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Daily Corinthian Vol. 116, No. 236

• Corinth, Mississippi •

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30 pages • Two sections

International Development Alliance president builds relationships on trip to Japan BY BRANT SAPPINGTON bsappington@dailycorinthian.com

Staff photo by Bobby J. Smith

The captured Corinth cannon is welcomed back by Park Rangers Jim Minor and Ashley Berry, Shiloh Superintendent John Bundy, and a visitor to the Corinth Interpretive Center.

Captured Corinth cannon returns home Artillery piece was used during Battle of Corinth BY BOBBY J. SMITH bjsmith@dailycorinthian.com

A cannon captured by Union forces at Battery Robinett during the Battle of Corinth has found

its way back to the Crossroads City — just in time for the battle’s 150th anniversary. “Man, I’m excited like Christmas morning to see this thing,”

said Park Ranger Tom Parson, who worked for years to have the cannon moved from Shiloh NaPlease see CANNON | 2A

A recent trip to Japan by the Alliance’s top official offered a unique opportunity to plant seeds and forge relationships that could lead to future economic development in the region. Alliance President and Chief Operating Officer Gary Chandler recently returned from a week-long trip to Japan as part of a small delegation of Northeast Mississippi economic development and government officials traveling with Governor Phil Bryant and officials from the Mississippi Development Authority and the Tennessee Valley Authority to the annual Japan-U.S. Southeast Association (SEUSJapan) meeting in Tokyo and a series of meetings with executives from Toyota and its automotive parts suppliers. “The point is to plant seeds and build relationships,” said Chandler. “We’re in the business of creating jobs.” Chandler said the visit provided the chance to meet face to face with a variety of Japanese industrial leaders during the conference as well as at the meetings in Toyota City. The SEUS-Japan conference was the 35th annual conference for the organization. The conference alternates annually between Japan and the United States and helps promote

trade and investment between Japan and the southeast region of the United States. In a global economy filled with high-tech methods of communication including email, social media and others, Chandler said at the end of the day personal relationships and personal contact still matters. “You just can’t beat the impact of meeting with someone face to face,” he said. The opportunity to meet with Toyota officials and executives from the auto manufacturer’s suppliers was one any economic developer would be thrilled by, said Chandler. “That is a golden opportunity,” he said. Chandler said the Alliance has been hard at work positioning the county for success including recent improvements to the industrial site at Highway 45 and Camp Warriner Road. They are continuing to aggressively market the area and reach out to automotive suppliers and others. The Japan trip provided a unique opportunity to share the benefits the area can provide to potential employers directly with those influencing the decisions being made by these large Japanese corporations. The economic developer said in the past economic development deals were often Please see JAPAN | 14A

Drug Court graduation celebrates new beginnings BY BRANT SAPPINGTON bsappington@dailycorinthian.com

BOONEVILLE — The courtroom at the Prentiss County Courthouse was filled Friday with laughter, smiles and a few tears from this year’s graduating class of the First District Drug Court and their families as the graduates marked the completion of the program and the start of a new chapter in their lives. U.S. Senator Roger Wicker was the keynote speaker for the drug court’s third annual graduation ceremony. The ceremony celebrates the graduate’s completion of the intensive three-year-program designed to give non-violent drug offenders an opportunity to avoid prison and instead undergo intensive supervision and

rehabilitation to help them take control of their addictions and build better lives. “We are in America, a land of second chances and that’s what this is today,” Wicker told the graduates. “We are a land that believes in redemption.” The senator praised the work of the program and the participants for their commitment to rebuilding their lives. “It helps. It’s good for the people involved, it’s good for the community and it’s good for America when we can bring somebody back,” said the senator. The First District Drug Court was established by Circuit Court Judge Jim Pounds and serves Alcorn, Prentiss, Tishomingo, Please see GRADUATION | 3A

Staff photo by Brant Sappington

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker (left) chats with Circuit Judge and First District Drug Court founder Jim Pounds following Friday’s drug court graduation ceremony.

Hog Wild BBQ Festival kicks off Thursday Drought impacts corn yields BY STEVE BEAVERS sbeavers@dailycorinthian.com

Things are about to get wild in Corinth. The 22nd Annual Hog Wild BBQ Festival gets under way Thursday in downtown. Three days of carnival-like fun, entertainment and plenty

of good barbecue will be available for the whole family. “At this point we have 34 teams registered and two of those have never been here before,” said Susan Joiner with Main Street Corinth. Joiner said teams will be taken up to Wednesday night

for the Kansas City Barbecue Society sanctioned event. Things get going on Thursday with the Happee Days Carnival around court square from 6-11 p.m. Armbands for the carnival can be purchased

Index Stocks...... 7A Classified....13B Comics Inside Wisdom......3B

Weather......5A Obituaries......3A Opinion......4A Sports......8A

Please see BBQ | 2A

BY BOBBY J. SMITH bjsmith@dailycorinthian.com

The summer’s drought and hot weather have wreaked havoc with local corn yields. “The drought and heat had a significant impact on the yields this year,” said Patrick Poindexter, county director of the

MSU Extension Service. The unfavorable conditions hit during the corn’s pollination process and resulted in lots of corn not completely filled out and “skippy” kernels, Poindexter explained. Please see DROUGHT | 2A

On this day in history 150 years ago Sterling Price’s two divisions march from Ripley and follow the troops who had set out the day before. Van Dorn sends the troops north rather than directly to Corinth in a bid to confuse the Federals about his intentions. The ploy has limited success.

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Local

2A • Daily Corinthian

Sunday, September 30, 2012

CANNON CONTINUED FROM 1A

tional Military Park to its new home at the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center. The cannon is a 3.8-inch rifle, commonly known as a James Rifle. On the second day of fighting during the Battle of Corinth, Oct. 3, 1862, the James Rifle was part of a four-gun Confederate battery that was selected to participate in a early morning bombardment of the Federal position at Battery Robinett. Along with two other batteries the gun was led to the crest of a hill just north of the Federal line. After the bombardment began, the Federal artillery response was so intense the Confederates were forced to withdraw from their exposed position on the hill. In the rush to retreat from the deadly cannonade, the Confederate artillery crews abandoned

their pride piece — the 3.8inch rifle. “As the morning sun came of the trees and buildings of Corinth, the early rays reflected off of the polished bronze surface of the gun,” Parson wrote in a paper about the cannon. “The gleaming cannon stood between the opposing liens like a prize waiting to be taken. The image was too much for Captain Brown of the 63rd Ohio.” Brown and a dozen men seized the cannon and began rolling it back to the Union lines, but heavy fire from southern sharpshooters forced the men back. But soon another attempt would bring the cannon inside the Federal lines. The Federal troops who captured the cannon were proud of the achievement. They almost immediately made an effort to mark the occasion. “Later in the day one

of the men took a sharp scribe, and with understandable pride, etched letters into the soft bronze metal: ‘Captured Oct 4, 1862 Corinth MS by 1st US Inf.’,” Parson wrote. 150th Anniversary Walks The Corinth Battlefield Unit will offer a number of interpretive programs to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Corinth. Park staff will offer indepth hikes interpreting the battle on the dates of the anniversary, at the same time they occurred, 150 years later. “The hikes will provide visitors with a deeper understanding of what occurred during the fierce fighting, describe the real war experiences of the Northern and Southern soldiers and provide rare opportunities for visitors to access park staff for extended periods of time on

the battlefield,” said Shiloh National Military Park Superintendent John Bundy. The programs will allow visitors to experience portions of the battlefield not routinely visited by the public and allow the hikers a chance to interact with rangers who will present in-depth analysis of the strategic and tactical movements of the troops. “With the walking tours some are simple and here on the grounds of the Interpretive Center, and others are more lengthy walks through rough terrain,” explained Parson. (Note: All programs will meet at the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center unless otherwise noted.) Tuesday, Oct. 2 Prelude to Corinth - 6 to 7 p.m. - Program at the Interpretive Center auditorium Wednesday, Oct. 3 John C. Moore’s Brigade (part 1) - 9 to 10 a.m. Caring for the Wounded

BBQ

The General A free public showing of the silent film “The General” will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 3, on a jumbo screen in the CARE Garden at the Corinth Depot. Hosted by the Crossroads Museum and the Interpretive Center, the film will commemorate the anniversary of the Battle of Corinth just a few steps away from the historic crossroads that made Corinth an important strategic objective during the Civil War. The film is based on the true story of the Great Locomotive Chase of 1862 and features the “The General,” a train which passed through Corinth’s crossroads dozens of times in the late 19th century. Originally released in 1927, “The General” is a classic silent comedy written, directed by and starring Buster Keaton. Running time for “The General” is 107 minutes.

DROUGHT

CONTINUED FROM 1A

for $15. The entertainment lineup sees Sweet Emotions take the stage at the corner of Fillmore and Cruise Street at 6:30 p.m. Delvis & The Mississippi Blue Mafia -- an Elvis Tribute by Dale Rushing -- will follow Sweet Emotions at 8:30. Thursday night will also see several industry teams cooking for its employees. A gate fee of $5 is set for the first night. The gate fee for the final two nights is $8 each night. Joiner said the streets around court square will

and Dead - 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. The Medal of Honor at Corinth - 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. John C. Moore’s Brigade (part 2) - 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Interpretive Center Hamilton’s Flank Attack - 2 to 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4 The Regulars Capture a Cannon - 8:30 to 9 a.m. Battey Powell and the Confederate Breakthrough - 9 to 10 a.m. Battery Robinett and Fuller’s Ohio Brigade 10:15 to 11 a.m. Battery Robinett and John C. Moore’s Brigade (part 3) - 11:15 a.m. to noon Davis Bridge and John C. Moore’s Brigade (part 4) - 9 to 11:30 a.m. The Confederate Retreat From Corinth - 1 to 1:30 p.m. The Occupation of Corinth - 2 to 2:44 p.m. (To sign up for battlefield hikes contact park staff at 287-9273.)

be closed at 5 p.m. Tuesday to allow the carnival to set up. Following a cook's meeting at 3:30 p.m.,

competition begins at 4:30 Friday with the Anything But Contest. “That is a lot of fun,” said Joiner. “There is always great local participation and you never know what is going to be prepared.” The dessert contest is slated for 5 p.m. Friday's entertainment schedule is 6:30-7:30, Ben Ricketts; 7:45-9:15, Brandon Giles; and 9:30-11:30, Almost Famous. Judging gets started Saturday at noon with awards presented at 4 p.m. The 22nd event will crown a Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion along with

handing out awards in Chicken, Pork Rib, Pork Shoulder, Brisket, Sauce, Dessert, People’s Choice and Anything But categories. Over $8,000 will be awarded with the Grand Champion taking home $1,000. The final night of entertainment begins with Maty Noyes at 6:30 p.m. Surviving Allison takes the stage at 8:15 followed by Prowler at 9:45. Hog Wild T-shirts can still be purchased at the Alliance until Thursday at 2 p.m. when they can be bought at the festival. Cost is $15 for adults and $10 for children.

CONTINUED FROM 1A

With the majority of Alcorn County’s corn harvest complete, many farmers have seen yields as low as 25 bushels per acre and in some cases even lower. Other farmers whose fields got more rain are seeing yields closer to 30 bushels to the acre. The average yield for corn farmers in the area are about 90 to 100 bushels per acre. A yield report will be compiled once area farmers complete the corn harvest. Corn yields were low for local farmer and Alcorn County Supervisor Tim Mitchell. “We got probably 30

percent less than what we usually get,” Mitchell said. “The grain quality is good, but the ears didn’t fill out.” Mitchell’s farm usually produces around 130 bushels of corn each year. This year the corn yield is down to 70. Mitchell farmed roughly 800 acres of corn this year. “Those two weeks of 110 degree weather hurt us,” said Mitchell. Does this year’s disappointing corn crop mean Mitchell will turn to other crops next year? Not at all. “We’re going to try it again, hope for better weather, stick with the plan and do it again,” said the farmer. IJE9AI CKJK7BÃ<KD:I 9EHFEH7J;Ã8ED:I JH;7IKHOÃI;9KH?J?;I =EL;HDC;DJÂIFEDIEH;: 7=;D9OÃI;9KH?J?;I

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Local

3A • Daily Corinthian

Deaths Bettye Humphries Tutor

Funeral services for Bettye Humphries Tutor, 69, of Corinth, are set for 3 p.m. today at Magnolia Funeral Home Chapel of Memories with burial at Henry Cemetery. Mrs. Tutor died Friday, Sept. 28, 2012, at her home. Born May 24, 1943, she was retired from the garment industry. She was a member of Oakland Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by her parents, Freeman and Fleetie Nixon Humphries. Survivors include her husband, Jimmy Tutor of Corinth; a son, Barry

Todd Wilson (Laura) of Franklin, Tenn.; a daughter, Kim Wilson of Oxford; t w o grandchildren, Katherine Wilson and J o h n Robert Wilson; Tutor h e r stepchildren, Connie Andresen (Bob) of Finger, Tenn., Stacey Tutor of Bonneville, and Ronald “Ron” Tutor (Charlotte) of St. Louis, Mo.; her step-grandchildren,

Marcella Elizabeth Gann

Marcella Elizabeth “Marcy” Gann, 70, was born March 14, 1942, to Howard Cline Wyer and Marcela Veronica Wyer in Brooklyn, N.Y. She went to be with the Lord on Friday, Sept. 28, 2012. She was a Christian and a member of Oakland Baptist Church. She was the secretary of her Sunday School Class from its beginning many years ago until the present time. She worked at ITT-Alcatel-Corelco for 34 years. After her retirement she was a volunteer at the Resource Center for Women (now Oasis Medical Center) for several years. She knitted numerous pairs of baby booties for the new mothers, who came to the center. Her hobbies were knitting and crocheting, doing arts and crafts, reading and her favorite pastime was shopping at the mall. She was preceded in death by her parents; a brother, Howard Cline Wyer Jr.; and a sister, Mary Campion Wyer. She is survived by her husband of 47 years, Noel Travis Gann of Corinth; a

Bobby Andresen, Chris Andresen, Courtney Burcham, Chase Burcham, Paris Tutor, Corwyn Tutor, Amelia Liesman Tutor and Grace Liesman; a step great-grandchild, Jayla Kwiatkowski; and her brothers, William L. Humphries of Memphis, Tenn., Kenneth Don Humphries (Mary Sue) of Corinth, Larry Wayne Humphries of Adamsville, Tenn., and Joe Dan Humphries of Adamsville, Tenn. Dr. Randy Bostick will officiate. Visitation continues today from 1 p.m. until service time at Magnolia Funeral Home.

sister, Irene Marie Davis and husband Ward of Maryland, N.Y.; a brother, Harry Wyer and wife Carole of Long Island, N.Y.; her sisters-in-law, Betty Jane Fett of Corinth, Betty Hewitt Gann of Columbus, Ga.; and a host of nieces, nephews, great nieces, nephews and great great nieces, nephews, other relatives and numerous friends. Visitation will be held today from 5 until 8 p.m. at Monday from 1 p.m. until service time at Magnolia Funeral Home. Funeral services will be held on Monday at 2 p.m. with Dr. Randy Bostick officiating. Burial will be at Forrest Memorial Park Cemetery. Pallbearers will be the men of her couples Sunday School Class: Dennis Bumpas, Charles Carpenter, Al Clemons, James Larry Cornelius, Mike Hall, Lowell Hinton, Claude Hinton, Charlie Holt, Gerald McClintock, Frank Morton, Ransom Roland Jr., Jesse Sims and Sam Tull. Online Condolences can be left at www.magnoliafuneralhome.net.

Obituary Policy The Daily Corinthian include the following information in obituaries: The name, age, city of residence of the deceased; when, where and manner of death of the deceased; time and location of funeral service; name of officiant; time and location of visitation; time and location of memorial services; biographical information can include date of birth, education, place of employment/occupation, military service and church membership; survivors can include spouse, children, parents, grandparents, siblings (step included), and grandchildren, great-grandchildren can be listed by number only; preceded in death can include spouse, children, parents, grandparents, siblings (step included), grandchildren; great-grandchildren can be listed by number only. No other information will be included in the obituary. All obituaries (complete and incomplete) will be due no later than 4 p.m. on the day prior to its publication. Obituaries will only be accepted from funeral homes.

Sunday, September 30, 2012

MSU shares catfish expertise in Nigeria BY BONNIE COBLENTZ MSU Ag Communications

STARKVILLE — Commercially grown catfish in North America or Africa face similar challenges, a fact that sent one Mississippi State University veterinarian on a training mission to Nigeria in June. Dr. Skip Jack, a professor of pathobiology and population medicine at MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine, spent almost three weeks teaching Nigerian catfish farmers, veterinarians and students about health issues related to their fish. He was part of the Farmer to Farmer project, teaching under the oversight of the U.S. Agency for International Development. “They don’t have the same catfish we raise, but fish, no matter what species, have similar bacterial and viral problems,” Jack said. “Nigerian catfish producers deal with the same issues of water quality and fish response to infectious diseases, even though their diseases are somewhat different from ours.” Mississippi and U.S. farm-raised catfish are channel catfish, or Ictalurids. Those raised in Nigeria are called African or walking catfish and are the Clarius species. Jack said Nigerian catfish producers manage their catfish differently from their counterparts in Mississippi. “Nigeria is just above the equator, and their fish are much more lowoxygen tolerant than ours are,” Jack said. “They don’t have to provide the aeration that our ponds require at times.” Jack spent two weeks teaching week-long sessions to aquaculture professionals with the Fisheries Society of Nigeria, or FISON. He spent one week in Lagos and one week in Abuja, the Nigerian capital. He spent the

final four days in Ibadan, working with Christian Veterinarians Nigeria, the University of Ibadan Veterinary School and the Federal College of Animal Health and Production Technology. “I team-taught with a Nigerian veterinarian who does fish work, and I talked with several faculty members at the schools who want to come here, work at our clinic and learn some of the things we do,” Jack said. “We also talked about putting together a book on fish health for Nigeria.” Dr. Charity Oche, executive secretary of FISON, said growth of their industry depends on producers receiving training from aquaculture experts. She said Jack’s expertise in this field was several years ahead of what was available in Nigeria and very useful. “He was attentive and eager to answer all questions, shedding more light using America’s experience with channel catfish,” Oche said. “We are planning a second visit for Skip to teach the same workshop because we believe the number of professionals who attended is not representative of the number of people who can benefit from this training.” Nigeria is a nation of 168 million people located in West Africa. It is a federal constitutional republic with oil reserves that generate tremendous revenue. It is part of the Commonwealth of Nations, formerly the British Commonwealth, and English is widely spoken. “Nigeria has half the population of the United States in an area the size of the Southeastern Conference,” Jack said. “Eighty percent of the food in Nigeria is imported.” Catfish production is

not a major industry in Nigeria, but no aspect of food production is big business in the country. None of their catfish is exported. “Most of their catfish are either sold fresh in local markets or made into a smoked catfish product that is fabulous,” he said. Nigerian catfish operations are small, with a large pond there covering 2 acres. In the United States, ponds typically cover 8 to 10 acres. American catfish ponds have significant government controls to protect food safety, a topic Jack discussed when he guest-lectured. “I talked about food safety concerns and antibiotic resistance. They don’t have restrictions on the use of antimicrobials in food animals that we have,” Jack said. “In the United States, we can use only three antibiotics in food fish. There, they can use anything they can get over the counter.” Oche said Jack taught veterinarians and industry professionals simple ways to manage fish health that don’t require antibiotics as the first course of action. “The participants knew some methodologies to use but needed some form of authentication,” Oche said. “A workshop of this nature is meant to review the expected global standards and fill in gaps where standards are lacking, correct what is being done wrongly and strengthen right actions.” Jack’s trip to Nigeria was coordinated by the U.S. Agency for International Development and Winrock International, an organization headquartered in Little Rock that links expertise at American universities with needs abroad. MSU’s veterinary college was asked to address this training need. Jack was chosen for the task. His wife Lynda accompanied him.

GRADUATION CONTINUED FROM 1A

Lee, Itwamba, Monroe and Pontotoc counties. The program requires participants to take part in rehabilitation and substance abuse treatment programs and undergo extensive supervision including random drug tests at least twice per week. They must also appear weekly before Pounds and participate in at least two support group meetings each week. For graduate Monica Coker, the program has provided a new chance at a better life. She told the crowd she spent 15 years living in denial of her substance abuse problem and hurting herselve and those around her. “I became a sponge that soaked up and dried up all the love around me, and only gave back poison,” she said. After facing prison time she had the opportunity to take part in the program and through it began to accept her problem and take responsibility for building a better life. “My live is improving and I’m so blessed,” she said. For George Lahey Sr. the program proved to be the key to his son and drug court graduate Jef-

P.O. Box 1800 Corinth, MS 38835

frey Lahey overcoming his problems and becoming a better man. The father said the program gave him back his son and he’s seen him take responsibility for his life, reunite with his family and begin building a better life and a better future through the help of the program. “I do believe this is not only a good program, I believe it truly works,” he said. Pounds, who initiated the program, told the group the graduation marks the beginning of a new phase in their journey. He said he’s proud of them for successfully making it through and he looks forward to seeing

them succeed in life. “This is a good start and you have a lot of people around who love you and want you to succeed,” said the judge. The drug court program requires participants to pay for their treatment along with monthly payments toward fines and other court costs and fees and a fee for their monthly supervision. The program operates at no direct costs to taxpayers and instead funded through these fees along with funds from felony fines and court costs. Drug Court Coordinator Jennifer Cummings noted the group graduating Friday had already paid a total of $35,357

in fines, court costs and restitution. In contrast, at the national average per day cost of incarceration, the group would have cost tax payers $335,800 per year to house in prison had they been sentenced to prison time instead of being allowed to participate in the program.

Fall is in the air at The Holiday House Door Pieces & Arrangements, Sunflowers, Huge Selection of Netting, Ribbon, Christmas Ornaments and all other components for your Christmas Decorations 6 Farris Lane (off N. Polk) Corinth, MS • 662-665-4925 Tuesday-Friday 10:30 am - 5:00 pm Saturday: 10:30 am - 3:00 pm

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Opinion

Reece Terry, publisher

Mark Boehler, editor

4A • Sunday, September 30, 2012

Corinth, Miss.

Our View ‘Voices of Corinth’ CD connects us with our past Corinth during the Civil War comes to life in a new audio recording made by the National Park Service. Produced by Shiloh National Military Park, the “Voices of Corinth” audio CD tells the story of wartime Corinth through the words of participants, both military and civilian. Shiloh Superintendent John Bundy said Shiloh Park personnel who worked on the project are very proud of the “Voices of Corinth” CD. We are also proud of our friends at Shiloh Park for the effort in producing the CD and the quality end result. Park volunteers and rangers not only provided voices to the recordings, but Shiloh rangers also conducted all of the research, wrote the script and then recorded, edited and mixed the CD. The “Voices of Corinth” project was recorded and mixed in just one week to make it available for purchase in time for the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Corinth, which was fought in early October 1862. The CD’s purpose is to supplement any tour or study of Corinth by bringing to life the voices of the people who experienced the Civil War in the area. The CD begins when Corinth was occupied in early 1862 and takes listeners from that point to when the Union abandons the town in 1864. Letters, diaries and journals written by people who were there are used those to tell the story of the people who experienced it. Approximately 50 historical characters tell Corinth’s story from both sides of the conflict. Along the way, listeners will hear from generals Beauregard, Van Dorn and Grant, as well as civilians like Kate Cumming, a Scotland-born lady who nursed Corinth’s Confederate wounded after the Battle of Shiloh. The CD was funded in part by Eastern National bookstores, a notfor-profit partner of the National Park Service. “Voices of Corinth” truly connects us with our past. Get one, listen to our Corinth history and show our support for our friends at the local interpretive center and Shiloh park. And then them thanks for the great job they do. Daily Corinthian (For more information on the CD and upcoming events commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Corinth, visit www.nps.gov/shil or call 662-287-9273. The CD is available for $8.95 at the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center bookstore.)

Prayer for today O God, help us to accept your grace instead of trying to earn your love. Amen.

A verse to share Whether Paul or Apollos or Cephas or the world or life or death or the present or the future -- all belong to you, and you belong to Christ, and Christ belongs to God. — 1 Corinthians 3:22-23 (NRSV)

Sound Off Policy Effective immediately, the Daily Corinthian Sound Off policy will be the same as its Letter to the Editor Policy. Sounds Offs need to be submitted with a name, address, contact phone number and if possible, e-mail address, for author verification. The author’s name and city of residence will be published with the Sound Off. Sound Offs will only accepted from those who wish to have their names published with their opinion. All other Letter to the Editor rules apply for Sound Offs.

Reece Terry publisher rterry@dailycorinthian.com

Obama’s rhetoric versus his record, Part II Nowhere is the contrast between Barack Obama, as defined by his rhetoric (“Obama 1”) and Barack Obama as defined by his actions (“Obama 2”) greater than in his foreign policy — and especially his policy toward Israel. What if we put aside Barack Obama’s rhetoric, and instead look exclusively at his documented record over a period of decades, up to and including the present? The first thing that is most striking about that record is the long string of his mentors and allies who were marked by hatred of the United States, and a vision of the world in which the white, Western nations have become prosperous by oppressing and exploiting the non-white, non-Western nations. The person most people have heard of who matched that description has been Jeremiah Wright, whose church Barack Obama attended for 20 years, and was still attending when he began his campaign for the presidency. But Jeremiah Wright was just one in a series of mentors and allies with a similar vision and a similar visceral hostility to the West. Barack Obama was virtually marinated in that vi-

sion from childhood. His mother clashed with her Indonesian husband when he beThomas gan to move Sowell away from his earlier antiHoover Institution Western radicalism and to work with Western businesses investing in Indonesia. As a counterweight to whatever ideological influence her Indonesian husband might have on her son, she extolled the virtues of his absent Kenyan father, who remained a doctrinaire, anti-Western socialist to the end. After Barack Obama was sent back to Hawaii to live with his grandparents at age ten, his grandfather introduced him to a black man named Frank Marshall Davis, who had a long career of anti-American, antiwhite propaganda that included a stint as a member of the Communist Party. Davis was Obama’s mentor on race throughout his adolescent years, until Obama left for college. The progression of such mentors and like-minded contemporaries continued as Obama went through Occidental College, Columbia University and the Harvard

Law School. These included Professor Edward Said at Columbia, a spokesman for Palestinian terrorists, and Professor Derrick Bell at the Harvard Law School. Bell was an advocate of so-called “critical race theory” — an uncritical mishmash of notions by a man who said that he saw his role as deliberately annoying white people. Barack Obama literally embraced Professor Bell at a public gathering. After Obama went out into the world and worked for a time in a private business, he regarded himself as being, in his own words, “a spy behind enemy lines.” Later, when he began his political career by running for state office in Illinois, his campaign began with a fundraiser in the home of Bill Ayers, who had been a domestic terrorist who planted bombs in public places, including the Pentagon. When this association was later revealed, Obama said that he was still a child during Ayers’ years as a terrorist. But Obama was by no means still a child when Ayers defended his years of terrorism in a statement that appeared in the New York Times — ironically, on Sept. 11, 2001. This is not the Barack Obama that most voters

saw and elected President of the United States in 2008. What they saw was a carefully crafted image of a bright, articulate, energetic and genial fellow who would heal our racial and partisan divides. His likability was high and remained so, even after many became disappointed with his policies. His geniality has carried him over many rough spots. But have you ever heard of a grumpy confidence man? Geniality is a prerequisite for the job. What many regard as a failure of Obama’s foreign policy, especially in the Middle East, may well be one of his biggest successes. His desire to redistribute wealth domestically is part of a larger ideological vision that includes a redistribution of power internationally. Obama has long said that the United States plays too large a role internationally. His policies suggest that Islamic countries need a larger role. The troubling question is whether he still sees his own role as “a spy behind enemy lines” in the White House. (Daily Corinthian columnist Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.)

