R E S H M E N T.

@1664USA

Fo r a g e s 21 + o n l y. P l e a s e d r i n k re s p o n s i b l y.

O u r t i m e l e s s Fre n c h b e e r i s s e a rc h i n g f o r t h e per fect hands to hold it.

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ModelMogul

iNAMORATA WOMAN Leucadia one-piece halter swimsuit in Coral, $160, inamoratawoman.com

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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big business Don’t let that body fool you— Emily Ratajkowski is here to work. The model/actress/entrepreneur is taking the fashion world by storm with her hugely successful line, Inamorata. Thanks to her 23 million (and counting) Instagram followers, the swimsuit and body line has been selling out— and this is just the start. by EDDIE ROCHE photography by ZOEY GROSSMAN makeup by holly silius hair by sylvia wheeler stylist assistant: Nadia Beeman prop stylists: Andy Henbest & Stephanie Mace

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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“My worry used to be that I was a jack of all trades and master of none, but I’ve kind of erased that and I really embrace the fact that I’m able to do multiple things.” Have you always been the type of person who is able to juggle so many projects? I was the kid who was in ballet class, acting class, soccer, all that stuff, theater, everything. It was just always in my nature to spread myself somewhat thin. My worry used to be that I was a jack of all trades and master of none, but I’ve kind of erased that and I really embrace the fact that I’m able to do multiple things. How did the idea of Inamorata come about? It really started with me doing a lot of licensing deals. I grew up in Southern California. I love bikinis, that’s important to say. I grew up on a beach. I’ve always had a giant collection of suits. I’ve also always been interested in fashion. I was in third grade drawing my teacher’s wedding dress when I found out she was getting married. But as an adult, it really came to me through doing all these licensing deals, and also targeted ads through Instagram or with campaigns and realizing, “Oh, wow, I’m being hired to collaborate with these brands for my creative direction. I feel like I could do this just as well if not better than what they’re doing. I want to give it a shot!” Who did you turn to for advice? I talked to a lot of my friends who have their own brands. I’m between L.A. and New York. A lot of my friends work in the industry and have smaller brands, and then I just worked super hard to find a factory. Our factory is in L.A., almost all our stuff is in L.A. I brought on my best friend [Kat Mendenhall], who worked in luxury manufacturing for 10 years. She has come on to handle the back end, and I continue to be the designer and creative director and all that other good stuff. Zac Posen is a friend of yours. Did you talk to him about the business? Zac and I come from similar positions, where we didn’t have a dad who built and sold companies or someone who was really there to be like, “Okay, this is what you do on the business front.” We come from a creative background; both of our dads are painters. He told me about his own experience and about having so much excitement around your brand or identity and needing

to be able to understand and balance that out and maintain as much control as possible. Zac and I talked about how if you want your business to last a long time, you need to have control and ownership. What’s in your background that makes you able to do all this so naturally? I went to UCLA for art, so I have always been a pretty good craftsman. I design everything. Everything for me is taken from inspiration. Then I literally just have a notebook where I sketch out [the looks] and work with the factories to build the samples. Then we really just go from there. Tell us about the name Inamorata. Why did you decide to call it that? I definitely didn’t want to name it EmRata because I want the brand to exist without me and sort of be its own thing. As much as I’m so grateful for all my fans who have come over to Inamorata, I definitely want it to grow into its own company separately from my own identity. But I liked the idea of having something that alluded to EmRata and my name. When I was thinking of things I loved, I thought Inamorata because it means female muse or siren, and I like the idea that a woman is her own muse and her own siren. What have been the biggest challenges in getting this company going? What we have had to work the hardest on is production, because we have such an amazing customer acquisition cost and rate. We have all these new customers coming all the time who want new products. Our goal is to really have lots of new products, whether it be body, which is the lingerie, ready-to-wear category, or swim, which is released every two and a half weeks. Having this sort of infrastructure for a company that’s really in its infancy helps us meet the demands of our consumers. That has been the toughest part; basically, finding a factory that could keep up with us. Who are some of the people you look up to who have made the leap from modeling to something else? Kathy Ireland is amazing. She’s so smart. In some ways, I’ve modeled my business after her, which is to start with

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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iNAMORATA WOMAN Orpheus top and bottom in Black and White Polka Dot, $75 each, inamoratawoman.com; model’s own earrings and shoes

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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iNAMORATA WOMAN Leucadia one-piece halter suit in Raisin Dot, $160, inamoratawoman.com; model’s own earrings and shoes

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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iNAMORATA WOMAN Leucadia one-piece halter suit in Vert, $160, inamoratawoman.com; model’s own earrings, socks, and shoes

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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“AS MUCH AS WE LOVE SWIM AND WE WANT TO CONTINUE TO DO THAT, there are just so many other things that people want.” something really simple, earn your customers’ trust, fill your customer base, and use your name to do so. She started with socks, which was really brilliant. Everyone thought she was crazy, but she actually was so amazingly smart because it was a basic thing. She knew once she could sell socks, she could sell anything. Our first year, we had only six styles of swim, so in some ways I feel like we have modeled ourselves a little bit after what she did. How do you want to see the business grow? I think we’ll continue to expand into lingerie and readyto-wear; right now, we call that category body. Our bike shorts are one of our best-selling products, even over swim. It’s a great staple, and people know that we make good ones and you can wear them all the time. For us, it’s really about continuing to build our customers. One thing that makes our business special is that we have this amazing ability to acquire customers with such low prices and at such a high rate. It’s really what they want, and that’s the key thing for us. As much as we love swim and we want to continue to do that, there are just so many other things that people want. They want ready-to-wear, they want accessories, and we plan to take on all that. How many people are working for you now? It’s me and my best friend. Then we have a full-time employee and a couple of interns. In our office, it’s about four people, so we’re really, really small. How involved are you in the day-to-day? My friend Kat [Mendenhall] deals with making sure everything is coming from the factory on time, and we have the pick and pack and all that, but when you have a company this small, all hands are on deck. So I’m kind of doing everything. Your shoot with photographer Zoey Grossman is beautiful. That was my first time working with her. She is super, super amazing. We like working with female photographers, and we try to do that as much as possible. What’s really fun about Inamorata is

every two and a half weeks we are dropping a new collection, whether it’s swim or body, so we have a lot of opportunity. Everything is about our content. We get to go to photographers and be like, “Listen, this is what we need to do, this is the general idea, what do you think?” We actually pulled up these fun, sort of ’70s and ’80s images that I had saved on my mood board, so it kind of worked out perfectly. A lot of that ’80s inspiration has been floating around, but nobody has really done it well. Do you think you’ll sell in stores? I really don’t see a reason at this point for us to move to wholesale. For us, [the direct-to-consumer model] has been incredible and successful, so there just isn’t a reason, but eventually we would like to do something. Would you do a runway show? No. I don’t really get runway shows. For me, everything is about content. If you can create a lot of content from that show, go for it, but I bet you can create even more fresh and interesting content through other ways. I think what’s evolving is that the old go-to’s in fashion are in a really different place. You can be really creative with how you market. What’s the best part of this project? It’s so creative. It’s so fun. I am an actress and a model, so I am used to being hired and brought along in the later stages of a project. This is an experience where I get to control everything from start to finish. What other projects are you working on right now? I am also starting to develop my own film projects because that’s something that I realized I really enjoy and want to do more of. Do you know what kind of stories you want to tell? Women’s stories. Not just men’s stories with women in them but actually stories of women’s experiences. What are your summer plans? I think we’ll be in the Hamptons a little bit this summer, which is very exotic for me, because I’m from California!

