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Tuesday Jan. 15,

2013

50 cents

Daily Corinthian Vol. 117, No. 13

Rain & cold Today

Tonight

38

27

60% chance of freezing rain

• Corinth, Mississippi • 16 pages • 1 section

Icy conditions expected to continue National Weather Service issues winter storm watch for area until 6 p.m. today BY JEBB JOHNSTON jjohnston@dailycorinthian.com

Potentially icy conditions are expected to continue today. On Monday afternoon, the National Weather Service Memphis Forecast Office posted a winter storm watch for

this morning until 6 p.m. today in Alcorn County for potential freezing rain accumulations. A winter weather advisory had been posted through 9 a.m. today. NWS expects another upper level disturbance to bring a

new round of precipitation, and potentially icy troubles, to the Mid-South. Following possible ice accumulations last night, new accumulations of at least one quarter inch are possible today. Trees, power lines and elevated

road surfaces are the first to be affected by ice accumulations. Precipitation should diminish by the evening. After a weekend of heavy rains accompanying a cold front, more precipitation followed on Monday in the form

of sleet, freezing rain and a few snow flakes. Some bursts of sleet came in the late morning and early afternoon, prompting both the city and county school disPlease see WEATHER | 2

Thieves continue to hit area Dollar General stores BY STEVE BEAVERS sbeavers@dailycorinthian.com

Thieves continue to target area Dollar General stores. The latest heist took place Friday when subjects broke out the front glass and got away with cash from the store’s safe in New Albany. Locally, investigators with the Alcorn County Sheriff’s Department continue to look for clues in the break-in of a Dollar General in Kossuth.

Staff photo by Steve Beavers

Tri-State Flywheels Antique Tractor Club member Travis Thompson gets his 1954 McCormick Farmall Super C tractor ready to be displayed at the Alcorn Farm & Machinery-Home & Outdoor Show.

Arena prepares for farm show BY STEVE BEAVERS sbeavers@dailycorinthian.com

Equipment began rolling in and the telephone started ringing off the hook in preparation for the Alcorn Farm & Machinery-Home & Outdoor Show. Monday was the start of a busy week at the Crossroads Arena as farm equipment was

being moved in for the show that kicks off Thursday and continues through Saturday. “We have been pretty much flooded by calls from last-minute vendors,” said arena operations manager Greg Moss. The Tri-State Flywheels Antique Tractor Club already had around six tractors on the arena

floor by midday Monday. The 30-member club is set to have close to 12 antique tractors ready for the show by Thursday. Those attending the farm show can expect to see anything from a 1954 Model 40 John Deere to a 1949 Allis-Chalmers. Please see SHOW | 2

“We continue to work with other local agencies to solve the case,” said Reggie Anderson, investigator with the Alcorn County Sheriff’s Department. “Any assistance the public can give us would be appreciated.” Two male subjects broke into the Kossuth store early Christmas Eve, taking the safe which contained a significant Please see THIEVES | 2

City will consider board appointments BY JEBB JOHNSTON jjohnston@dailycorinthian.com

New appointments to the boards of Crossroads Arena and the Corinth School District are on the agenda today for the Board of Aldermen. The city board will hold a regular meeting at 5 p.m. The arena board has a vacancy as a result of the recent passing of Joe Franks, who

was appointed last July for a five-year term that began Aug. 22 and runs through 2017. That seat on the board is a joint appointment with the Alcorn County Board of Supervisors. Also up for consideration is the seat on the Corinth School District Board of Trustees Please see CITY | 2

Alliance particpates in Capital Day events BY BOBBY J. SMITH bjsmith@dailycorinthian.com

Representatives from The Alliance traveled to Jackson last week to discuss Northeast Mississippi’s economic development with state leaders. The trip was centered around Capital Day, a yearly meeting put together by the Mississippi Economic Council. Alliance president and chief operating officer Gary Chandler and 2013 Alliance CEO Brett Marlar joined the administrators, legislators and other leaders on Thursday. “It’s great to see our leaders transcend county lines — and party lines — to work to better Alcorn County and the surrounding areas as a whole,” said Marlar. The day began with a lineup of speakers at the Capitol. Gov. Phil Bryant, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves,

Secretary of State Delbert Hoseman and House Speaker Phil Gunn spoke were among the statewide leaders who spoke to Capital Day attendees about issues pertinent to the upcoming legislative session. “They spoke about items relative to the upcoming session, like charter schools,” Chandler said. “Also, economic development and jobs are always a hot topic with any administration or legislative session.” Later in the day, the Alliance president and CEO had an opportunity to briefly meet with the governor and his staff to discuss issues facing the area, including the potential expansion of existing industry, projects carrying over from 2012 and altogether new projects. “As we start the new year, it’s Please see ALLIANCE | 2

Submitted photo

The Alliance’s leadership met with state legislators in Jackson last week. Taking part were (from left) Rep. Nick Bain, Rep. Bubba Carpenter, Alliance president and chief operating officer Gary Chandler, Sen. Rita Parks, Rep. Tracy Arnold and Alliance 2013 CEO Brett Marlar.

Index Stocks........7 Classified......14 Comics...... 11 Wisdom...... 10

Weather........5 Obituaries........ 3 Opinion........4 Sports........8

On this day in history 150 years ago Brig. Gen. Charles S. Hamilton is put in command of the Federal garrison in Corinth and the District of West Tennessee. It is an important posting, but Hamilton falls from grace when he tries to undermine other Union generals in a bid for more power.

January is GLAUCOMA Awareness Month Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness and may have no symptoms to warn you! x x x Dr. John Shipp, M.D.

Over 2.7 million Americans have glaucoma but only half of those know they have it. More than 120,000 are blind from glaucoma in the U.S (9-12% of all cases of blindness). The best way to protect your sight from glaucoma is to get tested so it can be treated if needed.

Call 662-286-6068 to schedule your glaucoma eye screening today.

Glaucoma Nerve Damage

Eye Care Specialists 3302 W. Linden St. Corinth, MS 38834 (662) 286-6068


2 • Daily Corinthian

Local/Region

Gas prices predicted to decrease in 2013

Corinth husband, wife arrested for selling controlled substance BY STEVE BEAVERS sbeavers@dailycorinthian.com

BY JONATHAN FAHEY AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK — At least gasoline should cost you less in 2013. Hamburger, health care and taxes are all set to take a bigger bite out of the family budget this year. But drivers’ annual gas bills are expected to drop for the first time in four years. Forecasters say ample oil supplies and weak U.S. demand will keep a lid on prices. The lows will be lower and the highs won’t be so high compared with a year ago. The average price of a gallon of gasoline will fall 5 percent to $3.44, according to the Energy Department. “Everything is lining up to lead to softer prices this year,” said Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst at the Oil Price Information Service. That would still be the third-highest average price ever. But a discount of 19 cents per gallon from 2012 would save the typical household $205 this year and free up $25 billion that could go instead to restaurants, malls or movie theaters — the kind of

consumer spending that accounts for 70 percent of American economic activity. “It’s a little benefit to the economy, and it’s a little more reason the Fed doesn’t have to worry about inflation,” said James Hamilton, an economist at the University of California at San Diego who studies energy prices. Forecasters caution that they can’t predict other factors like Middle East tensions, refinery problems or hurricanes along the U.S. Gulf Coast — in other words, the same events that caused gasoline prices to spike in 2011 and 2012. Any or all of those troubles could crop up again in 2013 and push pump prices above last year’s record average of $3.63 a gallon. The government expected gas to average about $3 during 2011. Then came the Arab Spring, which included the shutdown of Libya’s oil production. Oil prices shot up, and gasoline averaged $3.53 for the year. The government’s forecast for last year also turned out to be too low, by 18 cents per gallon.

And, Hamilton said, consumer spending might not see a boost from lower gasoline prices because most Americans will be paying higher taxes. The expiration of last year’s payroll tax reduction will cost an extra $579 for households making $40,000 to $50,000 in 2013, according to the Tax Policy Center, a non-partisan Washington research group. But after average gas prices rose in 2010, 2011, and 2012, a little relief will be welcome in 2013. Gas prices set records each of the past two years for a few reasons. Global demand has risen as the developing economies of Asia, Latin America and the Middle East burn more gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. At the same time, unrest in the Middle East has sparked fears of widespread supply disruptions in a region that produces a quarter of the world’s oil. That makes traders willing to pay higher prices up front for oil as a way to protect against possible dramatic price spikes in the future.

coming back.” Larry Nelms was busy unloading his lawn mower pullers for the show. “The show drew a lot of people last year,” said Nelms. “There were so many people, they talked my ears off.” Nelms will have around nine of his pullers for individuals to check out. “This is going to bring a lot of people,” he said. “If you are thinking about buying something to use in the spring, you will have a selection of things to look over this weekend.” The auction, set for Saturday from 10 a.m.

until 5 p.m., has already $5 million in equipment committed. Greg Peterson, aka Machinery Pete, will be filming segments for his “Machinery Show” that is televised on RFD-TV over the weekend. Inside the facility, vendors will have many items on display. “There will be everything from lawn mowers to barbecue grills inside and even some arts and crafts,” added Moss. Doors open on Jan. 17-18 at 9 a.m. and runs through 6 p.m. Farmers can check out the auction equipment beginning at 6 a.m. Saturday.

ter to the mayor, superintendent and school board president. His term expires in March. Appointments are for five years. Other items on today’s agenda are: ■ Continued public hearings for property cleanup on Polk Street (Burns property), 1115 Douglas Street (Michael property) and 408 Harris Street (Harris property)

■ Reports of the department heads ■ Contractor’s pay request and engineers’ invoice for wastewater treatment plant project ■ Consider quotes for administrative vehicle ■ Mileage rate adjustment ■ December claims docket ■ Zoning and planning matters, if any ■ Minutes from meetings of Dec. 4, 17 and 18.