Mitt Romney’s taxes: Who really cares? Did anyone think the release of Mitt Romney’s tax returns would satisfy Democrats and make them focus on the real issues in this campaign, including President Obama’s failed domestic and foreign policy record and approaching massive tax increases? If so, please call me for a great deal on Arizona swampland. The Obama campaign’s deputy manager, Stephanie Cutter, accused Romney of taking advantage of lower tax rates for capital gains available only to “those at the top.” Is Cutter saying Romney is wrong to obey tax law? The tax code is a mess. It, not Romney, should be the object of scorn. And by the way, Americans who make average incomes can benefit from lower capital gains taxes if they build sufficient wealth by making good investments. Now that we know Romney paid a considerable amount of tax last year and in previous years, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid should apologize for his comment about an unnamed “source” he claimed told him Romney paid no taxes for a decade. After

Beth Cossitt

Mark Boehler

business manager bcossitt@dailycorinthian.com

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Willie Walker

Roger Delgado

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press foreman

Romney released his returns, instead of apologizing, Reid tried a new tack. “The inCal formation reThomas leased today reveals that Columnist Mitt Romney manipulated one of the only two years of tax returns he’s seen fit to show the American people,” Reid said in a statement. “And then only to ‘conform’ with his public statements. That raises the question: what else in those returns has Romney manipulated?” Reid, of course, still has not released his 2011 tax returns. Is he hiding something? Suppose a “source” told me so? I don’t care how much, or how little, the Romneys pay in taxes. I do care, and so should voters, about government overspending and a national debt that now tops $16 trillion dollars. I don’t care how much money anyone makes and neither should voters. Voters should be concerned only about whether they

have the opportunity to make a decent living without having to depend on government. I do care — and so should voters — that our future is being mortgaged to pay for “entitlements” and huge interest on long-term debt that is greater than the gross domestic product of some countries. Before leaving Washington to campaign for re-election, members of the Senate passed one of those stopgap spending bills, ensuring government paychecks will continue to go out. It ends what many regard as one of the least productive legislative sessions in U.S. history; not necessarily a bad thing when you consider the damage Congress might have caused were it not for a Republican House crying, “NO!” In the first presidential debate scheduled for Oct. 3, Romney must show a part of himself no one has yet seen and perhaps not even he knows exists. He should remind Americans of their history of self-reliance, personal responsibility and accountability. When government replaces those virtues with entitlements and de-

World Wide Web: www.dailycorinthian.com To Sound Off: E-mail: email: news@dailycorinthian.com Circulation 287-6111 Classified Adv. 287-6147

pendency it diminishes and weakens the nation. Government is supposed to be of, by and for the people, not in spite of the people. It is “we the people,” not you the government. It is the people who grant power to those who govern. Quote Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, Mitt. Quote Reagan. Remind people why the Democrats lost control of the House in 1994 and again in 2010. It makes no sense to vote for conservatives in one election and then vote for a liberal in another. Four years ago, a majority of Americans were seduced by Obama’s soaring and messianic rhetoric. It’s time for us to embrace what our parents and grandparents tried to hand down to us: individual responsibility and a sense of caring for each other. If Romney makes that case in this “entitlement nation,” he could win. If not, we’re finished and what Romney paid in taxes will matter even less than it should now. (Readers may e-mail Daily Corinthian columnist Cal Thomas at tmseditors@tribune.com.)

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Editorials represent the voice of the Daily Corinthian. Editorial columns, letters to the editor and other articles that appear on this page represent the opinions of the writers and the Daily Corinthian may or may not agree.


Daily Corinthian • Sunday, September 30, 2012 • 5A

State Briefs Associated Press

Death row inmate back for 2nd appeal JACKSON — Death row inmate Howard Dean Goodin is headed back to the Mississippi Supreme Court for a second round of arguments on his claim that he is mentally disabled and shouldn’t be executed. The justices will hear arguments Tuesday in Jackson. Goodin is appealing a 2010 ruling by Newton County Circuit Judge Marcus Gordon, who found him mentally competent and denied his request for a new trial. The Supreme Court granted Goodin a hearing in 2009 on claims

of mental disability and ineffective work by his case attorney. Those post-conviction claims were initially dismissed by Gordon in 2007. Goodin was convicted of capital murder in 1999 for killing a shopkeeper in Union.

New schools chief sought in Greenwood GREENWOOD — The Greenwood School Board has hired the Mississippi School Board Association to help it find a new superintendent. The Greenwood Commonwealth reports that the school board will pay MSBA $9,500 for its help with the search. Board president Harold

s n a sici

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Fisher says applicants will be sought from inside and outside Mississippi. The school board is looking for a successor to Margie Pulley who announced Aug. 28 that she was retiring after more than 38 years with the district. Her last day was Aug. 31. Jennifer Wilson, who had been an assistant superintendent, is the interim superintendent.

Kosciusko bans saggy pants KOSCIUSKO — The town of Kosciusko has adopted a ban on sagging pants. The Star Herald reports that the wearing of sagging pants was added recently to the town’s

ordinance prohibiting public indecency. The ordinance takes effect Oct. 18. The city began talking about taking action on the indecent exposure in August and had reviewed several other municipalities’ ordinances on the matter. Kosciusko Mayor Jimmy Cockroft says there is a lot of public support for the ordinance. The board of aldermen adopted the ordinance on Sept. 18. In the ordinance, sagging pants are defined as appearing to wear pants or skirts more than three inches below the top of the hips exposing the skin or undergarments. Violators will be charged a $50 fine for the first offense and no

more than $200 for a subsequent offense. In addition to the fine, the Kosciusko Municipal Court may order a violator to serve up to 40 hours of court approved community service activities. Other municipalities that have passed a “sagging pants” ordinance include Fulton, Columbus, Tunica, Tupelo, Ripley, Indianola, Meridian, Columbia and Saltillo. The dropped-trousers trend has been debated around the country in TV shows, city councils, school boards, state legislatures and courtrooms. Communities from Lynwood, Ill., to Lafourche Parish, La., have passed laws imposing fines for too-low trousers.

FAMILY CARE

State to take control of Oktibbeha schools JACKSON — Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant has declared an emergency allowing the state to take over the Oktibbeha County School District. Bryant signed the declaration Friday at the request of the state Board of Education. “I have reviewed the findings by the Mississippi Department of Education and agree the current leadership in the Oktibbeha County School District is jeopardizing the learning environment,” Bryant said in a statement. “This pattern cannot continue. The students and communities in that district deserve better.”

NOW OPEN Taking Appointments Mon. - Wed. 8:00 am - 4:30 pm

Sherry Wilson Jobe, ACNP Adults 16 & up Call for your appointment 2668 S. Harper Road - Suite 4 • (662) 212-9006 • Corinth, MS


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41-pound cat up for adoption Associated Press

RICHARDSON, Texas — Don't be fooled by the name: Skinny the cat is one hefty feline. And all 41 pounds of her needs a home. A Dallas-area animal

Nation Briefs

SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 8 PM

shelter has cared for the 5-year-old orange tabby since getting a call about a stray in a yard about a week ago. Kim Chapin with Richardson Animal Services said Friday that Skinny's

“very sweet” — and the largest cat she's seen in 21 years with the shelter. Not surprising. U.S. government growth charts show Skinny weighs about as much as the average 4-year-old child.

Associated Press

Obama urges Congress to approve housing plan WASHINGTON — Citing historically low mortgages, President Barack Obama is pressing Republicans to back housing policies the White House says would help struggling homeowners refinance their debts and prevent foreclosures. Obama is blaming congressional Republicans for not passing legislation he proposed in February that would lower lending rates for millions of borrowers who have not been able to get out from under burdensome mortgages. Republicans have objected, citing among other things the estimated $5 billion to $10 billion cost of the proposal. “Here we are - seven months later — still waiting on Congress to act,” Obama said Saturday in his weekly radio and Internet address. Congress has recessed and is not scheduled to return until after the November elections. “Instead of worrying about you, they’d already gone home to worry about their campaigns,” the president said. Obama’s push comes as home prices have been rising across the United States. National home prices increased 1.2 percent in July, compared with the same month last year, according to the Standard & Poor’s/Case Shiller index released Tuesday. In the Republican weekly address, Arizona congressional candidate Vernon Parker said the U.S. corporate tax rate is pushing jobs overseas. He said he agrees with GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his running mate, Paul

Ryan, “that we need to stop all the looming tax hikes and develop a pro-growth tax code that brings jobs home and keeps jobs here.”  

Flu vaccine guards against new strains WASHINGTON — Time to get your flu vaccine — and a surprising new report shows babies and toddlers seem to be getting protected better than the rest of us. Last year’s flu shot won’t shield you this year: Two new strains of influenza have begun circling the globe, and the updated vaccine appears to work well against them, government officials said Thursday. Just because last year was the mildest flu season on record doesn’t mean the virus might not bounce back to its usual ferocity this winter. “People cannot become complacent this year,” said Dr. Howard Koh, assistant secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, who received his own flu shot Thursday. A yearly vaccination now is recommended for nearly everybody, but new figures released Thursday show that last year 52 percent of children and just 39 percent of adults were immunized. Best protected: Threequarters of tots ages 6 months to 23 months were vaccinated. That’s a significant jump from the previous year, when 68 percent of those youngsters were immunized. But even though seniors are at especially high risk of severe illness or death if they catch the flu, just 66 percent of them were immunized, a number that has been slowly dropping

for several years. Older adults got a little lost in the recent public health push to explain that flu vaccine benefits all ages — and it’s time to target them again, said Dr. Daniel Jernigan, a flu specialist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In contrast, child deaths from flu have made headlines in recent years — the U.S. counted 34 pediatric deaths last year — raising parents’ awareness of the risk, he said. The only ones who shouldn’t get vaccinated: babies younger than 6 months and people with severe allergies to the eggs used to make the vaccine. Flu specialists can’t say how bad this winter’s flu season might be. Influenza strains constantly evolve, and some cause more illness than others.

No sign of remains in new search for Hoffa ROSEVILLE, Mich. — Jimmy Hoffa is presumed dead, cocooned in mystery and innuendo and missing for the past 37 years. Patricia Szpunar just hopes that if the former Teamsters boss’ remains do turn up, they’re not in her backyard. Over the years, authorities have dug up a Michigan horse farm, looked under a swimming pool and pulled up floorboards in their quest for Hoffa. The latest search led police, droves of local and national reporters and dozens of curious onlookers to Szpunar’s brick ranchstyle home in Roseville. “I’m looking forward to everybody going home,” she told The Associated Press on Friday from her front porch. Szpunar has lived at the house since 1988.

Hog Wild Entertainment Thursday, October 4th 6:30-8:00 Sweet Emotion 8:30-10:30 Delvis & The Mississippi Blues Mafia (Elvis Tribute by Dale Rushing) Friday, October 5th 6:30-7:30 Ben Ricketts 7:45-9:15 Brandon Giles 9:30-11:30 Almost Famous Saturday, October 6th 6:30-8:00 Maty Noyes 8:15-9:30 Surviving Allison 9:45-11:45 Prowler


Daily Corinthian â&#x20AC;˘ Sunday, September 30, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ 7A

THE WEEK IN REVIEW

Business

WEEKLY DOW JONES Dow Jones industrials

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Apple apologizes for error-ridden map app

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CSVLgNGs 7DaysGrp ChKanghui PrSUltNG rs Vipshop n AMN Hlth CaptlTr AGreet BarcShtC Cryolife

34.02+7.07 11.62+2.39 30.35+5.01 51.09+7.45 7.50+1.00 10.06+1.33 3.77 +.49 16.80+2.17 14.20+1.72 6.72 +.80

ECB Bnc Vicon SwGA Fn SynergyRs SL Ind LucasEngy BovieMed CT Ptrs AmDGEn GSE Sy

15.50+3.80 3.00 +.61 9.99+1.74 4.17 +.50 14.89+1.75 2.34 +.26 3.60 +.35 4.40 +.36 2.59 +.19 2.03 +.14

BrdwyFn lf LML Pay LifePtrs AspnBio rs OakRidgeF GeoMet pf Spherix rs B Comm IntrntGold RoyaleEn

2.35+1.20 +104.3 3.40+1.53 +81.8 2.70 +1.11 +69.8 2.77 +.73 +35.8 4.81+1.08 +29.0 5.80+1.26 +27.8 11.76+2.56 +27.8 4.70+1.02 +27.7 3.35 +.69 +25.9 4.04 +.75 +22.8

+26.2 +25.9 +19.8 +17.1 +15.4 +15.2 +14.9 +14.8 +13.8 +13.5

+32.5 +25.5 +21.1 +13.6 +13.3 +12.5 +10.8 +8.9 +7.9 +7.4

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Blyth s iPSEEafe CSVInvNG hhgregg RadioShk Stonerdg ThomCrk g Tronox s PrUShNG s GMot wtB

25.99-8.86 -25.4 78.00-26.06 -25.0 17.76-5.30 -23.0 6.90-1.65 -19.3 2.38 -.56 -19.0 4.97 -.98 -16.5 2.85 -.55 -16.2 22.65-4.30 -16.0 22.14-4.12 -15.7 8.26-1.51 -15.5

NovaCpp n IncOpR Medgen wt Arrhythm Crexendo Vringo ParkCity Richmnt g ImmunoCll NovaGld g

2.15 3.45 4.51 2.20 3.05 2.90 3.30 4.76 2.81 5.60

Questcor Gevo USMD n BioFuel rs MitekSys ParametSd Dialogic rs CasellaW Enphase n KandiTech

18.47-11.66 2.14-1.16 22.23-11.10 5.07-2.07 3.23-1.25 6.49-2.43 2.52 -.69 4.27-1.02 4.14 -.97 4.02 -.91

-.41 -.65 -.69 -.32 -.43 -.40 -.44 -.61 -.31 -.59

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BkofAm 6371834 8.83 S&P500ETF 5651481143.97 GenElec 2608077 22.71 Bar iPVix 2586973 9.00 SprintNex 2485794 5.52 SPDR Fncl 2440917 15.59 iShR2K 2213204 83.44 iShEMkts 2027917 41.33 NokiaCp 1951586 2.58 FordM 1783594 9.86

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2.59 7.50 21.66 29.76 22.66 1.03 5.98 19.10 68.57 31.46

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STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Div

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Ex

AFLAC AT&T Inc AMD Alcoa AlliantTch AlphaNRs AmIntlGrp Aon plc Apple Inc BP PLC BcpSouth BkofAm Bar iPVix Bemis Caterpillar Checkpnt Chevron Cisco Citigroup CocaCola s Comcast Deere Dell Inc DirSCBear Dover DowChm EnPro ExxonMbl Facebook n FstHorizon FordM FrkUnv FredsInc GenElec GpFSnMx n HewlettP iShEMkts iS Eafe iShR2K Intel IBM JPMorgCh

NY 1.32 47.88 -.30 -0.6 +10.7 NY 1.76 37.70 -.38 -1.0 +24.7 NY ... 3.37 -.23 -6.4 -37.6 NY .12 8.85 -.28 -3.0 +2.4 NY .80 50.11 +.40 +0.8 -12.3 NY ... 6.57 -.64 -8.9 -67.8 NY ... 32.79 -.84 -2.5 +41.3 NY .63 52.29 -.39 -0.7 +11.7 Nasd10.60 667.11-32.99 -4.7 +64.7 NY 1.92 42.36 -.64 -1.5 -.9 NY .04 14.74 -.09 -0.6 +33.8 NY .04 8.83 -.28 -3.1 +58.8 NY ... 9.00 +.31 +3.5 -74.7 NY 1.00 31.47 -.30 -0.9 +4.6 NY 2.08 86.04 -5.68 -6.2 -5.0 NY ... 8.28 -.37 -4.3 -24.3 NY 3.60 116.56 -1.24 -1.1 +9.5 Nasd .56 19.10 +.20 +1.0 +6.0 NY .04 32.72 -.95 -2.8 +24.4 NY 1.02 37.93 -.10 -0.3 +8.4 Nasd .65 35.74 -.48 -1.3 +50.8 NY 1.84 82.47 +.23 +0.3 +6.6 Nasd .32 9.85 -.43 -4.2 -32.6 NY ... 14.88 +.84 +6.0 -43.8 NY 1.40 59.49 -1.55 -2.5 +2.5 NY 1.28 28.96 -.99 -3.3 +.7 NY ... 36.01 -2.03 -5.3 +9.2 NY 2.28 91.45 -.47 -0.5 +7.9 Nasd ... 21.66 -1.20 -5.2 -43.3 NY .04 9.63 -.22 -2.2 +20.4 NY .20 9.86 -.54 -5.2 -8.4 NY .46 7.42 +.04 +0.5 +10.9 Nasd .24 14.24 -.07 -0.5 -2.3 NY .68 22.71 +.18 +0.8 +26.8 NY ... 13.70 ... ... +6.1 NY .53 17.06 -.53 -3.0 -33.8 NY .82 41.33 -.45 -1.1 +8.9 NY 1.72 53.00 -1.55 -2.8 +7.0 NY 1.23 83.44 -2.06 -2.4 +13.1 Nasd .90 22.66 -.47 -2.0 -6.6 NY 3.40 207.45 +1.47 +0.7 +12.8 NY 1.20 40.48 -.40 -1.0 +21.7

Last

Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg%Chg

Name

Ex

Div

KimbClk Kroger Lowes McDnlds MeadWvco MicronT Microsoft MorgStan NY Times NiSource NokiaCp NorthropG Oracle Penney PepsiCo PeregrinP Pfizer PwShs QQQ ProctGam PulteGrp RadioShk RegionsFn RschMotn S&P500ETF SearsHldgs Sherwin SiriusXM SouthnCo SprintNex SPDR Fncl Staples TecumsehB TecumsehA Torchmark Vale SA VangEmg WalMart WellsFargo Wendys Co Weyerhsr Xerox Yahoo

NY NY NY NY NY Nasd Nasd NY NY NY NY NY Nasd NY NY Nasd NY Nasd NY NY NY NY Nasd NY Nasd NY Nasd NY NY NY Nasd Nasd Nasd NY NY NY NY NY Nasd NY NY Nasd

2.96 85.78 +.46 +0.5 +16.6 .60 23.54 -.14 -0.6 -2.8 .64 30.24 +.05 +0.2 +19.1 3.08 91.75 -1.96 -2.1 -8.6 1.00 30.60 -.10 -0.3 +14.7 ... 5.98 -.38 -6.0 -4.9 .92 29.76 -1.43 -4.6 +14.6 .20 16.74 -.34 -2.0 +10.6 ... 9.76 +.18 +1.9 +26.3 .96 25.48 -.02 -0.1 +7.0 .26 2.58 -.20 -7.0 -46.6 2.20 66.43 -.46 -0.7 +13.6 .24 31.46 -1.01 -3.1 +22.7 ... 24.29 -1.60 -6.2 -30.9 2.15 70.77 +.22 +0.3 +6.7 ... 1.03 -4.36 -80.9 ... .88 24.85 +.34 +1.4 +14.8 .61 68.57 -1.58 -2.3 +22.8 2.25 69.36 -.06 -0.1 +4.0 ... 15.50 -1.48 -8.7 +145.6 ... 2.38 -.56 -19.0 -75.5 .04 7.20 -.33 -4.3 +67.3 ... 7.50 +1.05 +16.2 -48.3 2.85 143.97 -1.90 -1.3 +14.7 .33 55.49 -2.47 -4.3 +74.6 1.56 148.91 -1.15 -0.8 +66.8 ... 2.59 +.05 +2.0 +42.3 1.96 46.09 +.83 +1.8 -.4 ... 5.52 -.13 -2.3 +135.9 .25 15.59 -.24 -1.5 +19.9 .44 11.52 -.73 -6.0 -17.1 ... 5.60 -.56 -9.1 +25.8 ... 5.18 -.31 -5.6 +10.2 .60 51.35 -.57 -1.1 +18.3 1.16 17.90 -.74 -4.0 -16.6 1.44 41.72 -.41 -1.0 +9.2 1.59 73.80 -.65 -0.9 +23.5 .88 34.53 -.44 -1.3 +25.3 .08 4.53 -.04 -0.9 -15.6 .60 26.14 -.39 -1.5 +40.0 .17 7.34 -.42 -5.4 -7.8 ... 15.98 +.24 +1.5 -1.0

AGRICULTURE FUTURES WkHigh WkLow Settle WkChg CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 12 Mar 13 May 13 Jul 13 Sep 13 Dec 13 Mar 14

756.25 759.50 757 751 667.25 641.75 647.50

705 708.75 706.75 700.50 629 603.75 612.75

756.25 759.50 756.50 749 659 630.50 637.75

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. +8 +8.50 +6.75 +6.75 -6 -9 -9.25

SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Nov 12 Jan 13 Mar 13 May 13 Jul 13 Aug 13 Sep 13

1626 1626.75 1588 1537.25 1517 1487.75 1425.75

1557.50 1558.75 1508.50 1464.50 1445.75 1428.25 1372.25

1601 1602.75 1564.25 1521.50 1496.75 1463 1399

907.25 916.75 913.75 875.25 872.50 882.25 882

849.25 861.50 863.75 824.25 826.25 835.25 850

902.50 912.25 906.25 867 868.75 874.75 878.75

Oct 12 Dec 12 Feb 13 Apr 13 Jun 13 Aug 13 Oct 13

126.05 128.95 132.45 136.15 132.70 132.80 135.80

121.52 123.95 127.80 131.60 128.10 128.65 132.55

122.07 124.70 128.42 132.52 128.90 129.17 133.20

-3.45 -3.77 -3.50 -3.20 -3.50 -3.23 -2.80

77.17 73.75 80.25 87.55 95.65 98.22 98.00

+1.37 -1.22 -.95 -.15 +.10 +.12 +.55

69.15 70.65 71.68 72.76 73.91 76.01 75.63

-2.85 -2.60 -2.55 -2.49 -2.31 -2.16 -2.23

HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. -20.75 -19.25 -15.25 -4.50 -10.50 -16.75 -18.50

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 12 Mar 13 May 13 Jul 13 Sep 13 Dec 13 Mar 14

WkHigh WkLow Settle WkChg

Oct 12 Dec 12 Feb 13 Apr 13 May 13 Jun 13 Jul 13

77.45 75.87 81.70 87.80 95.70 98.37 98.10

75.47 73.40 79.05 85.35 94.40 96.50 96.30

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. +5.25 +4.25 +.75 -4.50 -3.25 -4 -6.75

Oct 12 Dec 12 Mar 13 May 13 Jul 13 Sep 13 Oct 13

72.25 73.67 74.55 75.39 76.26 ... 76.60

69.15 70.46 71.50 72.54 73.64 ... 75.12

Tables show seven most current contracts for each future. Grains traded on Chicago Board of Trade; livestock on Chicago Mercantile Exchange; and cotton on New York Cotton Exchange.

MUTUAL FUNDS Name

Obj

PIMCO TotRetIs Vanguard TotStIdx Vanguard InstIdxI Fidelity Contra Vanguard 500Adml American Funds CapIncBuA m Vanguard TotStIAdm American Funds IncAmerA m American Funds GrthAmA m Vanguard InstPlus American Funds CpWldGrIA m American Funds InvCoAmA m American Funds WAMutInvA m FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m Dodge & Cox Stock Dodge & Cox IntlStk

CI LB LB LG LB IH LB MA LG LB WS LB LV CA LV FB

Total Assets ($Mlns) NAV 165,689 73,450 66,940 59,603 58,280 57,924 57,367 56,646 55,441 47,245 45,614 45,204 40,289 40,234 39,531 37,039

11.58 35.84 131.95 79.68 132.83 52.87 35.85 17.98 33.86 131.95 36.02 30.65 31.31 2.23 118.94 32.45

Total Return/Rank 4-wk 12-mo 5-year

Pct Min Init Load Invt

+1.2 +2.4 +2.4 +3.1 +2.4 +1.2 +2.5 +1.8 +3.1 +2.4 +2.5 +1.4 +1.5 +1.9 +2.7 +2.5

NL 1,000,000 NL 3,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 2,500 NL 10,000 5.75 250 NL 10,000 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL200,000,000 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 4.25 1,000 NL 2,500 NL 2,500

+11.4/A +27.8/A +28.0/A +24.6/B +28.0/A +17.3/A +28.0/A +19.2/B +24.9/B +28.0/A +21.0/B +25.0/C +23.9/D +18.6/A +29.4/A +14.8/C

+8.9/A +1.5/A +1.1/B +2.8/B +1.1/B +0.6/C +1.6/A +2.2/C +0.1/D +1.1/B -1.4/B -0.2/C +0.5/B +3.6/C -1.8/D -3.7/B

CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Morningstar. Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

NEW YORK â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Apple CEO Tim Cook apologized Friday for the company's error-ridden new mobile mapping service and pledged to improve the application installed on tens of millions of smartphones. In an unusual mea culpa, he invited frustrated consumers to turn to the competition. Cook said Apple â&#x20AC;&#x153;fell shortâ&#x20AC;? of its own expectations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything we do at Apple is aimed at making our products the best in the world. We know that you expect that from us, and we will keep working nonstop until Maps lives up to the same incredibly high standard,â&#x20AC;? he said in a letter posted online. Apple released an update to its iPhone and iPad operating system last week that replaced Google Maps with Apple's own map application. But users quickly complained that the new software offered fewer details, lacked public transit directions and misplaced landmarks, among other problems. People have been flocking to social media to complain and make fun of the app's glitches, which include judging landscape features by their names. The hulking Madison Square Garden arena in New York, for instance, shows up as green park space because of the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;garden.â&#x20AC;? Until the software is improved, Cook recommended that people use competing map applica-

tions to get around â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a rare move for the world's most valuable company, which prides itself on producing industry-leading gadgets that easily surpass rivals. Apple has made missteps in the past â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even under founder and CEO Steve Jobs, whose dogged perfectionism was legendary. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think they are clearing the air and, more importantly, clarifying why they had to do their own maps,â&#x20AC;? said Tim Bajarin, a Creative Strategies analyst who's followed Apple for more than three decades. He recalled an infamous problem with the iPhone 4's antenna that interfered with reception when people covered a certain spot with a bare hand. Jobs apologized, though he denied there was an antenna problem that needed fixing. Apple quickly recovered. But Cook's remarks went further, saying the company was â&#x20AC;&#x153;extremely sorryâ&#x20AC;? and promising to make swift changes. Contrast that with Jobs' statement from 2010, when he said the antenna issue had been â&#x20AC;&#x153;blown so out of proportion that it's incredible.â&#x20AC;? Still, Jobs also acknowledged that Apple was â&#x20AC;&#x153;stunned and upset and embarrassed.â&#x20AC;? But he insisted the antenna issue was not widespread and only a small number of users complained to Apple's warranty service. On Friday, Cook said the new version of the map-

ping app was designed to give users the features they've been asking for. It includes turn-by-turn directions, voice integration and a 3-D flyover feature. Google's map application for the iPhone did not give turn-by-turn directions or voice-guided navigation, although its version for Android devices does. Google, Bajarin said, wouldn't license the turnby-turn feature to Apple because Google prefers to give devices running its own Android software an advantage over the iPhone and iPad. Maps and navigation are among the most-used features of smartphones. Cook said Apple's maps will get better as more people use the app and provide feedback. That's true for all digital maps. Google's system wasn't perfect when it launched, but it got better over the years as users pointed out mistakes and helped the company collect its vast trove of data. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ultimately, what (Apple) discovered early on is that Google had access to

100 million iOS users who helped them build the Google Maps database, Bajarin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At some point Apple had to put its foot down.â&#x20AC;? It came time, he explained, for Apple to own the users of its mapping service, not Google. But for now, Cook actually recommends that users look at other options â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including Google maps. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While we're improving Maps, you can try alternatives by downloading map apps from the App Store like Bing, MapQuest and Waze, or use Google or Nokia maps by going to their websites and creating an icon on your home screen to their web app,â&#x20AC;? Cook wrote. Could Apple have avoided the debacle? Bajarin thinks so, maybe by acknowledging that the map app was a work in progress. That's what the company did when it released Siri, its virtual assistant. Customers understood. Apple released the iPhone 5 last week and on Monday said it sold more than 5 million of them in three days.

           Eric M Rutledge, AAMSÂŽ CFPÂŽ Financial Advisor 1500 Harper Road Suite 1 Corinth, MS 38834 662-287-1409

Brian S Langley Financial Advisor

Stocks seal 3Q gains BY JOSHUA FREED Associated Press

Stocks posted solid gains for the third quarter, although the ride got bumpy at the end. Stocks fell five days of the last six, including on Friday, the last trading day of the quarter. But the big indexes are still up 4 percent or more for the three months. They're ahead 10 percent or more for the year. That's despite all the anxiety about the euro, Iran and U.S. politics. Actually, those worries are exactly why stocks are up, said Uri Landesman, who runs the Platinum Partners hedge fund. He notes that investors around the world feel that U.S. stocks look pretty good, compared to some of the alternatives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are scared, and 2008 wasn't that long ago, and Europe remains a problem,â&#x20AC;? he said. Those factors â&#x20AC;&#x153;are keeping the market up in the face of some really questionable economic data and questionable behavior by the Fed.â&#x20AC;? Investors got some more of that iffy economic data on Friday. The Commerce Department said

consumer spending rose a half-percent last month, compared with July. That was a big jump â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but it was driven by higher gas prices.