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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shootScoop iNAMORATA WOMAN Neptune top in Coral, $75, inamoratawoman.com

grape crush Start with a light coat of the Blue Raspberry shade as a base, then layer the Grape Pop color on top. Add shimmer to the inside of the eye and blend outward for a disco-chic effect. BEAUTY MUST: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Soda Pop eyeshadow palette, $10.99, maybelline.com

get the beauty look

loose curls The ionic technology seals hair cuticles, resulting in less frizz and a high shine. Hold it horizontally and wrap a section of hair over the clamp away from face. Hold for a few seconds and release. Tug slightly on the ends while hair is still warm and shake out. BEAUTY MUST: DRY BAR The 3-Day Bender 1.25" Digital Curling Iron, $145, sephora.com

Sweep the Supersonic brush—which features a hard inner core and evenly spaced soft bristles for maximum volume—from the root of the lash to the tip. The clump-free formula glides on evenly, so apply several coats. BEAUTY MUST: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Volum’ Express The Rocket mascara in Blackest Black, $8.77, maybelline.com

bold hold

After running fingers through curls, spray hair lightly with this dry argan-oil-infused texture spray that achieves long-lasting hold. It’s perfect for carefree, undone styles. BEAUTY MUST: MOROCCANOIL Dry Texture Spray, $28, moroccanoil.com

Le cheek c’est chic Apply a small amount of blush onto the apples of cheeks and blend up from the cheekbones to temples. This formulation feels like a cream with a light powdery finish. BEAUTY MUST: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Dream Bouncy Blush in Pink Frosting, $7.99, maybelline.com

zo e y g r o s s m a n ; s h u t t e r sto c k ( 3 ) ; a l l ot h e r s co u rt e sy

amp’d up lashes

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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ICONMoment

AVERY TORY SUMMER It wouldn’t be l’été without a check-in with Daily fave Tory Burch. Recent journeys, upcoming fixations, and enduring obsessions— she addresses them all!

a l l ot h e r s co u rt e sy

BY ASHLEY BAKER PHOTOGRAPHY BY Noa Griffel

Tory Burch Eau de Parfum, $128, available at Sephora boutiques and sephora.com

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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Ceramic charm earrings, $298

Colorblocked underwire one-piece, $258

Smocked printed dress, $498

looks she loves Ravello studded sandal, $248

Tory’s top picks from the brand’s East Hampton boutique, which are also available at toryburch.com

Overprinted wrap dress, $498

Miller mini bucket bag, $348

Daisy lace-up platform trainer, $278

a l l ot h e r s co u rt e sy

Spongewear pitcher, $98

This spring, you visited Tokyo, where you opened a Tory Burch store in Ginza. What were some of the coolest things you experienced on your trip? It was beyond incredible. I ate delicious gyoza, visited the Meiji Shrine, and saw the cherry blossoms. We went during the three days of blooming. It was unforgettable. Where will you be traveling this summer? I will be spending some time in Italy and out on Long Island. And what will you be wearing? I’m really excited about our pre-Fall collection, which is just coming out. It was inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe—she was a phenomenal artist and an independent spirit. The collection is focused on her irreverence. We have a wrap dress with a layered pigment-striping that is lightweight and perfect for the summer. And of course, it wouldn’t be summer without a signature scent. What inspired the launch of your first fragrance, Tory Burch Eau de Parfum? We thought about moving into the beauty space for a long time. We are a patient brand, particularly in terms of launching new product categories, so we spent a lot of time thinking about what our signature fragrance should be. We wanted a balance of femininity and tomboy, grounded and graceful.

“my parents each had a signature scent; both are Ingrained in my memory. our fragrance is anchored by vetiver, which my father wore every day growing up.” You’ve mentioned that your parents wore memorable fragrances—did you incorporate any of those notes? My parents each had a signature scent; both are ingrained in my memory. Our fragrance is anchored by vetiver, which my father wore every day growing up—my brothers still wear it. We balanced the depth of the vetiver with airy floral notes, like peony. Those scents bring me back to the summer days I spent in my mother’s garden growing up. How did you combine these often-disparate scents into one cohesive statement? The whole process was fascinating. There was a fair amount of trial and error—I learned that notes may be great on their own but not work well together. Developing a scent is a lot like designing a collection—everything has to be cohesive, balanced, and harmonious.

The bottle is so striking, too. We wanted something that would look beautiful on a vanity. I kept thinking about all the vintage bottles and atomizers my mom collected. The cap is fretwork, one of our brand’s signatures, and the bottle’s lines and beveled edges were informed by Donald Judd and Josef Albers. Do you remember the first time you wore it? I’ll never forget when one of the entrepreneurs we work with through our foundation came up to me at a networking event and told me how much she loved the fragrance. She had saved up to buy it and wore it only on Saturday nights. It was a huge compliment. And how often do you wear it now? Every day. It’s understated enough to wear during the day. You know, my mom actually wears it all the time, which is the greatest endorsement I could ask for. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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visionAccomplished

CENTER OF THE WORLD The Times Square Edition opened its doors this spring.

OPERATION:

EDITION Longtime Hamptons resident Ian Schrager spends his weekends tucked away in the Hamptons en famille, but during business hours, he’s building an empire of hotel properties throughout the world. One of his most ambitious projects? The recent opening of The Times Square Edition, which aims to bring a true luxury experience back to the center of the universe.

What inspired you to stake your claim to Times Square? I’m in an opportunistic business, so we respond to opportunities. As a practical matter, I’ve had a number of successful projects in Times Square. Not only Studio 54, but the Royalton Hotel, the Paramount Hotel, and the Hudson Hotel as well. They’ve all done really well. People don’t realize that Times Square is the most successful submarket in New York City, because it does business 12 months a year. I never doubted for a minute that I could do a good product. You do something sexy and original and provocative, and people will come, no matter where it is. The hotel has been a smash.

How did you go about creating the property? I wanted to do two things that were kind of contradictory—a sophisticated, refined space with lots of romantic gardens, juxtaposed against hurly-burly, boisterous activity. We wanted to create a new entity that the two by themselves couldn’t have created. That’s when the magic happens. Who designed the space? Yabu Pushelberg designed the interiors, and Arnold Chan handled the lighting. Studio staff from the company were really responsible for producing it, pulling it all together, and making it all happen. It was a really collaborative effort. If we weren’t happy with the way it looked, I wouldn’t have done it.

What do you want people to think of when they think of The Edition? Modern, edgy, luxury—and not luxury that’s reminiscent of a hundred years ago. The Edition is a microcosm of the best New York has to offer—great bars, nightclubs, and restaurants. Everything you need. The terraces are really exciting—it’s clear that you’re in Times Square, but you feel removed from it all, in a sense. That’s exactly what I’m talking about. We call those the Blade Runner terraces. It doesn’t literally look like the original Blade Runner, but it feels like it. What’s the concept with the food? There are three different restaurants. The Terrace

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all images courtesy

BY EDDIE ROCHE


all images courtesy

SOMETHING FOR ALL The hotel features two restaurants and the Paradise Club.

Restaurant is a modern, American version of the traditional French brasserie. I say “French,” but it doesn’t attach itself to any specific area. It has food from all over the globe, but it’s served in a casual, romantic way. It’s not overly loud, like most brasseries, and it’s open all day long. Then we have the signature restaurant, 701West, which is eclectic, quirky, has a great wine list. Like a chop house with great dishes and lots of things prepared at the table. The third restaurant at the Paradise Club is theatrical—it offers a 15-course dinner with small plates that include everything from hot dogs to caviar. It’s theatrical, successful, and fun. What’s the concept behind Paradise Club? It’s hard to describe without putting it in a box, but it’s a visual and visceral entertainment experience. It’s chaotic, and it doesn’t have a narrative. It’s not telling a story or following the traditional format of a cabaret act or theater. If anything, it’s almost like modern vaudeville, because it’s just a bunch of acts that are connected in spirit. Time just flies by. Do you plan on featuring any other performers there? There’s a new invention and a rebirth of this kind of cabaret performance. It’s part of what nightlife needs— an injection of energy. We plan on doing a lot more of it, and not only in Times Square—in all The Editions. Even in The Public [Hotel], we have a great show. I believe in this. People want to go out and dance, but they also want to be entertained. They want to eat, drink, and dance. That’s the new formula for a successful nightclub. Diana Ross recently performed at the hotel, and Kendall Jenner and Cara Delevingne attended. Why did you pursue such a splashy opening? If I could have created an earthquake, I would have! I

“IF I COULD HAVE CREATED AN EARTHQUAKE, I WOULD HAVE! I WANtED EVERYBODY TO NKOW ABOUT IT, AND I WANTED TO BLOW EVERYBODY AWAY.” wanted everybody to know about it, and I wanted to blow everybody away. Times Square is the center of the universe, and I wanted to be at the center of the center. How was that night for you? Well, I’m like an expectant father sitting in the delivery room waiting for his wife to give birth. It’s funny, my fun is mostly in creating it and then watching people enjoy it and have fun. I remember that great movie, 42nd Street, and how the director in the movie had pulled off this great show and he was in the alleyway incognito listening to what people were saying. His payoff was that people liked his show. I’m the same way. You’re opening another Edition hotel in West Hollywood later this year. What can you tell us? That property will be as special as the Times Square one. Very unique, very special, and very California. As a longtime Hamptons resident, would you ever consider opening a hotel there? I don’t think so; it’s such a short season. I’ve been asked a couple of times. I’ve always avoided the Caribbean, the Hamptons—all those places that are vulnerable to weather are generally not always successful business operations.