SHOW CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Several antique John Deere models along with a Massey Ferguson and Ford are expected to be part of the show. “All the tractors will be from the 1950s and ’60s,” said club president Jimmy Whitfield. “Everyone in the club loves old tractors and getting together, but what this bunch really prefers is going on antique tractor rides.” Moss is glad the club is participating in the farm show for a second year. “They are in demand,” he said. “We wanted to make sure they were

CITY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

now held by Tom Rogers, who has indicated that he will not ask to be reappointed to another term. “Serving on this board has been the very pinnacle of my business life, and I will be forever grateful for the opportunity to serve the finest school district in the state of Mississippi,” Rogers wrote in a let-

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Tuesday, January 15, 2013

The public has again helped law enforcement officials in the fight against illegal drug activity. A pair of individuals have been arrested and charged with the sale of a controlled substance by the Alcorn County Nar-

cotics Unit. Aaron Golson, 36, of 1409 Meigg Street, Corinth and his wife Ashley Golson, 29, of the same address, were arrested Thursday following complaints from citizens in the community. Aaron Golson’s bond was set at $10,000 while

Cost share program still available for Tarebreeches Creek landowners For the Daily Corinthian

The Natural Resources Conservation Service is still accepting applications to help producers protect and improve soil and water resources within the Tarebreeches Creek watershed. The watershed includes land that drains into a stream, creek or water body that flows into Tarebreeches Creek. This land is located northwest of Corinth and includes parts of the Gift and Holly communities. Funds are made possible under a Section 319 Grant from the Environmental Protection Agency and are administered through the Mississippi Soil and Water Conservation Commission. The Commission was organized to assist local soil and water conservation districts with programs to help local farmers improve and protect soil and water quality in their respective counties.

The Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality has been monitoring this watershed’s water quality over the past year to obtain levels of fecal coliform, nitrates and phosphates and sediment. This watershed was impaired enough for the agency to approve this watershed for funding installation of best management practices. Local landowners in this drainage area may install practices such as water troughs, heavy use areas, cross fencing, grade stabilization structures, tree planting and nutrient management. Cost share for eligible practices is 60 percent federal funds and 40 percent local landowner funds. Each approved practice has components set forth that are eligible for cost share. The value of land taken out of production will be considered a component in the installation of structural practices only.

“The 319 Program helped me improve my grazing system,” local landowner Leamon Talley said. “This conservation investment allows me to rotate cattle between pastures, have a safe and environmentally-friendly area to feed cattle and provides adequate water for each pasture cell.” Many landowners have already participated in this beneficial program to improve their cropland and pasture land. Funding is limited and will be available for only a short time. Interested producers in this watershed should call or visit the local NRCS office located at 3103 Mullins Drive in Corinth or phone them at 662-2877223 Extension 3. All programs are voluntary and offer sciencebased solutions that benefit both the landowner and the environment. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

General, located in the heart of downtown on Highway 2, was robbed at 3:05 on Dec. 24. The store was unable to reopen until three days later. In Thaxton, the crime happened on Dec. 10 about 3:43 a.m. In both crimes, video shows two individuals involved with tying a chain to the safe and pulling it out through the front door. In New Albany, thieves broke out the front glass around 5:30 a.m. before taking money from the safe. The safe was not taken in this theft. Thieves managed to get the safe open and take the cash that was inside. The subject or subjects

managed to avoid any security cameras during the theft. In Ashland, a Dollar General was robbed at gunpoint with undetermined amount of cash taken on Dec. 15. Dollar General stores have been hit numerous times in Tennessee. Over the last year, 10 stores have been robbed in Middle Tennessee. The latest coming on Dec. 23 in Columbia, Tenn. when two males robbed the store at gunpoint. Individuals with information about the Kossuth break-in can call the sheriff’s office at 2865521 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-773-TIPS.

Parks, Rep. Nick Bain, Rep. Bubba Carpenter and Rep. Jody Steverson. Talk at the dinner focused on issues important to Northeast Mississippi — job creation and other projects currently underway at The Alliance.

“It was a very productive 24-hour period,” Chandler said. “You don’t always get an opportunity to spend time with the governor. Being able to talk about special projects for Corinth and Alcorn County goes a long way.”

closed Monday because of the heavy rains and will be closed again today. Sleet gave way to steady rain during the afternoon

with the temperature around 30 degrees. City crews were placing sand on bridges. “We haven’t had any weather-related problems yet,” Police Chief David Lancaster reported at 3 p.m. “We still need to watch the bridges and overpasses.” He was concerned about conditions worsening, particularly after sunset and into this morning. County supervisors were also keeping an eye on conditions. In the 2nd district, Supervisor Dal Nelms said bridges at Central School Road and U.S. 72 and on County Roads 306 and 309 appeared to be in the early stages of icing at mid-afternoon.

THIEVES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

amount of cash. During a three-week stretch, stores in in the Thaxton Community of Pontotoc County and Eastview, Tenn. were also entered and money taken from the safe. Law enforcement agencies in both Alcorn and Pontotoc counties believe their crimes could involve the same subjects. Both crimes saw a pair of while males enter the front doors of the store and tie some sort of logging chain to the safe. The safe was then pulled through the doors by a white pickup, causing major damage to the the front of each store. The Kossuth Dollar

ALLIANCE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

a very busy time,” said Chandler. On Wednesday night, Chandler and Marlar met for dinner with the delegation from Alcorn County, including Sen. Rita

WEATHER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

tricts to let classes out at 1:45 p.m. McNairy County schools had already

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3 • Daily Corinthian

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Deaths Edward Pride

IUKA — Edward James Pride, 72, died Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, at MS Care Center. Visitation is Sunday from 2 until 4 p.m. at Magnolia Funeral Home.

Jean Rogers

RIENZI — Jean Rogers died Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013, at her home. Arrangements are pending with Grayson’s Funeral Home.

Joe Allison

SELMER, Tenn. — Funeral services for Joe Neal Allison, 59, are set for 3 p.m. Wednesday at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Selmer with burial at Mars Hill Cemetery in Adamsville. Mr. Allison died Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013, at Sanctuary Hospice House in Tupelo. Born Aug. 23, 1953, in Selmer, he was a sales representative and a Baptist. Survivors include a daughter, Keli Jones and her companion, Brian Ferguson of Ramer; a sister, Ruth A. Johnson (Gary) of Corinth; a brother, Ray Allison (Pam) of Bethel Springs, Tenn.; and a grandson, Kooper Jones. He was preceded in death by his parents, William T. and Myrtle Ruth (Matlock) Allison.

Clint Overton will officiate the service. Visitation is today from 5:30 to 8 p.m.

Becky Crum (Jimmy), both of Corinth; 23 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her father, Walter Houston Elam; her mother, Mary Zilphia Rogers Elam; the father of her children, James Marsh Crum; and a brother, Junior Elam. Charlie Browning will officiate the service.

Shirley Crum

Funeral services for Shirley Temple Crum, 66, of Corinth, were held Monday at Magnolia Funeral Home Chapel of Memories with burial at the Crum Family Cemetery. Ms. Crum died Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, at her home. Born Jan. 11, 1946, she was a retired factory Crum worker who most recently worked for Corinthian Furniture. She was of the Christian faith. Survivors include sons Billy Joe Crum (Brenda), Bobby Joe Crum (Deloris), David Leon Crum (Penny), and Michael Dewayne Crum (Darlene), all of Corinth; a daughter, Bonnie S. Lindsey (Wayne) of Corinth; four brothers, Lelon Elam, Billy Elam, Don Elam (Betty) and Johnny Elam, all of Corinth; two sisters, Dorothy Bobo and

Helen Davenport

GREENVILLE — Funeral services for Helen Dodd Davenport, 91, are set for 1 p.m. Thursday at Parkview Baptist Church with burial in Greenlawn Memorial Gardens. Mrs. Davenport died Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013, at her home. She was born in McNairy County in 1921 and grew up in Corinth. She moved to Greenville in 1948 and was employed with Morgan & Lindsey until retiring in 1984. She was preceded in death by her parents, Homer A. and Arlie B. Taylor Dodd; her husband, Charles H. Davenport; one sister; and three brothers. Survivors include one son, Charles R. Davenport; a daughter, Charlotte R. Oliver; three grandchildren; and five great-

Things to do today Charter schools meetings The Parents’ Campaign is hosting two meetings today for individuals concerned about charter school legislation being proposed in the current legislative session. “School Reform and Charter Schools: What Do They Mean for Northeast Mississippi?” will be presented at 11:45 a.m. and 6:30 p.m., both at the Parish Hall of All Saints Episcopal Church, 608 West Jefferson Street, Tupelo, across from the Lee County Library. It is co-sponsored by the Parents for Public Schools and North Mississippi Education Consortium. “At both meetings, I will be sharing what I believe can be accomplished through serious school reform and the dangers that are inherent in what I call the for-profit school reform agenda that is being pushed by big-money ‘education’ corporations and their lobbyists,” said Nancy Loome, executive director of The Parents’ Campaign.