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8A • Daily Corinthian

Local Softball

Kossuth belts 4 home runs in road victory

Sports

Sunday, September 30, 2012

Alabama eases past Ole Miss, 33-14 BY JOHN ZENOR Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Amari Cooper caught two touchdown passes from AJ McCarron and Christion Jones returned a kickoff 99 yards for another score, leading No. 1 Al-

abama to a 33-14 victory over Mississippi Saturday night. The Crimson Tide (5-0, 2-0 Southeastern Conference) trailed briefly, 7-6, for the first time in regulation since last year’s Tennessee game, a span of nine-plus games.

The Rebels (3-2, 0-1) put up a fight against a team that had been walloping opponents by nearly 37 points on average, but still lost their ninth straight SEC opener. McCarron completed 22 of 30 passes for 180 yards and

Eddie Lacy gained much of his 82 yards in the fourth quarter when Alabama put it away with Jeremy Shelley’s third and fourth field goals of the game. The Tide’s defense bailed out an offense that sputtered. at times with three interceptions.

BY H. LEE SMITH II lsmith@dailycorinthian.com

Kossuth did all its damage via the long ball in picking up a 10-7 win at Smithville in late slow-pitch softball action on Thursday. The Lady Aggies banged out 15 hits with all 10 runs coming on homers. Kossuth, which also hit four in a losing effort against Booneville on Tuesday, has now totaled 62 four-baggers through 22 games. Kossuth (13-9) got a three-run homer from Jordan Dickson in the first inning. After Smithville had pulled to within 3-2, Kristen Devers delivered a three-run shot in the third. Carleigh Mills added to a 6-4 lead with a three-run blast in the fifth. Smithville cut the deficit to 9-6 with a pair of runs in the sixth, only to see Shelby Stewart get one back with a solo homer in the seventh. Stewart, Paden Tomlin, Devers and Dickson had three hits each. Kossuth held a 15-12 advantage in the hit department. The Lady Aggies wrap up Division 1-3A play Monday with a make-up contest at Alcorn Central. Kossuth finPlease see KOSSUTH | 9A

Local Schedule Monday Softball Saltillo @ Tish Co., 5:30 Kossuth @ Central, 6 Volleyball Corinth @ Chester Co., 6   Tuesday Softball Itawamba @ Tish Co., 5:30 Amory @ Corinth, 6 West Union @ Central, 6:30 Kossuth @ Tupelo, 7:00 Volleyball Tishomingo Co. @ Pontotoc   Thursday Football Northeast @ Coahoma, 6:30 Softball Corinth @ Kossuth, 6 Volleyball USJ @ Corinth, 6 Tishomingo Co. @ Belmont   Friday Football Booneville @ Kossuth, 7 (WXRZ) Holly Springs @ Central, 7 Corinth @ Amory, 7 Biggersville @ Smithville, 7 Tishomingo Co. @ Pontotoc, 7 Belmont @ Ripley, 7 Calhoun City @ Walnut, 7 TCPS @ Thrasher, 7 McNairy @ JCM, 7   Saturday Volleyball Division Tournament @ Ripley Cross Country Central, Kossuth @ Itawamba

Shorts AC Football Meeting Parents of members of the ACHS/ ACMS football teams are asked to attend a meeting on October 9 in Coach Lander’s room at ACHS. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m.  

Golf Tournaments ■ The Pickwick Methodist Men’s Club will be holding a 4 person Scramble on October 6. Entry fee is $240 per team or $60 per person and includes golf cart rental, range balls and lunch. Lunch will be served at 11 a.m. and the tournament will begin at 12 p.m. For more information call the Pickwick United Methodist Church at 731-689-5358. ■ Whispering Pines Golf Course will be hosting a 3 man Scramble tournament on October 13. An entry fee of $40 per person will be charged, and golf carts can be rented for an additional $10. The tournament will include lunch for all participants and begin at 9 a.m. For more information call Bob or Judy Miller at 286-6151 or 284-6351. ■ Shiloh Ridge is hosting a 3 person scramble on Saturday, Oct. 20. The event is open to the public with an entry fee of $30 for members and $40 for others. Fee includes 18 holes of golf and cart. For more info call 286-8000.

(AP Photo/Dave Martin)

Alabama wide receiver Amari Cooper (9) stiffs arm out of the tackle of Mississippi linebacker Denzel Nkemdiche (4) in the first half of an NCAA college football game at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala., Saturday.

Corinth clubs fare well in own meet BY H. LEE SMITH II lsmith@dailycorinthian.com

The hosts made the most. Corinth turned in good showings across the board Saturday at the Corinth Cross Country Invitational. Nineteen teams and over 500 runners took part in the 8th annual event held in the field across the road from Corinth Elementary School. “It warmed up a little the last two races, but it was great weather,” said Corinth Head Coach Larry Mangus. “I was really pleased with the turnout.” The varsity teams finished fourth in the Class 4A-6A division. Both the Warriors and Lady Warriors earned a second-place finish among 4A schools, trailing only perennial champion Pontotoc. “Pontotoc is so strong, but

we are getting closer,” said Mangus. “The boys ran well and all the girls set personal records or ran season bests.” All junior high teams ran together with Corinth finishing second to Saltillo in both meets. Kossuth finished second to French Camp in the 1A-3A boys’ event. The Lady Aggies were third behind Mooreville and South Pontotoc among 1A3A females. The Ripley girls finished fifth in the 1A-3A event with Page Rowland winning the individual title. The Tishomingo County boys were sixth overall and third among 4A schools in the 4A-6A race. ■ Overall the Corinth girls were fourth in 4A-6A with 90 points. Pontotoc was first with 41, followed by Starkville (55) and Saltillo (57). Emma Knight (15:44) and

Yvette Evans (15:54) set personal records and finished No. 2 and No. 3 among the 75 finishers. Kate Mattox of Starkville turned in the fastest finish in the state with a time of 14:52. Holley Marshall (22), Katie Jones (37) and Mary Wayne (38) rounded out the top five finishers for the Lady Warriors. Each ran a season best in the process. ■ The Corinth boys were fourth overall in 4A-6A with 95 points. Saltillo won with 39 points, followed by Starkville (47) and Pontotoc (59). Clayton Allred topped the effort with a fourth-place finish in 17:21. Will Crigger was next at 17th among 97 finishers in a time of 18:44. Corinth travels to Moulton, Ala., on Saturday to take part in the Jesse Owens Invitational. “It’s a huge meet and is well

run,” said Mangus. “It’s an excellent course and we run well there.” Lady Warriors 2. Emma Knight, 15:44*; 3. Yvette Evans, 15:54*; 22. Holley Marshall, 17:08; 37. Katie Jones, 18:26; 38. Mary Wayne, 18:32; 45. Hannah Rogers, 18:59*; 67. Claire Smith, 22:20* Warriors 4. Clayton Allred, 17:21; 17. Will Crigger, 18:44; 22. Jordan Mills, 19:07; 25. Dennis Dilworth, 19:17; 31. Austin Martin, 19:29; 32. Reed Pearce, 19:32; 39. Austin Powell, 20:08; 55. Rosley Smith, 21:22; 81. Baley Martin, 24:01*; 87. Ben Henson, 24:57*; 93. Michael Saul, 25:59 *Personal Record

Blue Devils roll in Division 1-3A opener BY H. LEE SMITH II lsmith@dailycorinthian.com

BOONEVILLE — The Blue Devils crowned the queen in style. Booneville showed little rust from an open date by scoring three times in the first quarter en route to a 54-6 win

over Alcorn Central in its annual Homecoming contest. The Blue Devils improved to 4-2 overall and 1-0 in 1-3A, joining Belmont and Ripley atop the six-team league in the opening weekend of division play. Seven different Blue Dev-

ils scored touchdowns, paced by Zeus Rogers two scoring jaunts. Jack Simpson tossed a pair of touchdowns, both in the opening half as Booneville built a 47-6 lead. Booneville jumped out to a 14-0 lead behind a 30-yard run by Rogers and a 5-yard

jaunt by Jordan Miller. Alcorn Central (2-5, 0-1) recorded its lone score in the opening period on a 5-yard run by Josh Berry. Simpson connected with Zane Lott from 19 yards out to push the lead to Please see OPENER | 9A

Wild one: No. 5 Georgia holds off Tennessee Vols Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga.— Mark Richt looked past the mind-boggling offensive statistics to find the most important fact for his Georgia team. When the game was on the line, Georgia made the plays. Even on defense. Todd Gurley ran for three touchdowns and Keith Marshall added two as No. 5 Georgia recovered after blowing a 17-point lead to beat Tennessee 51-44 on Saturday in the highest-scoring game ever between the SEC rivals. Georgia (5-0, 3-0 SEC), which had never scored more points against the Volunteers in 41 previous meetings, needed three takeaways in the final six minutes stay

unbeaten. Twice Sanders Commings intercepted Tyler Bray’s passes and in between the Tennessee quarterback was stripped from behind and the fumble was recovered by Georgia’s John Jenkins. “You can get into statistics, but the bottom line is a lot of games are going to come down to the end where somebody has to make a play,” Richt said. “It’s nice to have a gutcheck and come out on top.” The Bulldogs’ defensive plays in the closing minutes followed a game packed with offense. The previous high for points in the series was 84 in Tennessee’s 51-33 win in 2006. On Saturday, the teams

combined for 60 points in just the first half. Georgia had 282 yards rushing as its two freshmen each topped 100 yards. With former Georgia standout Herschel Walker watching, Gurley had 24 carries for 130 yards. Marshall had 164 yards on only 10 carries. Asked if he anticipated the high-scoring pace, Gurley said “Probably not.” “We know what we’re capable of,” said Gurley, who has rushed for more than 100 yards in four of his first five games. “We did our thing. We executed.” Aaron Murray threw two third-quarter touchdown passes to Michael Bennett for the Bulldogs.

Georgia led 27-10 early in the second quarter before Tennessee took the lead with 20 unanswered points. Tennessee (3-2, 0-2 SEC) took its third straight loss in the series under coach Derek Dooley, the son of Georgia’s former longtime coach Vince Dooley. “We are better in a lot of areas, but we have to shore up the run defense,” Derek Dooley said. “Georgia is a great running team but we are a lot better than what we showed out there today. It was frustrating.” Georgia plays at No. 6 South Carolina next week in a key SEC East game. “We’ve been able to overPlease see GEORGIA | 9A


Scoreboard

Sunday, September 30, 2012

KOSSUTH

Baseball American League

CONTINUED FROM 8A

A few spots are available on the Corinth KIX soccer team, a club that travels to tournaments in Northeast Mississippi and Southern Tennessee. Age limit is 10-13, depending on birthday. Minimal cost required. For more information on a tryout call Brian (415-3215) and leave a message.  

East Division W L Pct GB 91 67 .576 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 90 67 .573 ½ 87 71 .551 4 70 88 .443 21 69 88 .439 21½ Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 85 73 .538 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chicago 83 75 .525 2 Kansas City 70 87 .446 14½ Cleveland 66 91 .420 18½ Minnesota 66 92 .418 19 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 92 65 .586 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Oakland 90 68 .570 2½ Los Angeles 87 70 .554 5 Seattle 73 85 .462 19½ Wild-card standings W L Pct WCGB New York 91 67 .576 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Baltimore 90 67 .573 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Oakland 89 68 .567 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Los Angeles 87 70 .554 2 Tampa Bay 86 71 .548 3 ___ Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Games Baltimore 9, Boston 1 Cleveland 8, Kansas City 5 N.Y. Yankees 11, Toronto 4 L.A. Angels 7, Texas 4 Minnesota 4, Detroit 2 Chicago White Sox 3, Tampa Bay 1 Oakland 8, Seattle 2 Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Games Toronto 3, N.Y. Yankees 2 Detroit 6, Minnesota 4 Oakland 7, Seattle 4, 10 innings Tampa Bay 10, Chicago White Sox 4 L.A. Angels at Texas,(n) Boston at Baltimore,(n) Kansas City at Cleveland, (n) Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Games Kansas City (Hochevar 8-15) at Cleveland (McAllister 5-8), 12:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 16-13) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 9-14), 12:07 p.m. Boston (Z.Stewart 1-3) at Baltimore (J.Saunders 2-3), 12:35 p.m. Detroit (A.Sanchez 4-6) at Minnesota (Hendriks 1-8), 1:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 19-5) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 6-5), 1:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Greinke 6-2) at Texas (Darvish 16-9), 2:05 p.m. Seattle (Er.Ramirez 1-3) at Oakland (Milone 13-10),34:05 p.m. Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Games Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 6:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m. Minnesota at Toronto, 6:07 p.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 6:10 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 9:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.

Baseball Record Book

National League

ished second in the four-team league and will travel to either Leflore County or Leland for the opening round of the Class 3A playoffs.

KHS 10, Smithville 7 KHS 303 030 1 -- 10 15 3 SHS 022 002 1 -- 12 2  WP: Abbie Clausel (11-7). LP: Ashton Hensley. Multiple Hits: (K) Shelby Stewart 3, Paden Tomlin 3, Kristen Devers 3, Jordan Dickson 3, Briana Bryan 2. HR: (K) Dickson, Devers, Carleigh Mills, Stewart. Record: Kossuth 13-9

BRIEFS CONTINUED FROM 8A

Baseball Tryouts â&#x2013;  The

West Tennessee Wildcats, a 7U travel baseball team, will be holding tryouts for the 2013 season. If interested call Chad at 731-646-0426. â&#x2013;  The Jackson Athletics, a 13U majors travel team, will be holding tryouts for the fall and 2013 season. If interested call Jason at 901-487-6875.  

Corinth KIX Soccer

The 2012 Mississippi Baseball Record Book, which includes public schools and four-year state colleges can be purchased for $10. It is available by mailing payment to: Mississippi Baseball Record Book, Diamonds By Smillie, 3159 Kendrick Road Corinth, MS 38334.

New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Toronto Boston

z-Washington z-Atlanta Philadelphia New York Miami x-Cincinnati St. Louis Milwaukee Pittsburgh Chicago Houston

East Division W L 95 62 91 66 78 79 73 84 67 90 Central Division W L 95 62 85 72 80 77 76 81 59 98 52 105

Pct .605 .580 .497 .465 .427

GB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 4 17 22 28

Pct .605 .541 .510 .484 .376 .331

GB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 10 15 19 36 43

West Division W L Pct GB x-San Francisco 92 65 .586 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Los Angeles 82 75 .522 10 Arizona 79 78 .503 13 San Diego 74 83 .471 18 Colorado 62 95 .395 30 Wild-card standings W L Pct WCGB z-Atlanta 91 66 .580 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; St. Louis 85 72 .541 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Los Angeles 82 75 .522 3 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division ___ Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Games Cincinnati 1, Pittsburgh 0 Miami 2, Philadelphia 1 N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 1 Houston 7, Milwaukee 6 St. Louis 12, Washington 2 Arizona 8, Chicago Cubs 3 San Francisco 3, San Diego 1 L.A. Dodgers 8, Colorado 0 Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Games Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, (n) Houston at Milwaukee, (n) N.Y. Mets at Atlanta ,(n) Philadelphia at Miami, (n) Washington at St. Louis, (n) Chicago Cubs at Arizona, (n) San Francisco at San Diego, (n) Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, (n) Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Games Philadelphia (Hamels 16-6) at Miami (Eovaldi 4-12), 12:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 19-9) at Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 12-13), 12:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Mejia 1-1) at Atlanta (Medlen 9-1), 12:35 p.m. Houston (Lyles 4-12) at Milwaukee (Fiers 9-9), 1:10 p.m. Washington (Detwiler 10-7) at St. Louis (Lynn 17-7), 1:15 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 10-15) at San Diego (Volquez 11-11), 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Rusin 1-3) at Arizona (Collmenter 5-3), 3:10 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 1-3), 3:10 p.m. Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Games Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Washington, 6:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 6:10 p.m. Houston at Chicago Cubs, 7:05 p.m. San Diego at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m. Cincinnati at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 8:40 p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 p.m.

Basketball WNBA Playoff schedule CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (x-if necessary) (Best-of-3) Eastern Conference Connecticut 1, New York 0 Thursday, Sept. 27: Connecticut 65, New York 60 Saturday, Sept. 29: Connecticut at New York, 6 p.m. x-Monday, Oct. 1: New York at Connecticut, 6 p.m. Atlanta 1, Indiana 0 Friday Sept. 28: Atlanta 75, Indiana 66 Sunday, Sept. 30: Indiana at Atlanta, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, Oct. 2: Atlanta at Indiana, TBD Western Conference Minnesota 1, Seattle 0 Friday, Sept. 28: Minnesota 78, Seattle 70 Sunday, Sept. 30: Minnesota at Se-

attle, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, Oct. 2: Seattle at Minnesota, TBD Los Angeles 1, San Antonio 0 Thursday, Sept. 27: Los Angeles 93, San Antonio 86 Saturday, Sept. 29: Los Angeles at San Antonio, 2 p.m. x-Monday, Oct. 1: San Antonio at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

Football NFL standings, schedule AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 81 75 Buffalo 2 1 0 .667 87 79 New England 1 2 0 .333 82 64 Miami 1 2 0 .333 65 66 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston 3 0 0 1.000 88 42 Jacksonville 1 2 0 .333 52 70 Tennessee 1 2 0 .333 67 113 Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 61 83 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 121 83 Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 85 102 Pittsburgh 1 2 0 .333 77 75 Cleveland 0 4 0 .000 73 98 West W L T Pct PF PA San Diego 2 1 0 .667 63 51 Denver 1 2 0 .333 77 77 Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 68 99 Oakland 1 2 0 .333 61 88 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Dallas 2 1 0 .667 47 54 Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 47 66 N.Y. Giants 2 1 0 .667 94 65 Washington 1 2 0 .333 99 101 South W L T Pct PF PA Atlanta 3 0 0 1.000 94 48 Tampa Bay 1 2 0 .333 60 67 Carolina 1 2 0 .333 52 79 New Orleans 0 3 0 .000 83 102 North W L T Pct PF PA Minnesota 2 1 0 .667 70 59 Chicago 2 1 0 .667 74 50 Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 57 54 Detroit 1 2 0 .333 87 94 West W L T Pct PF PA Arizona 3 0 0 1.000 67 40 San Francisco 2 1 0 .667 70 65 Seattle 2 1 0 .667 57 39 St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 60 78 ___ Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Game Baltimore 23, Cleveland 16 Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Games Tennessee at Houston, Noon San Diego at Kansas City, Noon Seattle at St. Louis, Noon New England at Buffalo, Noon Minnesota at Detroit, Noon Carolina at Atlanta, Noon San Francisco at N.Y. Jets, Noon Miami at Arizona, 3:05 p.m. Oakland at Denver, 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 3:05 p.m. New Orleans at Green Bay, 3:25 p.m. Washington at Tampa Bay, 3:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 7:20 p.m. Open: Indianapolis, Pittsburgh Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Game Chicago at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4 Arizona at St. Louis, 7:20 p.m.

Daily Corinthian â&#x20AC;˘ 9A

College football scores EAST Albany (NY) 55, Monmouth (NJ) 24 Bloomsburg 43, Gannon 24 Brown 37, Georgetown 10 Clemson 45, Boston College 31 Colgate 47, Yale 24 College of NJ 55, W. Connecticut 27 Cortland St. 20, Montclair St. 0 Delaware Valley 42, Albright 21 Duquesne 24, St. Francis (Pa.) 21 Gettysburg 35, McDaniel 3 Ithaca 40, Utica 22 Lehigh 34, Fordham 31 Merchant Marine 34, RPI 31 Merrimack 63, Pace 14 New Hampshire 34, Delaware 14 Ohio 37, UMass 34 Penn 28, Dartmouth 21 Princeton 33, Columbia 6 Rochester 30, St. Lawrence 20 Rowan 17, Brockport 3 Sacred Heart 34, CCSU 21 San Jose St. 12, Navy 0 Shippensburg 49, Lock Haven 6 Stony Brook 23, Army 3 Susquehanna 17, Muhlenberg 0 UConn 24, Buffalo 17 Ursinus 24, Moravian 7 Villanova 35, Maine 14 Wagner 31, Bryant 21 Waynesburg 20, Thiel 19 West Virginia 70, Baylor 63 Wilkes 37, FDU-Florham 27 SOUTH Alabama St. 54, Alcorn St. 14 Appalachian St. 55, Coastal Carolina 14 Campbellsville 15, Kentucky Christian 14 Catholic 41, Hampden-Sydney 28 Christopher Newport 45, Maryville (Tenn.) 31 Cumberland (Tenn.) 41, Pikeville 23 Cumberlands 61, Lindsey Wilson 21 Duke 34, Wake Forest 27 E. Kentucky 28, UT-Martin 16 Ferrum 49, Averett 28 Furman 45, W. Carolina 24 Gallaudet 52, Anna Maria 24 Georgetown (Ky.) 63, Bethel (Tenn.) 21 Georgia 51, Tennessee 44 Hobart 61, WPI 8 Howard 56, Savannah St. 9 Jacksonville 26, Marist 14 Jacksonville St. 31, SE Missouri 16 Louisiana Tech 44, Virginia 38 Louisiana-Monroe 63, Tulane 10 Miami 44, NC State 37 Middle Tennessee 49, Georgia Tech 28 Millsaps 33, Centre 16 Missouri 21, UCF 16 North Carolina 66, Idaho 0 Old Dominion 45, Richmond 37 Randolph-Macon 22, Emory & Henry 10 SC State 14, Norfolk St. 0 Southern U. 21, Florida A&M 14 Stillman 32, Lane 22 Troy 31, South Alabama 10 Tulsa 49, UAB 42 Tusculum 49, Brevard 39 Union (Ky.) 37, Bluefield South 14 Willamette 28, Sewanee 24 Winston-Salem 35, Bowie St. 3 Wofford 49, Elon 24 MIDWEST Adrian 24, Hope 0 Alma 20, Olivet 14 Aurora 55, Maranatha Baptist 14 Bemidji St. 35, Minn.-Crookston 2 Bethel (Minn.) 21, Augsburg 20 Bowling Green 48, Rhode Island 8 Butler 21, Dayton 11 Carthage 31, North Park 6 Cent. Missouri 35, Missouri Southern 10

Central 31, Dubuque 24 Cincinnati 27, Virginia Tech 24 Coe 51, Buena Vista 0 Cornell (Iowa) 48, Beloit 8 DePauw 17, Washington (Mo.) 14 E. Illinois 65, Austin Peay 15 Eureka 31, Westminster (Mo.) 18 Findlay 43, Notre Dame Coll. 42 Greenville 49, Crown (Minn.) 18 Gustavus 37, Hamline 0 Hillsdale 44, N. Michigan 6 Illinois College 56, Lawrence 20 Illinois St. 34, South Dakota 31 Iowa 31, Minnesota 13 Kent St. 45, Ball St. 43 Lake Forest 13, Carroll (Wis.) 10 Loras 28, Luther 25 Malone 24, Tiffin 14 Martin Luther 17, Presentation 13 Miami (Ohio) 56, Akron 49 Missouri Valley 47, Culver-Stockton 7 Monmouth (Ill.) 31, St. Norbert 9 N. Illinois 55, Cent. Michigan 24 Northern St. (SD) 45, Minn. St.Moorhead 7 Northwestern 44, Indiana 29 Northwestern (Minn.) 38, Minn.Morris 14 Ohio St. 17, Michigan St. 16 Penn St. 35, Illinois 7 Purdue 51, Marshall 41 Ripon 42, Knox 17 Simpson (Iowa) 20, Wartburg 19 St. Olaf 38, St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Minn.) 35 St. Thomas (Minn.) 47, Carleton 24 Trine 30, Kalamazoo 20 Wayne (Mich.) 21, Northwood (Mich.) 11 Wayne (Neb.) 31, Augustana (SD) 27 Wheaton (Ill.) 49, Augustana (Ill.) 7 Winona St. 45, Upper Iowa 42 Wis. Lutheran 27, Lakeland 17 SOUTHWEST Houston 35, Rice 14 Nevada 34, Texas St. 21 SE Louisiana 31, Lamar 21 Texas A&M 58, Arkansas 10 FAR WEST Air Force 42, Colorado St. 21 Arizona St. 27, California 17 Montana St. 24, S. Utah 17 Sacramento St. 54, Idaho St. 31

Golf Ryder Cup results Saturday at Medinah Country Club Medinah, Ill. UNITED STATES 10, EUROPE 6 Foursomes United States 3, Europe 1 Justin Rose and Ian Poulter, Europe, def. Webb Simpson and Bubba Watson, United States, 1 up. Keegan Bradley and Phil Mickelson, United States, def. Lee Westwood and Luke Donald, Europe, 7 and 6. Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson, United States, def. Nicolas Colsaerts and Sergio Garcia, Europe, 2 and 1. Jim Furyk and Brandt Snedeker, United States, def. Rory McIlroy and Graeme McDowell, Europe, 1 up. ___ Fourballs United States 2, Europe 2 Dustin Johnson and Matt Kuchar, United States, def. Nicolas Colsaerts and Paul Lawrie, Europe, 1 up. Bubba Watson and Webb Simpson, United States, def. Justin Rose and Francesco Molinari, Europe, 5 and 4. Sergio Garcia and Luke Donald, Europe, def. Tiger Woods and Steve Stricker, United States, 1 up. Rory McIlroy and Ian Poulter, Europe def. Jason Dufner and Zach Johnson, United States, 1 up.

OPENER CONTINUED FROM 8A

21-6. Scoring runs by Rogers, Daryl Barefield and A.J. Grizzard -- coupled with a 19-yard pass from Simpson to Jazz Prather â&#x20AC;&#x201D; extended the Blue Devilsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lead to 47-6 at intermission. Khalil Patterson capped the scoring with a 21-yard run in the third -- the seniorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first tally of the season.

Central totaled just 87 yards on 48 plays. Adam Carter finished with 55 yards on 17 carries. Booneville travels to Kossuth (1-5, 0-1) and Alcorn Central plays host to Holly Springs (3-4, 0-1) on Friday. â&#x2013;  At Bruce, the host Trojans opened Division 1-2A play with a 55-0 win over Walnut. Bruce improved to 5-2, 1-0 in league play, while Walnut dropped to 2-5, 0-1. Booneville 54, Central 6

Central 6 0 0 0 -- 6 BHS 21 26 7 0 -- 54   1st Quarter BHS -- Zeus Rogers 30 run (kick failed) BHS -- Jordan Miller 5 run (Miller pass from Jack Simpson) AC -- Josh Berry 5 run (kick failed) BHS -- Zane Lott 19 pass from Simp son (Eric Benitez kick) 2nd Quarter BHS -- Rogers 37 run (kick failed) BHS -- Jazz Prather 19 pass from Simp son (Benitez kick) BHS -- Daryl Barefield 6 run (Benitez kick) BHS -- A.J. Grizzard 1 run (kick failed)   3rd Quarter BHS -- Khalil Patterson 21 run (Benitez kick)

Bruce 55, Walnut 0 Walnut Bruce

0 14

0 27

0 6

0 8

-- 0 -- 55

1st Quarter B -- Zack Curithirds 53 run (Shaq Bush kick), 11:45 B -- Bush 44 punt return (Bush kick), 8:46   2nd Quarter B -- Rashad Turner 56 pass from Davis Brown (Bush kick), 11:07 B -- Terrance Jones 18 pass from Brown (kick failed), 6:32 B -- Brown 14 run (Bush kick), 2:45 B -- Donta Armstrong 55 pass from Brown (Bush kick), 1:00   3rd Quarter B -- Zay Armstrong 76 run (kick failed), 8:29  

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GEORGIA CONTINUED FROM 8A

come the adversity weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had to this point,â&#x20AC;? Richt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The rest of the season hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been a whole lot of drama, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure there will be drama next week.â&#x20AC;? Bray moved the Vols inside the Georgia 35 late in the game before he fumbled when hit by linebacker Jordan Jenkins. John Jenkins recovered with 1:22 remaining. Bray had one more

long-shot chance when the Vols took possession with 15 seconds remaining. Commingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; interception on first down ended the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through all the disappointment, I think the team grew a lot,â&#x20AC;? said Tennessee tight end Mychal Rivera, who had three catches for 82 yards. Bray completed 24-of45 passes for 281 yards with two touchdowns and three interceptions.

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10A • Sunday, September 30, 2012 • Daily Corinthian

Assistance Mississippi Youth Challenge

Marines helping Marines

Mississippi Youth Challenge Academy features a structured environment with a focus on job training, social skills and self-discipline. Other academic opportunities include high school diploma, college classes through a local university and nationally certified construction skills. The academy is designed to meet the needs of today's “at risk.” Both male and female applicants are accepted, 1618 years of age. Tuition is free. For more information, call 1-800-507-6253 or visit www.ngycp.org/ state/ms. “Change your life today!”  

“The Few and the Proud — Marines Helping Marines” — a United States Marine Corps League is a visitation program for senior inactive Marines. When a senior inactive Marine is housebound or in a nursing home or hospice, the Corinth detachment will visit fellow Marines — because once a Marine always a Marine. For more information, call 662-287-3233.  