What do you think of the Hamptons these days? I’m a family guy now, and I go to my house and hide there. I don’t need to see everyone I see throughout the week in New York out in the Hamptons. We live a very provincial, boring life. I go and see my wife, hang out with the five kids, and I’m perfectly happy. I don’t need anything else. How nostalgic are you? Not very. I’m always onto the next thing. I’m always looking forward, not back. I think what’s happened previously is important to learn from, but I’m always looking forward. What do people want to know about your past? People must ask about Studio 54 all the time. They do. It happened 40 years ago. The only other seminal cultural event that happened on that scale was Woodstock! People who’ve never even been there are fascinated by it. It’s a phenomenon. Have you been back recently? Do you ever go to see a Broadway show there? Yes, and it looks different. I do go to Broadway shows and when I pass 54th Street, it evokes some emotions. Happy emotions? Yes! We weren’t always, but we’re happy now. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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brandBuilder

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big

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Shoshanna Gruss celebrated a major milestone earlier this year—the 20th anniversary of her brand. THE DAILY SUMMER caught up with the founder of Shoshanna to reflect on two decades of chic, inclusive fashion, and her take on the most stylish women in the world. BY Aria Darcella photography by william jess laird

all others courtesy

How far have you come since you have launched? The collection has grown and matured with me. It’s definitely reflected my life. When I first started it was full of youthful clothing, and now we reach a wide range of ages and sizes. My confidence in it all has grown as well. We have really stayed true to what we set out to do, which was to develop a clothing line that’s inclusive of more body types and celebratory of women’s bodies. In what ways were you innovative? In 1998, nobody was talking about different body types. People were saying, “We don’t really need that.” But I know you do, because I am the customer. That really hit a nerve. We were one of the first swim lines to sell separates in cup sizes the way we did. Now pretty much everyone sells bikinis as separates. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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Is it daunting to put that much of yourself into the business? I am the customer, and I want to stay the customer. That is how I test the temperature of everything. Would I wear this? When you feel that passionately about something, it makes sense. Shoshanna is my name, and I want to produce the most beautiful quality clothing that people are going to wear. I can’t pass it off like it has nothing to do with me, because it has everything to do with me. I still love it, too. I would say it saved me at certain points of my life as well. We all have our ups and downs, but I always have my business to turn to and put myself into. It has always been such a positive source for me. What were some of the challenges in the early days? I was so driven when I first started. When I think back, I can’t believe that I had the gall to do something I really had no background, no idea what it was. My dad used to always say, “You don’t even know what you don’t know.” I made probably 100 wrong turns and a million mistakes in the beginning. But to me they weren’t really mistakes—they were just times when I hit a wall and turned a corner. Do you have any favorite pieces that you have designed over the years? The swimwear, for sure! It was such a struggle growing up to find something that was even sort of cute. Anything that did fit me on top looked like something I could share with my grandma. I love that we make these pieces that range from size A through DDD and fit such a broad range of bodies. Your company employs 25 women. What is it like being in that space? It’s very natural for me to be around these amazing, talented women, but we have had men work with us over the years. I hire the people in my office because of their talent, and because of the confidence that I have in them. How do you navigate your work/life balance? I’m a full-time mom, but I do work full-time. My dad is my hero, but he went to work. I don’t think he felt any guilt—nor should he have. But I do [feel guilty], not being everywhere. [Especially] being a single mom, actually. But it’s well worth it. I wouldn’t do it any other way. What are your favorite things to do in the Hamptons? I’m a beach girl. There’s nowhere I’d rather be than in the ocean. I’ve always liked to soak up the days in nature. Swimming, walking, gardening, relaxing, playing with my kids. In the summer, they usually go to camp. I try to work out and work, but mostly I’m home. Some mornings I will drive to Ocean Road to watch the sunrise, straight across where my house is. I live in North Haven, which looks out over Shelter Island, and we have the most unbelievable sunsets. My bedroom faces the sunset and whenever I’m changing to go to a party or something I always get caught up in the sunset. Once in a while I’ll go out and meet up with friends, but I love sitting outside and reading a book. What are some tips for entertaining at home? I use a company called The Culinistas. They’re almost like Uber for an at-home chef. They cook and set up the menus; they’re amazing. If I’m just doing something casual, I like to pick up food from the Hampton Market in Sag Harbor or Round Swamp Farm to make it easier on myself. I do not like formal dinner parties in the Hamptons. I will do almost anything to avoid that. I just like being outdoors—simple, easy,

HAT ATTACK bikini in Ditzy Blossom, $120—$165

HAT ATTACK sunhat in Gingham, $115

HAT ATTACK Cayman tote in Gingham, $138

HAT ATTACK sunhat in Ditzy Blossom, $115

Umbrella stripe widestrap onepiece, $143

beach needs

These Shoshanna pieces are so breezy, you’ll practically live in them this summer. Solid navy cami classic one-piece, $245

Dot jacquard bra halter one-piece, $260

NEVADA textured ring-top bikini, $128–$198

All available at shoshanna.com

clean food, friends, cold drinks—that’s what I envision and fantasize about all winter long. Who are some of your style icons these days? Cate Blanchett. She always wears things that are fascinating, fun, and tailored to perfection. I also like to see people in the street. I am always interested in how people put together their look, especially when traveling. What city has the best style? Italian women on the Italian Riviera. The shoes are always a little bit different. They wear good jewelry to the beach, and it’s not too much or too understated. It looks like it’s been in their family forever. Their hair color is great, and their skin is always a little too tan but beautiful. They look like they are on a movie set! Got any big vacation plans this summer? I’m going to Spain for 10 days, and then I’ll be back for July 4th. Then I’m in Sag Harbor for the rest of the summer. Do your travels inspire your designing at all? Always! I was fortunate to travel when I was growing

HAT ATTACK Cayman tote in Ditzy Blossom, $138

up. We spent a lot of summers out of the country. I had a good global understanding when I was younger and was always intrigued by other countries and people. Now I travel as much as I’m able to with three little kids. Tell us about working with Saks Fifth Avenue! Saks is one of my longtime customers. We were talking about the 20th-anniversary collection, and Saks asked if they could have it as an exclusive. They put a lot of their support behind it. They are a wonderful partner, and I love working with them and shopping there. How did your collaboration with Hat Attack come about? They approached us, and it seemed like a natural fit because we are heavily involved in the swim and beachwear business. I don’t like to do things that feel forced. The timing for this was perfect—it felt natural and organic. Who would be some of your dream collaborators? I would love to work with a hotel or a beach resort. It would be an excuse to be on a beach for work! FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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RENAISSANCE MAN

A L L I M AG E S CO U RT E SY

WELCOME HOME The Maidstone hotel is one of the hautest haunts in the Hamptons.

Jonathan Baker has made his mark as a director, hotelier, and fragrance impresario. What’s next for this multitasking East Hamptonite? A little hint: It involves fashion!