Nature group meets Anyone interested in ac-

tivities involving wild birds or nature can attend the next meeting of the Corinth Audubon Nature Group to being held at 6 p.m. in the Corinth Library auditorium. Guest speakers will be Cynthia and Woody Harrell, who will speak on “The Troverts on the Appalachian Trial 2012.”

BY JEFF YORK For the Daily Corinthian

Influenza activity is widespread across most of the United States, including the Crossroads area in Tennessee and Mississippi, and more flu activity overall than in recent flu seasons. The Department of Health urges all who have not yet received a flu vaccine to get one now to help protect vulnerable people around them, their families and themselves from the flu virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported that people who have had this year’s vaccine are about 60 percent less likely to have to visit a medical provider for treatment of influenza illness than unvaccinated people. “We expect several more weeks of influenza activity, so we want everyone who hasn’t yet been vaccinated to do so now,” said Health Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD. “People who are still unvaccinated are at the most risk of getting sick and spreading the virus to others..” For those who do fall ill with the flu, treatment with antiviral medication may help. Antiviral medications can reduce the length and severity of illness when started early, ideally within 48 hours of onset of illness. People at high risk for developing serious complications from the flu,

Senior activities

Culinary Month Alcorn Welcome Center will be observing Culinary Month during the month of January. There will be a display featuring restau-

The First Presbyterian Senior Adult Ministry hosts a Wii sports class for senior adults on Tuesdays at 9 a.m. There is no cost to participate. Call the church office at 286-6638 to register or Kimberly Grantham at 284-7498.

Guild exhibit Jeremiah Briggs’ artistic works are the featured January exhibit at the Corinth Artist Guild Gallery. The gallery is also featuring a collection of Jesse Ables’ snow scenes during the month.  Regular gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday. Viewings by appointment are also available. Contact the gallery located at 507 Cruise St. in Corinth, at 662-665-0520.

GETTING YOU BACK HOME! Did you know your loved ones can experience the comfort and care of Country Cottage for short stays just when they need it?

Bernice Hastings

Funeral services for Era Bernice Hastings were held Monday at Memorial Funeral Home Chapel with burial in Forrest Memorial Park. Mrs. Hastings died Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013, at MS Care Center in Corinth. She was born on March 7, 1924, in Ripley, to the late Manuel and Etta Brock. She was a retired factory worker and a member of the Kossuth Worship Center. Along with her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, Roy Warren Hastings; four brothers, Marvin, Mitchell, Carlton and Dee Brock; two sisters, Marie Brock and Etta McKay; and her stepmother, Lizzy Brock. Mrs. Hastings is survived by her son, Jim Hastings (Linda) of Corinth; three brothers, Wayne Brock (Rosa Lee) of Ripley, Alvie Brock of Memphis, Tenn., and Harold Brock (Jamie) of Pontiac, Mich.; two sisters, Angie Hamm of Kents Store, Va., and Naoma Da-

vis of Ripley; one grandson, Greg Hastings and Amybeth of Memphis, Tenn.; and two great-grandchildren. Bro. Larry Murphy will officiate the service.

Zachary Price

Funeral services for Zachary Hayse Price, 22, of Como, are set for 1 p.m. today at Magnolia Funeral Home Chapel of Memories in Corinth with burial at Indian Creek Cemetery. Mr. Price died Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, in Memphis, Tenn. Born March 26, 1990, he was a construction worker and a Baptist. Survivors include his father, Tony Price and his wife, Sheila Pearson of Como; his mother, Jackie Baker of Sardis; two brothers, Christopher Clark Pice of Memphis, Tenn., and Justin Baker of Oxford; his maternal grandmother, Gail Roberts of Sardis; and his maternal grandfather, Hayse Price of Memphis, Tenn. He was preceded in death by his paternal grandmother, Lovie Price, and his maternal grandfather, Jackie Roberts. Bro. Warren Jones will officiate the service. Visitation is from 11 a.m. until service time.

Health official urges people to get vaccines

rants and culinary events in the state. Also there will be free recipes and eat. drink.Ms magazines for the traveling public. The Welcome Center will also be having random drawings during the month for an apron with the “Find Your True South” logo.

Rogers camp meets The Col. William P. Rogers, Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp No. 321, will hold its monthly meeting tonight at Martha’s Menu, 302 Taylor St., Corinth at 7 p.m. Author Tim Kent will speak on the “Mystery of Spring Hill, Tenn.” Male descendants of Confederate soldiers may join the SCV, a non-political, educational, historical preservation organization. Visitors are welcome to attend all meetings. For more information, contact Larry Mangus at 287-0766 or visit www.battleofcorinth.com.

grandchildren. Visitation is Wednesday from 6 until 8 p.m. at Boone Funeral Home in Greenville. The Rev. Justin Hiens will officiate the service.

such as young children, pregnant women, people age 65 and older, and those with chronic health conditions, should contact their health care providers to learn if antiviral medication or other treatment is recommended, noted Dr. Dreyzehner. “Classic symptoms of the flu include fever, body aches, sore throat and cough. Anyone at high risk of serious illness who thinks they may have the flu should contact their healthcare provider promptly to determine if treatment with an antiviral medication could help them,” said Kelly Moore, MD. People who are sick should stay at home to recover, and to prevent spreading illness to coworkers and others. TDH recommends not returning to work or school until 24 hours after your fever goes away in order to minimize the chances of spreading the flu to others. It’s also important to practice good health habits to protect yourself from the flu and other winter viruses and to prevent spreading them to others if you do get sick. Good health habits include frequent hand washing with soapy water, keeping hands away from your face, getting plenty of rest, eating a healthful diet and covering coughs and sneezes with a sleeve or tissue, noted Dr. Moore.

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Opinion

Mark Boehler, editor

4 • Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Corinth, Miss.

Lawmakers’ jobs are both boon, conflict BY JEFF AMY JACKSON — It’s the strength and the weakness of a citizen legislature — many Mississippi lawmakers have other jobs back home. A strength, because it gives them knowledge of particular subjects they make laws on. A weakness, because it can make them look like they’re pulling for their own self-interest when they’re in Jackson. “In most jobs your experience is considered an advantage,” said Natalie Wood, a policy specialist with the National Council for State Legislatures. “But in legislatures, sometimes it can be considered a liability.” The two sides of that coin were on display on the first day of the 2013 Mississippi Legislature last week, as the House Insurance Committee considered proposals to regulate special deals cut by drug plans with chain and mail-order pharmacies. The committee includes two pharmacists — Republicans John Read of Gautier and Bobby Howell of Kilmichael. Read, according to his 2011 economic interest disclosure, works as a pharmacist for Fred’s Super Dollar. Howell, according to his statement, is retired. Committee members faced appeals from pharmacists, especially those who own independent drug stores, to force drug plan managers to deal with all pharmacies on equal terms. The state already has a law that’s supposed to allow any drug store to participate in any insurance plan that the drug store accepts the terms of. But pharmacists say it’s not working, as plan managers push beneficiaries toward exclusive deals with chains and mail-order pharmacies. Also sitting in on the meeting was Rep. Forrest Hamilton, R-Olive Branch. A former drug store owner, he still works part-time as pharmacist at a psychiatric hospital. That means changes in how drug stores get paid wouldn’t affect his income. “I don’t have a dog in this, but I understand both sides and both issues,” Hamilton said. He’s all for restrictions on special deals, not because it would benefit his former colleagues, other independent pharmacists, but because he says it’s good for the public. “The No. 1 thing I think we need to be concerned about is the welfare of our constituents,” Hamilton said. Pharmacist-legislators are far from the only lawmakers who might have to vote on regulating their own profession. Many Mississippi legislators are retired, but others work as lawyers, real estate agents, farmers, accountants, ministers, homebuilders, teachers, even paramedics, undertakers, exterminators and optometrists. For example, House Insurance Committee Chairman Gary Chism, R-Columbus, is an insurance agent. He has long wanted to make it harder to evade Mississippi’s mandatory auto insurance law. That would benefit drivers who collide with others who are now uninsured. But it could also help Chism sell more auto insurance. Wood, who works for NCSL’s center for ethics and government, says Mississippi is not unusual. “With citizen legislatures, but with all legislatures, it’s an issue,” she said. “Conflict of interest is the most common ethical dilemma that legislators face. Conflicts are not good or bad. It’s how you handle them.” In Mississippi, both legislative rules and state ethics law say lawmakers shouldn’t vote on issues in which they have a financial interest. State ethics law says officeholders can’t use their office to gain financial benefits for themselves, their families or their businesses. Officials can’t vote to send money directly to their business, but it may be legal for them to take regulatory actions that benefit their industry in general. But knowledge of an industry can benefit the public. In Mississippi, most legislative committees don’t have staff members to research issues. Lawmakers often rely on lobbyists or government officials to explain proposals. Lawmakers with professional experience can test those claims against their own knowledge.

Prayer for today Lord -Jesus Christ, your blood washes away our sins and reconciles us to you. May we never get used to the wonder of a God who gives his own life for those who are killing him. Amen.