Friendship class The Friendship Class meets weekly on Thursday at 6:30 p.m. in the fellowship hall of the First Presbyterian Church on Shiloh Road. This group of mentally challenged adults and mentors enjoy sharing time together, games, crafts, singing and refreshments. For more information, call the church office at 286-6638.  

Story Hour Pre-school Story Hour is held each Thursday at 10 a.m. at the Corinth Library. Year-round art exhibits are also on display and educational non-profit groups meet in the auditorium monthly. The Corinth Friends of the Library hold their ongoing book sale inside the library. Hardback, paperback and audio books, and VHS and DVD donations to the library are always appreciated. For more information, call 287-2441. 

Volunteers needed Magnolia Regional Hospice is currently seeking individuals or groups to be trained as volunteers. Hospice is a program of caring for individuals who are terminally ill and choose to remain at home with family or a caregiver. Some of the ministry opportunities for volunteers are sitting with the patient in their homes to allow the caregiver a break, grocery shopping, reading to a patient, craft opportunities, bereavement/grief support and in-office work. For more information, contact Lila Wade, volunteer coordinator at 662-293-1405 or 1-800843-7553.  

Program expanded The Northeast Mississippi Planning and Development District/ Elderly and Disabled Medicaid Waiver Program has expanded into Alcorn, Prentiss, Tippah and Tishomingo Counties. This home and community based program is an alternative to nursing home placement and can offer services such as homemakers, expanded home health services, home delivered

meals, adult day services, escorted transportation, in-home respite and case management. For more information, call 1-800-745-6961 for details.  

‘Just Plain Country’ Just Plain Country performs at the Tishomingo County Fairgrounds in Iuka every Saturday from 7-10 p.m. Good family entertainment.  

Genealogy society The Alcorn County Genealogical Society has reopened for business Thursdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. The genealogical society has moved to its new location -- the southeast corner of the Alcorn County Courthouse basement in the old veterans’ services office. The genealogical society will be open at the above hours until they get volunteers lined up, then they’ll be open more days for their patrons’ convenience.  

Support groups ■ The Crossroads Group of Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday at noon, and at 7 p.m., seven days a week, at 506 Cruise Street in Corinth. All meetings are non-smoking. The Northeast Mississippi area of Narcotics Anonymous Hotline is 662-841-9998. ■ The Corinth Downtown Group AA meets Sundays and Tuesdays at 8 p.m. at the First Baptist Church, 501 N. Main Street, Corinth. For more information for all area AA groups, please call 662-212-2235. ■ An Alcoholics Anonymous meeting is held in Iuka at the old Chevy

7th Annual Fall Fundraising Luncheon

Catfish & Khakis

dealership building off old Hwy. 25 each Wednesday at 7 p.m. and Friday at 7:30 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women whose common welfare is to stay sober and help others achieve sobriety. The Iuka meeting is an open meeting, anyone who has a problem with alcohol or other substances is welcome to attend. For more information, call 662-660-3150. ■ The Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group in Corinth is partnered with the Alzheimer’s Association Mississippi Chapter. Keri Roaten is the facilitator. The group meets every first Thursday of each month at the Corinth Public Library, from 6-7 p.m. The group discusses the hardships of those caring for people effected by the disease and offer several different resources as well. For more information, contact k_roaten@hotmail. com or 662-594-5526. ■ The “Good Grief” ministry of the HopewellIndian Springs United Methodist Charge is a collaborative effort of both churches and meets every Wednesday afternoon at 3 p.m. in the dining room of the Arby’s Restaurant, 706 Highway 72 East, Corinth. The ministry was established to support those who have experienced a devastating life event such as the death of a loved one, diagnosis of a terminal illness or condition, the loss of a spouse or parent through divorce, even the loss of a job or home. The ministry is non-denominational and open to all. There is no cost to attend and no obligation to continue. For more information, call Bro. Rick Wells, pastor of Hopewell and Indian Springs United Methodist Charge and facilitator at 662-587-9602.

■ Al-Anon is a support group and fellowship of relatives and friends of alcoholics. The group meets at 7 p.m. on Mondays at 1st Baptist Church in Corinth. For more information, call 462-4404. ■ Mended Hearts is a support group open to all heart patients, their families and others impacted by heart disease. Its purpose is to inspire hope in heart disease patients and their families through visits and sharing experiences of recovery and returning to an active life. Healthcare professionals join in the mission by providing their expertise and support. Mended Hearts meets the second Monday of every month at 10 a.m. at the Magnolia Community Service Complex in the Cardiac Rehab Conference Room, 1001 South Harper Road in Corinth. ■ Finding Hope Ministries, a ministry of Fairview Community Church is offering a depression support group. The sessions will be held in the fellowship hall of Fairview Community Church, 125 CR 356, Iuka -- just off Hwy. 350. The support group meets from 10-11 a.m. Friday mornings and 6-7 p.m. Friday evenings. For more information, call Debra Smith at 662808-6997. ■ A grief support group for anyone who has lost a loved one or may have a sick family member and needs someone who will understand what your going through is meeting at Real Life Church, (next to Fred’s in Corinth), every Monday from 6-7 p.m. For one on one meetings, contact Sherry Scott at 662-415-7173. ■ C.A.U.S.E. (Corinth, Autism, Understanding, Support, Education) support group, “Just love them for who they are,” meets every first Monday of the month at 6 p.m. There is help for parents

of a child with autism. Meet other parents, share experiences, ask questions, get advice, help others, vent or just read. For more information, call 662-415-1340.  

‘Sharing Hearts’ The Sharing Hearts adult care program offers Alzheimer’s Day Care on Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 501 Main Street, Corinth. It is a respite day program that provides individual group activities such as arts and crafts, exercise, music, games and therapy and lunch to patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. The purpose of the program is to provide caregivers some free time from care while providing social interaction for the participants. For more information, call Tim Dixon at 662396-1454.  

Shiloh museum A museum dedicated to the Battle of Shiloh and area veterans is now open next to Shiloh National Military Park. It is located at the intersection of state Route 22 and Route 142 in Shiloh, across from Ed Shaw’s Restaurant. The Shiloh Battlefield & World War II Museum is the home of Honor Our Veterans Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to raising money for projects to benefit area veterans. The museum features items Larry DeBerry has amassed over a lifetime of collecting Shiloh-related artifacts, as well as artifacts from the Korean War, World War II, the Vietnam War — all the way up to the war in Afghanistan. The Shiloh Battlefield & World War II Museum is open Monday through Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. For more information call Larry DeBerry at 731-926-0360.

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Daily Corinthian • Sunday, September 30, 2012 • 11A

Community Events Family reunion The Vandiver family reunion is being held today at noon at Glen City Hall where it was held last year. Everyone is asked to bring a dish.  

Class of ‘72 Walnut High School graduating class of 1972 is having its 40th reunion on Saturday, Oct. 6 at Chapman’s Restaurant, 251 CR 745, Walnut. Meet and greet is at 5 p.m. and dinner at 6 p.m. RSVP no later than Monday, Oct. 1 for a headcount to Kathie Jarmon Kerr, 7527 Oak St., Kansas City, MO 64114, or at kathiekerr@ gmail.com or 816-6510308. Spouses/friends, teachers and friends from other classes are welcome to attend, as long as they RSVP. Visit “Walnut High School Class of 1972 Walnut Miss” on Facebook.  

Trash & Treasures Trash & Treasures along the Tenn-Tom is being held Friday and Saturday, Oct. 5-6 on Hwy. 25 north and south through Tishomingo County and U.S. Hwy. 72 and Alt. 72 to Burnsville. This is a 50-plus mile yard sale event in Tishomingo County. Designated setup areas available. For more information, contact Tishomingo County Tourism at 1-800-3864373 or info@tishomingo.org.   

Girl Talk UT Extension and McNairy County Health Department is presenting a program for girls ages 9-12 and their moms to talk about their changing bodies, decision making, teen pregnancy, sexuality and family values. The

“Girl Talk” program will start on Thursday, Oct. 4 (for moms only) and continue on Thursdays, Oct. 11, Oct.18 and Oct. 25 at 6 p.m. at the McNairy County Ag Educational Center. Space is limited and registration is required. The cost is $30 per mother/daughter. The cost includes all materials, activities and snacks. To register or for more information, contact UT Extension at 731-645-3598.  

Air show/Fly-in There will be an Air Show and Fly-in at Iuka, Segars Field from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 6. New, homebuilt and antique airplanes will be featured. There will be skydivers at noon. Admission is free. Rain date will be Oct. 7.   

T-shirts on sale The 22nd Annual Hog Wild BBQ Festival T-shirt is now on sale. The Tshirts are available at The Alliance. Cost is $10 for youth and $15 for adult sizes.  

Tri-county Genealogy Fair The 3rd Annual TriCounty Genealogy Fair will be held Saturday, Oct. 6 at the historic Jacinto Courthouse from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Fair is sponsored by the Tishomingo County Historical & Genealogical Society, the Alcorn County Genealogical Society, and the Prentiss County Genealogical & Historical Society. Registration will begin at 9:30 at the Jacinto Courthouse. located on Highway 356 East in Jacinto. Seminars will include a session at

10 a.m. on Beginning Genealogy-Finding Folks by Mrs. Diane Garvin of Booneville. At 11 a.m., Dr. Robert Harris, professor of history and genealogy at the Wallace State Community College in Hanceville, Ala., will speak on “Journey to the Bottom of the Barrel: What You Might Do When You Hit a Brick Wall.” After a lunch period, Dr. Harris will resume at 12:30 p.m. and teach another class, “Blue & Gray, Black & White: Basics of Civil War Research.” Mrs. Angela Broyles, founder of Bluewater Publications, will teach a session at 1:30 p.m. on “How to Get Published.” She has also spearheaded Historical Truth, an initiative dedicated to collecting and preserving rare and unique stories through the collection of oral, written, and audiovisual histories of individuals. These speakers are a phenomenal group of professionals that are offered for the small registration fee of $20. On the courthouse lawn, sponsoring historical societies will have history books for sale. Individual researchers may set up their family histories on the lawn for a small fee of $5. Be sure to bring a table. The registration deadline is today. Although registration is not required, it is required for participation in one of the speaker’s seminars. Make checks out to TriCounty Genealogy Fair and mail to P.O. Box 273, Iuka, MS 38852. Registration will be accepted at the door; however, no box lunch will be available for late registrants. For more information, call the Tishomingo County’s Old Courthouse Museum at 662-4233500 to register or e-

mail tishomingohistory@ yahoo.  

Green Market The Green Market in the CARE garden at the Corinth Depot offers an opportunity for local farmers, gardeners, artisans, craftsman, etc. to sell their wares in an open-air, grassroots setting. The next Green Market is being held Saturday, Oct. 6 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The popular RED Green Market will be held from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17. Applications are now available at the tourism office.  

Photos on display The 11th Annual Crossroads Museum Photo Contest received 219 entries this year. Those photos will be on display at the museum until today. The museum is open MondaySaturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. and on Sunday, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. The museum is located at 221 North Fillmore Street in downtown Corinth. Admission is adults $5; over 50 $3; under 16 free. For more information call 662-287-3120 or visit www.crossroadsmuseum.com.  

Welcome Center events Anyone who needs new recipe ideas for tailgating or football gatherings can go by the Mississippi Welcome Center in Alcorn County to pick up a unique recipe for MS Caviar and a free copy of the eat.drink. MS magazine which features several tailgating recipes. The Welcome Center is also highlighting the great outdoors in Mississippi, including the many outdoor attractions

in Alcorn and Tishomingo Counties. Visitors can also fill out one of the comment cards and be entered in the end of the month drawing for a Mississippi specialty gift item. The Welcome Center, 2028 South Tate St., Corinth, is also celebrating Blues Month through today. Many Blues artists are from Mississippi, stop in the Welcome Center anytime during normal business hours to pick up an official Blues Trail Map, There will also be information in Blues venue locations and event listings. For more information, call 662-286-3443 or visit alcorn@mississippi.org.  

Exhibits held ■ Paintings by Northeast alumni Dot Courson and her daughter Susan Patton are on display in the Anderson Hall Art Gallery on the Booneville campus of Northeast Mississippi Community College through Oct. 8. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. Contact Terry Anderson for more information at 662-720-7336 or tfanderson@nemcc. edu. ■ The Crossroads Museum at the Historic Depot at 221 North Fillmore Street (across from Joe’s Shoes) in downtown Corinth has a special Civil War Archives exhibit to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Corinth, Battle of Shiloh and the Civil War. The exhibit features authentic and some never-before-seen rare Civil War relics and information from the vast Crossroads Museum archives. The temporary exhibit will be on display until Dec. 31. Along with the Civil War exhibit, the museum also

houses fossils, American Indian artifacts, depot and railroad industry history displays and aviation memorabilia. Special items inside the museum include the original Dilworth’s Hot Tamale cart, Don Blasingame items and over 1,000 pieces of authentic Coca-Cola memorabilia. The museum is open Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday, 1-4 p.m. Admission is adults, $5; over 50, $3; and children under 16, free. For more information, contact the museum at 662-287-3120 or visit www.crossroadsmuseum.com . ■ Dogwood Plantation resident and artist Alice Prussia has 25 additional paintings added to her exhibit at Dogwood Plantation Assisted Living bring her total collection to 75 paintings. Visitors are welcomed to view the exhibit at Dogwood Plantation, 1101 Levee Rd., Corinth.  

Dining with Diabetes UT Extension in McNairy County will hold free classes for all diabetics, their family members or caretakers. Classes will include educational information by various health care professionals, recipes for healthy meals that don’t cut taste and the opportunity to taste a variety of dishes. Diabetics will also have the opportunity to have their blood pressure and glucose level checked, free of charge. All classes cover a different topic, so plan to attend each class. The first class will be Tuesday, Oct. 9 at 5:30 p.m. at the Selmer Senior Center and the next three classes will be on Tuesdays, Oct. 16, 23 and 30. To register or for more information, contact UT Extension at 731-645-3598.

Biggersville Pentecostal Church 701 Hwy 45, Corinth, MS Pastor T. G. Ramsey and church family will be celebrating the life of our former pastor, Rev. Russell Hamm, his ministry and work for the Lord. Pastor Hamm faithfully served the Lord for over 60 years and 37 years in Biggersville. We invite all to join us during these special services.

Friday, October 5, 2012, 7 p.m. Homecoming Fellowship Service Saturday, October 6, 2012, 7 p.m. – Gospel Concert featuring The Downs Family

Ephesians 4:11 And He gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some pastors and teachers

Sunday, October 7, 2012, 1:30 p.m. – Hamm Memorial Service – Worship & Praise with reflections on Bro. Hamm’s thirty-seven years of service 3:00 p.m. – Dedication of the Fellowship Hall as the Russell Hamm Memorial Hall with reception following

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12A • Sunday, September 30, 2012 • Daily Corinthian

Another big Supreme Court term kicks off Monday BY MARK SHERMAN Associated Press

WASHINGTON — When last we saw the chief justice of the United States on the bench, John Roberts was joining with the Supreme Court's liberals in an unlikely lineup that upheld President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. Progressives applauded Roberts' statesmanship. Conservatives uttered cries of betrayal. Now, the Supreme Court is embarking on a new term beginning Monday that could be as consequential as the last one, with the prospect for major rulings about affirmative action, gay marriage and voting rights. Many people on both the left and right expect Roberts to return to the fold and side with the conservative justices in the new term's big cases. If

they're right, the spotlight will be back on Justice Anthony Kennedy, whose vote typically is decisive in cases that otherwise split the court's liberals and conservatives. But Roberts will be watched closely, following his health care vote, for fresh signs that he's becoming less ideologically predictable. It may be that the dramatic health care decision presages “some shift in his tenure as chief justice,” said Steve Shapiro, the American Civil Liberties Union's national legal director. “Or does it give him cover to continue to pursue a conservative agenda?” The first piece of evidence could be in the court's consideration of the University of Texas' already limited use of race to help fill its incoming freshman classes, which

comes before the court Oct. 10. The outcome could further limit or even end the use of racial preferences in college admissions. Roberts has expressed contempt for the use of race in drawing legislative districts, calling it “a sordid business, this divvying us up by race,” and in assigning students to public schools, saying that “the way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race.” The written arguments submitted by both sides in the Texas case leave little doubt that Kennedy, not Roberts, holds the prized vote. The challengers of the Texas program and the university itself cite Kennedy's prior writings on affirmative action a combined 50 times. The court also is expected to confront gay mar-

riage in some form. Several cases seek to guarantee federal benefits for legally married same-sex couples. A provision of the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act deprives same-sex couples of a range of federal benefits available to heterosexual couples. Several federal courts have agreed that the provision of the law is unconstitutional, a situation that practically ensures that the high court will step in. A separate appeal asks the justices to sustain California's Proposition 8, the amendment to the state constitution that outlawed gay marriage in the nation's largest state. Federal courts in California have struck down the amendment. Once again, many legal analysts expect Roberts essentially to be against gay marriage. “The out-

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come clearly turns on how Anthony Kennedy votes,” said Georgetown University law professor Michael Seidman. The justices may not even consider whether to hear the gay marriage issue until November. Another hot topic with appeals pending before the high court, and more soon to follow, is the future of a cornerstone law of the civil rights movement. In 2006, Congress overwhelmingly approved, and President George W. Bush signed, legislation extending for 25 more years a critical piece of the Voting Rights Act. It requires states and local governments with a history of racial and ethnic discrimination, mainly in the South, to get advance approval either from the Justice Department or the federal court in Washington before making any changes that affect elections. The requirement currently applies to the states of Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia. It also covers certain counties in California, Florida, New York, North Carolina and South Dakota, and some local jurisdictions in Michigan and New Hampshire. Coverage has been triggered by past discrimination not only against blacks, but also against American Indians, Asian-Americans, Alaskan Natives and Hispanics. The court spoke skeptically about the provision in a 2009 decision, but left it mostly unchanged. Now, however, cases from Alabama, North Carolina,

South Carolina and Texas could prompt the court to deal head on with the issue of advance approval. The South Carolina and Texas cases involve voter identification laws; a similar Indiana law was previously upheld by the court. It is unclear when the justices will decide whether to hear arguments in those cases. Arguments themselves would not take place until next year. Yet there still is a chance that the court could become enmeshed in election disputes, even before the ballots are counted. Suits in Ohio over early voting and provisional ballots appear the most likely to find their way to the justices before the Nov. 6 election, said Richard Hasen, an election law expert at the University of California at Irvine law school. Among other important cases already on the court's docket: ■ A high-stakes dispute, to be argued first thing Monday, between the business community and human rights advocates over the reach of a 1789 law. The issue is whether businesses can be sued in U.S. courts for human rights violations that take place on foreign soil and have foreign victims. ■ A challenge to the use of drug-sniffing dogs in two situations. Florida police used a marijuanasniffing dog's alert at the door of a private home to obtain a search warrant to look inside the house. The question is whether the dog's sniff itself was a search. A separate case looks at the reliability of animals trained to pick up the scent of illegal drugs.

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September is National Childhood Diabetes Tip Obesity Awareness Month One in three American children is prove and Want to know how a particular meal affects blood the already overweight or obese. They your prolong are at greater risk of cardiovascu- lives of the sugar? Check it bone just before first bite of thatnext meal andgenlar disease, andthejoint problems, sleep apnea, sychological eration again one andbullying a half to and two hours afterThis that. ItsAmericans. OK to go upof problems, more. is a sobering public health issue, about 50-60 points.asIf itoverweight goes up moreand then youProtecting may need compounding obesity the health to make ancontinue adjustementinto in foodadulthood. or medicine. Remember your and wellThe financial implications of childbeing after meal blood sugar goal should be under 180 accordingof hood obesity are sobering, at $14 A m e r i c a n Jimmy Bennett B billion per year in direct health care c h i leven d r e n Ji to the American Diabetes Association. Some doctors costs alone. Increased awareness for years to and prevention obe- come is a critical Adults recommend that youofbe childhood under 140. Controlling your diabetes can helpendeavor. you to reduce sity will save billions of dollars in must ensure that young people rethe risk of damage to yourcare eyes,costs kidneys, nervesceive and most of all your unnecessary health and a healthy startheart. in life. promote healthier lifestyles to im-

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Daily Corinthian â&#x20AC;˘ Sunday, September 30, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ 13A

         

 

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Contact Announces the Re-establishment of Offices at Laura Holloway 601 Main Street, Walnut, Mississippi 38683 Tippah County by appointment atHours Office 1-662-223-6895 And 662-287-6111 Nashville area office: 9005 Overlook Blvd. â&#x20AC;˘Brentwood, Tennessee 37027 ext. 308 Hours by appointment 1-615-242-0150 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax 1-615-274-4948 toForOffice advertise information e-mail: Hodumlaw1@aol.com Other location: your Collierville, Tennessee 38017 Office 1-901-853-8110 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax 1-901-853-0473 Law Firm Continuing to serve West and Middle Tennessee and onandthis Northern Middle Mississippi with representation in: Family Law â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Criminal Defense â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Contract and page. Corporate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Personal Injury â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Entertainment Law Web site: Hodumlaw.com

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14A • Sunday, September 30, 2012 • Daily Corinthian

Submitted photos

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant (far left) chats with Alliance President and Chief Operating Officer Gary Chandler during a recent economic development trip to Japan. Gary Chandler (above, third from right) poses with the Mississippi delegation to the SEUS-Japan Conference in Tokyo, including Gov. Phil Bryant (second from left). Gary Chandler visits with Masato (Max) Yamanami, (above right) general manager with TMA-Japan, Toyota Motor Corporation.

JAPAN CONTINUED FROM 1A

driven by personalities, but he’s seen a shift over the past decade toward a more data driven approach to site selection for corporations. His conversations with executives in Japan reinforced this idea that they are looking for concrete information showing how their company will benefit from locating in a specific area and what resources will be available to them. The companies want to see details on the availability of qualified workers, the readiness of the potential site or building, what utilities and other services are available at the site now and what the costs will be to get their project up and running at the site in question. Chandler said they’re also strongly interested in how quickly a site or location can be made ready to begin production. “Speed is of the necessity,” he said. Chandler said the availability of a qualified labor force and buildings or sites that are immediately ready for development are key factors the executives are focusing on in choosing sites for new development. The opportunity to meet with executives from Toyota’s suppliers was especially important. Chandler said it’s important to understand that the growth of the

supplier infrastructure connected to the Toyota plant at Blue Springs will be a very long-term process that will take as much as two decades to mature. The goal is to plant seeds and build and nurture relationships with these companies now that will hopefully lead to opportunities for future economic development. “This is a long term process. We’re planting seeds now that will hopefully bear fruit in the future,” he said. Chandler said the Alliance and its leadership saw the Japan trip as a unique opportunity that they had to take advantage of when it arose. He noted The Alliance functions as a public-private partnership with funding coming from both the City of Corinth and Alcorn County as well as the membership made up of private companies and individuals in the community. He said they are very mindful of their responsibility to spend the community’s funds wisely and while they haven’t done much international travel in the past, this trip was an unusual and valuable opportunity that they believe will pay direct dividends in the future. He also noted they were able to offset a great deal of the cost thanks to funding from the private sector that was provided directly to support the cost of the trip.

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History

1B • Daily Corinthian

Sunday, September 30, 2012

Cannon in the lobby carries great story BY TOM PARSON NPS Ranger

In my last two articles I told you to stay out of the creek and the river when looking for cannons. Instead of another story about where one isn’t, this time I’ll talk about where one is: the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center. This particular cannon is a beauty and it has a great story to match its good looks. By the book, it is a 3.8 inch bronze rifle of the James design and fired a 14 pound projectile. It was cast in Chicopee, Mass., early in the war and was assigned to a Union artillery battery (not sure which one) that had the misfortune to lose it to the Confederates at Shiloh. Service in the Confederate army began when the gun was given to Hoxton’s Tennessee Battery, a new unit which had just been organized in Memphis. The battery, commanded by Captain Thomas Tobin, already had four cannon but they were all smoothbores and inferior to the new rifle. It became the pride of the battery. Tobin’s men probably didn’t know it, but the rifle was rather unique. Only six of this particular type was ever cast. The differences between these guns and other James rifles are both subtle and obvious. Early James rifles were cut with 15 rifled grooves inside the barrel to give the projectile a “twist” to improve range and accuracy. There were some problems with early models and the manufacturers were unhappy with the design. Eventually all James rifles were cut with 10 grooves though as an experiment six guns were cast with a 7 groove rifling pattern. Tobin’s men had acquired one of these experimental pieces The first test for Hoxton’s battery came at the battle of Corinth. Assigned to the artillery reserve of Price’s corps, the battery had not been called up and thus sat out the fighting on the first day of battle. When orders came to prepare for a pre-dawn bombardment of the Union positions, Tobin was keen to pick out the perfect spot to deploy his guns. Along with two other batteries

This cannon at the Interpretive Center is a beauty, and it has a great story to match its good looks. (for a total of 12 guns), Tobin’s guns were drawn south on the Memphis or Chewalla Road (modern Wenasoga Road) until they reached the line of infantry, sleeping in their battle formations. The cannon were drawn to the crest of the hill just to the north of the Federal line and the artillerymen quietly went about preparing the pieces to fire. The closest fortification to the Confederates was the small earthwork known as Battery Robinett. Behind the thick walls were three powerful 20 pounder Parrot Rifles, manned by twenty-six men of Company “C” 1st United States Infantry and their commander, 1st Lieutenant Henry C. Robinett. These men were different from the other twenty-three thousand men prepared to defend Corinth; they were not part of the volunteer army which had sprung up at the outbreak of the

As the morning sun came over the trees and buildings of Corinth, the early rays reflected off of the polished bronze surface of the gun. The gleaming cannon stood between the opposing lines like a prize waiting to be taken. war but were part of the regular standing army of the United States. This unit was established in 1791 and survives today as the garrison at the United States Military Academy at West Point. Tobin wasn’t satisfied with the selected position and so, along with his bugler, set out to find a more likely location. The two had moved no more than 30 yards in the direction of Corinth when they were captured by a company of Union skirmishers and escorted inside the enemy lines. At 4 a.m. the Confed-

erates opened fire but General Van Dorn’s hope of “softening up” the Federal line came to naught. The Union response was so overwhelming that within thirty minutes the Confederates were forced to withdraw from the exposed position on the ridge. Horse drawn limbers were brought up and attached to the individual cannons and drew them away to safety. The Federals, however, were sending such a tremendous amount of munitions onto the ridge that the Southerners were forced to abandon one of

the guns and a caisson. It was the 3.8” rifle, the pride of Hoxton’s Battery. As the morning sun came over the trees and buildings of Corinth, the early rays reflected off of the polished bronze surface of the gun. The gleaming cannon stood between the opposing lines like a prize waiting to be taken. The image was too much for Captain Charles Brown of the 63rd Ohio. With a dozen men of Company B he ran across the intervening ground and through the defensive layer of abatis which separated the opposing armies. Men seized the bridles of the horses still attached to the caisson and made their way back to the Northern lines. Other men latched onto the cannon carriage and began to physically haul it toward the Federal lines but the heavy rifle fire from Confederate sharp shooters forced them to abandon the ef-

fort. Unwilling to let the enemy have their cannon back, another attempt to capture the cannon was made. From behind the walls of Battery Robinett came four men of the 1st U.S. Infantry; Corporals Patrick Meade and Joseph Plasky along with Privates Michael Ryan and Daniel Murray. The men ignored the bullets, running across the two hundred yard gauntlet and clapped hands on the rifle. It was a heavy burden to pull. The barrel alone weighed 938 pounds and the carriage added an additional 900. Two of the men lifted the wooden trail and threw their weight forward to get the carriage rolling while the other two turned the wheels by hand to speed the process along. They ignored the sharpshooters and physically rolled the cannon yard by yard toward the safety of Battery Robinett. When they were halfway to their goal they were assisted by Private James Strange of company “F”, 2nd U.S. Artillery who ran out to help secure the prize. As the five men pulled the cannon through the Union line the thousands of men in Colonel John Fuller’s Ohio brigade erupted in resounding cheers of triumph. Later in the day one of the men took a sharp scribe and with understandable pride, etched letters into the soft bronze metal: Captured Oct 4, 1862 Corinth MS by 1st US Inf. The history of the cannon is a little murky following the Battle of Corinth. It was assigned to a Union artillery battery, but which one is a mystery. After the war it was placed in storage in a Federal arsenal and there it sat for over 30 years. In 1897 the newly established Shiloh National Military Park received some 250 cannon barrels to be placed on display on the battlefield. The rifle was among them. For years it stood out in one of the fields until its unique history was uncovered and the barrel was placed on prominent display inside the Please see CANNON | 2B

Civil War battle re-enactors bring history to life BY JORDAN BUIE The Jackson Sun

JACKSON, Tenn. — Cleon Plunk responded to a newspaper ad in 2002 that asked for Civil War reenactors. “Civil War reenactors,” the ad read. “History not hatred.” The 59-year-old brick mason from Broken Arrow, Okla., said the ad piqued his interest, so he asked his wife if he could join. She said yes, and he has re-enacted Civil War battles ever since. “I was always interested in that time period,” Plunk said. “Even as a teenage boy, it fascinated me to learn and study about it.” On March 28, Plunk rocked along in an old box car as he and other men dressed in blue rode a train toward Shiloh. He and his companions were packed in the car with their rifles and other weapons. Plunk said that on the train ride, he sank into the experience. For reenactors such as Plunk, the flags still blaze and the smoke has not cleared, not for war, but for memory. They seek to remember the cost of

battles fought on home soil and the tragedy that ensued. Reenactors have met on or near Civil War battlefields to engage in mock warfare for decades, but this year, and for the next three years, battles are coming upon their sesquicentennial or, 150th anniversaries, and will draw thousands of reenactors. The Jackson Sun visited Hardin County in the spring to document the 150th anniversary Battle of Shiloh reenactment held there by the BlueGray Alliance national reenactment organization. The goal was not only to record the day’s events, but to capture the experience of the reenactors in writing and video. Along with this article, The Jackson Sun produced a mini-documentary about the experiences of the reenactors in this story that can be viewed at http://tinyurl. com/9gu33cg . Reenactor Curtis Waldrip, of Liberty, Texas, is an commercial pilot and former school teacher. He is also a member of the National Guard. He said he reenacts

“I was always interested in that time period. Even as a teenage boy, it fascinated me to learn and study about it.” Cleon Plunk Civil War re-enactor Civil War battles to bring history alive. Waldrip, 50, said he put on a uniform for the first time when he was 16 and that it gave him a taste of battle he had never encountered in a history book. “Reading about the Civil War in a textbook is so sterile,” he said. “You don’t get the rub of the wool uniform against your skin or the taste of powder in your mouth and the nasty flavor of the little things.” Waldrip was a reenactor for the 8th Texas Calvary regiment, which traveled from East Texas to Tennessee for the Shiloh reenactment. Riding a horse adds another dimension to battle, he said. “When you are up there seeing the world over a horse’s ears, you’re not just a guy in a costume,” he said. “People can get killed on a horse.”