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A L L I M AG E S CO U RT E SY

How did you get involved in film? When I was 14 years old, I was a reporter for Us Weekly. I was kind of like how Cameron Crowe worked for Rolling Stone, except he was covering rock ’n’ roll bands, and I was covering celebrities. I always wanted to tell a story. My mother was in love with the industry—she was an actor who dabbled in producing. I’d always loved movies. Because I don’t have a father, my real connection to them was my mother. I’m always a believer that you’ve got to be the biggest fan of what you love in order to be the best at it. From a young age, I probably saw thousands and thousands of movies. I was always influenced by Robert Evans who ran Paramount Studios; I used to play poker with him. He used to say, “Jonathan, if you’re going to be successful, you have to own whatever you direct or produce. You can either do it yourself or you can option it.” I didn’t really want to option it, so I learned how to write, and wrote scripts with a writing partner. As I moved up through the ranks of being a producer, I met Warren Beatty, and he told me if I didn’t direct movies, I would regret it for the rest of my life. It’s because of Warren that I’m a director. What kinds of stories do you want to tell? I like dramas, and the deeper they go, the more interesting they are, but I stay away from the deepness until it’s offered to me. [My films are] all commercial, independent, and unique. Even when you’re successful, it’s never easy. I’ve never had anybody just hand me a check and say, “Go create!” I’ve always had to fight to create it, and fight to produce it, and then keep the storyline earnest, honest, and true. Like I said, I don’t give up, so I have to take it to the very end and even when it’s at the end, I still check in on it. It’s like my baby. What was your vision for The Maidstone? I’ve tried to make the Hamptons the East Coast version of L.A., with the hotel as a pivotal point. The community [in the Hamptons] is really about youth and the beautiful people over 30. I’m really looking for people to respond to jonathanbaker.com, bakerentertainmentgroup.com, and themaidstone.com. This is all part of a plan that allows me to have a voice, and use that voice to speak to the young community. You get to experience me through the hotels, either by staying there or eating there, by the movies, by my products—and, importantly, because I’m part of the philanthropy in the community. Tell us about the Jonathan Baker fragrance line. Jonathan Baker had a blue label line in the ’90s and early 2000s, and those products were sold in ski resorts all around the world. Then, we developed the black line that is carried in The Maidstone and at Nordstrom. Now, we’ve brought on Phil Zellner of Lighthouse Beauty as the president of Jonathan Baker Beauty and Fashion. He is now going to expand the beauty line and home care line, and we’re going to start dabbling in fashion. That’s going to kick off with a party at The Maidstone on Friday, July 26th. What’s next with the fragrance? The white line, which is beautiful and more feminine. The black line is more masculine, although women still like it. I’m also developing aromatherapy wipes that you can use in your home. There will be big candles, too. And what about your fashion offerings? I really respond to Egyptian cotton. I love T-shirts. I really love the simplicity of a look with a little bit of structure. Being a designer is extremely creative. I’m very specific on what I like and what I don’t like.

“LUXURY, TO ME, IS OPULENCE THAT IS CREATIVE, SIMPLE, AND PURE, WHETHER IT’S 100 percent ORGANIC OR 100 percent AROMATHERAPY.” What does luxury mean to you? My quote in life is always “alone in luxury, together in romance.” That’s what I live by when I design stuff. Luxury, to me, is opulence that is creative, simple, and pure, whether it’s 100 percent organic or 100 percent aromatherapy. How did you meet your wife, Jenny? Through a friend in NYC about nine and a half years ago. I was a single father, and I was kind of done dating American women at the time. Jenny is Swedish, and we are opposite ends of the same coin, but we are on the same point. That’s the magic of our relationship. All the things I want to do, she wants to support, and all the things she wants to do, I want to support. And then you work together on The Maidstone, yes? Oh, yeah. But again, opposite ends of the same coin. I care about marketing—the narrative, the voice. She cares about the colors, the design, the art. Together, we kind of mesh everything together, and once it starts to bleed, we’re on the same page. And if it doesn’t, then we don’t like it. You mentioned earlier that you’re heavily involved in philanthropy in the community. Can you expand on that? When we were living in New York, we would try to support [organizations] that would bring out less fortunate children to spend time in the Hamptons. Also, I like to support the less privileged children who are extremely smart but don’t get a chance to go to college. We try really hard to support by giving grants. Final question. Who would you invite to a dinner party at The Maidstone, alive or dead? Quentin Tarantino, Truman Capote, Bruce Springsteen, Alec Baldwin, Warren Beatty, Jackie Onassis, John F. Kennedy, Tom Cruise, Charlize Theron, Meryl Streep, Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, and Woody Allen.

Jonathan Baker’s fragrance line, available at The Maidstone.

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FamilyTies

into the blue

The business and personal lives of Blue One boutique co-owners Crystal Smith Willis and Jarret Willis are closely tied. So it comes as no surprise that as their family is growing, so is their business. As Crystal and Jarret—who is also a major player at Bespoke Real Estate—await the arrival of their first child, the duo reflect on how their story has built them a loyal following of friends and shoppers.

Were you ever worried about mixing business with your personal lives? Jarret Willis: To be honest, that was the easy part. We got engaged a year and a half into having the store. It was a natural progression; there was no pressure. Crystal Smith Willis: We’re a real team. Once we opened the store and people really gravitated toward us, we realized that not only do people like our fashion sense, but they love our story. So we went off on that before all the social media really hit the roof. Fastforward 13 years in business, and our clients have really grown with us. Seeing us get engaged, seeing us get married, seeing us doing pop-ups and trunk shows…the story has really evolved. People have followed us the whole way and really feel part of it. That’s what makes us a force to be reckoned with. How do you explain your success? Crystal: Jarret and I have built a strong and powerful business that has caught the eyes of many customers, and with that, a loyal following has developed. Both our clients and followers look to us every season to bring them fresh new styles. They rely on us to provide an accessible interpretation of what’s trending on the runways worldwide. By following us on Instagram, our audience gets an inside and instant look at our livelihood and how we navigate through the Hamptons socially.

When did you first realize that people were interested in your story? Jarret: Crystal was born and raised in the Hamptons. She had worked in a shoe store across the street from our first store, and she had such a loyal following already. Crystal: People were coming to me with all their fashion questions. “Where did you get this?” That made me think that maybe I could actually do this on my own. You’ve been together for so long! Crystal: We met 19 years ago, and we’ve been married for 10. Now we’re expecting our first baby! Would you encourage your child to go into the fashion industry? Jarret: I would encourage our kid to do anything that’s going to make our kid happy. Crystal: To follow his dreams! But he’s going to be around the fashion industry. I didn’t grow up surrounded by fashion, but I just loved it. Do you think being parents will inspire you to start carrying kids’ clothes? Crystal: Yes. People have been asking us for years. It never made sense to us, and we had no real knowledge

of it, as it wasn’t part of our lifestyle. Next year, we will launch some really cool collaborations with kids’ stuff. As I’m shopping for our little guy, I haven’t been able to find certain stuff. How would you describe the boutique’s aesthetic? What do you gravitate toward? Jarret: Pretty much the opposite of what you see in department stores. Our brand and business model is the anti-department-store experience. We create real relationships. We curate brands that speak to us and speak to our personalities and style. Our whole business is really relationship-driven. Crystal: Because we are so involved with clients and we know their lifestyle, we really can create a story when we are buying for our clients. What are some of the longest customer relationships you’ve had? Jarret: We have several that span 13 years. They are extensions of our family. There are several families that have really seen us evolve. Crystal: They came directly through the store. We stayed in contact with them, we dine with them, we

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WillIAM jess LAIRD ; ALL others COURTESY