A verse to share We rejoice in the hope of the glory of God. — Romans 5:2 (NIV)

Worth quoting You can’t put a limit on anything. The more you dream, the farther you get. — Michael Phelps

Bryant’s education plan offers workable solutions JACKSON — Pacing back and forth as he talked in front of the state’s most influential business group with his ever-present Western boots polished to a blinding shine, Gov. Phil Bryant appeared well at ease in his role as salesmanin-chief for his “Education Works” agenda as the 2013 legislative session. Bryant used his time addressing the Mississippi Economic Council’s “Capital Day” event to urge the state’s business community to embrace his $26 million education plan – one that relies on some substantive basic reforms that have eluded the state for years but that seem – in most cases - infinitely doable from a political standpoint. As an organization that has a half-century track record of both talking the talk and walking the walk in supporting public education in Mississippi, MEC was the perfect forum for Bryant to make his pitch. The MEC has honored the state’s best and brightest high school scholars with

STAR (Student-Teacher Achievem e n t Recognition) student status Sid Salter for the last 46 years. Columnist Mississippi State University President Mark Keenum reiterated MEC’s status as a business group that values education when he unveiled a new MSU scholarship program that will offer MEC’s STAR students $6,000 in additional scholarships. In doing so, MSU becomes the first Mississippi university to make that investment as an effort to keep the state’s best students in Mississippi to pursue their educations. Bryant told the MEC crowd that he struggled as a child with reading before a teacher recognized that he in fact had dyslexia. “I just thought I was dumb,” Bryant said. “The teacher knew better and told me so.” Bryant went on to tell the familiar story of

his diesel mechanic father’s support of his family and the dignity of jobs produced from vocation, technical and workforce training. But Bryant’s “Education Works” focus is what he called the “literacy crisis” and the consequences of the continuation of Mississippi’s long history of so-called “social promotion” — passing students to the next grade when they are not academically prepared to do work on that new grade level. Bryant said: “Data show that 46 percent of thirdgraders and 78 percent of fourth-graders in Mississippi are not proficient in reading. The problem only gets worse as students pass to the next grade, and by eighth grade, a student who couldn’t read proficiently in third grade is four times more likely to drop out of school than his peers.” The “Education Works” agenda has other main points: Raising standards for teacher and a teacher merit pay pilot program; continuing early childhood education efforts; increas-

ing school choice through charter school legislation and open enrollment; and a program that would provide $10 million in tax credits to individuals or businesses who donate funds for students in low-performing school districts to attend private schools. With Republicans in charge in both houses of the Legislature, much of Bryant’s plan should win legislative support. But there are policy disagreements over charter schools among GOP colleagues — and the open enrollment proposals are certain to generate criticism in some circles. The MEC crowd by and large liked what they heard from Bryant as he made his pitch. One line in particular that drew applause was this one: “We have 152 walls that we build around these school districts, and we won’t let students in or out. I want to change that.” (Daily Corinthian and syndicated columnist Sid Salter can be contacted at 601-507-8004 or sidsalter@sidsalter.com.)

History suggests entitlement era is winding down BY MICHAEL BARONE It’s often good fun and sometimes revealing to divide American history into distinct periods of uniform length. In working on my forthcoming book on American migrations, internal and immigrant, it occurred to me that you could do this using the American-sounding interval of 76 years, just a few years more than the Biblical lifespan of three score and 10. It was 76 years from Washington’s First Inaugural in 1789 to Lincoln’s Second Inaugural in 1865. It was 76 years from the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse in 1865 to the attack at Pearl Harbor in 1941. Going backward, it was 76 years from the First Inaugural in 1789 to the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713, which settled one of the BritishFrench colonial wars. And going 76 years back from Utrecht takes you to 1637, when the Virginia and Massachusetts Bay colonies were just getting organized. As for our times, we are now 71 years away from Pearl Harbor. The current 76-year interval ends in December 2017. Each of these 76-year periods can be depicted as a distinct unit. In the colonial years up to 1713, very small numbers of colonists established separate cultures that have persisted to our times. The story is brilliantly told in David Hackett Fischer’s

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“Albion’s Seed.” For a more downbeat version, read the recent “The Barbarous Years” by the nonagenarian Bernard Bailyn. From 1713 to 1789, the colonies were peopled by much larger numbers of motley and often involuntary settlers — slaves, indentured servants, the unruly Scots-Irish on the Appalachian frontier. For how this society became dissatisfied with the colonial status quo, read Bailyn’s “Ideological Origins of the American Revolution.” From 1789 to 1865, Americans sought their manifest destiny by expanding across the continent. They made great technological advances but were faced with the irreconcilable issue of slavery in the territories. For dueling accounts of the period, read the proAndrew Jackson Democrat Sean Wilentz’s “The Rise of American Democracy” and the pro-Henry Clay Whig Daniel Walker Howe’s “What Hath God Wrought.” Both are sparklingly written and full of offbeat insights and brilliant apercus. The 1865-1941 period saw a vast efflorescence of market capitalism, European immigration and rising standards of living. For descriptions of how economic change reshaped the nation and its government, read Morton Keller’s “Affairs of State and Regulating a New

Society.” The 70-plus years since 1941 have seen a vast increase in the welfare safety net and governance by cooperation between big units — big government, big business, big labor — that began in the New Deal and gained steam in and after World War II. I immodestly offer my own “Our Country: The Shaping of America From Roosevelt to Reagan.” The original arrangements in each 76-year period became unworkable and unraveled toward its end. Eighteenth-century Americans rejected the colonial status quo and launched a revolution and established a constitutional republic. Nineteenth-century Americans went to war over expansion of slavery. Early 20th-century Americans grappled with the collapse of the private sector economy in the Depression of the 1930s. We are seeing something like this again today. The welfare state arrangements that once seemed solid are on the path to unsustainability. Entitlement programs — Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid — are threatening to gobble up the whole government and much of the private sector, as well. Lifetime employment by one big company represented by one big union is a thing of the past. People who counted on corporate

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or public sector pensions are seeing them default. Looking back, we are as far away in time from victory in World War II in 1945 as Americans were at the time of the Dred Scott decision from the First Inaugural. We are as far away in time today from passage of the Social Security in 1935 as Americans then were from the launching of post-Civil War Reconstruction. Nevertheless our current president and most politicians of his party seem determined to continue the current welfare state arrangements — historian Walter Russell Mead calls this the blue state model — into the indefinite future. Some leaders of the other party are advancing ideas for adapting a system that worked reasonably well in an industrial age dominated by seemingly eternal big units into something that can prove workable in an information age experiencing continual upheaval wrought by innovations in the market economy. The current 76-year period is nearing its end. What will come next? (Daily Corithian columnist Michael Barone, senior political analyst for The Washington Examiner, is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a Fox News Channel contributor and a coauthor of The Almanac of American Politics.)

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Editorials represent the voice of the Daily Corinthian. Editorial columns, letters to the editor and other articles that appear on this page represent the opinions of the writers and the Daily Corinthian may or may not agree.


Daily Corinthian • Tuesday, January 15, 2013 • 5

State Briefs Associated Press

Mayor running for council post LAUREL — Laurel Mayor Melvin Mack may be leaving the mayor’s office but not politics. Mack said that he will not seek re-election but will, instead, run for a vacant city council post. Mack plans to run for the city’s ward seven post held by Councilman Trey Chinn. Chinn recently said he was not running again. Mack’s home is in ward seven. “My family and I started talking about it and I decided I would run for a councilman position,” Mack said. Mack served on the Jones County Board of Supervisors for eight years and on the Laurel City Council for eight years. “Now that I’ve served in both positions, I know more,” Mack said. “The council has more authority than the mayor. As mayor, you have to have at least four votes to get something approved. The council position will allow me to concentrate on ward seven.” Mack was elected to his first term as the first African American mayor of Laurel in 2005 and reelected in 2009. As mayor, Mack said he concentrated on paving city streets and improving the city’s infrastructure with the ongoing water and sewer improvement projects.

Second suit involving fatal frat fire settled OXFORD — The second of two wrongful death lawsuits filed in the aftermath of a 2004 fatal fire at the Alpha Tau Omega house on

the University of Mississippi campus has been settled. Jordan Williams of Atlanta, Ga., Howard Stone of Spencer, Va., and Will Townsend of Clarksdale died in the early morning fire on Aug. 27, 2004. The Stone family’s suit was settled out of court last year, with terms undisclosed. William M. Quin II, attorney for Williams’ family,said that the lawsuit has been “settled in principle.” He says within several weeks that papers will be filed with Lafayette County Circuit Court asking for the case to be dismissed. Quin declined to discuss the settlement agreement.

Vicksburg police seize 7 pounds of meth VICKSBURG — Vicksburg police have seized a suitcase with seven pounds of methamphetamine after stopping a tour bus Monday on Interstate 20. Police Capt. Bobby Stewart said that the drugs were found in piece of luggage with no name on it.