Waldrip said a reenactor from his regiment who participated in the Shiloh reenactment died during training after Shiloh. Waldrip said the man and a few others rode through a wooded area in a line at a full gallop. The man’s saddle slipped, and he slid sideways and his head hit a tree. “He was given a soldier’s burial,” Waldrip said. “The man had asked to be buried in his reenactment uniform.” He said reenactors are looking for what he called “the Holy Grail experience of re-enacting.” Waldrip said his “most real experience” as a reenactor came in 2001. He was sent by a higherranking officer to get orders from another soldier. As he rode his horse through a stretch of woods at dusk, surrounded by lightning bugs and the sounds and smells of

the forest, he believed he was in another time. “I am a very logic-driven and rational person, but at that time there was nothing in my view that was modern,” Waldrip said. “It could have been 1862.” Jason Crow, 41, who lives on a ranch in Batson, Texas, is a lieutenant in Waldrip’s 8th Texas Regiment who visits battlefields where the real 8th Texas Regiment of the Confederacy fought, including Shiloh. He said that along with the historical element of re-enacting, he enjoys working with his horses and learning about the tactical elements of Civil War combat and what it took to be a cavalryman. “Reenactment is an art in the same way you might call football an art,” Crow said. “You are trying to outmaneuver your opponent and to put on a good show.” Some might wonder how you could outmaneuver an opponent or win in a reenactment. Crow said there are two kinds of events: Spectator battles, which are scripted, and tactical battles, where the goal is to put

your firepower in a position that overpowers your opponents until they must retreat. “It’s like a giant game of paintball, but we are only firing blanks, so we use the honor system,” he said. “Sometimes we have referees who determine when someone has been outmaneuvered, and the loser is forced to go to the rear and stand down for an hour, while their side must fight without them.” Crow said the more people who participate in a reenactment, the more you can do. He and other committed reenactors go to eight to 10 reenactments a year, as well as to schools and other locations where they put on demonstrations. It is estimated the Gettysburg battlefield, in Pennsylvania, will draw nearly 80,000 reenactors on the 150th anniversary of the battle next July. Waldrip said that with 6,000 reenactors, the Shiloh reenactment was the largest he has attended, but that the reenactment at Gettysburg will make Shiloh look like “an elementary school event to show students what uniforms looked like.”


Outdoors

2B â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Corinthian

Sunday, September 30, 2012

Archery season for deer opens tomorrow After a weekend off from work chilling out with friends, doing hobbies, catching a football game on the tube or some other enjoyable activity, sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s difficult to get going once Monday rolls around. But, if I had to guess, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say many of our area sportsmen wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be getting that yucky feeling tomorrow. Instead of the Monday morning blahs, those who are avid bowhunters and have managed to get the day off from work will be feeling like theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on â&#x20AC;&#x153;cloudnine.â&#x20AC;? The Mississippi archery season for deer opens in this area on Oct. 1 and goes through Nov. 16. Archery equipment can be used throughout all of the deer seasons but at least 500 square inches of solid unbroken fluorescent orange must be worn

during any primitive weapon or gun season. B a g limits and David antler criGreen teria remain the Outdoors same as in recent years. The bag limit for antlerless deer is five per license year, but only one per day may be taken. A yearly limit of three bucks may be taken, not exceeding more than one per day. To be legal for harvest in our area (the Hill Zone), bucks must have a minimum 10-inch inside spread or at least one main beam measuring 13 inches in length. However, youth hunters 15 years of age or younger can take any antlered buck. Our neighbors just to our north have already

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done your work. The bow is tuned, scouting completed and, maybe, the stand has been placed. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re raring to go. All youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re waiting on is daylight. got their archery season underway. The Tennessee season opened on Sept. 22. Mississippi and Tennessee have one thing in common with their archery seasons. Both are consistent about when they open. The Tennessee season always opens on the fourth Saturday in September, while Mississippi sticks to using the first of October as being its opening date, unless the first falls on a Sunday, then it will be moved up a day. For the best chance of having success in archery

season, hunters should locate and set up in the vicinity of a good food source, preferably one that deer are hitting hard at the moment. Setting up a stand near agricultural crops such as corn or soybeans, or close to a cluster of white-oak trees steadily dropping their first acorns would be a great place to start right now. Deer will devour the acorns as fast as they drop and go after the grain as long as it lasts. But since itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s this late in the game, I suppose most have already got such a place in mind. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve

done your work. The bow is tuned, scouting completed and, maybe, the stand has been placed. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re raring to go. All youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re waiting on is daylight. In your haste to get out the door, though, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget the small stuff that could keep the hunt from going smoothly. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t follow a blood trail in the dark without a flashlight, the bow is a hassle to get up into the stand if the bow rope is left at the house, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sure no fun getting busted by a deerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nose when you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t made the necessary precautions prior in concealing your scent. Scent concealment is fickle at best with the wind swirling in the hills around here. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried my share of cover scents, but the most effective tactic Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost me a dime. The night be-

fore a hunt Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take the clothes Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to wear and hang them outside so they can air-out in the fresh night air. Employers beware! If you happen to have several employees call in sick this Monday, it could be because of the virus that goes around each year about this time causing people to lose sleep, tiptoe through the woods, climb trees and do all sorts of wild things. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bow Madness!â&#x20AC;? (Daily Corinthian columnist and Alcorn County resident David Green is an avid hunter and fisherman in the Crossroads area. Anyone wishing to share their own unique outdoor story or have any news to report pertaining to the outdoors, David can be contacted at dgreen_outdoors@yahoo.com.)

Weyerhaeuser Company sets preference for ATFS-certified wood BY JAMES L. CUMMINS For the Daily Corinthian

The American Tree Farm System (ATFS), a program of the American Forest Foundation, is the largest and oldest woodland system in America. As always, certified Tree Farmers meet the highest standards of sustainability and manage their lands for water, wildlife,

wood and recreation. Weyerhaeuser, one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest forest products companies, recently announced a supply chain preference for certified material sourced from the ATFS. For the nearly 90,000 family forest owners sustainably managing 27 million acres of forestland in America, the Wey-

erhaeuser preference for their certified wood can make a real difference in the viability of the tree farms and the economic health of rural communities. Tom Martin, president and CEO of the American Forest Foundation confirmed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weyerhaeuserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement is just what certified Tree Farm-

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ers have been waiting for. Healthy forests need healthy markets because protecting your trees against pests, pathogens and catastrophic fire can be expensive. These landowners are hardworking people who want to keep their forests, as forests, and keep them in their family.â&#x20AC;? Weyerhaeuserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate sustainability goals include demonstrating forest stewardship by certifying at least 99 percent of its timberlands in North America to sustainable forestry standards like those of ATFS. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of our customers want certified wood. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a widespread understanding of the value of certification-encouraging corporate best practices remains by far

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Healthy forests need healthy markets because protecting your trees against pests, pathogens and catastrophic fire can be expensive. These landowners are hardworking people who want to keep their forests, as forests, and keep them in their family.â&#x20AC;? Tom Martin President and CEO, American Forest Foundation the most important role for certification. Buyers want to know their wood comes from sustainably managed forests. To give our customers what they want, we need more ATFS certified wood.â&#x20AC;? said Dan Fulton, president and CEO of Weyerhaeuser Company.

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Weyerhaeuser supports the use of internationallyaccepted sustainable forestry standards, including the use of independent, external auditors that verify a companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to responsible sourcing. Weyerhaeuserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsible fiber sourcing practices are guided by its wood procurement policy and implementation guidelines. The preference for ATFS wood will be implemented at Weyerhaeuser through a number of measures, including incentives, procurement decisions, policy and expansion support of the ATFS. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forests need strong industry players like Weyerhaeuser to recognize the value that family forest owners are contributing to sustainable forestry. Giving preference to wood from American Tree Farm Systemcertified land means more woodland owners have the financial resources to continue their hard work and on-the-ground stewardship,â&#x20AC;? said Martin.

CANNON CONTINUED FROM 1B

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visitor center. A final trip was in store for the rifle and on Sept. 18, 2012, it was placed on a wooden gun carriage and set on permanent display in the lobby of the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center. It belongs here in Corinth. It was just across the street that the Confederates fired it for their last time, blasting fire and shell toward the enemy lines, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only yards from the spot where the Regulars dragged it through the Union lines to a thundering chorus of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Huzzaâ&#x20AC;? from the men of Ohio. How could it belong anywhere else but Corinth? (Tom Parson is a ranger at the National Park Serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center.)


Wisdom

3B • Daily Corinthian

Engagement

Younger sister contracts high schooler’s senioritis

Anniversary

Hill — Burse Miss Nakeitra L. Hill and Mr. Creston M. Burse will exchange vows at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012 at Church of the Crossroads in Creston M. Burse, Nakeitra L. Hill Corinth. The brideelect is the daughter of Ms. Linda McKinnon and Mr. and Mrs. Steve Hill. She is the granddaughter of Ms. Leaster Knight, Ms. Willie R. McKinnon, Mr. Calvin Burton and the late Mary A. Hill. The prospective bride-groom is the son of Mrs. Brenda Dortch and the late Jessie L. Turner. He is the grandson of the late Howard and Bertha Burse and Mrs. Johnnie B. Turner. Miss Hill is a 2002 graduate of Corinth High School. She received a bachelor of science in biological sciences and a master in health education/health promotion from Mississippi State University. She is currently completing her doctorate in public health from Jackson State University’s School of Health Sciences. She is a program manager for My Brother’s Keeper, Inc. in Ridgeland. Mr. Burse is a 2002 graduate of Bailey Magnet High School in Jackson. He received a bachelor of science in business information systems from Mississippi State University and an MBA in information technology management from Harding University. He is the executive director for information communications at Minact, Inc. in Jackson. All friends and relatives of the couple are invited to attend the ceremony. The reception is RSVP only.

Sunday, September 30, 2012

Mr. and Mrs. Kara Blackard

Blackard anniversary Dr. Kara and Linda Blackard of Corinth will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Oct. 5. They will be honored at a reception from 2-4 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 7 at Wheeler Grove Baptist Church. The couple have two children: Ronnie (Connie) Blackard and Steve(Sandy) Blackard, all of Corinth. They have four grandchildren. All friends and relatives are invited to celebrate this special occasion with the couple.

DEAR ABBY: A year ago I remarried and gained three great stepkids. I’m worried about the oldest, who is a senior (18). She doesn’t care about school anymore. She’s smart enough. When she tries, she gets A’s. But when she doesn’t want to do the work, she gets F’s. Her youngest sister (12) is doing the same thing now, too. Neither one is using drugs or alcohol or skipping school. They are fundamentally good kids. I recognize that it’s laziness because I did the same thing 30 years ago. Abby, until now I had only sons. Having daughters now is a very steep learning curve. I need suggestions on how to help their mom parent them through this rough period. I love our children deeply and want to be the kind of stepdad God wants me to be for them. -- CLUELESS STEPDAD DEAR CLUELESS: For a man who signed himself clueless, you have clear insight. You and your wife should schedule an appointment with the oldest girl’s school counselor and find out to what degree her grade point average has been

promptly at noon. My husband knows this, but he comes in from working whenever he’s ready. He has a cellphone and could call to let me know he’s going to be late, but he rarely does. When he finally gets in, the food is cold and I am upset. He thinks I’m “unreasonable” to expect him to be on time or call. He has never cooked a meal in his life, so he has no idea what is involved. I’m fed up with his behavior and need some suggestions. -- BOILING MAD IN ALABAMA DEAR BOILING MAD: Talk calmly to your husband and ask if it would be more practical to schedule it for 1 p.m. or 2 p.m. That he wouldn’t call to let you know he’s running late does seem inconsiderate, and if the problem persists, it might be better for both of you if his “main meal” consists of a sandwich he makes for himself whenever he returns home. (Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.)

affected by her “laziness.” Then ask your s t e p Abigail daughter Van Buren what she plans to Dear Abby do after high school. If she wants to further her education, she needs to understand that schools pay attention to applicants’ high school records. The 12-year-old is another story. Find out from her teachers whether she has fallen behind in her classes and see that she gets tutoring if she needs to catch up. Make sure she completes her homework. You and her mother should impress upon her that you expect the best she’s capable of, and for good grades there will be rewards just as for poor grades there will be consequences. Then practice what you preach. DEAR ABBY: My husband and I are retired. He has a small farm that he calls his “hobby” farm. When we retired, we agreed to have our main meal at noon every day. I work hard to have a nutritious meal on the table

Today in history Today is Sunday, Sept. 30, the 274th day of 2012. There are 92 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History On Sept. 30, 1962, James Meredith, a black student, was escorted by federal marshals to the campus of the University of Mississippi, where he enrolled for classes the next day; Meredith’s presence sparked rioting that claimed two lives. In an address to the nation, President John F. Kennedy expressed hope that the school, the state of Mississippi and the nation would “return to their normal activities with full confidence in the integrity of American law.”

On this date In 1777, the Continental Congress — forced to flee in the face of advancing British forces — moved to York, Pa. In 1791, Mozart’s opera “The Magic Flute”

premiered in Vienna, Austria. In 1846, Boston dentist William Morton used ether as an anesthetic for the first time as he extracted an ulcerated tooth from merchant Eben Frost. In 1912, the Columbia Journalism School in New York held its first classes. In 1938, after cosigning the Munich Agreement allowing Nazi annexation of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain said, “I believe it is peace for our time.” In 1949, the Berlin Airlift came to an end. In 1952, the motion picture “This Is Cinerama,” which introduced the triple-camera, triple-projector Cinerama widescreen process, premiered at the Broadway Theatre in New York. In 1954, the first nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus, was commissioned by the Navy.

After complaint, man allowed to change name BY HOLBROOK MOHR Associated Press

JACKSON — A Mississippi man has taken his wife’s last name after the ACLU complained he was told by state officials that he would need a court order to do so because it was not traditional. Robert Everhart, 28, of Pascagoula, born Robert McCarthy, changed his last name on his driver’s license Wednesday by using his marriage certificate, as many women do in taking their husband’s last name. The American Civil Liberties Union of Mississippi sent a letter to Mississippi Department of Public Safety Commissioner Albert Santa Cruz on Tuesday, saying the agency was violating state and federal law. DPS spokesman Warren Strain said Tuesday

that Everhart’s request was unusual, and employees at driver’s license stations were operating under an old practice. He said the employees were informed that men can use marriage certificates to change their names, just like women do. Everhart said he could have paid for a court order to make the change long ago, but he fought out of principle. He said it was his decision to take his wife’s name and the state should honor it. “I know most people think I rolled over and took my wife’s name,” he said in a telephone interview. “But she’s the only surviving kid with her parents, and everybody said my name wrong. It was a dual reason. Now all I have to do is worry about people misspelling it.”

In 1955, actor James Dean, 24, was killed in a two-car collision near Cholame, Calif. In 1962, the National Farm Workers Association, founded by Cesar Chavez and a forerunner of the United Farm Workers, held its first meeting in Fresno, Calif. In 1982, the situation comedy “Cheers” premiered on NBC-TV.

Ten years ago New Jersey Senator Robert Torricelli abruptly ended his scandal-tainted re-election campaign just five weeks before

the election, leaving Democrats scrambling for a replacement candidate.

Five years ago A U.N. envoy failed to meet with Myanmar’s top two junta leaders in his effort to persuade them to ease a violent crackdown on anti-government protesters, but was allowed a highly orchestrated session with detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Taliban militants in southern Afghanistan hanged a teenager found to have U.S. money in his pocket

as a warning to others not to use dollars. The United States won the Presidents Cup in Montreal, 191⁄2 -141⁄2, giving them a victory on foreign soil in cup competition for the first time since 1993. Germany defeated Brazil 2-0 in the final of the Women’s World Cup held in Shanghai, China.

One year ago A U.S. drone airstrike in Yemen killed two American members of al-Qaida, cleric Anwar al-Awlaki and recruiting magazine editor Samir Khan.

Today’s Birthdays Nobel Peace Laureate Elie Wiesel is 84. Actress Angie Dickinson is 81. Singer Cissy Houston is 79. Singer Johnny Mathis is 77. Actor Len Cariou is 73. Singer Marilyn McCoo is 69. Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert is 67. Pop singer Sylvia Peterson (The Chiffons) is 66. Actor Vondie Curtis-Hall is 62. Actress Victoria Tennant is 62. Actor John Finn is 60. Rock musician John Lombardo is 60. Singer Deborah Allen is 59. Actor Calvin Levels is 58.

2012

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4B • Sunday, September 30, 2012 • Daily Corinthian

Funny women flourish in female-written comedies BY SANDY COHEN AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES — Call it The “Bridesmaids” Effect: Ever since the R-rated 2011 comedy became a runaway hit, taking in more than $280 million worldwide and earning Oscar nods for actress Melissa McCarthy and writers Kristin Wiig and Annie Mumolo, a rash of female-written comedies are enticing viewers with provocative new characters who are more like women we know. The latest is “Pitch Perfect,” written by “30 Rock” and “New Girl” scribe Kay Cannon and starring a cast of comediennes including Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson, Anna Camp and Brittany Snow. The musical comedy, which counts Elizabeth Banks among its producers, focuses on the competitive world of college a cappella. Full of music and laughs, the story centers on the Bellas, an all-female group of singing misfits. “’Bridesmaids’ I think

opened up a door to allow women to show a bunch of different women in different ways of being funny. It was kind of like an arrival moment,” Cannon said. “Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, they made it cool to be funny and to be embarrassed and to look a thousand different ways and show a bunch of different areas of their lives.” And they aren’t the only ones. Diablo Cody opened doors and eyes with 2007’s “Juno,” which introduced a female protagonist who was sharp, endearing and facing real-life circumstances. The appeal was in her intelligence, not her sexuality, and moviegoers could relate. The film earned Cody an Academy Award for best screenplay and was also nominated for best picture, best director (Jason Reitman) and best actress (Ellen Page), plus took in more than $140 million at the box office. Since then, women have been finding a voice in comedy more than ever before. This summer saw

actresses Zoe Kazan and Rashida Jones pen interesting comedic characters to play in their own starring vehicles: “Ruby Sparks” and “Celeste and Jesse Forever,” respectively. Lauren Miller and Katie Anne Naylon wrote about female friendship and entrepreneurial efforts (as phone-sex operators) in “For a Good Time, Call...” Playwright and director Leslye Headland also made her screenwriting debut this summer with “Bachelorette,” an adaptation of her play that explores a group of New York girlfriends dealing with life questions when the first among them marries. Women are also making comedic strides on TV. Elizabeth Meriwether created “New Girl,” which earned five Emmy nods. Lena Dunham is the multi-hyphenate talent behind HBO’s “Girls,” which also earned a round of Emmy nods, including producing, writing, directing and acting honors for Dunham. Mindy Kaling

of “The Office” wrote her way into a starring role on her new show, “The Mindy Project.” Whitney Cummings helped create “2 Broke Girls.” Then there’s Chelsea Handler, who has written and produced “Chelsea Lately” since 2007. “Really what you see in the last 10 years is ... this groundswell of female writers and sometimes female directors being accepted by the comedy community,” said Headland. “And then you get to 2011, where ‘Bridesmaids’ did something that’s actually never been done, which is an R-rated, female-centric comedy that makes money.” Both Headland and Cannon, whose scripts were written before “Bridesmaids” was released, say the success of that film made it easier to get their movies made. Cannon, who is also an actress, initially turned to writing because she wasn’t finding or getting the kind of roles she sought. “I didn’t necessarily al-

ways feel that what I was reading was how women actually talked, or it was an archetype I didn’t fit,” she said. “I wasn’t going to be the prettiest inginue or the character actress.” Fey’s “30 Rock” character, Liz Lemon, is a new kind of character, Cannon said: A real woman who’s really funny as she faces real-life challenges. Headland says the new breed of funny female writers arose out of frustration, and feminism. “These writers ... are adept at really expressing those characters and writing those stories because I’m assuming they’re struggling with the same thing I am, which is: What’s going to happen to us? And what do we want to say to the women before us and also the women coming up after us?” she said. “There are new problems with being a woman that no one’s talked about. There are new dilemmas that are coming up that just haven’t really quite been articulated.”

Actresses such as Kendrick, Snow, Wilson and others say these new female-created characters look and sound more like actual women they know. “There’s something to women writing for themselves, women writing for women, that just feels a lot more honest and therefore a lot funnier,” Kendrick said. Still, despite this new wave of comedic opportunities, women are still drastically underrepresented as writers, directors and producers in both TV and film. “There’s still only maybe three female writers or two female writers to 10 guys in any kind of writer’s room,” Cannon said. But at least women’s voices are now in the mix. “You’re not going to solve the problem, but you can start the conversation,” Headland said. “I think part of your job, especially as a woman, is to let yourself be a little ugly and to show uglier parts of yourself. That’s your job as a female artist.”

Homes’ unsettling ‘May We Be Forgiven’ not for everyone BY PATRICK CONDON Associated Press

A book that’s hard to like but even harder to forget, A.M. Homes’ “May We Be Forgiven” is a wild, almost unhinged satire about the toxic relationship between a pair of brothers and the havoc it wreaks in their lives and those of the people they love. It’s not for everyone, but adventurous readers who can tolerate its frequent detours into kinky sex and disturbing violence will find buried within an almost uplifting

belief in the possibility of redemption. Harold Silver’s brother George is the younger of the two, but people always assume that George — taller and better-looking, wealthier and more successful in his field — is older than Harold. A historian with a specialty in the life and career of Richard Nixon, Harold has always suffered envy for George, a powerful TV network executive who lives with his wife and adolescent children in a ritzy Westchester subdi-

vision. He’s also spent most of his life suffering at the hands of George, an obnoxious bully with a dangerous temper. As “May We Be Forgiven” gets under way, Harold and his wife, Claire, are spending a tense Thanksgiving Day with George and his family. The unhappy family gathering foreshadows a shocking act of brutality by George a few months later that radically alters Harold’s life. Harold is somewhat complicit in George’s vio-

Horoscopes Sunday, September 30, 2012 BY HOLIDAY MATHIS Creators Syndicate

In the wake of yesterday’s full moon, energy levels drop slightly as we recover from the outpouring of emotion and personal expression. There also will be a level of preoccupation accompanying the test of the sun’s squared position with Pluto. The secret to passing this test is to accept that change is inevitable and refuse to worry about it. ARIES (March 21-April 19). The moon is no longer full, but it’s still in your sign, offering you more than the usual amount of attention. You will receive compliments, encouragement and congratulations. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Don’t be surprised when people gather around you. That’s what happens to people who create exciting events and make their own fun. You just can’t help but be effective in this regard. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Usually, a leap of faith requires that you jump into unknown territory. But the leap of faith you take now looks an awful lot like you staying in one place. By staying, you’re postulating that things will get better -- and they will. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Seek friends with similar interests. A sense of belonging is what’s needed now, whether or not you consciously realize it. Your spirit will be made light by a kindred soul. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). If you don’t feel as motivated as you’d like, your environment may be to blame. Too many distractions zap your energy. Clear the clutter on surfaces to re-

store your energy. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You do not try to be an intimidating presence, and yet there’s someone who doesn’t quite know how to act around you. If you can put this person at ease, your life will get easier. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). The morning may feel like someone called a meeting without having a clear purpose as to why. You will realize that you have to supply your own “why” for the people who haven’t a clue. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You may want more, but that’s only because you don’t fully realize what you have. When you realize the potential of all that’s available to you, you’ll be amazed at what you can do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). With so many people trying to involve you in their lives, you may forget that you’re the one in charge of your schedule. You stay powerful and in control by being slow to commit. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). A change in your schedule, eating habits or responsibilities at home will cause a degree of stress, even though the change is for the better. So be good to yourself. Take it easy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). There are choices on the table. Decisions need to be made now, or some of those options will no longer be available. Making choices is work. Accept the responsibility because you’re very good at this now. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). The main mission of your day could be derailed by a host of interesting tangents. You’ll wonder whether your original goal is still a good one. For now, assume it is and push forward.

Cryptoquip

lent act, and even as he’s thrust into new responsibilities for what’s left of George’s family, he simultaneously watches as his own marriage, career and health all crumble to varying degrees. A lot happens in the just under 500 pages of this novel, and Homes keeps the pages turning swiftly with a blunt writing style and a relentless flair for the absurd. While it’s set firmly in a recognizable present day, there’s a fog of unrealism that pervades “May We Be Forgiven.” Harold, for

the most part frustratingly passive, nevertheless repeatedly stumbles into bizarre sexual encounters and a series of vaguely threatening run-ins with strangers. This aura of random menace gives the book the feel of a (very adult) fairy tale, and like a fairy tale, it also has a finely tuned conscience: As he starts to accept more responsibility in the lives of George’s children, Harold begins to acquire a new sense of purpose and definition in a life that he previously drifted through.

Many readers will likely be shocked or put off by parts of “May We Be Forgiven.” The sex and violence that permeate the book at times feel gratuitous, but Homes wants more than to titillate: She’s turning a mirror on the tawdriness that comprises so much of our current events, and the reflection is not a pleasant one. It’s hard to call Harold the “hero” of this story, but by the book’s closing pages — for those who make it that far — he almost starts to feel like one.


NOTICE is hereby given to the following Alcorn County Registered Voters that your name has been put on the Inactive List due to an incorrect address. Inactive voters are allowed to vote in the upcoming election, but unless the voter record is updated prior to October 29, 2012, the voter will be required to vote an Affidavit Ballot. If the voter record is not corrected then you will be subject to being purged after the November 6, 2012 election. If you see your name please contact the Circuit Clerk’s Office between the hours of 8-5 Monday thru Friday at 662-286-7740. Please take into consideration that people will have the same name so to verify it is you, please look at the Voter Registration Number on your Voter Registration Card or contact the Circuit Clerk’s Office with your date of birth.