BY Aria Darcella


WillIAM jess LAIRD ; ALL others COURTESY

vacation with them—[the relationship] really goes deep. How do you translate that personal relationship to the online version of your boutique? Crystal: Instagram really pushes a lot of sales. People are following us to know what’s going on in the Hamptons. They can buy off of Instagram or they can message us and we know who is reaching out to us. We can tell them the size that will fit them. We send boxes to clients constantly. We put together a huge box. Jarret: We were a trunk club before trunk clubs were even a thing. Crystal: We are in a seasonal location and you have to keep the business going throughout the year. The way to do that is sending personal boxes to our clients on consignment. We know their sizes and style, and then they send back whatever they don’t want. We’ve been doing that for years. How often are pieces returned? Jarret: Probably less than 10 percent. That speaks to how well we know them and what they do in their everyday lives, whether it’s during the week at home or one of their vacation homes, or traveling in Europe. Because of that relationship, we have a low return rate. What is special about being a retailer in the Hamptons? Crystal: It has been our niche. These people are loyal customers of ours. It’s not just tourists coming in. You do get that, obviously. But for the most part, these are people shopping with us since we have been open. What makes your boutique so unique? Jarret: There are so many pop-ups [in the Hamptons]. And if they’re not a pop-up, they’ll close for the winter. We are open all year round. We service our clients 365 days a year. That is really what’s different about us. Tell us about the rest of the scene in your area! What are your favorite things to do? Jarret: We live close to the store. Socially in the summer, things are changing a little bit more now because Crystal’s pregnant, but typically we spend a lot of time out at restaurants. Whether it’s on Shelter Island, or on Vine Street or Sunset Beach. Crystal: Sag Harbor is so close and it’s nice to be on the water, so we frequent those restaurants. We pop all over really. We try to support each town and their different businesses. We post it all on our Instagram. People will reach out to us and ask, “How is the new restaurant that just opened? What would you suggest to eat?” It’s cool. Who do you follow on Instagram? Crystal: A lot of clients and friends, because it’s important for us to see and know what they’re up to. And of course, bigger fashion houses. We’re buying so far in advance, so we’re really seeing a lot of the trends before they happen, which is cool. What trends should we be gearing up for this fall? Crystal: Jarret and I handpick everything we buy for the store, and we buy specifically with clients in mind. For fall, we’re seeing a mix of the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s. We are seeing blazers—one of my personal favorite wardrobe staples—cinched with a belt. We made sure to offer a wide range of incredible belts this season to get you started. We bought some great capes for fall too, a trend we were seeing in almost every designer’s lookbook. The color that stood out this season is purple. Everyone has also been asking us about the one-shoulder trend—it’s all about the asymmetrical neckline!

BONVIVANTS leaf-icon button down in Blue, $175

CLOSED lover and fighter tee in White, $85

alex mill Tropical Camo ripstop cap, $148

RIVIERAS slip-ons in Rouge, $98

ONIA Charles trunks in Ditsy, $225

HISTORY REPEATS graffiti-print jacket in Beige, $690

QUICK PICKS

CLOSED windbreaker in Camo, $525

Crystal and Jarret gave The Daily Summer the Blue One shopper treatment, and curated a selection of must-haves for the season!

NICHOLAS plunge onepiece in Mango, $250

STREETS AHEAD studded belt in Camo, $275

CULT GAIA x Adriana Degreas dress, $1,350 MANOKHI buckle skirt in Nude, $650

ULLA JOHNSON wrap-up heels in Bone, $395

ULLA JOHNSON beaded bag in Origami, $445 All available at Blue One, 2397 Montauk Hwy, Bridgehampton, and online at shopblueone.com

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MATCHMaker

PLAYING CUPID LOKO founder Vivek Jain

love by loko

Vivek Jain has figured out how to marry romance with technology. The founder of the new LOKO dating app has eliminated the need for a painfully awkward first date by inviting users to communicate with each other exclusively by video before meeting in person, and it’s quickly emerging as the app of choice among the East End’s dating set.

Where does LOKO’s name come from? It’s Hawaiian, and it means character and disposition. We’re about personality more than anything else. It’s also an anagram of “look.” But the main reason is that there is this “crazy” connotation, and a lot of that has to do with my personal story. How so? I never really dated. I married my first girlfriend, and I

was with her for 15 years. So when I got into the dating world, it was—there’s just no other way to put it—crazy. Everything had changed. It had really turned into a hookup culture. I couldn’t believe that this is what I’m about to enter into, and what my kids will enter into one day. What was your experience with dating apps? At first, I was trying to meet someone the old-fashioned way. But my busy lifestyle—I’ve got two kids and own

a couple of businesses—wasn’t allowing me to meet someone. Oddly enough, my kids were poking fun at me about my love life one night. So I thought, Why not try the online dating world? I tried all the apps that everyone’s heard of, and it was a disaster. What made it so frustrating? You don’t get a real sense of who a person is based on text messaging. The idea of a magical first date doesn’t

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s h u t t e r sto c k ( 1 ) ; a l l ot h e r s co u rt e sy

BY Aria Darcella


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really exist now, because you get all the big points about someone through text. There’s no talking until 4 a.m. anymore. I had some really bad experiences. I considered doing a book about my dating horror stories, but I just figured I’d do an app instead. Do you see any benefit in online dating? For people who are really busy, it allows you to meet people you wouldn’t normally. But that’s where technology should stop—just allowing you to connect with somebody. After that some old-fashioned human interaction needs to play a more important part. What makes LOKO different from other dating apps? As far as I know, we are the first video-only dating app. There is no texting and no static photos. How does it work? You set up a profile with two videos: an eight-second “hello,” and an optional 30-second “about me.” Once you set up your profile, it goes to a human moderator for approval. We want users to feel safe and comfortable, so we’ve built our central intelligence to weed out nudity. We also screen for obscenity and things like that. Once your profile is approved, you can go onto the portal and look at other videos and match like you would in any other dating app. How do you meet people? We force you to press play on the video. Our goal is to slow things down a bit to move away a superficial decision that’s essentially a video game. We want to make this process more thoughtful. After watching, you can “pass,” or “connect” and wait for the other side to connect. If you connect with someone, a calendar pops up so you can schedule a 15-minute video date or chat. We call it the “elimidate.” Tell us more! First dates are terrible because they rarely go well. This way, you can have the first date from the comfort of your own couch with your dog on your lap or your best friend beside you. Instead of spending all night going out, you spend 15 minutes and get a feeling of who the person really is. Wait, what’s so bad about first dates? Obviously, there’s the cost of going out. There was a really cool survey about the cost of a first date based on the state you live in. New York was the highest, at around $300. And a lot of times, you know within the first few minutes if it’s not going to work. Why are these dates only 15 minutes long? We want to encourage people to go meet someone in person and not try to learn everything there is to know about them over text. We talked to a behavioral scientist, and the science tells us that you can tell within eight minutes if there is a real connection. There’s so much anxiousness and ghosting that you really don’t know what you’re getting yourself into these days with online dating. More often than not, you’ve built a picture in your head about who this person is based on one or two photos and a few text messages. Tell us about your worst first date. I met a girl through work. She showed up to our first date wasted. She had warned me that she’d been out drinking with her friends. But then within 15 minutes, she’d passed out at the table! We were at a fancy fivestar restaurant and her head was sort of bobbing, and then all of a sudden, it was on the table. We packed things up and called it a night but decided to give it a shot a second time. And the second time, she showed

up drunk as well. She had actually passed out in the cab on the way to the restaurant. Have you been catfished? I haven’t, but I’ve heard stories about it. A lot of it has to do with the pictures. Filters can really change [how someone looks]. A lot of time [the pictures are] five years old. Why do you think people turn to dating apps? When apps first came out, using them was a big fauxpas, but now, it’s the norm. There’s an interesting statistic that said one-in-five people who get married [now] met on online. Just three years ago, that statistic was at 5 percent. It’s growing exponentially, and they think maybe in a decade it will be 60 or 70 percent of people who meet online. This technology allows you to open up your network. Dating apps also remove this fear of rejection. It’s easier to be sitting on your couch at 11 p.m. going through profiles than putting yourself out there at a coffee shop or bar. How did you meet your business partner, Norm Macdonald? I was at a conference in San Diego, and he was the entertainment. We hit it off and exchanged numbers. Nine months later, we both were on the same flight to L.A., and we ended up sitting next to each other randomly. We started chatting. We had a layover, so we got lunch together. We realized that we look at life the same way, and we became really good friends. When did you two decide to team up on the app? I was in L.A. for work one night, and I was whining to Norm about these first dates. He’s the kind of guy who needs to get to the bottom of everything, so we jumped down all these rabbit holes. That’s what led to the first-date issue, and us trying to solve it. Then we really dug into what’s the problem as a whole? He has a