High court will referee equity case JACKSON — The Mississippi Supreme Court will hear a civil dispute between a former samesex couple. Mona Cates and Elizabeth Swain split in March 2006 after nearly six years together. Swain sued Cates seeking reimbursement for investments made in property during their partnership, according to court documents. The case was heard by the Tate County Chancery Court, which ruled partially in Swain’s favor and awarded her

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$44,995 in damages. The issue was appealed to the Mississippi Court of Appeal, which reversed the lower court’s ruling last April. The Supreme Court last November agreed to hear the case. Court spokeswoman Beverly Kraft said that the Supreme Court has not yet scheduled oral arguments in the case. The case is not on the court’s January-February docket. According to court documents, Cates and Swain met in 2000 and by the end of the year had moved in together in a home Swain purchased in Pensacola, Fla. Cates provided earnest money, made the sole contributions to the cou-

ple’s joint checking account and paid $11,000 to trade in Swain’s vehicle for another, documents show. Meanwhile, Swain paid the mortgage on the Florida home, and the couple jointly purchased other vehicles and made improvements to the home, the records show. The house was sold — with Swain receiving about $32,000 in equity — when the couple moved to Seattle in 2003, according to the court documents. Cates then purchased a home for $200,000, with Swain giving her a check for $34,000 representing the equity from her Florida home. And two years later, the couple relocated

to Cates’ native Mississippi, where Cates purchased a $350,000 home.

Olive Branch becomes more bike-friendly OLIVE BRANCH — Olive Branch will likely be improving bicycle access to roadways soon, using an $189,600 grant from the state Department of Transportation. The Board of Aldermen is scheduled to accept the grant at its meeting today. The city must match the grant with $47,400 for construction. The 10-foot-wide bike and pedestrian lane is set to run from the soccer park on Church Road to Craft Road, where the city’s first bike lane lies.

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Obama dodges criticism about lack of diversity BY JOSH LEDERMAN Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Deflecting criticism about a perceived lack of diversity in his second-term Cabinet, President Barack Obama on Monday urged Americans not to rush to judgment about who he will appoint to replace departing members of his team. In a declaration tinged with the rhetoric of his re-election campaign, Obama asserted: “We’re not going backwards, we’re going forward.” Scrutiny has been mounting over the number of women and minorities that will surround the nation’s first black president in his second term. Cabinet members who are departing at the end of his first term — including Secretary of State Hillary Clinton — are being replaced largely by white males. But in the final White House news conference of his first term, Obama brushed off that criticism, asking for critics to hold their tongues until the remaining vacancies have been filled. “I’m very proud that in the first four years, we had as diverse, if not a more diverse, a White House and a Cabinet than any in history,” Obama said. “I intended to continue that, because it turns out when you look for the very best people, given the incred-

“We’re not going backwards, we’re going forward.” President Barack Obama ible diversity of this country, you’re going to end up with a diverse staff.” Running through a list of high-profile positions filled by women during his first term — such as Clinton and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius — Obama said women comprised 50 percent of his White House staff during his first four years, not to mention the two women he nominated to fill Supreme Court vacancies. Obama’s appeal for patience was unlikely to quell the concerns of members of his own party who have publicly fretted whether Obama’s Cabinet and the tight cadre of advisers who will have his ear over the next four years will end up almost entirely male and white, in stark contrast to the diverse coalition of women, Hispanics and minorities that helped give Obama a second term. “It’s as embarrassing as hell,” Rep. Charlie Rangel, D-N.Y., one of the longest-serving AfricanAmericans in Congress, said last week. Obama nominated Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry to replace Clinton at the State Department after U.N. Ambassador

Susan Rice, who is black, asked for her name to be removed from consideration. Republicans had blasted Rice over her initial comments about the attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, who is Hispanic, stepped down last week, adding to a list of departures that includes EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, who is black. Obama has not yet announced who he will nominate to fill those roles. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano is staying for Obama’s second term. The president has announced his picks to fill two other top jobs, nominating former Sen. Chuck Hagel to run the Defense Department and Obama’s chief of staff, Jack Lew, to serve as Treasury secretary. Two leading candidates to replace Lew at the White House are both men. Attorney General Eric Holder, who is black, and Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, who is of Japanese-American descent, will stay on. A spokesman for Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said Monday that he too will keep his job.

board in 2010 in a move that disturbed many residents in the recessionbattered suburbs southeast of Los Angeles. The day before his death, he held a meeting of the neo-Nazi group at his home.

al dialogue to help prevent similar tragedies. Parents held photos of their children, spoke in wavering voices, cried and hugged. “I do not want to be someone sharing my experience and consoling another parent next time. I do not want there to be a next time,” Hockley said. The group did not offer specific remedies, saying it wants to have openminded discussions about a range of issues, including guns, mental health and safety in schools and other public places. Several speakers said they did not believe there was a single solution. “We want the Sandy Hook school shootings to be recalled as the turning point where we brought our community and communities across the nation together and set a real course for change,” said group cofounder Tom Bittman. Adam Lanza, 20, shot his way into the school on Dec. 14 and killed 26 before committing suicide as police arrived. He also killed his mother at their Newtown home.  

Nation Briefs lican leader said Monday after a series of meetings with military leaders in the country. Sen. Mitch McConnell, who led a congressional delegation to Afghanistan and Israel, expressed optimism about an 11-year war that now stands as the longest

Associated Press

McConnell optimistic about Afghanistan WASHINGTON — The United States should keep a residual force of about 10,000 in Afghanistan after combat forces leave at the end of 2014, the Senate Repub-

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Military suicides hit record in 2012

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WASHINGTON — Suicides in the U.S. military surged to a record 349 last year, far exceeding American combat deaths in Afghanistan, and some private experts are predicting the dark trend will grow worse this year. The Pentagon has struggled to deal with the suicides, which Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and others have called an epidemic. The problem reflects severe strains on military personnel burdened with more than a decade of combat in Afghanistan and Iraq, complicated by anxiety over the prospect of being forced out of a shrinking force. Pentagon figures obtained Monday by The Associated Press show that the 349 suicides among active-duty troops last year were up from 301 the year before and exceeded the Pentagon’s own internal projection of 325. Statistics alone do not explain why troops take their own lives, and the Pentagon’s military and civilian leaders have acknowledged that more needs to be done to understand the causes.

Last year’s total is the highest since the Pentagon began closely tracking suicides in 2001. It exceeds the 295 Americans who died in Afghanistan last year, by the AP’s count.

Boy convicted of killing white supremacist dad RIVERSIDE, Calif. — A boy who was only 10 when he fatally shot his white supremacist father was convicted Monday of second-degree murder by a judge who said the child knew what he did was wrong. Riverside Superior Court Judge Jean Leonard weighed the severity of the crime versus whether the amount of abuse and neglect suffered by the boy, now 12, played a significant role in the slaying of 32-yearold Jeff Hall, a regional leader of the National Socialist Movement. Leonard noted the boy lay in bed, waited for the right moment and shot his dad at point-blank range with the “bad gun” — a .357 Magnum — while he slept on a sofa in the family home. “This was not a complex killing,” said Leonard, who heard the case without a jury. “He thought about the idea and shot his father.” The boy’s stepmother told authorities that Hall had hit, kicked and yelled at his son for being too loud or getting in the way. Hall and the boy’s biological mother had previously gone through a divorce and custody dispute in which each had accused the other of child abuse. She initially told authorities she had killed Hall but then quickly retracted her statement. She was not charged in the case. Defense attorney Matthew Hardy said because of the abuse his client learned it was acceptable to kill people who were a threat. The boy thought if he shot his dad, the violence would end, Hardy said. Also at issue were the father’s racist beliefs. Hall, who said he believed in a white breakaway nation, ran for a seat on the local water

Elder Bush leaves Houston hospital HOUSTON — Former President George H.W. Bush was released from a Houston hospital and went home Monday after spending nearly two months being treated for a bronchitis-related cough and other health issues, a family spokesman said. Bush, 88, the nation’s oldest living former president, was admitted to Methodist Hospital on Nov. 23. His stay included a week in intensive care last month. Bush had been in the hospital for about a month before his office disclosed in late December that he was in intensive care because physicians were having difficulty controlling a fever that developed after the cough improved. His office said on Dec. 29 that he had been moved back to a regular hospital room. Since then, his condition has continued to improve and he has been undergoing physical therapy to rebuild his strength. Bush’s office said he was treated for a bacterial infection, along with the bronchitis and cough.

Group launches anti-violence plan NEWTOWN, Conn. — Nicole Hockley says she still finds herself reaching for her son’s hand or expecting him to crawl into bed with her for a hug before school. “It’s so hard to believe he’s gone,” said Hockley, whose son Dylan was among the 20 first-graders and six adults killed by a gunman a month ago at Sandy Hook Elementary School. She was among several parents to speak Monday at the launch of Sandy Hook Promise, a group calling for a nation-

Toyota retakes global auto sales crown DETROIT — Toyota has once again dethroned General Motors as the world’s top-selling automaker. The Japanese company sold 9.7 million cars and trucks worldwide in 2012, although it’s still counting. GM sold 9.29 million. Both companies saw higher sales, but Toyota’s growth was far larger as it rolled out new versions of popular models like the Camry. GM executives promised sales growth this year, especially in the U.S. GM was the top-selling carmaker for more than seven decades before losing the title to Toyota in 2008. GM retook the sales crown in 2011 when Toyota’s factories were slowed by an earthquake and tsunami in Japan. The disaster left Toyota dealers with few cars to sell. The company has since recovered.