ID

Last Name

First Name

Middle Name

BENDER

ALISA

D

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SHELLY ALISA

JEANNETTE D

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BELINDA

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1903043 1904358

BRADLEY BENDER

ANGEL BELINDA

MARIE DIANE

1885944

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JOHN

DAN

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DUSTIN JOHN

DALE DAN

575031202

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RALPH UNA MAE

DEWEY

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BENJAMIN

RICKY

JOE

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BRADLEY BENJAMIN

REESE RICKY

DALTON JOE

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1888343 1909708

BRADLEY BENNETT

WILLIE MARIE

B M

1908001

BERGE

JOHN

ORRIN

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BRADY BERGE

REBECCA JOHN

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FAYE GAIL

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1905257 750003156

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CYNTHIA CLAUDIA

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1905230 1896703

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CHARLES GERALD

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ID

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1890255

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R

1897539

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B

1890253

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1900259

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775124451

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1890732

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1888548

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1907143

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1904143

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1902089

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1899937

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1890884

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1903385

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1904255

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1897819

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1882525

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Voter Query1887843 Report

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ID

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Page : 2

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1883640

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1891263

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1907622

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1907295

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1904881

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1906843

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1900986

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1883815

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775146499

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1908901

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1897180

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1903836

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1897934

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CHARLOTTE

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ANTHONY

1887948

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JEAN

MARIE

1898384

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1882558

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1882722

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1886402

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1898981

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SHAWN

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1899931

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1896840

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1899571

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1909579

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1884578

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1903571

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DEAN

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1901579 Voter Query Report

Middle Name

FRANK

ELMO

Statewide Management SystemPEARL 1893086 Election BOLLING

JANE

1882586

BOMAN

ROSE

MARY

1895977

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1896344

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CHARLES

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1906615

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1900980

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1890418

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1903651

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JOHN

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1900279

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1897584

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MERRICK 09/26/2012

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1908848

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1908404

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1888517

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1898104

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Date :

County: Alcorn

ID Page : 8

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1884576

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1888893

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1905294

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1885214

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1888335

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1885213

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1909570

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1899633

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775119601

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1898082

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1901613

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MICAH

1890259

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1886388

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1908403

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1886389

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1898234

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1904943

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1908171

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1898304

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1897068

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1907144

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1900144

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1886595

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1893131

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1904520

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1898543

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1885735

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1883187

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1898205

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1882739

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1904364

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1906932

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1906688

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1887971

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1904265

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1907148 County: Alcorn BEAN

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1890277

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1890428

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1906676

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1902343

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1902633

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1903529

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1894918

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1882587

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1886391

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1889642 Election BEATTY Statewide Management SystemMISTY

Voter Query Report Suffix III

HUTSON

1896093

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F : 09/26/2012 Date

County: Alcorn

EDWARD

Page : 9

1907393

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1885453

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1898732

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1902181

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Statewide Management SystemSEAN 1909157 Election BOYD

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Date : 09/26/2012

Page : 15

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Date : 09/26/2012 Voter Query Report Voter Query Report 1908398 BRACKSTONE GLADYS 1886582 • Sunday, BRADBERRY FRANCES WAISENETTA Daily Corinthian September 30, 2012 • 5B