“OUR GOAL IS TO SLOW THINGS DOWN A BIT.… WE WANT TO MAKE [THE ONLINE DATING] PROCESS MORE THOUGHTFUL.” public persona [as an entertainer], but underneath he’s an astute businessman. If you think about it, comedians are master storytellers. They understand how to market things. He’s one of the hardest-working guys I know. Do you believe in true love? There is some value in believing in magic. Why can’t that happen? FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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DUALInterest

LIT CHICKS Grace Atwood and Becca Freeman launched their podcast, Bad on Paper, a little over a year ago. In that short time, their book-centric show has grown to include notable guests, and even a live tour. The duo—who clearly have the gift of gab—chatted with The Daily Summer about all the fun they’ve been having behind the microphone. BY Aria Darcella photography by carter fish

Grace Atwood (left) and Becca Freeman

We heard a rumor that you guys didn’t like each other when you first met… Grace ATWOOD: We were both working at BaubleBar. I met Becca and I thought she was mean and bossy. Cut to three months later and we became really close friends—to the point that we had to be separated. We were too disruptive sitting together! Becca Freeman: In her defense, I am mean and bossy. And now she can’t get rid of me! What inspired you to team up for a podcast? ATWOOD: I’ve had my blog for almost 10 years. Podcasts were the next big thing and I wanted to start one. But doing a podcast by myself would be boring, so I asked Becca to do it with me. We decided to start it around books because we are both big readers.

Which genres do you gravitate toward? Freeman: We thought we had the same taste in books, but through hosting the podcast we’ve realized that we actually don’t. That makes it more interesting. I gravitate toward romantic comedies or teen high school dramas. One place we come to together is dystopian young adult fiction. If there are unsupervised young adults, especially if they’re rich, we are very into that. ATWOOD: I love any Gone Girl rip-off. Any murder-y killer where “girl,” “wife,” or “woman” is in the title, you got me. What is it about YA fiction that is so captivating to adults? ATWOOD: It’s a really nice vacation, especially given the current political climate and everything going on in the world. It’s nice to read something that is totally

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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“We thought we had the same taste in books, but through hosting the podcast we’ve realized that we actually don’t!” implausible, maybe a little bit poorly written but fun. It’s like brain candy. Freeman: As you get older, people’s adult experiences diverge more, so there’s less commonality. But everyone went to high school, everyone understands the five basic cliques. It’s such a common experience. It appeals to everyone in some way because it’s nostalgic. How much do you spend on books monthly? Freeman: Since doing the podcast, we’ve had more books sent to us. I also get a lot of books sent to me that I don’t want to read. In general, I read about five or six books a month. If you multiply that by $10, that’s probably $60. And that’s not counting the books I buy and don’t read. ATWOOD: I’m in the same boat. Last month I read eight books. We definitely have spent too much money. Becca, have you ever put yourself out there like this before? Freeman: Not really. I’ve been on the brand side of marketing my whole career. I was the head of marketing at [feminine-care brand] LOLA, so I knew about podcasts from the branding side. I had dabbled in the Internet before but never anything this big. I didn’t have huge expectations. I thought this would be a hobby— something fun. I wasn’t thinking about it in a strategic way like, “This could become my job someday.” What were some of the early challenges? Freeman: We originally launched the podcast with a different name and didn’t realize until the night we were uploading it that there was another podcast with the same name. They didn’t really have any [online] presence. We figured naively that if there was an issue Apple wouldn’t approve our podcast. So when they did, we were like, “It’s fine!” Three months in, we ran into a scuffle with the other podcast, so we needed to change our name. Looking back, we’re glad we did because we love the new name so much more. It was a blessing in disguise. What’s the vibe of your recording sessions? Freeman: We often record it in our sweatpants in Grace’s apartment at her dining room table. ATWOOD: We always have seltzer. If it’s a weekend or we’re recording at night, we have tequila. We are also trying to be better hosts and have snacks. When we have guests, we record in my living room so it feels like a comfortable casual conversation. Becca is secretly hoping to become a seltzer influencer. Freeman: It’s my only hope and dream. ATWOOD: That and having Dunkin’ Donuts sponsor us. What’s your Dunkin’ Donuts order? ATWOOD: Medium iced coffee with just a little milk. Freeman: Medium French vanilla coffee with cream and one sugar. You talk about much more than books on the show. Did you plan to expand to cover different subjects? ATWOOD: No. It was out of necessity—we thought about the maximum number of books we could read and

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settled on two a month. Then we decided to give advice in between. We weren’t being strategic at all. This winter, we got burnt out. Reading two books and coming up with discussion points every month was a lot of work. So we decided to bring on guests. That’s where we saw the podcast really grow. We got exposure to their audiences. Who have you featured on the show? Freeman: Our first guest was Katie Sturino, who is a friend of ours. We had her on to talk about body positivity. We had Blair Eadie from Atlantic-Pacific and influencer Chinae Alexander—people who are in our network. Have you been surprised by anyone who has agreed to join you? Freeman: One night we had a little too much to drink and we were spitballing dream guests. We DM’d Alyssa Mastromonaco, who was President Obama’s deputy chief of staff. We were like, “Would you ever want to be on our podcast?” and she wrote back immediately, “Sure! Sounds fun.” It’s been so fun to reach out to amazing women and actually having a conversation with them, and becoming friends. We’ve also had Kathryn Gallagher, the actress from You. How do you plan out each episode? ATWOOD: We make a rough outline before every single episode so that we have our talking points. But we don’t want the conversation to feel rehearsed or practiced. Freeman: When we have guests on, we crowd source the questions from our audience. They get to ask questions of people they wouldn’t otherwise be having a conversation with. Sometimes it’s very particular—they have a career situation or a dating scenario. It’s a cool way we can create content that involves our audience. What makes for a really good guest conversation? ATWOOD: It’s important that the guest be honest. When our guests are willing to be completely open and not give generic advice, that’s when the episode is most successful. You recently went on tour. What’s it like to do an episode in front of a live audience? ATWOOD: Shocking. We never thought this was going to happen. What is also surprising is that we really like

it. I’m an introvert. I don’t love crowds or big groups. Being on stage is a totally different element. Freeman: Doing it in person is so cool because you see people nodding along when they agree with you or even when they disagree with you and somebody is yelling. You get that reaction. It’s really interesting. What other feedback have you received from your audience? Freeman: The No. 1 thing we hear is that they feel like we are [their] best friends. That’s because we try to be really honest and truthful. It feels like you’re having a glass of wine with your girlfriends. There’s a lot of women who maybe don’t live near their friends or have children. It’s their girl time. They might be missing it in their real life and they tune into it in the car on their commute. Takeaways from the live shows? ATWOOD: Each audience is so different. In D.C. we realized that we had big readers. So we learn about each market; it’s fun to expand on different concepts. Next time we’ll do even more book talk when we get to D.C. Freeman: Each show is different because we have different guests. Lastly, we have a panel. On this past tour, we’ve been gearing it around female friendship. Everything is really formed by our guests’ experiences. So even though every show has a formula about friendship, what comes out each time is really different. What’s next for you two? ATWOOD: We’re working on planning a really big fall tour. Freeman: As we’ve done shows, it brings people out of the woodwork to ask us to come to different cities. Part of the fall tour is going to the ones, especially on the West Coast, that we didn’t hit this time around. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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SKINSavior Privet Bloom Body Lotion, $ 32