Business

7 â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Corinthian

YOUR STOCKS Name

P/E Last

A-B-C-D AES Corp dd AK Steel dd AbtLab s ... AbbVie n ... AcadiaPh dd Accenture 18 AccoBrds 6 ActivsBliz 15 AdobeSy 23 AMD dd Aeropostl 16 Aetna 9 Affymetrix dd Agilent 13 AlcatelLuc ... Alcoa 36 AllscriptH 19 Allstate 8 AlphaNRs dd AlpAlerMLP q AlteraCp lf 19 Altria 16 Amarin ... Amazon cc AMovilL 25 AmAxle 7 ACapAgy 10 AmCapLtd 3 AEagleOut 18 AmExp 14 AmIntlGrp 2 ARltyCT n ... Amgen 16 Anadarko dd AnalogDev 20 Annaly 10 ApolloGrp 6 ApolloInv 7 Apple Inc 11 ApldMatl 90 ArcelorMit dd ArchCoal dd ArchDan 18 ArenaPhm dd AriadP dd ArmHld ... ArmourRsd 10 AscenaRt s 17 Atmel 41 Aurizon g 18 AvagoTch 15 Avon 57 Baidu 26 BakrHu 13 BcoBrad pf ... BcoSantSA ... BcoSBrasil ... BkofAm 30 BkNYMel 13 Barclay ... BariPVix rs q BarrickG 10 Baxter 17 BedBath 13 BerkH B 18 BestBuy dd Blackstone 70 BlockHR 16 Boeing 14 BostonSci dd BrMySq 31 Broadcom 27 BrcdeCm 14 CA Inc 12 CBL Asc 28 CBS B 16 CMS Eng 17 CSX 12 CVS Care 18 CblvsnNY 18 Cadence 21 Cameco g ... CdnNRs gs ... CapOne 11 Carlisle 15 Carnival 22 Celgene 27 CellTher rs dd Celsion dd Cemex ... Cemig pf s ... CenterPnt 21 CntryLink 36 ChkPoint 17 CheniereEn dd ChesEng dd Chicos 17 Chimera ... CienaCorp dd CinciBell 49 Cirrus 18 Cisco 14 Citigroup 13 CitrixSys 38 Clearwire dd CliffsNRs 6 Clorox 19 Coach 17 CocaCE 14 CognizTech 24 ColonyFncl 16 Comc spcl 20 CmclMtls 12 Comverse dd ConAgra 20 ConocPhil s 7 ConsolEngy 20 ConstellA 16 Corning 10 Cosan Ltd ... Costco 24 CSVelIVSt q CSVS2xVx rs q CypSemi 13 DCT Indl dd DR Horton 8 Danaher 19 DeanFds 25 DeckrsOut 9 DelphiAuto ... DeltaAir 6 DenburyR 10 Dndreon dd DevonE 34 DirecTV 13 DrxFnBull q DirSCBear q DirFnBear q DirDGldBll q DirxSCBull q Discover 9 Disney 16 DollarGen 16 DollarTr s 15 DomRescs 22 DonlleyRR 6 DowChm 26 DryShips dd DuPont 14 DukeEn rs 18 DukeRlty cc

11.03 4.46 33.36 34.09 5.61 69.86 8.47 11.50 38.16 2.64 12.32 45.78 3.90 43.54 1.69 8.92 10.26 42.93 9.18 16.73 34.68 32.99 8.35 272.73 24.61 11.13 31.05 13.24 19.64 61.21 35.05 12.69 86.92 77.87 42.24 14.70 19.32 8.91 501.75 11.75 16.98 6.81 28.56 10.20 19.98 42.40 6.87 16.42 6.97 4.58 34.57 15.39 112.64 42.01 18.65 8.65 7.70 11.47 26.72 19.22 26.03 34.18 68.03 55.73 95.36 14.48 16.90 19.41 76.55 6.32 34.22 34.62 5.59 23.56 20.90 38.21 24.92 20.65 51.89 15.65 14.02 21.22 29.73 61.28 60.28 37.37 97.67 1.50 9.05 10.39 10.88 19.88 40.07 48.15 20.18 16.94 17.47 2.73 14.60 5.37 28.62 20.97 42.22 70.71 3.18 36.14 76.60 61.01 33.64 78.45 21.38 37.40 15.69 4.34 31.03 58.47 29.91 35.33 12.50 17.84 100.37 19.91 6.31 10.25 6.73 20.89 59.59 17.75 38.15 37.62 13.44 16.88 6.41 53.82 53.35 135.30 12.05 13.24 10.11 70.98 39.73 50.59 43.02 38.04 52.39 8.72 34.28 2.11 46.27 65.39 14.63

E-F-G-H E-CDang dd E-Trade 40 eBay 18 EMC Cp 20 Eaton 13 EdisonInt 25 Elan 13 EldorGld g 29 ElectArts dd EmersonEl 21 EmpDist 16 EnCana g 19 EngyTsfr 9 Epocrates dd Ericsson ... EsteeLdr s 29 ExcoRes dd Exelixis dd Exelon 16 Express 9 ExpScripts 30 ExxonMbl 11 Facebook n ... FedExCp 16 Fifth&Pac dd FifthThird 10 Finisar 30 FstHorizon dd

4.79 9.49 53.18 24.21 55.33 46.07 10.17 13.03 14.43 55.32 20.89 19.36 46.36 11.69 10.36 64.23 6.48 4.66 29.42 14.06 54.69 89.58 30.95 98.42 14.31 15.35 14.98 9.96

Chg FstSolar dd 31.21 FirstEngy 15 39.49 FlowrsFds 20 27.22 17 37.59 -.08 ForestLab 10 6.84 -.22 ForestOil 53 19.44 -.01 Fortinet +.24 Francesca 30 27.22 11 34.72 +.60 FMCG 4.39 -.02 FrontierCm 21 1.18 +.17 FuelCell h dd dd 20.80 -.02 Fusion-io 18 45.92 +.07 GATX 17 36.04 -.03 GNC 3 3.11 -.06 GT AdvTc ... 4.92 +.25 Gafisa SA +.19 GameStop dd 23.01 15 31.39 +.11 Gap +.08 GenDynam 10 70.35 dd 19.12 -.02 GenGrPrp 15 40.93 +.16 GenMills -.03 GenMotors 11 30.33 10 8.01 -.37 Genworth GaGulf 22 50.39 ... 9.00 -.59 Gerdau 24 77.77 +.06 GileadSci ... 44.26 -.26 GlaxoSKln ... 12.14 +4.79 GoldFLtd 21 37.03 +.08 Goldcrp g -.15 GoldmanS 13 136.13 21 723.25 +.02 Google 17 39.34 -.06 GreenMtC dd 5.27 +.50 Groupon GpFSnMx n ... 17.79 -.03 5 33.85 -.18 HCA Hldg 7.99 +.10 HalconR rs dd 11 35.91 -.04 Hallibrtn 8.34 +.03 Halozyme dd 33 15.08 -.02 HWinstn g 8 23.82 -.09 HartfdFn 9.40 +.11 Headwatrs dd 11 9.22 -.01 HltMgmt 3.90 -18.55 Heckmann dd HeclaM 54 5.90 +.04 11 44.08 -.31 Herbalife dd 6.34 -.14 HercOffsh Hertz 17 17.58 +.22 13 56.42 +.54 Hess dd 16.95 +.69 HewlettP 6 45.82 +.12 HollyFront dd 22.56 -.06 Hologic 23 63.48 -.08 HomeDp 9.01 -.11 HopFedBc 29 HostHotls cc 16.64 +1.12 dd .32 +.23 HstnAEn dd 6.31 +.17 HovnanE HudsCity dd 8.54 -.33 6.59 -1.00 HuntBncsh 12 8 17.25 +.31 Huntsmn +.07 I-J-K-L +.04 q 16.22 -.16 iShGold q 56.68 -.06 iShBraz q 34.23 -.07 iShEMU iSh HK q 19.90 -.43 iShItaly q 14.19 -.07 q 9.94 -.92 iShJapn iShMex q 73.72 -.54 iSTaiwn q 13.58 +.97 iShSilver q 30.04 +.27 iShChina25 q 41.31 +.04 iSCorSP500 q 147.74 -.57 iShEMkts q 44.66 +1.39 iShB20 T q 119.52 -.04 iS Eafe q 58.11 +.09 iSRusMCV q 51.96 -.20 iShiBxHYB q 94.39 +.03 iSR1KG q 67.40 +.22 iShR2K q 87.39 -.10 iShREst q 66.59 -.36 iShDJHm q 22.06 +.03 Incyte dd 19.22 +.11 IndiaGC dd .16 +.59 Infosys 17 51.93 +.26 IngrmM 9 17.67 +.08 IBM 13 192.62 +.77 IntlGame 17 14.89 -.54 IntPap 20 40.83 -.71 Interpublic 15 11.74 -.03 Invesco 17 27.34 +.34 Isis dd 13.69 +1.37 ItauUnibH ... 17.41 -.02 Ixia 29 19.24 +.59 JDS Uniph dd 13.18 -.10 JPMorgCh 10 45.88 +.02 JanusCap 16 9.76 -.16 JetBlue 13 5.90 -.25 JohnJn 24 72.56 -.31 JohnsnCtl 13 31.73 -.06 JnprNtwk 59 20.82 +.07 KB Home dd 16.11 +.09 KBR Inc 21 28.75 -.07 KKR 8 16.28 -.05 KeyEngy 9 7.30 +.07 Keycorp 10 8.87 -2.96 KindMorg 54 36.94 +.49 Kinross g dd 9.44 -.12 KnghtCap dd 3.58 -.76 KodiakO g 25 9.10 +.03 Kohls 10 41.99 -.07 KraftFGp n ... 46.85 +.92 KrispKrm 5 11.82 +2.12 LDK Solar dd 2.04 +.15 LSI Corp 34 7.21 -.02 LVSands 24 52.17 +.53 LeapFrog 12 9.67 +.44 LennarA 15 41.02 +.27 Lexmark 9 26.85 +.29 LibMed A n ... 109.60 +.23 LillyEli 14 52.80 +.20 Limited 17 45.50 -.28 LincNat 17 27.57 -.30 LinearTch 20 35.79 +.05 LinkedIn cc 117.52 +.31 LionsGt g dd 17.91 +.09 LloydBkg ... 3.58 +.33 LockhdM 11 93.91 -.25 LaPac dd 20.22 +.21 lululemn gs 45 72.30 +.03 LyonBas A 18 61.20 -.06 M-N-O-P -.19 -.05 MEMC dd 3.70 +1.51 MFA Fncl 10 8.68 -.47 MGIC dd 2.87 +.09 MGM Rsts dd 12.75 +.26 Macys 12 37.08 +.24 Manitowoc 27 16.22 -.44 MannKd dd 2.49 +.95 MarathnO 12 32.06 -.71 MarathPet 9 62.62 +.01 MktVGold q 45.23 +.06 MV OilSv s q 40.30 -.06 MktVRus q 30.14 +.06 MktVJrGld q 20.26 -.66 MartMM 45 98.08 +.01 MarvellT 15 8.74 -.32 Masco dd 17.50 -.08 Mattel 15 36.82 -.04 MaximIntg 23 29.15 -.15 McDrmInt 16 11.66 +.42 McEwenM dd 3.71 13 44.22 -.01 Medtrnic +.12 MelcoCrwn 36 19.17 20 43.34 -.30 Merck 23 36.30 -.03 MetLife MetroPCS 9 9.51 MKors ... 54.46 +.24 Microchp 30 33.11 -.09 MicronT dd 7.60 -.52 Microsoft 15 26.89 +.06 Molycorp dd 8.78 -.42 Mondelez ... 27.48 +.27 Monsanto 24 100.59 -.17 MorgStan dd 20.07 -.02 Mosaic 14 59.53 +.19 Mylan 16 27.54 +.28 NCR Corp 30 27.14 +.02 NII Hldg dd 6.35 -.42 NRG Egy dd 23.20 +.60 NYSE Eur 17 32.74 +.01 Nabors cc 14.50 +.06 NamTai 24 12.80 +.10 NBGreece ... 1.69 -.04 NOilVarco 12 70.34 -.16 NetApp 26 33.24 +.13 Netflix cc 103.45 +.17 Newcastle 4 9.75 -.91 NewellRub 15 22.06 -.03 NewLead h ... 1.18 -.77 NewmtM 13 45.30 +1.02 NewsCpA 24 26.80 +1.47 Nexen g ... 26.92 -.12 NiSource 26 25.88 +.01 NikeB s 22 53.19 -.01 NobleCorp 18 37.30