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1895510 1886594

BUTLER BURBACH

JENEL ED

EVERETTE

1906143 1886594

CLARK BURBACH

CYNTHIA ED

1900799 1904520

BUTLER BURCHAM

LANNY AMANDA

G

1882660 1904520

CLARK BURCHAM

DALE AMANDA

G

1899067 1885735

BUTLER BURCHAM

MELANIE ARNOLD

A W

1890742 1885735

CLARK BURCHAM

FRED ARNOLD

JR W

1897838 1898205

BUTLER BURCHAM

PORTIA BRIAN

KEITH

1888152 1898205

CLARK BURCHAM

FRED BRIAN

L KEITH

1882545 1888518

BUTLER BURCHAM

REGINA CYNTHIA

DENISE KAY

1892196 1888518

CLARK BURCHAM

GRANT CYNTHIA

KAY

1883622 1899117

BUTLER BURCHAM

SUE CYNTHIA

R SUZANNE

1908953 1899117

CLARK BURCHAM

JANIE CYNTHIA

SUZANNE

575005434 1904364

BUTLER BURCHAM

TAMMY DIANA

LYNN JOY

1904364 1890192

BURCHAM CLARK

DIANA JEFFERY

1893116 1906688

BUTLER BURCHAM

TAMMY ELIZABETH

A

1883664 1887971

BUTLER BURCHAM

WALTER GLINDA

D FAYE

1888511 1904265

BUTLER BURCHAM

WILLIAM MILDRED

D SUE

1898023 1902633

BUTTERFIELD BURCHAM

ROHN RICK

1899319 1882587

BUXTON BURCHAM

GENEVA SHERRY

1882547 775040526

BYNUM BURCHAM

1882548

BEVERLY

JEAN

COX

BRIAN

EDWARD

1897578

COX

CARLA

BRADFORD

1902627

COX

JAMIE

1890918

COX

JANET

BURCHAM

1894617

COX

KELLY

MECHELL

1904316 1896119

BUE COX

FLORA LANNY

ELIOUSE

1896313 1904316

DAVIS BUE

VELMA FLORA

ELIOUSE

1897077 1886105

BUFFI COX

LOUISE LEETHA

HUTSON

1890767 1897077

DAVIS BUFFI

WILBURN LOUISE

LHUTSON

1893107 1898764

BUGGS COX

ADDIE LORI

LUE A

1892583 1893107

DAVIS-SMITH BUGGS

SUZANNE ADDIE

MICHELLE LUE

1896093 1890625

BUIE COX

DONALD RAYMOND

A

1884650 1896093

DAVISON BUIE

JAMES DONALD

MARSHALL

1883798 1900815

BULLARD COX

BARBARA TINA

LOUISE

1898288 1883798

DAWSON BULLARD

CHARLES BARBARA

R

1898992 1909693

BULLARD COX

EMALINGE TINA

FULTON LOUISE

1898841 1898992

DAWSON BULLARD

DEBORAH EMALINGE

1903217 1890627

BULLARD COX

PONY WILLIE

E

DAWSON BULLARD

PAULA PONY

1898620 500014744

BULLARD CRABB

REBECCA AMBER

DIANNE LEIGH

1899182 1898620

DAWSON BULLARD

ROGER REBECCA

DALE DIANNE

1897602 1903271

BULLOCK CRABB

DERORAH SHELIA

KAY

1898716 1897602

DAY BULLOCK

SHERRY DERORAH

LYNN KAY

1900789 1890628

BUMPAS CRABTREE

JUSTIN SARAH

L JEAN

500003465 1900789

DEAN BUMPAS

AMBERT JUSTIN

LEIGH L

DELLA A

1903412 1907448

DEARMAN BUMPAS

REBECCA SHERRI

JEAN DELLA

M

1882891 1889764

DEARMAN BUMPAS

TONY STEVE

EVERETT Page : 32

ID

Middle Name

MATTHEW FLORA

COX

1897048

Voter Query Report

LEE

CHRISTIAN BUE

Voter Query 1897077 Report 1885603 Suffix

Last Name

1906636

County: Alcorn

Date : 09/26/2012

HELEN

CONTINUED FROM 5B

575153269

1883295 1903217 Election BUTCHER BULLARD PONY Statewide Management SystemDOMINIC

CHILDS

County: Alcorn

HUPP

Page : 21

ID

1907448 1896827

Last Name

Last Name BUMPAS CRAIG

First Name

First Name SHERRI KRISTI

1889764 Election CRAIG BUMPAS STEVE Statewide Management SystemMCCULSKY 775111076

County: Alcorn Voter Query Report

Voter Query Report

Date : 09/26/2012

ID

Last Name

First Name

Middle Name

1904115

DAVIS

TERESA

L

1889299

DAVIS

VAUDI

Middle Name

Suffix

HUPP

ID

Voter Query Report 1897425 1903217

Middle Name

Suffix

Last Name

First Name

Middle Name

KAY FULTON

Date : 09/26/2012

BUMPAS CRANE

VERA GREG

M

1882700 1890092

DEATON BUMPAS

HERBERT VERA

KENNIS M

1899494 1892756

BUNCH CRANE

CHARISTOPHER REGENIA

DOUGLAS

1885245 1899494

DEATON BUNCH

HERBERT CHARISTOPHER

KENNIS DOUGLAS

1908478 1895673

BUNTING CRANFORD

PEGGY MARGARET

JUNE

1899078 1908478

DEBERRY BUNTING

JUDY PEGGY

R JUNE

1886595 575114774

BURBACH CRAVENS

CYNTHIA JESSICA

D

1906593 1886595

DECROOT BURBACH

PAMELA CYNTHIA

PD

1886594 1886945

BURBACH CRAWFORD

ED PATTI

DENISE

1890932 1886594

DEES BURBACH

BELINDA ED

ANN

1904520 1905733

BURCHAM CRAWFORD

AMANDA PHILIP

G CAREY

1893303 1904520

DEES BURCHAM

JOHNNY AMANDA

RAY G

1885735 1892748

BURCHAM CRAYTON

ARNOLD KAREN

W M

1906432 1885735

DEES BURCHAM

ORATOR ARNOLD

JW

1898205 1890193

BURCHAM CREDDILLE

BRIAN DARLENE

1890769 1898205

DEES BURCHAM

STELLA BRIAN

MAE KEITH

1907233

BURCHAM CREDILLE

CYNTHIA BILLY

KAY RAY

1898101 1888518

DEETER BURCHAM

GARY CYNTHIA

GENE KAY

1899117 1899103

BURCHAM CREDILLE

CYNTHIA TINA

SUZANNE G

1898739 1899117

DEGROOT BURCHAM

NANETTE CYNTHIA

MARIE SUZANNE

1904364 1892744

BURCHAM CREEL

DIANA LAURIE

JOY R

1897273 1904364

DEGROOT BURCHAM

SCOTT DIANA

HENRY JOY

1906688 1892745

BURCHAM CREEL

ELIZABETH STEVEN

A WADE

1906401 1906688

DEITRICH BURCHAM

JOHN ELIZABETH

GARRETT A

JOY LEE

Statewide Management System 1906688 Election BURCHAM ELIZABETH

1887971 1898316

BURCHAM CREELY

GLINDA ROBERT

FAYE JOSEPH

1893292 1887971

DELLINGER BURCHAM

JULIA GLINDA

LYNN FAYE

1901487

CLARK

JERRY

AL

1904265 1897455

BURCHAM CREGEEN

MILDRED LISA

SUE

1896060 1904265

DELLINGER BURCHAM

LORIE MILDRED

LSUE

1887971 1883685

BURCHAM CLARK

GLINDA JOHNNIE

FAYE O'NEAL

ROBINSON

1902633 1888136

BURCHAM CRENSHAW

RICK EULA

R

1901745 1902633

DEMING BURCHAM

KRISTI RICK

LYNN

1904265 1903524

BURCHAM CLARK

MILDRED JOHNNIE

SUE O'NEAL

II

J

1882587 1888425

BURCHAM CRENSHAW

SHERRY ROSHANADA

L

1882587 1909657

1902633 1907497

BURCHAM CLARK

RICK KAY

H

DIANE

775040526 1883724

BURCHAM CRENSHAW

TAMMY VANESSA

D ANN

1882587 1904753

BURCHAM CLARK

SHERRY LAMAR

MARY TAMMY

JEWELL D

1898225

CRENSHAW

VIOLET

LORETTA

775040526 1883708

BURCHAM CLARK

TAMMY LINDA

BYNUM

WILLIAM

J

1882591

BYRD

BRENDA

GAIL

1897230

BYRD

JEFFREY

C

1894551

BYRD

SANDRA

LYNN

1909177

CABALLERO

KAY

H

County: Alcorn 1893117 Election BYRD Statewide Management SystemBERTHA

ID

Last Name

First Name

1898597 Election CACKOWSKI Statewide Management SystemNANCY

Y

GUSSIE

LEE

1886347

CAGER

PATRICK

ONAISSIS

575153273

CAGER

TODD

LAMAR

1904919

CAGER

WILLIE

1895515

CAHOON

FRANCES

MARIE

1901584

CAIN

CORA

I

1886114

CAIN

DON

MICHAEL

1898897

CAIN

JAMES

RUSSELL

1896216

CAIN

MARY

J

1887984

CALDWELL

DOYLE

GENE

1896121

CALDWELL

JAMES

DARRELL

1898184

CALDWELL

JONATHAN

1896272

CALLAHAN

EVA

1900509

CALLAHAN

SHAWN

ROCKY

1903238

CALVARY

VICTOR

S

1887096

CALVERT

AMANDA

1896095

CALVERY

BESSIE

1898018

CALVERY

BRIAN

HEATH

1902609

CALVERY

MELISSA

HUMPHREY

1900473

CAMERON

JESSE

PRESTON

1907369

CAMPBELL

ANNTISHA

SHANTA

1886126

CAMPBELL

CHARLOTTE

ANN

1896200

CAMPBELL

COLIN

A

575008931

CAMPBELL

JAMIE

MARIE

1902366

CAMPBELL

JENNIFER

L

1890209

CAMPBELL

JOHN

W

1897051

CAMPBELL

ROBERT

A

1896883

Last Name CAMPBELL

First Name RUSSELL

Statewide Management SystemSHIRLEY 1889630 Election CAMPBELL

WILLIAM

FRASER

1908921

CANCILLA

CHRISTOPHER

EDWARD

1901875

CANNON

TITUS

R

1898750

CANTU

MICHAEL

JUAN

1892737

CARDWELL

EDWIN

ROYCE

1884808

CARLISLE

AGNES

M

1883711

CARLISLE

DAVID

R

1883712

CARLISLE

JOAN

H

1899679

CARLTON

JAYSON

LEE

1905730

CARLTON

RONALD

JOE

1908373

CARLYLE

JAMES

S

1896109

CARMACK

JAMES

A

1906379

CARMICHIEL

LYNN

KEITH

1903674

CARPENTER

MARY

1898183

CARPENTER

NORRIS

1902568

CARPER

MYRANDA

B

1886951

CARRINGTON

REGINA

G

1897980

CARRINGTON

STEPHEN

K

1898994

CARROLL

NORA

M

1903522

CARSON

CARRIE

R

1882641

CARSON

DONALD

RAY

1882643

CARSON

PAMELA

KAY

1896124

CARTER

AUDREY

1891257

CARTER

BERNICE

1885597

CARTER

BILLY

1882670

CARTER

BROOKS

CHARLES

Statewide Management SystemDERONDA 1898382 Election CARTER 1882605

CARTER

DOCK

1891901

CARTER

JENNIE

1885228

CARTER

1905264

CLARK

TANECIA

1909128

CLARY

JAMES

1909697

CLARY

SANDRA

1897883

CLAUNCH

SHARON

1899563

CLAUSEL

1901970

Suffix

CROOK

ROSLYN

SUZETTE

1882669

CLEMENT

KENNETH

WAYNE

1884789

CROSS

VIRGINIA

1886754

CLEMENT

LEE

CHESLEY

1892439

CLEMMER

DESIREE

1896370

CLEVELAND

TERRY

1892108

CLIFTON

LOU

1907493

CLINERD

1890220

DEVUSSE

KEVIN

VAN

C

1882647

CROW

EDITH

BARNES

1896211

DEVUSSE

PATRICIA

LYNNA

ANN

1906708

CROWE

KELLY

D

1885235

DEWALT

GREGORY

LEE

RANDALL

A

6084423

CRUM

AUDREY

1902203

DEWBERRY

KELLEY

MARIE

CLITES

JAMES

ALLEN

1907314

CRUM

CHARLES

J

1901529

DEWBERRY

RITCHIE

EDWARD

1890219

CLITES

TERESA

DIANE

1906452

CRUM

DORIS

A

1903153

DEWITT

AMANDA

1890795

COBBLE

OTIS

J

1908331

CRUM

EARLIE

BEATRICE

1909496

DIAZBARRIGA

CARLOS

1906996

COBURN

KEN

1893104

CRUM

ELVA

L

1882680

DICKERSON

LENA

LVELLA

1898587

COBURN

LISA

P

CRUM

FUTURE

1883754

DICKERSON

TERESA

ANN

775079467

COCHRAN

SHANNAN

D

1908052

CRUM

GARY

L

1902958

DICKSON

JAMES

STEWARD

1896896

COCHRAN

TIM

J

1895693

CRUM

HARM

P

1888624

DICUS

MARIE

1897120

COCKMAN

JEFFREY

R

1892079

CRUM

J

C

1892300

DILDY

BENNIE

RAY

1892282

DILDY

GENEVA

D

1899277

DILDY

MICHEAL

EUGENE

1888446

DILDY

SHIRLEY

Y

1892443

DILDY

TONY

DELAIN

Last Name COFFEY

First Name JOAN

1895866

CRUM

JILES

J

1907411

CRUM

LEANN

R

1897624

CRUM

LYNN

APRI

1900616

COFIELD

HEATHER

MARIE

1908935

COGGIN

LARRY

WAYNE

575018655

COKER

ARLENE

1898745

COLE

ANGELA

1904861

COLE

FRANK

COLE

JAMES

1896895

COLE

SHIRLEY

1902225

COLE

VICKIE

1909596

COLELLA

FAYE

1906066

COLEMAN

1902731

COLEMAN

1890609

MARY

D

1892207

CRUM

MICHAEL

ANTHONY

1896053

DILLINGHAM

ERBY

LAMAR

1892086

CRUM

MOLLIE

MARIBELLE

1889293

DILLINGHAM

JOHN

J

1890218

CRUM

OLA

BLANCH

1899576

DILLINGHAM

LOUISE

1892491

CRUM

QUEENA

SUE

1892633

DILLON

KRISTI

1890216

CRUM

TABITA

JEAN

1882894

DILLON

VIRGINIA

POWERS

1906049

CRUM

TERRA

LEEANNE

1896905

DILWORTH

ANNETTE

AUDREY

CLYDE

1889667

CRUMP

ARMINTHA

K

BARBARA

JEAN

1888261

CULLEN

JOHN

GRANT

COLEMAN

CHRISTOPHER

GERALD

1888306

CULLEN

MELISSA

CAROL

1896166

COLEMAN

DAVID

L

1902169

CULP

MICHAEL

LYNN

1897468

COLEMAN

DERRICK

D

1902659

COLEMAN

JENNIFER

LEN

1889649

COLEMAN

MILDRED

ANN

1903555

CUMMINGS

1895090

COLEMAN

NORMA

K

1892742

1895525

COLEMAN

ROBERT

KEVIN

1896368

1889671

COLEMAN

SHIRLEY

MARIE

1899718

COLEMAN

TERA

1899048

COLLIER

1905461

MARIE

R : 09/26/2012 Date REHNEA

FREDERICK GRACIE

MAE

1907198

DILWORTH

J

D

775181243

DILWORTH

JAMES

EDWARD

PATRICK

1888604

DILWORTH

JAMES

N

L

1893281

DILWORTH

KATHERINE

W

DESSA

C

1888454

DILWORTH

M

C

CUMMINGS

JAMES

M

1897174

DILWORTH

MICHAEL

J

CUMMINGS

JAMES

RAY

1904289

DILWORTH

SULA

P

1895254

CUMMINGS

KENNETH

L

1901131

DILWORTH

TARANDAL

ANTWONE

LEE

1897631

CUMMINGS

KIMBERLY

DAWN

1904508

DILWORTH

TRENT

LALRICE

DAPHNE

LEIGH

1888142

CUMMINGS

MARGARET

KATHY

1888623

DIRTH

TARA

ANN

COLLIER

MARILYN

SUE

1897128

CUMMINGS

MEKKA

L

1895335

DITTMER

CHARLES

RAY

1891667

COLLINS

BRITTANY

ANN

1902125

CUMMINGS

PHILLIP

1898776

DIXON

BILLIE

D

1896537

COLLINS

ELIZABETH

ANNE

1889669

CUMMINGS

RUBEN

E

1903171

DIXON

ESSIE

M

1894343

COLLINS

ETHLEEN

R

1900180

CUNNINGHAM

DIANN

CASSIE

1897420

DIXON

JOAN

M

1900225

CUPPLES

MARY

L

1909500

DIXON

KAREN

DENISE

1890642

CURLEE

GEORGIA

MAE

1889278

DIXON

KEVIN

PAUL

1905371

DIXON

NORMA

H

1885624

DIXON

THOMAS

RAY

1885613

DIXON

WILLIAM

COLLINS

LOUISE

1904751

COLLINS

MICHAEL

LEE

1890190

COLLINS

ROGER

DALLAS DAVIS

COLN

LEXIE

P

1904283

CURRY

HEIDI

S

1905022

COLSTON

KRISTIE

LYNN

1897664

CURRY

ROY

LUTHER

1882649

COLTER

DALE

KEITH

1882635

CURRY

SIDNEY

A

1882645

COLTER

JANET

WALTERS

1907902

CURTIS

DAN

1899570

COMAX

JAMES

1906505

CURTIS

JACQUELINE

1904166

COMBS

ALLEN

EDWARD

1892741

CURTIS

1897829

COMER

DIXIE

DIXON

775016678

CURTIS

775255732

COMER

KAYLA

LOGAN

1888420

RICHARD Date : 09/26/2012

JR JEFFREY

DENISE

1889003

CARTER

MARY

A

1902386

COOK

AMANDA

DENISE

1887989

CARTER

MARY

JOANNE

1898277

COOK

CAROL

N

1886935

CARTER

ROGER

DALE

1901572

COOK

HARRISON

L

1885598

CARTER

TILL

1885314

COOK

KARA

L

1900061

CARTWRIGHT

DEBORAH

D

1898278

COOK

LESLIE

D

1889637

CARVER

LUCY

MAY

1899417

COOK

MICHELLE

ERVIN

1892184

CASE

VERA

SUE

1909288

COOK

MICHELLE

HEIDIE

1894596

CASEY

JEMMARAH

SIRMAIL

1909130

COOK

R

CONNIE

1894891

CASH

LINDA

MAE

575149254

CASH

PATRICK

KEITH

1886939

CASSIDY

FRANCES

W

1886938

CASSIDY

SAMANTHA

O

1899455

CASSIDY

VALERIE

1890802

CASSON

HELEN

DORIS

1905467

CASTILE

KENNETH

L

1883732

CASTILE

KENNETH

S

1906144

CATCH

JEROME

ALEXANDER

1898856

CATRINA

DENISE

SPEARS

1897112

CERESKA

FRANK

A

County: Alcorn

ID

1908053

R

1888424

CHAPMAN

SANDRA

L

575038208

CHAPPELL

JESSICA

BRYNN

1887961

CHARLES

RICHARD

AMON

1897945

CHASTAIN

BETTY

GAIL

1895462

CHASTAIN

SHAWN

CHRISTOPHER

1886131

CHAVERF

ALFREDO

1905858

CHAVERF

SUZANN

M

1887988

CHELETTE

JEFFERY

DENNIS

1903237

CHERONES

PATRICIA

1900582

CHERRY

WILLIAM

S

1900525

CHIEPPO

JOSEPH

THOMAS

1885601

CHILDER

VICKY

LYNN

1899946

CHILDERS

AMY

C

1882637

CHILDERS

HAZEL

1905454

CHILDERS

LANNIE

MELVIN

1886941

CHILDS

BETTY

MARIE

1897496

CHILDS

FRED

W

1897974

CHILDS

J

DODD

DEBORAH

KERRIN

L

1885254

DODD

THOMAS

SHARON

NATASHA

1886964

DODDS

LINDA

CUTCHENS

MICHAEL

E

1890399

DODSON

JONATHAN

1892753

CYPHER

CAREY

DODSON

LARRY

1907496

CYPHER

KATHERINEE

1883910

DODSON

NADINE

FERN

1898516

DABBS

TAISIR

A

1892286

DOGGETT

MADELEINE

L

1897226

DALRYMPHLE

DANIEL

T

1896285

DOLES

CONNIE

E

1907150

DONALD

JOHN

CARRA

B

1908547

DONALDSON

RICKIE

DALTON

First Name

Suffix

ANGELA

W

DON

Page : 35

CLIFFORD

Z

1899717

DOTSON

ANDRE

L

1906474

DALTON

DONALD

LEE

1908159

DOTSON

JIMMY

R

1892763

DALTON

HENRY

CONN

1896058

DOUGAN

BLENDA

SUE

1888432

DALTON

MARGARET

NELLE

1902112

DOUGLAS

RAY

1888625

DALTON

ORPHA

G

1889853

DOWNING

AMANDA

JANE

1888434

DALTON

SOLOMON

ALONZO

1909778

DOWNING

CRAIG

L

1896274

DAMPOUX

SARAH

LYLE

1889264

DOWNS

CLINTON

1889276

DAMRON

BILLY

1886368

DOWNS

DANNY

RAY

1902200

DAMRON

CHARLES

ALAN

1906148

DOWNS

JACKIE

RAY

1902201

DAMRON

SARAH

BARTON

1893298

DOWNS

LARRY

HOUSTON

1900539

DAMRON

VERNITRA

ALLEN

1889287

DOWNS

LUCILLE

J

1906623

DANCOE

ROBERT

JOHN

1887118

DOWNS

MELINDA

GAIL

1907013

DANGERFIELD

DARREN

1882888

DOYLE

MICHAEL

C

775266957

DARRELL

JUSTIN

H

1900367

DOYON

GEORGE

ARMANO

1903515

DAUGHERTY

ADRIENE

MOLAND

1900825

DRAKE

DONALD

TRENNACE

County: Alcorn

Page : 30

ID

Last Name

First Name

G

BRYAN

1890760

DAVENPORT

HELEN

MEEKS

1886123

COOLEY

BARRY

BERNARD

1902441

DAVID

PAUL

A

1886122

COOLEY

SHERRY

LYNN

1906431

DAVIDSON

NELLIE

MAE

1882698

DREWERY

DALE

1909066

COOPER

DELLA

L

1900564

DAVIDSON

SCOTT

CHRISTOPHER

1896064

DREWERY

HAROLD

1901746

DRAKE

PATRICIA

Statewide Management SystemTERESA 1896571 Election DREW

MICHELLE LAVON

DOROTHY

1891299

DAVIS

APRIL

LEEANDRA

1889258

DREWRY

MARY

H

COOPER

REBA

INEZ

1896280

DAVIS

BERTHA

L

1904290

DRIVER

ANGELA

LYNN

1898296

COPELAND

ANGELO

T

1893294

DAVIS

BETTY

JANE

1886975

DRIVER

RUBY

1890618

COPELAND

CATHY

MARIE

1893306

DAVIS

BILL

H

1895804

DROKE

JEFFREY

1896147

COPELAND

STACY

BERTRUM

1886297

DAVIS

BOBBY

D

DRONET

LISA

1889089

COPEN

MOLLY

1893969

DAVIS

BRENDA

K

1909564

DUBE

ROBERT

DONAT

1904164

CORBITT

TALANA

R

1889281

DAVIS

C

DUCKWORTH

ALISON

E

CORBURN

JAMES

BARY

Middle Name

575201336

1883699

First Name

1902231

DAVIS

CARL

JAMES

1902444

DUCKWORTH

ANTHONY

M

1903540

CORDELL

TERRY

ALTON

1896035

DAVIS

CHRISTIPHER

SHANE

1885623

DUCKWORTH

JIMMY

DWAYNE

1898792

CORLEW

TERESA

DIX

1885614

DUCKWORTH

JOHN

DAVID

775025630

CORLEY

CHRISTOPHER

JASON

1882696

DAVIS

ELIZABETH

LOUISE

775036106

DUCKWORTH

KARON

BYRD

6070331

CORNELIOUS

LINDA

J

1904285

DAVIS

ESSIE

L

1905742

DUDLEY

BRENDA

GAIL

1890812

CORNELIUS

CONNIE

SUE

1890764

DAVIS

GEORGIA

DEAN

1899994

DUFF

DAPHNE

LOUISE

1900880

CORNELIUS

DEWAYNE

MARCUS

1882677

DAVIS

GLENDA

1888620

DUKE

KATHERYN

H

1896115

CORNELIUS

EMMA

JEAN

1904964

DAVIS

GREGORY

WAYNE

1888619

DUKE

KENNETH

SPENCER

1896503

CORNELIUS

JAMES

WADE

1902777

DAVIS

JAMES

H

575214142

DUKE

TRESSA

ANN

1900557

CORNELIUS

NICOLE

TRACY

1900534

DAVIS

JENIA

H

1909796

DUMAS

CARLINE

M

1886780

CORNELIUS

PAUL

T

1907846

DAVIS

JERRY

1896909

DUMMITT

PAMELA

CHERYL

1889260

CORNELIUS

REBECCA

A

1900122

DAVIS

JIMMY

C

575006810

DUNBAR

DOLLY

A

1905464

CORNELIUS

RONALD

TERRY

JR

1902296

DAVIS

JIMMY

L

1905269

DUNCAN

DOROTHY

G

1902091

CORNELIUS

TRENA

MICHELL

Suffix

1883741

DAVIS

JOHN

RUSHING

1905968

DUNCAN

IRLUE

J

1897281

CORNWELL

ELISE

H

775009745

DAVIS

KALA

MAYANNE

1907395

DUNCAN

JENNIFER

LYNN

1900253

COSTELLO

CHARLES

L

1900157

DAVIS

L

ANDREA

1908513

DUNCAN

JIMMY

MAE

1899352

DAVIS

LARRY

1900753

DUNCAN

JUANITA

S

1890921

DAVIS

LOUIS

RUSSELL

1889265

DUNCAN

LOYD

G

1899084

DUNCAN

MELISSA

MARIE

First Name

Page : 25

ID

Last Name

Voter Query Report 1889818 Suffix

Statewide Management SystemELBERT 1904903 Election DAVIS

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

ODIS: 09/26/2012 Date

County: Alcorn

Page : 31

ID

Last Name

First Name

GREEN DANIEL

Date : 09/26/2012

COTRELL

ELIZABETH

1898798

COUGHLIN

DEBORAH

L

1897404

DAVIS

LYNDA

KAYE

1903400

COUNCE

JASON

CHRISTOPHER

1882892

DAVIS

MADELINE

KAY

1887987

COUNCE

KENNETH

EARL

1888148

DAVIS

MATTHEW

PARKER

1888627

DUNCAN

NELLIE

1892202

COUNCE

LOIS

M

1882691

DAVIS

MELISSA

LYNN

1903120

DUNCAN

OPAL

FAYE

1887986

COUNCE

SONYA

1882893

DAVIS

MERRITT

L

1902110

DUNN

ELIZABETH

TAYLOR

1894150

COUNTS

GERTRUDE

1886958

DAVIS

PAMELA

MARIE

1896288

DUNN

LEON

1901663

COURTNEY

JENNIFER

MARIE

1897467

DAVIS

PHILAPHIA

D

1904506

DUNN

STACIE

1888741

COWIN

AMANDA

KAY

1907398

DAVIS

RENDA

M

1899666

DUNPHY

MAUREEN

1905715

DAVIS

RUTH

DIANE

DURANT

SUZANNE

1899764

DAVIS

SHIRLEY

A

1882900

DURDEN

JOHN

ALLEN

1896067

DAVIS

STEVE

C

1886369

DURHAM

FRANKIE

PEARL

1882889

DAVIS

TAMMY

RENELL

1901277

DURR

DARNELL

D

1896130

DUVALL

BRAD

1897442

DWIGHT

EDWARD

ALLEN

1900486

DYER

FRITZ

JAMAAL

1895280

COX

ALLISON

M

1886937

COX

ANDREW

JOSEPH

1906636

COX

BEVERLY

JEAN

County: Alcorn

Page : 26

1903022

CHOATE

CAROL

MICHELLE

1897048

COX

BRIAN

EDWARD

575038445

CHOATS

JERRY

LEE

1897578

COX

CARLA

BRADFORD

1892262

CHRISTAIN

SONYA

M

1902627

COX

JAMIE

GLEN

1903754

CHRISTIAN

ARCHER

ANSER

1890918

COX

JANET

BURCHAM

1892263

CHRISTIAN

DAMON

1894617

COX

KELLY

MECHELL

1902003

CHRISTIAN

MATTHEW

DANIEL

1896119

COX

LANNY

1885603

CHRISTON

EMMIUEL

LEE

1886105

COX

LEETHA

1892727

CHRISTOPHER

MARTHA

W

1898764

COX

LORI

A

1903028

CHRISTOPHERSON MELANIE

KAY

1890625

COX

RAYMOND

A

ID

1904115

Last Name DAVIS

First Name TERESA

Voter Query Report 1892872 SMITH

Middle Name

Statewide Management SystemVAUDI 1889299 Election DAVIS

Voter Query Report

Statewide Management SystemNANCY 1885538 Election DUNCAN

GIBBS

L

Page : 36

Middle Name

1887970

S : 09/26/2012 Date

Suffix

LEIGH ELIZABETH

Date : 09/26/2012 G

1896313

DAVIS

VELMA

1890767

DAVIS

WILBURN

L

1900955

DYER

KENYOR

A

1892583

DAVIS-SMITH

SUZANNE

MICHELLE

1889270

DYKES

LULA

IRENE

1884650

DAVISON

JAMES

MARSHALL

1902109

EADS

CHRISTI

ANN

1898288

DAWSON

CHARLES

R

1906302

EAGAR

MARK

A

1898841

DAWSON

DEBORAH

KAY

1902815

EAGAR

TINA

M

CONTINUED ON 7B

Suffix

EVE

COOPER

County: Alcorn

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

1896106

Last Name

A : 09/26/2012 Date

RUTH

DALTON

WAYNE Date : 09/26/2012 JR

Suffix

Date : 09/26/2012

1896298

Voter Query Report

H

Middle Name

COOKE

Voter Query Report

JR

1906081

1909644

Statewide Management SystemCHARLOTTE 1890813 Election COTNER

Suffix

R

L

VELMA

County: Alcorn

Middle Name

M

Last Name

Voter Query Report

G

CHARLES

Voter Query Report 1909777

JR

M

DOCKERY

COOK

ID

LUCILLE

RAYMOND

ANGELA

Statewide Management SystemBARBARA 1889288 Election DOBBINS

Page : 34

Middle Name

1883916

Statewide Management SystemBONNIE 1896452 Election DALTON

Suffix

DOBBINS

First Name

JAMES

1883922

Middle Name

1908782

Last Name

1899355

1908956 Voter Query Report

E

Statewide Management SystemBOBBY 1903397 Election CHIPMAN

COOK

First Name

FERRELL

ID

DOBBINS

ID

Statewide Management SystemTED 1907390 Election COOK

RAYBURN

B

Last Name

Page : 24

Page : 29

R

1889294

County: Alcorn

JOYCE

SAMANTHA

SHIRLEY

NELL

1902648

CONWILL

CHAPMAN

VINCENT

DOROTHY

W

1901161

CHANNON

JEROME

CURRY

GERALD

LEWIS

1908827

CURLEE

1905572

CURRY

MARVIN

1886116

1900206

1892755

CARTER

LEWIS

JR

County: Alcorn

ANNIE

1904165

CHILDS

Suffix

Suffix

Date : 09/26/2012

CORINA

MARIE

STEPHEN

WILLIAM

Middle Name

COLMAN

W

RONALD

CULVER

First Name

1898087

ALEXANDRA

1896875

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

WALLACE

CHANEY

Last Name

Statewide Management SystemDEBORAH 1899794 Election CUMMINGS

First Name

CONWILL

1904896

ID

1899506

Last Name

CONWAY

First Name

JR

ID

500014271

DALE

O

Date : 09/26/2012

DILWORTH

Page : 23

Suffix

ANN

DILWORTH

1890227

O

Voter Query Report 1907083

Voter Query Report

MARIE

1904288

O'NEAL

Last Name

County: Alcorn

1886294 Election DILL Statewide Management SystemANGELA

Page : 33

Middle Name

MADENA

MANCIEL

LARRY

First Name

CRUM

LLOYD

JONATHAN

Last Name

CRUM

CARTER

CHANDLER

ID

1909357

CARTER

CHANDLER

Page : 28

1883691

1905344

1886208

County: Alcorn

BRUCE

1890829

ID

Suffix

Date : 09/26/2012

ELLEN

WILLIAM

County: Alcorn

Voter Query1892257 Report

Middle Name

LESTER

1901776

BOWEN

1896210

CONRAD

ELIZABETH

Suffix

JANE

CLARK

1901848

CHANDLER

Middle Name

Page : 20

A

CAROLE

J

1890599

Voter Query Report 1899109

Suffix

Date : 09/26/2012

CROW

KRISTA

NANETTE

Page : 20

1898312

CARTER

GENE

PAUL

1887993

H

DOLORES

MATTHEW

D

CORINE

DANIEL

DEVOOGHT

TAMMY

CLARENCE

CHANCELLOR

575093235

CLAYTON

CONDRA

CHANCELLOR

JEAN

DIANE

1895996

1903793

575005336

LEONA

MICHAEL

E

1898102

DEVOOGHT

JAMES

WAYNE

FLORINE

JOHNS

575093229

CROOK

CONARD

CHALMERS

SUSAN

1887992

775086694

1906681

DEVAUGHN

WILLIE

WILLIAM

SUE

MARIE

1885242

A

CONRAD

SARAH

HELEN

CLAY

1904862

CERESKA

DERRYBERRY

JANE

L

1897374

BURKLEY

1886959

SARA

JOHN

Statewide Management SystemMARILYN 1896570 Election CHALK

CHARLES

CRONIN

VICKIE

L

DERRYBERRY

1902148

JOHN

NANCY

1897557

DAWN

CONNER

CERESKA

JENNIFER

VALERIE

1890788

1897113

DERRICK

G

CONARD

Suffix

D

CLEO

LOUIS

ROBINSON

COLEMAN

DERRICK

JAMES

1902324

Middle Name

Statewide Management SystemTHOMAS 1905896 Election DENNEY

Voter Query Report

D

1892276

CRONE

L

First Name

JIMMY

LYNN

1890743

JIMMIE

Last Name

DENNEDY

SHAWN

FRANCIS

CONLEY

ID

1909722

II

JOYCE

STACIE

PATRICK

1905567

County: Alcorn

Statewide Management SystemLESLIE 775040526Election DENISON BURCHAM TAMMY 1906601

HUPP

II

Middle Name

DEPRIEST

ANDREW

1909197 Election CROUCH Statewide Management SystemAMIE

SHERRY E

DENNISON

CROKER

First Name

First Name

775038295

1896742

Last Name

BURCHAM DEMPSY

775016693

E

ID

Last Name

M

SARAH

Page : 22

ID

PATRICIA

ERNESTINE

County: Alcorn

Page : 27

DENNIS

CROKE

E

ROBINSON

1882692

CRISWELL

Voter Query Report Suffix

V : 09/26/2012 Date LATOYA Page : 20

County: Alcorn

OTIS

1896738

1894543 Election COLLINS Statewide Management SystemRUFUS

Middle Name

Statewide Management SystemWILLIAM 1898224 Election CRENSHAW

1890634

1890612

DON

DSUE

DENNIS

County: Alcorn

E

Suffix

CRISWELL

1886790 Voter Query Report

JEAN

CAMPBELL

CARTER

1894079

Middle Name

KEITH 09/26/2012 ANN Date :