SPF-45 Mineral Crème, $48

New SPF-50 for Baby!, $28

State Hampton Sun has been the East End’s go-to suncare line for nearly 15 years. Founder and Southampton resident Salvatore Piazzolla explains the phenomenon—and gives us intel on the latest gamechanging products in his arsenal. BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILLIAM JESS LAIRD Happy summer! What’s new at Hampton Sun? We’re excited about the launch of our new products, and we’ve expanded our all-natural mineral sunscreen line: launching an SPF-30 Mineral Continuous Mist spray, an All-Natural Face Stick for Kids, and a Face Stick for Adults. Trends are always changing, which is why we have expanded the Mineral Collection, and our Continuous Mist line is now coral-reef safe. We are a lifestyle brand that offers something for every sunbather. What makes the Mineral Collection so exciting is that we are one of the first companies to offer this extraordinary new advanced vanishing zinc technology, which is silky soft on the skin without leaving any white residue. With our luxurious formulas and chic packaging, we wanted to bring this improved technology to the consumer to make it easier to apply and offer a more eco-friendly option for everyday use. What are your most popular products? The Continuous Mist sprays. People love the convenience of the package and the effectiveness. It dries down really sheer on the skin. Our other, most popular products are the mineral face creams. They have many anti-aging ingredients and lots of vitamin C. They can be applied

New SPF-30 Mineral Mist, $34

for daily use underneath makeup and foundation. Tell us more about the kids line. What’s nice about Hampton Sun is that it’s a brand for the entire family. You don’t have to go looking elsewhere for product for kids and babies. We reformulated our baby products with vanishing zinc, so they’re more advanced. It’s creamy, smooth, and hydrating on the skin. And what about the Privet line? We launched this home collection last spring, and it was a phenomenon out in the Hamptons. In it, we captured the scent of Privet Bloom, a white flower from the privet hedge that blooms in late June and early July. It’s intoxicating and pleasant. It makes a beautiful house gift. How do you do your research? We work with a world-renowned chemist who participated in a book about sunscreens and regulations. We’re working closely with people who have this knowledge, and we are informed about FDA rulings. We want to make sure we are the leader in the luxury suncare space by offering the most advanced ingredients out there. For example, we’re one of the first companies to offer the vanishing zinc. We saw this as an opportunity to accelerate and elevate the experience of Hampton Sun so that you want to wear it every day. That’s really our goal—to get the message to wear your sunscreen every single day. Your website has a sunscreen quiz. What’s that about? It gives the customer the opportunity to give us their feedback. It has really helped me understand what they’re looking for and what they’re thinking. We heard over and over that zinc had always been really unpleasant to wear on the skin because it has always been thick, heavy, and white, and so that’s why we did a lot of digging and research to find this vanishing zinc.

SPF-70 for Kids!, $32

It’s not offered to everybody, so we worked really long and hard to make sure we locked it down directly. Where are the products available in the Hamptons this summer? White’s Apothecary in East Hampton; Hildreth’s Home Goods and Tenet in Southampton; Gurney’s in Montauk; Bluemercury in East Hampton and Southampton; and the Maidstone Club in East Hampton. You have an award-winning sunless tanning mist. It has won several awards—we really thrive on making sure we’re bringing the most advanced technology to the marketplace. It’s a phenomenal product with no-rub application for face and body. It hydrates, it’s natural, it’s the real deal. It’s suncare meets skincare. How did you get into this field? My background is in real estate; I’m entrepreneurial, always thinking about how to grow as a person. I came up with the idea in 2005, and I just kind of flipped out over it. I was fortunate that Michael Kors was the first person we released the idea to, and he thought it was brilliant and put us in the hands of some industry experts. From there, it evolved. I’m really passionate about bringing high-quality, high-technology sunscreen and formulas to the marketplace to wear every day. This is such an important thing to spend money on. Everybody is interested in anti-aging and protecting their skin and looking youthful, and suncare is a big part of it. Hampton Sun might be a little pricier than the average sunscreen, but it’s worth the money. Who needs the needles! Exactly! Avoid the Botox. Protect yourself with Hampton Sun. There are other brands out there, but they don’t offer the same quality and effectiveness with our natural ingredients. We brought glamour back to sunbathing.

all images courtesy

Sunshine

All available at hamptonsuncare.com FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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www.PlanetByLaurenG.com info@iftheplanet.com

SHOWROOMS N.Y.  L.A.  CHICAGO

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6/14/19 6:10 PM


CHICPages

The Buzziest NonFiction

HAUTE NEW RELEASES

Howard Stern Comes Again

Howard Stern (Simon & Schuster)

Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory: Stories Raphael Bob-Waksberg (Knopf Doubleday)

Stern has a knack for getting celebrities to dish, and this compilation features some of his favorite interviews.

Bob-Waksberg is known for his dark humor, thanks to his Netflix show, BoJack Horseman. His collection of short stories about love is sure to be both humorous and haunting.

More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say) Elaine Welteroth (Penguin)

Bunny Mona Awad (Penguin)

Former Teen Vogue editor Welteroth has penned her first book, and we can’t wait to devour her best life advice.

This novel about a girl who’s sucked into a clique of her peers that call one another “Bunny” has already earned rave reviews.

Norco ’80: The True Story of the Most Spectacular Bank Robbery in American History Peter Houlahan (Counterpoint Press)

Normal People

Calling all true crime lovers…

Sally Rooney (Hogarth) Rooney explores how relationships can transcend class, social status, and evolve over years of personal growth in this engrossing novel.

Out East: Memoir of a Montauk Summer John Glynn (Grand Central Publishing)

Rouge: A Novel of Beauty and Rivalry Richard Kirshenbaum (St. Martin’s Press)

Experience the Hamptons through the eyes of Glynn, and consider how the gorgeous setting has played a role in your own life.

This fictionalized version of the high-stakes beauty world is the stuff beach reads are made of.

required READING If you’re not immersed in books this summer, we are genuinely concerned for your mental health. To get you in the mood, THE DAILY SUMMER has rounded up a few essential new releases. Get thee to your local bookseller!

Coffee-Table Tomes Anti Glossy: Fashion Photography Now

Classics to Finally Cross Off Your List The Picture of Dorian Gray

The Beautiful and the Damned

Oscar Wilde

F. Scott Fitzgerald

(Vintage Classics)

Lessons about internal beauty to ponder as you consider Botox.

(Vintage Classics)

Because you’re already on intimate terms with The Great Gatsby. Mrs. Dalloway

Catch-22

Virginia Woolf

Joseph Heller

(Mariner Books)

George Clooney’s adaptation of the book just hit Hulu. Timing is everything, right?

Marvel at how much the lives of women have changed, and how much they’ve always been the same.

(Simon & Schuster)

Patrick Remy

Interiors: The Greatest Rooms of the Century (Phaidon)

Immerse yourself in the art of modern fashion photography, and the photographers who make it.

This book is gorgeous enough to be displayed itself and cleverly comes in four colors, so you can match it to your own décor.

(Rizzoli)

Bloom: The Luminous Gardens of Frederico Azevedo

Frederico Azevedo (Pointed Leaf Press)

The ultimate inspiration for your lawn and garden.

Camp: Notes on Fashion

Andrew Bolton, Karen Van Godtsenhoven, and Amanda Garfinkel

(The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

The catalog that accompanies the Met’s exhibit du moment is a gorgeous object that is almost more of an art piece than a book.

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BY Aria Darcella

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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voxPopuli

POWER WALK Shelley Long takes a hike in the 1989 film Troop Beverly Hills.

YOUR SUMMER CAMP MEMORIES, DISCUSSED! —Bob Mackie

“I went to Camp Greenville in the Blue Ridge Mountains. One time, I fell off the bunk bed and broke my arm. My favorite activity there was Capture the Flag, which I usually won. And I played a lot of music!” —Timo Weiland

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“I liked to stay home and draw pretty things. I wasn’t interested [in camping]. But I did go to the swimming pool. I like to swim!”

“I was lucky enough to go to Stagedoor Manor, the legendary theater camp in the Catskills. From the moment I stepped foot on campus, I was home. It was where I found my fellow cast album–obsessed nerds. Instead of baseball stats or superhero powers like the kids talked about back home, we sat around discussing Sondheim’s rhymes and which key was best to belt in. It was a magical place, an island of misfit toys given a few weeks to let their freak flags fly as high as they could…with as much indoor time as possible. It was the only summer camp where you went home paler than you were when you arrived.” —Erich Bergen

“I didn’t go. My mother wouldn’t let me out of her sight!” —Bernadette Peters

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“I went to a progressive camp, and then I went to musical theater camp. It made me not go into musical theater!” —Zac Posen

“I went to many camps growing up, and they left me with the best memories from my childhood. I went to sports camps and a Rodeo Bible Camp with my horse and my best friend. I had a cute crush from another small town. All week we did leather working, bible studies, horse chores, and cleaned stalls. I practiced to compete in chute dogging, which is basically starting in a chute with a horned steer and tackling it to the ground. I had never done anything that crazy, but it was insanely fun. They wouldn’t let the girls bull ride, so we competed in that and barrel racing. My summer crush became my fling. We made out in the horse stalls after cleaning them. It was so romantic. Ha! I will never forget those times.”