-.80 -.40 +2.39 -.52 -.12 +.10 -1.01 -.28 +.04 -.07 +.87 -.26 -.21 -.22 +.30 -.24 -.32 -.39 -.01 +.31 -.03 -.10 +.41 -.01 -.31 -.28 -.03 +.15 -1.00 -16.74 -1.89 -.08 +.75 +.65 +.18 -.71 +1.13 +.62 -.08 +.19 +.10 -.10 +.03 +4.06 -.05 +.04 +.17 +.79 +1.15 +.21 -.22 -.03 +.01 -.09 -.04 -.48 +.05 +.27 -.02 -.03 -.11 +.06 +.37 -.03 +.56 +.22 -.13 +.19 -.33 +.07 +.09 -.13 -.20 +.05 +.10 -.15 +1.02 -.29 +.14 -1.83 -.09 +.72 +.06 -.40 +.41 +.17 +1.58 -.04 -.26 +.18 +.03 +.21 +.06 +.16 -.25 -.73 +.30 -.30 +.03 -.12 -.04 -.10 -.03 +.48 +.46 -.11 +.06 -.35 +.25 +.07 +.89 -.23 -.31 +1.12 -.27 +.06 -.48 +.10 +.08 +.20 -.53 +1.46 +.29 -.23 +.01 -.04 -.05 +.19 -.23 -.10 -.09 +.63 -.17 -.39 +.38 +.06 -.17 +.12 -.19 -.31 -.46 -.17 -.13 +.15 +.48 +.11 -.04 -.03 +1.52 -.48 +.06 +.06 +.30 +.06 +.51 -.10 -.21 -.30 +.63 +.01 -.36 +.01 -.15 -2.00 -.06 -.55 +.18 +2.16 -.01 +.26 +.08 -.46 -.13 -.09 +.12 +.09 +.88

Today

Weaker sales expected Investors will await Forest Laboratoriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; latest earnings results today with tempered expectations. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because the drug maker cut its annual net income forecast and lowered its sales estimates in October, citing lower sales of its Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease drug Namenda and other products, along with greater expenses and higher taxes. The company has been grappling with growing competition from generic versions of its former best-seller, the antidepressant Lexapro.

NokiaCp ... 4.62 NorflkSo 12 64.87 NA Pall g ... 1.63 NoestUt 17 39.04 NorthropG 9 67.22 Novavax dd 2.15 Nvidia 15 12.20 OcciPet 11 82.67 OfficeDpt dd 3.80 OnSmcnd 85 7.66 OpkoHlth dd 5.71 Oracle 16 34.96 Orexigen dd 6.29 PG&E Cp 19 40.89 PMC Sra dd 5.40 PNC 12 59.45 PPG 18 141.03 PacEthan h dd .33 PanASlv 12 19.20 Pandora dd 11.07 Paychex 21 32.27 PeabdyE 9 24.60 PennWst g ... 10.45 PepcoHold 17 19.11 PeregrinP dd 2.10 PetrbrsA ... 19.38 Petrobras ... 19.70 Pfizer 16 26.74 PhilipMor 18 89.07 Phillips66 n ... 51.35 PiperJaf dd 34.00 PitnyBw 4 11.74 Polycom 36 11.48 Potash 16 42.66 PwShs QQQ q 66.96 PrUltQQQ s q 57.95 PrUShQQQ q 27.91 ProUltSP q 64.03 PrUVxST rs q 13.73 ProctGam 18 69.63 ProgsvCp 15 22.55 PrUShSP rs q 50.75 PrUShL20 rs q 65.02 PUSSP500 rs q 34.26 ProspctCap ... 11.18 PulteGrp 45 19.10 PureBio rsh dd .98

YOUR FUNDS

          

-.08 +.83 -.01 -.15 +.15 -.01 -.41 +.04 -.05 +.33 +.10 +.26 -.06 +.06 -.60 -1.07 -.01 +.37 +.05 +.49 -.57 +.09 +.03 -.01 -.13 -.17 +.22 -.16 +.77 +.01 -.17 +.17 -.13 -.30 -.55 +.24 -.15 -.43 +.41 +.21 +.04 +.34 +.12 -.06 -.24 +.07

ÂŽ

Eric M Rutledge, AAMS , CFP

ÂŽ

Financial Advisor 1500 Harper Road Suite 1 Corinth, MS 38834 662-287-1409

Brian S Langley Financial Advisor 605 Foote Street Corinth, MS 38834 662-287-4471 

www.edwardjones.com

Parting words from

Vanguardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CIO George â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gusâ&#x20AC;? Sauter joined Vanguard in 1987. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when investing in index mutual funds was beginning to catch on. As the fund companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief investment officer for the last nine years, he helped Vanguard grow to manage roughly $2 trillion in assets. Sauter left his post at the end of 2012 and is taking a few months off. Before he moved on, he shared some parting thoughts.

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starts to strengthen, interest rates will go back up and bond returns will be disappointing, even negative.