1890633

ID

T

1892730

750008633

LOLA

County: Alcorn

Middle Name

R

First Name

CLARK

Statewide Management SystemLYNDELL 1882665 Election COFFEY

TOMMY

Last Name

First Name

775119781

1882664

CAMPBELL

ID

Suffix

P

1905857

County: Alcorn

Last Name

Voter QueryStatewide ReportElection Management System

G

CAGE

ID

ROBINSON

Middle Name

1900604

County: Alcorn

ID

Voter Query1888518 Report

GATES

Suffix

S E

1890092 1903541

County: Alcorn

Suffix

GLEN: 09/26/2012 Date

Page : 37

Suffix


1904506

DUNN

STACIE

LEIGH

1899666

DUNPHY

MAUREEN

ELIZABETH

1908799

1892872

DURANT

SUZANNE

G

1907605

FISHER

FRED

1882900

DURDEN

JOHN

ALLEN

1901641

FISK

GABRIELLA

1886369

DURHAM

FRANKIE

PEARL

FITSCHEN

DAVID

1901277

DURR

DARNELL

County: Alcorn

County: Alcorn

Voter Query Report 1906016

FISCHBACH

CONTINUED FROM 6B D

PARTICK

JAMES D L

LINDA

1896079

FITZGEARLD

TIMOTHY

DUANE

PHYLLIS

H

BRAD

First Name

Middle Name

DWIGHT

EDWARD

ALLEN

1901909

FITZSIMMONS

1900486 1904316

DYER BUE

FRITZ FLORA

JAMAAL ELIOUSE

1896081 1904316

FIVEASH BUE

BONNIE FLORA

FAY ELIOUSE

1900955 1897077

DYER BUFFI

KENYOR LOUISE

A HUTSON

1906415 1897077

FLAKE BUFFI

BILLY LOUISE

LLOYD HUTSON

1889270 1893107

DYKES BUGGS

LULA ADDIE

IRENE LUE

1890408 1893107

FLANAGAN BUGGS

ALFRED ADDIE

W LUE

1902109 1896093

EADS BUIE

CHRISTI DONALD

ANN

1906302 1883798

EAGAR BULLARD

MARK BARBARA

A

1902815 1898992

EAGAR BULLARD

TINA EMALINGE

M FULTON

1891268 1903217

EANNARINO BULLARD

DIANE PONY

1901948 1898620

EARNEST BULLARD

D REBECCA

1908743 1897602

EARNEST BULLOCK

1906705 1900789

EASTMAN BUMPAS

County: Alcorn Last Name ID

ID

1896981 1896093

Last Name FLANAGAN BUIE

First Name

First Name ALICE DONALD

FLANAGAN BULLARD

LILLIE EMALINGE

K FULTON

SIMS E

1892912 1903217

FLANAGAN BULLARD

MANDY PONY

ANNETTE E

JOHNNY DIANNE

1898168 1898620

FLANAGAN BULLARD

TOMMY REBECCA

DIANNE

JOHNNY DERORAH

DEWAYNE KAY

1890376 1897602

FLANAGAN BULLOCK

WILEY DERORAH

HADEN KAY

CONWAY JUSTIN

JAY L

1888815 1900789

FLANNIGAN BUMPAS

EJUSTIN

TL

1887301 1907448

FLATT BUMPAS

FRANKLIN SHERRI

D DELLA

FLATT BUMPAS

SAMMY STEVE

EATON BUMPAS

A SHERRI

MICHAEL DELLA

1890935 1889764

EATON BUMPAS

CLAUD STEVE

W

1897719 1890092

EATON BUMPAS

DONNA VERA

LOUISE M

1896159 1890092

FLAX BUMPAS

LEN VERA

M

1898780 1899494

FLAX BUNCH

VERLINDA CHARISTOPHER

K DOUGLAS

1898240 1899494

EATON BUNCH

JACK CHARISTOPHER

DOUGLAS

1897723 1908478

EATON BUNTING

LYNN PEGGY

MICHELLE JUNE

ID

1890936 1886595

Last Name EATON BURBACH

First Name ROBERT CYNTHIA

Middle Name

Suffix

D

Statewide Management SystemTELESICA 1904381 1886594 Election EATON BURBACH ED

1897582 1908478

FLEMING BUNTING

BRIAN PEGGY

HALLMAN JUNE

1898323 1886595

FLEMING BURBACH

SANDY CYNTHIA

LD

2128697 1886594

FLEMMING BURBACH

RALPH ED

H

TIMOTHY AMANDA

JOE G

1887156 1904520

FLETCHER BURCHAM

JANA AMANDA

WORKMAN G

1902087 1885735

EATON BURCHAM

ZACHARY ARNOLD

D W

1907405 1885735

FLEX BURCHAM

EARNEST ARNOLD

W

1899654 1898205

FLIPPINS BURCHAM

PARISCIA BRIAN

ANYSE KEITH

1905275 1888518

FLIPPO BURCHAM

BILLY CYNTHIA

G KAY

1895265 1898205

EAVENSON BURCHAM

JANET BRIAN

G KEITH

1884219 1888518

EBRAHIM BURCHAM

YASHAR CYNTHIA

EMAD KAY

1909779 1899117

ECONOMY BURCHAM

MARTHA CYNTHIA

PSUZANNE

1909152 1899117

FLKLER BURCHAM

LORI CYNTHIA

FRANCES SUZANNE

FLORES BURCHAM

ROBIN DIANA

COLLEEN JOY

1899497 1904364

EDGAR BURCHAM

MICHAEL DIANA

D JOY

1896404 1904364

1907180 1906688

EDLEMON BURCHAM

STACY ELIZABETH

A

1909447 1906688

FLOYD BURCHAM

ASHLEY ELIZABETH

NICOLE A

775156169 1887971

EDWARDS BURCHAM

AMI GLINDA

LEA FAYE

1888827 1887971

FLOYD BURCHAM

ELEANOR GLINDA

VIOLA FAYE

1899063 1904265

EDWARDS BURCHAM

BRANDON MILDRED

LSUE

1898852 1904265

FLOYD BURCHAM

GLENDA MILDRED

JSUE

1884248 1902633

EDWARDS BURCHAM

JEFF RICK

E

1901057 1902633

FLOYD BURCHAM

LRICK

MARRINO

575188631 1882587

EDWARDS BURCHAM

JEREMY SHERRY

ALLAN

1899528 FLOYD 1882587 County: Alcorn BURCHAM

MARY SHERRY

ANN

1903121 775040526

EDWARDS BURCHAM

LEE TAMMY

JD

1883817 775040526

FLOYD BURCHAM

MARY TAMMY

FRANCES D

1883937

EGNEW

JOHN

HENRY

1908202

FLOYD

REBECCA

G

ROBINSON

1908475 Election FLOYD RODNEY Statewide Management ID Last Name SystemFirst Name

J

1888801

HARRY

FLOYD

VERA

1905369

EISELE

DAVID

1894885

EISELE

JONATHAN

ROBERT

1895253

EISELE

RAYLENE

L

1904385

FOLLIN

JAMES

M

1891810

EISENTROUT

CARL

H

1895641

FONTAINE

ARLENE

MARIE

FORD

ANGELA

MICHELLE

EISENTROUT

ELIZABETH

R

1885706

EKES

DENISE

DODD

1892634

FORD

ANTHONY

PAUL

THOMAS

1903786

FORD

EDNA

C

1890389

FORD

EDWARD

1904654

ELAM

ELMO

1891794

ELAM

GEORGE

1904659

ELAM

GERTUDE

B

FORD

HAZEL

1896072

ELAM

JAMES

R

1895992

FORD

HELEN

LEONE

DAVID

1903864

FORD

JIMMY

WAYNE

1898905

ELCHHORN

JEFFREY

1888630

ELDER

CARRIE

1883931

ELIAS

GEORGE

ID

Last Name

First Name

JR

Middle Name

Suffix

ALLISON

1906784 Election ELIGWE Statewide Management SystemVICTORIA 1888632 1889846

ELLIOTT ELLIOTT

FRITA LEASHAWN

MAE

FORD

MONTY

JOE

1890397

FORD

SUZETTE

F

1909497

FORNEY

DAVID

HOUSTON Page : 44

B

1900569

FORNEY

LEANN

STACEY

M

1906689

FORREST

WAYNE

WRIGHT

FORSYTHE

CYNTHIA

A

FORSYTHE

DELORES

RENEE

ELLIOTT

LESLIE

D

ELLIOTT

LINHDA

T

1896232

1888634

ELLIOTT

REESE

CLIFFORD

1883832

FORSYTHE

HETTIE

BEATRICE

1904383

ELLIOTT

ROSWIETH

1909051

FORSYTHE

REBECCA

SUE

1904661

ELLIOTT

VONNIE

D

1886315

FORTMAN

WILLIAM

RICHARD

M

1896859

FOSTER

ADRIAN

FOSTER

JERRY

L

1885627

ELLISON

GARY

R

1886898

1898574

ELLISON

GENE

RICHARD

1900403

FOSTER

MONICA

CELESTE

LEE

1893526

FOSTER

ZACHARY

O'BRYAN

1908829

FOURNIER

JANET

M

TODD

1902219

FOURNIER

WILFRED

ARMAND

FOUST

ADAM

575045332

ELMORE

JERRY

1886311

EMERSON

KRISTA

1887130

EMERY

DANA

County: Alcorn

1887129

EMERY

JUNE

ELAINE

1904393

1896821

EMISON

MARGARET

A

1886326

1903202

EMMONS

SUSAN

MARGARET

1882918

EMMONS

SYNTHIA

G

1892902

EMMONS

VICTORIA

1887134

ENGELHARDT

MARJORY

ID

1906017

Last Name FOWLER FOWLER

First Name BENNY CATHY

Statewide Management SystemELIZABETH 1906046 Election FOWLER 1883822

FOWLER

EVELYN

IDA

1882768

FOWLER

JACKIE

FOWLER

JAMES

LORRAINE

M

1899919

ENNIS

KRISTIN

LYNN

750006100

FOWLER

JAMES

EARL

1896457

EPPERSON

MARY

1890172

FOWLER

JIMMY

LOYD

1906413

FOWLER

NANCY

B

MICHAEL

WADE

1891326

EPPES

JOSEPH

LOREZ

1889837

EPPS

MARION

MCCALLA

1883932

ERENZ

JOHN

J

1883933

ERENZ

JUDITH

R

ID

1906759

Last Name ERNST

First Name BRIAN

Statewide Management SystemGLENDA 1897762 Election ERVIN 1907066 1901460

ESSARY ESSARY

DEBRA ETHEL

Voter Query Report 1902738

Middle Name

Suffix

E

FOWLER

PRISCILLA

FOWLER

TIMOTHY

W

1906134

FOWLER

WILLARD

GENE

KAY

1903780

FOX

DIAN

C

PAUL

1896201

FOX

MICHAEL

F

GAYLE

1893988

FRANKHOUSER

DONALD

L

RUTH

775242969

FRANKLIN

JOSEPH

ALLEN

L

1897710

FRANKS

CAROLYN

MATHIS

FRANKS

DAVID

NEAL

FRANKS

LARRY

1897922

ESSARY

GEORGE

HAROLD

1905490

1887125

ESSARY

JENNIFER

LEE

1897681

1907433

ESSARY

JENNIFER

ROBIN

1904386

FRANKS

MARTHA

1889831

ESSARY

OLIVER

LEE

1892637

FRANKS

NANCY

1907055

ESSARY

WESTLEY

GILBERT

1882759

FRANKS

RICKY

EUGENE

FRANZEN

NICHOLAS

KIRK

1898387

ESTES

MICHAEL

PAUL

1899503

ETHRIDGE

TERRY

LYNN

1899928

FRASER

TERESA

1899513

EUBANKS

BRADY

L

1909343

FRAZIER

KATHRYN

FRAZIER

KENNETH

RAY

EUBANKS

DONNIE

WAYNE

1909690

EUBANKS

JASON

SCOTT

1908493

FRAZIER

SHANE

KENNETH

1898178

EUBANKS

JERRY

LEE

1900568

FRAZIER

WAYNE

ANTHONY

FREEL

ROBERT

M

1908630

EUBANKS

LILA

ADELL

1896475

1891811

EVANS

BARBARA

ANN

775061766

1899841

EVANS

DEBROAH

LYNN

1888638

EVANS

DELLA

MURLENE

1883615

EVANS

FRANK

ADDISON

1889851

EVANS

JAMES

ALVA

1899888

FREEMAN

SEAN

LEE

1891800

EVANS

LOWELL

REX

1888818

FRIAR

DEBORAH

ANN

1899842

EVANS

MICHAEL

EVANS

1888819

FRIAR

WILLARD

RAY

SKYE

1902886

FRYE

BRENDA

JEAN

1906954

EVANS

MOLLY

1891812

EVANS

RICKY

1884680

EVANS

TERESA

County: Alcorn

EVANS

VICKY

D

1892468

EVERETT

BETTY

JEAN

1909630

EVERETT

CHARLES

LARRY

1907196

Last Name EVERSON

First Name INDYA

1898513 J

Voter Query Report 1892352 1890398

Middle Name

Suffix JR

TENEKA

EVETTS

FREEMAN

SHERRELL DANIEL

FREEMAN

JOSEPH

FUGITT

JEFFREY

FUGITT

JESSICA

FULKS

TERRY

MARIE L

DILWORTH CHARLES

BRANDON

Date : 09/26/2012 MARIE

1889623

FULPER

JOHN

1902551

FURR

JEREMY

W

1892927

GAGE

ANNA

LISA

GAHAGAN

RITA

JOANN

1900741

GAINES

KELLY

D

GAINES

NEALIE

A

Page : 46

EVETTS

MELISSA

DEANN

1886892

EVETTS

MELVIN

EDWARD

1884605

GAINES

STELLA

FAY

GALLAHER

NATHAN

A ELIZABETH

1902146

FAKLER

WAYNE

TIMOTHY

1908554

1883810

FARLEY

RUTH

P

1902694

GALLMAN

MARGARET

1895089

FARRIS

ALTON

H

1897348

GALLOWAY

SUDIE

W

1907986

GAMMILL

ANITA

1887307

GAMMILL

JEFFREY

LEE

FARRIS

DALE

1892906

FARRIS

EDWARD

T

1900516

FARRIS

GENE

OTIS

1890006

GANN

CASSANDRA

LEANN

SHARON

1890005

GANN

FREDDY

DEWAYNE

GANN

LINDA

C

1897611

FARRIS

LYNN

JR

1885264

FARRIS

WALTER

E

1882799

775119699

FARROW

ELOONY

COLEMAN

1887308

GANN

VELLA

LEE

MAYBELLINE

1898321

GANT

ALISHA

DIANE

ELLIOTT

1902408

GANT

BRIDGET

D

1899308

GANT

MARTHA

JANE

1896391

GANT

ROBERT

F

1890392

FAULK

MARY

500011172

FAULKNER

RUSTY

1890394

FAULKNER

VERNA

1891276

FEAZELL

NATHAN

1889416

FELKS

BARBARA

J

1885632

FELKS

DEBBIE

JEAN

1897659

FELKS

DELINA

KAY

1899431

FELKS

JERRY

DON

1890944

FELKS

MARION

ID

Last Name

First Name

Statewide Management SystemTERRI 1904363 Election GANT 1892832

GANT

TINA

MILLER

GARDNER

AARON

JUNIOR

GARDNER

CHARLES

JUNIOR

RAY

1900017

GARDNER

DANIEL

GRANT

1902124

GARDNER

DOUGLAS

H

FELKS

TERESA

ANN

1890953

FELKS

VERDIA

LOUISE

1900241

FELTON

ANGELA

1897908

Voter Query Report 1900209 1900048

GARDNER

DUANE

GARDNER

JAMES

GARDNER

JO

THOMAS

Date : 09/26/2012 LARON LAURA

1897066

FELTON

FLYNN

1897900

FENNIX

CHARLES

1909340

GARDNER

JOHNATHAN

BRYAN

1882921

FENSTERMAKER

JACK

1888892

GARDNER

JOSEPH

S

JODI

LEE

1888978

GARDNER

MARY

L

D

1892647

GARDNER

RALPH

HAROLD

EVONE

575001108

GARDNER

REBECCA

M

775166842

GARDNER

TELISHA

NICOLE

ID

1909583

Last Name FENSTERMAKER

First Name

Statewide Management SystemRICHARD 1901337 Election FENSTERMANKER 1901370

FERNANDO

1896179

FERRARA

BALADINO

1906397

FERRARA

DEIRDRE

1896178

FERRARA

DOROTHY

GLENN

Middle Name

Suffix

E

1899560

GARLAND

HOWARD

E

1907654

GARMON

TOMMY

GARNER

DENNIS

CHARLES

1903501

FERRELL

ELLEN

ANN

750001009

FERRIS

ERIC

MICHAEL

1898826

GARNER

FELICIA

DENISE

SHEREE

1907652

GARNER

MARTHA

ANN

GARRETT

AUDREY

MAE

FIELDING

1887154

FIELDS

ALLEN

KEITH

1896251

1909772

FIELDS

JERRY

DANA

1892847

GARRETT

DIANE

S

K

1902158

GARRETT

ERIC

MICHAEL

GARRETT

JUDY

T

1890371

FIELDS

JULIEN

1882766

FIELDS

LINDA

KAY

1904705

1906135

FIELDS

NAOMI

SUE

1901673

GARRETT

NICKLAS

F

O'NEAL

1888021

GARRETTY

J

B

GARY

EVELYN

MARIE

GASS

CHRISTOPHER

MATTHEW

1892630

FIKE

WILLIAM

County: Alcorn

1882755

FINDLEY

MICHAEL

WM

1886469

1899716

FINLEY

JENELL

R

1898106

1882753

FINLEY

TINA

STOCKDALE

1902735

FISCHBACH

HEATHER

SUSAN

1908799

FISCHBACH

PARTICK

1907605

FISHER

1901641

FISK

1906016

ID

1899619

Last Name GATES

First Name RITA

Page : 47

ELIOUSE Date : 09/26/2012

ELIOUSE B HUTSON

1893107 775039192

BUGGS GIBENS

ADDIE BRITTNEY

LUE KATHERINE

1893107 1888036

BUGGS GRISSOM

ADDIE BEVERLY

LUE TIDWELL

1896093 1883853

BUIE GIBENS

DONALD JAMES

PAUL

1896093 1887326

BUIE GRISSOM

DONALD HAROLD

DEAN

1883798 1896289

BULLARD GIBENS

BARBARA JANET

ANNETTE

1883798 1888037

BULLARD GRISSOM

BARBARA JOSEPH

BRADLEY

1898992 1903645

BULLARD GIBENS

EMALINGE JOANN

FULTON

1898992 1900113

BULLARD GRISSOM

EMALINGE MONIKA

FULTON BUST

1903217 1897087

BULLARD GIBENS

PONY JOSHUA

E N

1903217 1897335

BULLARD GROSS

PONY AUDREY

JE

1898620 1883844

BULLARD GICZBOUISKI

REBECCA JAMES

DIANNE JOSEPH

1897602 1883856

BULLOCK GICZICOWSKI

DERORAH LORRAINE

KAY

1900789 1889191

BUMPAS GIFFORD

JUSTIN DIGE

L B

1907448 1897626

BUMPAS GIGSON

SHERRI ALEX

DELLA JAMES

1889764 1895256

BUMPAS GILBERT

STEVE ALLEN

1890092 1894358

BUMPAS GILBERT

1899494 1909079

HUPP

Page : 48

ID

1898620 1902624

Last Name BULLARD GROSS

First Name REBECCA KRISTI

1897602 Election GROSS BULLOCK DERORAH Statewide Management SystemMICHAEL 1903652

Middle Name

LKENNETH

BUMPAS GUILLOT

SHERRI GLORIA

DELLA ANN

LEE

1889764 1897941

BUMPAS GUILLOT

STEVE MICHAEL

EDWARD

VERA PATRICE

M

1890092 1897669

BUMPAS GUNN

VERA ALICE

M MARIE

BUNCH GILLIES

CHARISTOPHER ALEXANDER

DOUGLAS TAYLOR

1899494 1889005

BUNCH GUNN

CHARISTOPHER JAMES

DOUGLAS HUGHEY

1908478 1908916

BUNTING GILLILAND

PEGGY JESSICA

JUNE WHITNEY

1908478 1885275

BUNTING GUNN

PEGGY JINDRA

1886595 1905611

BURBACH GILLILAND

CYNTHIA MELISSA

D HOPE

1886595 1889161

BURBACH GUNN

CYNTHIA JOHN

1886594 1895284

BURBACH GILLOM

ED GEORGE

LARRY

1906696

BURBACH GUNN

ED LINDA

1904520 1883636

BURCHAM GILMORE

AMANDA JULIUS

G AQUIAR

1904520 1904400

BURCHAM GUNN

AMANDA NICHOLAS

G LAMAR

1885735 1892934

BURCHAM GILMORE

ARNOLD MARY

W DAVIS

1885735 1893954

BURCHAM GUNN

ARNOLD TAMIKA

W LATRICE

1898205 1891292

BURCHAM GILMORE

BRIAN TERRI

LKEITH

1898205 1883868

BURCHAM GUNTER

BRIAN BILLY

KEITH JOE

KAY NICOLE

1888518 1903161

BURCHAM GURLEY

CYNTHIA CLAIRE

KAY LYNN

SUZANNE ERIC

1899117 1902786

BURCHAM GURLEY

CYNTHIA HELEN

Page : 54 SUZANNE KING

ID

Last Name BURCHAM GILMORE

First Name CYNTHIA ZYTPHER

Middle Name

Suffix

LJUNE

D

AARON Date : 09/26/2012 KAY

1904364 1899618

BURCHAM GINN

DIANA APRIL

JOY PAIGE

1904364 1887331

BURCHAM GURLEY

DIANA HURSHEL

JOY W

1906688 1899287

BURCHAM GINN

ELIZABETH RYAN

A BLAKE

1906688 1908541

BURCHAM GURLEY

ELIZABETH KEVAN

A L

1887971 1909774

BURCHAM GISLER

GLINDA NORMA

FAYE JEAN

1887971 1887345

BURCHAM GURLEY

GLINDA MARY

FAYE O

1904265 1883865

BURCHAM GISLER

MILDRED PHILIP

SUE STANELY

1904265 1887491

BURCHAM GURLEY

MILDRED PATRICIA

SUE B

1902633 1891134

BURCHAM GISSON

RICK KIMBERLEY

MARIE

1902633 1887333

BURCHAM GUTAI

RICK JOHN

A

1902360 1882587

GIST BURCHAM

KENNY SHERRY

WAYNE

1882587 1908655

BURCHAM GUTOWSKI

SHERRY LINDA

J

1889202 775040526

GLADNEY BURCHAM

DENVER TAMMY

LEE D

775040526 1907569

BURCHAM GUTOWSKI

TAMMY MARTIN

D C

GLASCO

DAVID

1883605

GUYNES

FRANKIE

W

ROBINSON

Date JOE : 09/26/2012

Statewide Management SystemJUAN 775181687Election GUZMAN

HUNTER

GLENN

CLYDE

RAYBURN

1892853

GLIDEWELL

BOBBY

WAYNE

1889999

GLIDEWELL

DONALD

RAY

1892825

GLIDEWELL

DOROTHY

MARIE

1892827

GLIDEWELL

EVELYN

1889176

GLIDEWELL

HERMAN

H

1901936

GLIDEWELL

KAREN

ANNETTE

1907280

GLIDEWELL

MAUREEN

LYNN

1898153

HACKNEY

DANIEL

1882795

GLIDEWELL

RICHARD

JOE

500009496

HACKNEY

TERESA

1892852

GLIDEWELL

SANDRA

LYNN

1894489

HAGLE

GEORGE

H

1892811

GLIDEWELL

SHIRLEY

ANN

1892001

HAJEK

GLORIA

ROSE

1896843

GLIDEWELL

TIMOTHY

LEE

1889461

HALCOMB

JAMES

L

1886899

GLISSEN

CHARLIE

C

1889462

HALCOMB

LUCY

1894669

GLISSEN

ROBIN

SEAN

1903569

HALE

AMERION

1895529

GLISSOM

MARILYN

KAY

1890984

HALE

ANNIE

FAY

1896416

GLISSOM

MICHAEL

SHAWN

1907523

HALE

EDWARD

LEE

1903005

GLISSON

CHRIS

RHODES

1890997

HALE

GEORGE

ERVIN

1907656

GLISSON

JEANINE

1883949

HALE

W

J

1888902

GLOVER

FLORA

DELL

1887863

HALFHILL

PAMELA

CARLOTTA

MICHELLEE

1899226

HALL

ANGELA

R

First Name

Page : 20

Page : 49

1909094

GWYN

ADRIAN

JAMAR

1886910

GWYN

RUTHIE

MAE

1888916

GWYN

TERESA

1892785

HA

TRUNG

MINH

1903613

HAAG

ALAN

B

1884117

HAAG

CARMEN

M

1898154 Election HACKNEY Statewide Management SystemCAROLE

L

County: Alcorn

ID

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

Suffix

Last Name

First Name

ROBINSON

JR

ELIASAR Page : 20

1900951

Last Name

JR

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

III

P H : 09/26/2012 Date

Page : 55

GLOVER

MILDRED

THELMA

1906464

HALL

CATHERINE

C

1883862

GNAZZO

SHIRLEY

A

1893502

HALL

COURTNEY

R

1897133

GOAD

ELLIOTT

J

1900544

HALL

DIAL

TEREATHER

1892947

GODDARD

ETHEL

T

1897240

HALL

MICHAEL

WARD

1892922

GODINEY

JOHN

GALVAN

1904230

HALL

MICHELLE

A

1888038

GODWIN

ANNA

JOYCE

1891009

HALL

RHONDA

JOYCE

1888039

GODWIN

TRAVIS

HENRY

1908758

HAMBRICK

DOUGLAS

L

GODWIN

WILLIAM

1894294

HAMBY

JAMES

CYRIL

1898361

GOFORTH

DOYLE

W

1897975

HAMER

THOMAS

D

1896418

GOLDMAN

RICKEY

RAY

1889737

HAMILTON

ELEANOR

R

1894352

GONZALEZ

EDNA

1884966

HAMILTON

HEATHER

LEIGH

1908333

GOOCH

KELLY

MARIE

575133010

HAMILTON

LISA

JO

1902983

GOOCH

LAEL

TRENT

775110597

HAMILTON

MATTHEW

VADEN

1900910

GOODGER

PAMELA

JEAN

1908716

HAMLIM

ANGELA

1909507

GOODLOE

ATIYA

L

1899491

GOODLOW

EDWARD

TYRONE

1902952

GOODMAN

BRENDA

PARR

1889108

HAMLIN

CHARLES

EDWIN

1909142

GOODMAN

BRENDA

RHUDY

775262539

HAMLIN

CHARLIE

THOMAS

1901658

GOODMAN

DAVID

BRENT

1898335

HAMLIN

CHRISTOPHER

LEE

1889349

GOODMAN

KATHLEEN

1907394

HAMLIN

FAE

SINCLAIR

1906794

GOODMAN

R

BRIDGET

1887444

HAMLIN

JOYCE

1895485

GOODMAN

RICHARD

DALE

1907766

HAMLIN

RHONDA

1904436

GOODRUM

RUBY

G

1889076

HAMLIN

ROBBY

1904388

GORDON

FELICIA

1902263

HAMM

BOBBY

L

1887489

GORDON

PATRICK

CREAGHE

1901215

HAMM

BRANDY

NEKOLE

1895829

GORDON

PEARL

LEWIS

1899097

HAMM

BRENDA

LEE

1907658

GORMAN

LILA

R

500003288

HAMM

CRYSTAL

LEIGH

T

1898052

HAMM

DONALD

L

MARY

1907103

HAMM

JAMES

M

Last Name GOSE

First Name WANDA

County: Alcorn

JR

Page : 50

ID

1893084

Last Name HAMLIN

First Name BILLY

Statewide Management SystemBROOKE 1893230 Election HAMLIN

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

Suffix

RENEE

G DALE Date : 09/26/2012

BILL

WAYNE

1890031

HAMM

LAVADIA

1900611

GOULD

JUSTIN

CASE

1905615

HAMM

SANDIA

F

1898411

GOWDY

IRBY

MILTON

1898524

HAMMETT

FENTON

G

1902579

GRADDY

EMILY

1885756

HAMMETT

SYLIA

RAYE

1899340

GRAHAM

AMANDA

S

575145429

HAMMOCK

GARY

C

775181222

GRAHAM

ASHLEY

NICOLE

1904078

HAMMOND

KIM

WAYNE

1904486

GRAHAM

RAY

LAMONT

1909775

HAMMOND

SHELBY

LYNN

GRAHAM

SIBYL

1909131

HAMPTON

C

LORENZO

1889173

GRAHAM

YULA

MAE

1904591

HANCOCK

ALMA

BLANCHE

1896541

GRAMMER

LISA

LYNN

1906735

HANCOCK

CHARLES

JR

1905348

HANCOCK

CHARLES

LEE

1904561

HANCOCK

ELOISE

1902600

HANCOCK

JASON

SHANE

1888213

HANCOCK

KATE

M

1884727

GRAVES

CURTIS

LEVI

1905382

GRAVES

LAURIE

L

1892916

GRAVES

LOVANNA

I

1900638

GRAY

BILLY

JOE

1883860

GRAY

BRIAN

WAYNE

1899668

GRAY

CHINA

NICHOLE

1908811

GRAY

CRYSTAL

STARR

1903794

GRAY

DAVID

PHILLIP

1899234

GRAY

DUSTIN

DREW

1894548

GRAY

GEORGE

H

1893463

GRAY

GREGORY

G

575264770

GRAY

HANNAH

KIMBERLY

1897423

GRAY

JASON

L

1888922

GRAY

JERRY

RANDALL

1902506

GRAY

JESSICA

WILSON

1894189

GRAY

JO

ANN

1902298

GRAY

LISA

1899416

Last Name GRAY

First Name NANCY

Statewide Management SystemNATASHA 1899686 Election GRAY

EUGENE

Page : 51

ID

1894328

Last Name HANCOCK

First Name KEITH

Statewide Management SystemMARTHA 1893474 Election HANCOCK

C

1895841

HANCOCK

THOMAS

D

1909273

HANEY

CRAIG

B

1889353

HANEY

HALEY

PRUITT

1900116

HANEY

LINDA

K

1884960

HANEY

TONYA

1899883

HANSE

LEILANI

1900133

HANSEN

DENISE

A

1896980

HANSEN

MARK

ROBERT

1889738

HARDIN

CONSTANCE

LYNN

1889733

HARDIN

DAWN

M

C

1883950

HARDIN

DONNIE

R

ANNE

1904629

HARDIN

JERRY

NEAL

Suffix

LEIGH

Date : 09/26/2012

1906181

GRAY

NELDA

SUE

1883887

HARDIN

ONES

ALTON

1896400

GRAY

NONA

W

1900502

HARDIN

RENEE

N

1908477

GRAY

THOMAS

DEAN

1889736

HARDWICK

ZERA

NEAL

1906182

GRAY

TOMMY

LEON

1907844

HARLOW

THOMAS

ROBERT

1893466

GRAY

TONY

1896534

HARMON

ANGELEAKE

V

1887495

GRAY

TONYA

RENA

575114653

HARMON

ARTHUR

1887334

GRAY

TWYLA

B

1889452

HARMON

TRACEY

GLENN

1898722

HARNACK

DONNA

MARIE

1901355

HARPER

JOHN

D

1900003

HARRINGTON

CHARLES

LEE

1905636

HARRINGTON

DAVID

LAMAR

575048011

HARRINGTON

LARRY

THOMAS

1909780

HARRINGTON

LISA

B

1889568

HARRIS

ANNIE

1893001

HARRIS

B

Date E : 09/26/2012

Suffix

SUE

R

Middle Name

Voter Query Report

B

HANCOCK

Voter Query Report

Page : 56

Middle Name

1904456

JR

Suffix

CHAD

GOSSETT

County: Alcorn

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

1906982

FAY : 09/26/2012 Date

Suffix

M

1888024

Date : 09/26/2012 THOMAS

Suffix

KAY LYNN

1907448 1898824

Voter Query Report 1886594

HUPP

DIANNE ANNE

JUSTIN MICHAEL

CHRISTOPHER

Suffix

Voter Query Report

BUMPAS GUARE

Page : 57

JR

GRAY

W

1892929

GRAYSON

JACQUELINE

RENEA

1898030

GRAYSON

JOHN

EARL

1900505

GRAYSON

T

ORLANDO

1897485

GRAYSON

TODD

JERAD

1902734

GRECO

BOBBY

LEE

1890952

GREEN

ALICE

1889172

GREEN

BRIGEETA

T

1907104

GREEN

DONNIEL

A

1899326

GREEN

EDNA

LUCILLE

1896517

HARRIS

CLIFTON

HARRIS

1889187

GREEN

EUGENE

CLIFTON

1896538

HARRIS

DIANA

LYNN

1909700

GREEN

FLOYD

JEROME

1907782

HARRIS

DOROTHY

ELLEN

1896931

GREEN

JUDY

H

1901975

HARRIS

I

EDDRIC

1902998

GREEN

LESTER

1886931

HARRIS

IDA

B

1899845

GREEN

SMITH

JAMIE

1908968

HARRIS

JACKIE

1899582

GREEN

THOMAS

LARRY

1899796

HARRIS

JESSICA

1889189

GREEN

TUNELULAR

YVETTE

1885282

HARRIS

JIMMY

LEE

575148733

GREENBERG

GARY

GEORGE

1898907

HARRIS

JODI

ELLIOTT

1906905

GREENFIELD

BRANDY

DANYEL

500003667

HARRIS

JONATHAN

T

1889188

GREER

ANGELA

1906088

HARRIS

KENNETH

DEWAYNE

1907213

GREER

BETTIE

MARIE

1889741

HARRIS

LEDFORD

RAY

VERLIN

1894469

HARRIS

LETRA

C

1889725

HARRIS

MAY

BELL

1889576

HARRIS

NICK

W

SR

1909223

HARRIS

PAMELA

DIANE

STORY

Last Name

First Name

JR

JR

Page : 52

County: Alcorn

ID

Last Name

First Name

Statewide Management SystemBRENDA 1889085 Election HARRIS

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

Suffix

J

L : 09/26/2012 Date

JESSICA

1890014

GREER

M

1889020

GREER

PAULINE

1898127

GREER

SHIRLEY

GEAN

1909384

HARRIS

RENAH

HARRIS

1909088

GREGORY

JASON

WILLIAM

1888043

HARRIS

RITA

DEES

1896973

GREGORY

PEGGY

I

1896447

HARRIS

SANDRA

LENORA

1889062

GREYER

SHINEKA

SHONTA

1882848

HARRIS

SHELBY

JOYCE

1900239

GRIDDINE

MICHELLE

1896155

HARRIS

TERRY

ANN

GRIFFIN

BILLY

R

1899962

HARRIS

THALIA

ANN

1897062

GRIFFIN

JANEY

K

1907783

HARRIS

VELMA

N

1901903

GRIFFIN

JANNIE

A

1889364

HARRIS

VERONICA

1894556

GRIFFIN

JOHN

RANDY

1887672

HARRIS

WILEY

SCOTT

1889557

HARRIS

WILLIE

CRAIG

1887452

HARRISON

MELODY

LYNN

LOUISE Date : 09/26/2012 JR

County: Alcorn

ANN

1902989

GRIFFIN

OREN

P

GATES

VICKI

LYNNETTE

450516

GRIFFITH

BOBBY

JOE

JAMES

1895466

GATLIN

JILL

ELIZABETH

1902802

GRIGGS

CHASI

LOUISE

FRED

D

1897917

GATLIN

THOMAS

RICHARD

575025903

GRIMES

ASHLEY

LYNN

GABRIELLA

L

1896986

GEE

SHERRI

L

1886902

GRIMES

BRENDA

JO

FITSCHEN

DAVID

LEE

1890351

GENTRY

TAMMY

LEESHELL

1888904

GRIMES

ERIC

MORROW

1887155

FITSCHEN

LINDA

1882797

GEORGE

MALCOLM

F

1886911

GRIMES

KEVIN

RAY

1896079

FITZGEARLD

TIMOTHY

DUANE

1899421

GEORGE

RICKEY

EDWARD

1897249

GRIMES

MELINDA

1901909

FITZSIMMONS

PHYLLIS

H

1891772

GIBBONS

LAURA

MARTIN

1901665

GRIMES

MILDRED

1896081

FIVEASH

BONNIE

FAY

1901346

GIBBS

BEVERLY

1906485

GRIMES

SUSANNE

1906415

FLAKE

BILLY

LLOYD

1903585

GIBBS

ETHEL

VAN

1888036

GRISSOM

BEVERLY

TIDWELL

1890408

FLANAGAN

ALFRED

W

775039192

GIBENS

BRITTNEY

KATHERINE

1887326

GRISSOM

HAROLD

DEAN

1883853

GIBENS

JAMES

PAUL

1888037

GRISSOM

JOSEPH

BRADLEY

B

Page : 53

ID

1902945

Last Name HART

First Name JILL

Statewide Management SystemNOYES 1896991 Election HART

Suffix

G

GREER

C

III

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

750005828

Voter Query1900031 Report

11

County: Alcorn

1900789 1897005

1904018

Statewide Election Management System

RAY Middle Name

LOUISE SUSANNE

ID

Suffix

MELINDA

FLORA MILDRED

Statewide Management SystemCOFER 1900503 Election GREER

Middle Name

KEVIN First Name

GRIMES

BUFFI GRIMES

County: Alcorn

G

1892925

1884431

Suffix

Suffix

BUE GRIMES

Voter Query1882777 Report

ANGELLA

1901273

JR

PALMER

Middle Name

1889170

1890954

County: Alcorn

County: Alcorn

BARNETT

Middle Name

1897077 1906485

ID

1888642

GRIMES Last Name

1897249

Voter Query Report Voter Query Report 1886902 GRIMES BRENDA JO Daily Corinthian September 30, 2012 • 7B 1888904 • Sunday, GRIMES ERIC MORROW

F : 09/26/2012 Date

1904316 1901665

County: Alcorn

1888889

1898455

Suffix

1886911 ID

LOUISE LYNN Date : 09/26/2012

HUTSON VAN

Voter Query1882789 Report

Middle Name

1896478

Statewide Management SystemEARL 1889833 Election EVETTS 1886891

FREELOUE

First Name

Statewide Management SystemFRANCES 1897356 Election FREEMAN

1892354

LIN

1899652

ID

1882761

Last Name

ASHLEY

LOUISE ETHEL

Statewide Management SystemE 1900698 Election GOSEA

HOOK

CHASI

FLORA BEVERLY

ID

JR

GRIGGS

575025903 County: Alcorn GRIMES

BUFFI GIBBS

1896419

ANN

1885628

ID

Page : 45

1902802

BUE GIBBS

County: Alcorn

SUE

1902245

County: Alcorn

JR

Date : 09/26/2012

1907161

1909103

Suffix

ELAINE

GREG

First Name

LEESHELL

11

1897077 1903585

ID

LYNN

ENGLAND

EPPERSON

MARTIN

Voter Query1900129 Report

L

1908538

County: Alcorn

EDWARD

LAURA

Last Name

1897848 Election GLOVER Statewide Management SystemHEATHER

Middle Name

1887160

1902949

RICKEY

GIBBONS

County: Alcorn

1894721

1897995

GLORIA

GEORGE

1891772

Statewide Management SystemRUBY 1888991 Election GLEASON

EUGENE

1903476

ELLIS

1899421

Voter Query1901371 Report

Date : 09/26/2012

1904810

1903792

ROBINSON

J

1891807

Voter Query Report 1896468

MALCOLM

Statewide Management SystemJOHN 1899117 Election GINENS BURCHAM CYNTHIA 1898214

WILLIS

1902805

County: Alcorn

TAMMY

GEORGE

1888518 1898744

LOUISE

JOHN

FLOYD

Page : 43SR

Page : 20Suffix Middle Name

EIDSON

1896247 Election FLYNN Statewide Management SystemEDWARD

GENTRY

1882797

County: Alcorn

SHANE

500002302

1888820

PAT

LANE

EATON BURCHAM

ELDIN

HUPP

Date : 09/26/2012

1890941 1904520

1903781 Election EHRMENTROUT Statewide Management SystemMERRIL

Suffix

KANNA

1886322 1898992

Voter Query Report 1906170 1889764

1890351

1904316 Suffix Voter Query1901346 Report

Middle Name

1900713 1907448

County: Alcorn

L

Middle Name

Statewide Management SystemCHARLES 1906136 1883798 Election FLANAGAN BULLARD BARBARA HUPP

RICHARD

SHERRI

ID

FITSCHEN

DUVALL

Suffix

THOMAS

GEE

Voter Query Report

LEE

1887155

1897442

Last Name

GATLIN

1896986

County: Alcorn

Date : 09/26/2012

1896130

ID

1897917

Page : 58

Voter Query Report

Middle Name

Suffix

PIERCE FRED

JR

1902000

HART

SULA

JANE

MCCORD

1898803

HART

TERESA

L

1883890

HARTMAN

NANCEY

LEE

1906939

HARTWIG

DEBORAH

KAY

1898107

HARTWIG

KENNETH

LEE

1900944

HARVILLE

BRUCE

DONOVAN

775016694

HARVILLE

CHRIS

BLAKE

1900923

HARVILLE

DEANNA

D

1886486

HARVILLE

GEORGE

DEWAYNE

CONTINUED ON 8B


ID

Last Name

First Name

Middle Name

Suffix

1907843

HOLLOWAY

JAMES

D

1887856

HOLLOWAY

TIMOTHY

H

1889388

HOLLOWAY

W

GEORGE

HOLMES

BRADLEY

1902945 HART JILL 1882864 8B • Alcorn Sunday, September 30,PIERCE 2012 • Daily Corinthian County: County: Alcorn Voter 1896991 HART NOYES FRED JR Query Report 1890064 1902000

HART

SULA

1898803

HART

TERESA

1883890

HARTMAN

NANCEY

ID

Last Name

First Name

MCCORD

HOLMES

CHRISTOPHER

HOLMES

JEFF

ALAN

L

Middle Name LEE

Suffix

1882833

HOLMES

JEWELL

ONELLA

ID

Last Name

First Name

Middle Name

Suffix

JONES

JACKIE

1899739

JONES

JACQUELINE

JONES

JAMES

TERRY

1883096

JONES

JERRY

DOUGLAS

1909087

JONES

JESSE

D

Middle Name

Suffix

1907379

JONES

JOHN

T

JR

County: Alcorn

Voter Query Report ID

1884978

Voter Query Report 1895827

County: Alcorn

Date : 09/26/2012

1887708

CONTINUED FROM 7B JANE

ROSS

II

Date : 09/26/2012 Last Name

First Name

Middle Name

Suffix

ID

Last Name

First Name

B N

1907366 1904316

JACKSON BUE

DONALD FLORA

GREGORY ELIOUSE

1904316 1902508

BUE JONES

FLORA JOHNNY

ELIOUSE RAY

1882834

HOLMES

JIMMY

DON

500008195 1897077

JACKSON BUFFI

JACQUELINE LOUISE

HUTSON

1897077 1891027

BUFFI JONES

LOUISE KENNETH

HUTSON LEE

1906939 1904316

HARTWIG BUE

DEBORAH FLORA

KAY ELIOUSE

1904316 1893188

BUE HOLMES

FLORA JUDY

ELIOUSE DIANE

1901336 1893107

JACKSON BUGGS

JAY ADDIE

DEE LUE

1893107 1889922

BUGGS JONES

ADDIE KEVIN

LUE EARL

1898107 1897077

HARTWIG BUFFI

KENNETH LOUISE

LEE HUTSON

1897077 1884029

BUFFI HOLMES

LOUISE ROCKY

HUTSON DAN

II

1889485 1896093

JACKSON BUIE

LESSIE DONALD

LUCILLE

1896093 1909074

BUIE JONES

DONALD KIMBERLY

COLAN

1900944 1893107

HARVILLE BUGGS

BRUCE ADDIE

DONOVAN LUE

1893107 1897401

BUGGS HOLSCLAW

ADDIE JR

LUE JOHN

BELL

1899238 1883798

JACKSON BULLARD

MELISSA BARBARA

1883798 775054956

BULLARD JONES

BARBARA LAURA

ANN

775016694 1896093

HARVILLE BUIE

CHRIS DONALD

BLAKE

1896093 1909319

BUIE HOLT

DONALD LINDA

G

1883975 1898992

JACKSON BULLARD

RONALD EMALINGE

W FULTON

1898992 1902677

BULLARD JONES

EMALINGE LELA

FULTON ANN

1900923 1883798

HARVILLE BULLARD

DEANNA BARBARA

D

1883798 1886252

BULLARD HOLT

BARBARA LINDA

GAIL

1894521 1903217

JACKSON BULLARD

RUBY PONY

E

1903217 1905014

BULLARD JONES

PONY MAE

E ANNIE

1886486 1898992

HARVILLE BULLARD

GEORGE EMALINGE

DEWAYNE FULTON

1898992 1887508

BULLARD HONDMAN

EMALINGE ERIC

FULTON WAYNE

1896621 1898620

JACKSON BULLARD

SHANNON REBECCA

GAIL DIANNE

1898620 1889909

BULLARD JONES

REBECCA MARSHA

DIANNE TERRY

1886048 1903217

HARVILLE BULLARD

KIMBERLY PONY

WOOD E

1903217 1905009

BULLARD HONEYCUTT

PONY GRACE

E

1891023 1897602

JACKSON BULLOCK

TRACY DERORAH

DWAYNE KAY

1883105 1897602

JONES BULLOCK

MARY DERORAH

JO KAY

1886727 1898620

HARVILLE BULLARD

MOSS REBECCA

CARLISE DIANNE

1898620 1884963

BULLARD HONEYCUTT

REBECCA PATSY

DIANNE ANN

1899150 1900789

JACKSON BUMPAS

TYRONE JUSTIN

L

1889793 1900789

JONES BUMPAS

MATTHEW JUSTIN

DEAN L

1897328 1897602

HASTINGS BULLOCK

AARON DERORAH

KAY

1897602 1884083

BULLOCK HONEYCUTT

DERORAH ROBERT

KAY LESTER

JACOB BUMPAS

DARLENE SHERRI

SUE DELLA

1909075 1907448

JONES BUMPAS

MAURICE SHERRI

LEGEARLD DELLA

1909514 1900789

HASTINGS BUMPAS

AARON JUSTIN

L

1900789 575023115

BUMPAS HOOD

JUSTIN CARL

EL

1909798 1889764

JACOB BUMPAS

MICHAEL STEVE

N

1893770 1889764

JONES BUMPAS

NANCY STEVE

JANE

1893009 1907448

HASTINGS BUMPAS

COLLEEN SHERRI

DELLA

1907448 1908772

BUMPAS HOOD

SHERRI KIMBERLEY

DELLA GAIL

1906729 1890092

JACOB BUMPAS

SHANNON VERA

RAE M

1904726 1890092

JONES BUMPAS

PATRICIA VERA

M

1893010 1889764

HASTINGS BUMPAS

MARLEN STEVE

CLYDE

1889764 1899400

BUMPAS HOOPER