“I never went to camp. My parents always made us think that all the kids in the neighborhood who went to camp had parents who wanted to get rid of them for the summer. They’d plead the case that they loved us so much that they didn’t want us to go away. We always thought camp was the place that kids got stuck going to. I would have liked to have gone to any camp after I learned later that it was a bonding experience!”

“I went to Camp Summertime for a whole month every summer. We would do arts and crafts every day; they’d take us to the beach and play volleyball. I wanted to be best friends with the older kids. I’d be hanging out with them when I should have been hanging out with kids my age. I loved camp. My gosh! It was so fun!” —Larsen Thompson

—Fern Mallis

—Mariah Strongin

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“I went to an all-boys camp called Camp La Junta in Hunt, Texas. I got the Best Manners award every summer, which my mom and I reference a lot. Everybody was really good at archery, horseback riding, and basketball, and I was just killing it on the manners front.” —Brandon Maxwell

“I went to sports camp in Sweden—we played different sports each day!”

“Camp was not a luxury I ever experienced. I left school when I was 12 and went to work. I worked at a Jesuit college for, like, half a year and then I went to a resort area and worked at a hotel where you could live. It’s a little Dickensian, but I made my way through.” —John Barrett

“I went to Camp Tockwogh in Worton, Maryland. It was definitely a great way to grow up quick. Other than counselors, you were almost completely on your own. I get so much inspiration for my swimwear line from my time at camp. Old photos, you name it. At Camp Tockwogh, there was this lagoon, and the older campers would go down there and tell ghost stories that made you pee yourself when you got back to the bunk that night.” —Garrett Neff

—Alex Lundqvist

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I LY. C O M

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TRUELife

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your PARTIES ARE RUINING MY LIFE Most of us have no idea about the the behind-the-scenes drama that goes into planning a successful event on the East End. The Daily Summer recently sat down with a somewhat disgruntled event planner to hear about some of her craziest days in the trenches. Prepare to laugh! AS TOLD TO EDDIE ROCHE

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“The interesting thing is that the more high-profile and highpowered they are, the less sense of reality they have.” Do you like your job? In the moment, it’s soul-sucking, thankless work. I love my big events six months later, when I can tell my family all about my fabulous life over Christmas dinner. But the actual day-to-day of being on site, sweating, and smiling at people who want outrageous things is taxing. What would you consider to be an outrageous request? Oh, everything from spraying WD-40 on a squeaky bathroom door that no one can hear to being asked to source a six-foot-tall custom cake in 12 hours. Tell us more about this squeaky bathroom door… I once had to procure WD-40 at a venue that did not have it on hand. The event hostess was miffed to hear a door squeak when she went to the toilet, so I had to find something to make the bathroom door stop squeaking, and do so in a cocktail dress. Was that humiliating? It was degrading. You really have to put your dignity aside when it comes to events, because good event planners do whatever it takes. I don’t know if everybody feels this way, but for 20 years, I’ve always laughed at the unexpected things. There’s always something. Once, I locked myself outside of my office at 1 a.m. when I was carrying an Oriental carpet. I was wearing sheer pajamas and no shoes. No cell phones, no keys, nothing. How did you get back in? I went to the Thai place next door and begged for a phone, and I called someone with a spare set of keys. But it’s just like, you have to get it done. I call it the “f**kening.” There’s always one thing that comes, and it’s the f**kening. I’ve planned for absolutely everything and it doesn’t matter, there’s always this one outlier that will happen that screws you up and gives you a lot of stress. I literally don’t think there’s anything I can do to avoid that. I’ve just had to learn to have a sense of humor about it. How do you deal with difficult clients? You never want to lose your cool. You just have to go on autopilot. I call it robot-mode. It's where you just smile and stare blankly and say, “Yes, I hear you. Yes, I will take care of that.” If it’s something that legitimately needs to be taken care of, you turn around and just do it. If not, you just go to the other side of the room and pretend to look busy. Have you ever gotten into a tiff with anybody? Not during the event—I don’t believe in doing that. I have had clients act deeply immature, talk trash about me.… There was this one in particular who kept pulling her staff aside and talking about me, and I could hear everything.

What was she saying? She was saying that I was “too big for my boots” because I had to make some decisions about table seating that she did not like. What would you say to her if she confronted you? I would say, “It’s just dinner, love.” Let’s stay on the topic of tough clients! Usually, I’m putting on an event for an artist or a creative. Those people may not have their feet firmly on the ground of reality, and they may come to you with some last-minute things. The interesting thing is that the more high-profile and high-powered they are, the less sense of reality they have. Because they have these teams around them who will say yes and try to make magic happen. When I don’t work for them and I’m also being given something on the spot and have literally 15 minutes to respond, I can’t pull a unicorn out of a U-Haul and have it prancing around the party. It’s a really interesting dynamic to have to tell these people who are living in a world of “yes” that the answer is going to be “no.” Do you feel like clients are more entitled these days? I do. Mostly because people want more for less. Now, we have a fun social media component that is rampant at every event. Events used to be private. You did an event, it happened, you controlled the photos that were out on the wire services, and that was the end of it. Now, things are happening in the moment, so that’s another reason you really have to keep your cool, because the last thing you want is a video of the event planner having a meltdown in the background. Trust me, I’ve wanted to! The Internet is a dangerous playground for people, and that makes it infinitely harder. For example, there was an event I did for a client and on some no-name photography site’s 11th page was a photo where the designer felt that her arm looked fat. It ruined the entire event for her. She had coverage on vogue.com, we had beautiful celebrities and models there. It was incredible, but no. Tell us more about the world of photo approval. They’re evidence of the crazy narcissism that goes on in

our industry. I love it when clients retouch their own photos—sometimes, to the point where the hostess looks unrecognizable. Usually, it’s a size 10 trying to look like a size 0. Clients are also very particular about the guest lists! My favorite types of clients are the ones who say that they are best friends with the most famous people in the world. Look, I want a party that is populated with cool notables, too. But let’s return to reality. I’ll never forget a dinner party I threw for someone I knew well. I asked her for a guest list, and instead of giving me a list of her friends—all of whom are cool, legitimate people in fashion—she put down all these hot models like Joan Smalls. “We’re girlfriends!” she said. And when I pressed, she said, “I saw her once at the CFDA event.” Yeah, she’s not coming to your dinner party. You can put Michelle Obama on your guest list, but that doesn’t mean I’m going to be able to get in contact with her. Is it harder doing events in the Hamptons? Much harder. There is the glorious schlepping of the product; because New York is a city that is based on messengers and convenient delivery services, you sort of forget how much schlepping has to be done. One summer, I found myself driving around cases of liquor in my backseat and then schlepping cases across the beach in heels, with no one to help me. I was dripping with sweat, and then expected to be the face of the event. There’s just a lot more grunt work that goes into the Hamptons. There’s also horrific traffic. Everything is far away, and you get a good beach day, and no one wants to come to the event. You’re trying to send an Uber, but it’s gonna cost you $3,000, which is basically your take-home for the whole affair. Any DJ drama? I’ve also found that vendors out East, for whatever reason, can be a little bit less reliable. We had a DJ once who, for a two-hour party, showed up an hour and a half late. His call time was an hour before the event started, too. As I was frantically calling and texting him, he was sending me screenshots of where he was in traffic, which turned out to be totally falsified because he was at his house down the road. His cousin, who actually was stuck in traffic, sent him the photos. Absurd!

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6/20/19 6:35 PM


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