75 31.63 -1.37 18 64.24 -.66 What mistakes have you made with your dd 1.36 +.07 own portfolio? dd 2.96 +.03 Being too conservative when I first started dd 5.78 +.20 investing as a young man. At that age, you dd 4.90 -.02 have a long time horizon and should dd 6.09 -.09 probably be more aggressive. I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a 20 14.35 +.08 mistake a lot of young investors are making cc 3.07 +.08 today. The data show that 20-somethings are Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your long-term outlook for the 29 14.95 +1.39 much more conservative than 20-somethings market? Stocks are a bit cheap now and you can expect a were 10 years ago. ... 55.81 +.16 reasonable return over the next decade â&#x20AC;&#x201D; dd 1.45 +.01 maybe 6, 7, 8 or 9 percent a year, something in 48 20.09 +.16 George â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gusâ&#x20AC;? Gus Saut Sauter line with the historic toric average. Corporate cc 40.43 -.15 earnings are the e key factor to look Age: 58 24 12.08 +.12 at and they continue tinue to be strong. ... 17.04 +.72 Career: Joined Vang Vanguard in 1987; named Vanguardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first fi chief investq 134.89 +.17 Are bond investors facing a stors ment officer in 2003. q 161.54 +.48 significant risk? k? q 146.97 -.10 Fun fact: Born and raised in Mansfield, r Unfortunately, we may be seeing q 27.66 -.11 Ohio; at age 8 he began beg taking deposits the bond marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of 1999 q 41.21 from neighbors and making loans. m and the run-up of tech stocks. q 63.22 +.18 Best investment advice: advic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Think Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re building a pretty big bubble in q 56.03 -.09 long-term. Investors frequently get Inve the bond markett and bubbles just 8 17.42 +.01 caught up u in the moment donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t end pleasantly. antly. A lot of 13 38.85 +.56 and in the noise around investors could be 24 46.95 +.42 them.â&#x20AC;? them disappointed. When dd 6.66 -.20 the economy 18 72.77 -.98 23 15.27 -.12 Mark Jewell â&#x20AC;˘ AP 22 38.48 +.38 4 33.97 +.68 dd 4.43 +.20 ... 6.15 +.02 NDEXES 32 13.51 -.04 52-Week Net YTD 52-wk 20 21.01 -.36 High Low Name Last Chg %Chg %Chg %Chg 10 8.23 -.10 ... 11.28 +.19 13,661.72 12,035.09 Dow Industrials 13,507.32 +18.89 +.14 +3.08 +8.74 22 11.02 -.03 5,591.41 4,795.28 Dow Transportation 5,600.49 +27.87 +.50 +5.53 +8.20 dd 32.58 +.07 499.82 435.57 Dow Utilities 458.19 -.77 -.17 +1.13 +1.62 18 27.69 +.09 8,717.05 7,222.88 NYSE Composite 8,717.44 +5.05 +.06 +3.24 +14.22 q 39.02 +.01 2,509.57 2,164.87 NYSE MKT 2,398.39 -3.33 -.14 +1.81 +5.89 q 41.81 +.04 3,196.93 2,662.96 Nasdaq Composite 3,117.50 -8.13 -.26 +3.25 +15.01 q 36.03 +.11 1,474.51 1,266.74 S&P 500 1,470.68 -1.37 -.09 +3.12 +14.09 q 48.99 +.12 15,513.37 -9.51 -.06 +3.46 +14.52 q 73.62 +.01 15,528.42 13,248.92 Wilshire 5000 883.19 729.75 Russell 2000 880.10 -.67 -.08 +3.62 +15.17 q 39.24 +.15 q 29.40 -.19 q 35.33 -.07 13,560 Dow Jones industrials 51 7.62 -.12 dd 12.16 +.18 Close: 13,507.32 13,200 dd 2.54 -.06 Change: 18.89 (0.1%) 31 54.67 -.34 12,840 10 DAYS ... 15.59 +1.39 13,800 13 51.01 +.43 25 14.73 -.14 13,500 15 58.87 +.03 10 34.35 +.33 13,200 51 7.70 -.49 dd 1.75 -.10 9 28.09 -.22 12,900 dd 3.53 13 19.91 -.03 12,600 57 2.50 +.06 16 31.07 +.16 12,300 17 18.19 -.09 J A S O N D J 19 43.93 -.03 ... 18.01 -.14 ... 11.97 -.31 TOCKS OF OCAL NTEREST 13 60.39 +.32 dd 2.23 YTD YTD 14 16.84 -.26 Name Div PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div PE Last Chg %Chg 10 42.62 +.45 3.08f 17 91.53 -.20 +3.8 1.40f 9 52.95 +.02 -.3 McDnlds 16 38.08 +.02 AFLAC 1.80f 44 34.02 -.25 +.9 MeadWvco 1.00 34 32.75 -.31 +2.8 20 32.34 -.08 AT&T Inc 2.56 19 87.99 -.38 +4.7 OldNBcp 19 26.45 +.04 AirProd .36 13 12.74 ... +7.3 89 60.71 +.36 AlliantEgy 1.88f 17 45.81 +.06 +4.3 Penney ... ... 18.09 -.17 -8.2 15 97.08 +.80 AEP 1.88 14 43.24 ... +1.3 PennyMac 2.28f 9 27.64 -.02 +9.3 32 22.77 -.18 AmeriBrgn .84f 16 44.29 +.45 +2.6 PepsiCo 2.15 19 71.29 +.41 +4.2 19 61.25 +.97 ATMOS 1.40f 15 35.75 +.22 +1.8 PilgrimsP ... 13 8.64 +.57 +19.3 18 49.30 -.31 BB&T Cp .80 12 30.26 -.05 +4.7 12 34.09 -.32 RadioShk ... ... 2.31 +.09 +9.0 1.92a 6 44.34 -.14 +6.5 dd 53.93 -.16 BP PLC RegionsFn .04 ... 7.19 -.05 +.8 .04 17 14.65 -.04 +.8 dd 5.58 -.04 BcpSouth 3.00 11 2543.00 -17.00 +.5 dd 5.10 -.05 Caterpillar 2.08 10 94.63 -.56 +5.6 SbdCp ... ... 44.60 +3.65 +7.8 10 12.12 -.01 Chevron 3.60 9 112.85 +1.12 +4.4 SearsHldgs 1.56 29 161.18 -.10 +4.8 CocaCola s 1.02 19 36.99 +.08 +2.0 Sherwin U-V-W-X-Y-Z .05e 5 3.15 -.01 +9.0 .65 21 38.92 +.46 +4.2 SiriusXM UBS AG ... 17.34 +.05 Comcast 1.96 17 43.05 -.11 +.6 2.00 15 65.04 -.25 +1.2 SouthnCo US Airwy 5 14.67 -.11 CrackerB ... ... 5.69 -.23 +.4 1.84 12 89.86 +.24 +4.0 SprintNex UltraPt g dd 18.36 +.12 Deere UtdContl dd 25.99 Dell Inc .32 8 12.29 +1.41 +21.2 SPDR Fncl .26e ... 17.06 -.05 +4.1 UPS B 20 79.24 +1.32 Dillards .20a 13 79.50 -.81 -5.1 TecumsehB ... ... 4.85 -.10 +5.4 US NGs rs q 18.98 +.26 Dover 1.40 13 66.60 -.47 +1.4 TecumsehA ... ... 4.88 +.04 +5.6 US OilFd q 34.28 +.22 EnPro ... 21 42.29 -.03 +3.4 Torchmark .60 11 53.52 +.07 +3.9 USSteel dd 24.38 -.50 .40f 11 13.99 -.01 +8.0 Total SA UtdTech 15 85.80 +.62 FordM 2.97e ... 52.91 +.03 +1.7 .24a 14 12.43 -.01 -6.6 USEC UtdhlthGp 10 53.36 +.54 FredsInc ... ... .59 +.01 +11.3 .34 26 36.35 -.05 +4.4 UrbanOut 32 42.25 -.50 FullerHB US Bancrp .78 12 33.47 -.03 +4.8 Vale SA ... 20.27 -.05 GenCorp ... ... 9.75 -.19 +6.6 WalMart 1.59 14 68.30 -.33 +.1 Vale SA pf ... 19.46 +.06 GenElec .76f 16 21.12 -.01 +.6 WellsFargo .88 10 34.77 -.33 +1.7 ValeroE 9 35.33 +.63 Goodyear ... 19 13.94 +.16 +.9 VangTSM q 75.69 -.08 .16f 81 4.85 +.03 +3.2 1.64f 22 66.76 +.45 +5.2 Wendys Co VangEmg q 45.02 +.18 HonwllIntl +8.3 .90 10 22.00 -.00 +6.7 WestlkChm .75a 18 85.90 +.51 VangEAFE q 36.05 +.05 Intel .68f 53 30.80 ... +10.7 .32 11 19.54 -.38 +1.3 Weyerhsr Velti dd 5.18 -.19 Jabil .17 8 7.40 +.14 +8.5 2.96 18 85.65 +.55 +1.4 Xerox VeriFone 55 32.20 +.60 KimbClk Verisign 23 38.38 +.38 Kroger ... ... 6.63 -.07 -1.8 .60f 21 25.86 +.16 -.6 YRC Wwde VerizonCm 39 42.59 -.71 Lowes .64 21 35.38 -.45 -.4 Yahoo ... 6 19.43 +.14 -2.4 VertxPh 25 47.34 +.03 ViacomB 16 57.76 -.02 VirgnMda h 33 37.59 +.06 Visa 51 160.65 -.51 Vivus dd 13.95 +.06 Vodafone ... 26.27 -.32 MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) AINERS ($2 OR MORE) OSERS ($2 OR MORE) VulcanM dd 53.87 -.71 Vol (00) Last Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg WPX Engy dd 14.70 -.16 Name Walgrn 18 39.04 -.06 RschMotn 1423864 14.95 +1.39 GenFin un 6.22 +2.37 +61.6 Repros wtA 19.15 -6.86 -26.4 WalterEn 56 36.70 -.58 Dell Inc 1144098 12.29 +1.41 Aurizon g 4.58 +1.12 +32.4 Telik rs 2.25 -.73 -24.5 WarnerCh 9 13.13 +.07 BkofAm 1067279 11.47 -.16 JPM2x10yT 33.88 +6.78 +25.0 WVS Fn 8.56 -1.44 -14.4 WeathfIntl ... 11.50 -.03 Facebook n 939752 30.95 -.77 SangBio 8.20 +1.22 +17.5 NamTai 12.80 -2.00 -13.5 WellPoint 8 62.44 +.69 SiriusXM 3.85 +.54 +16.3 FlamelT 4.04 -.54 -11.8 879228 3.15 -.01 AdeptTch WDigital 6 44.70 +.72 3.89 -.51 -11.6 S&P500ETF 795905 146.97 -.10 Halozyme 8.34 +1.13 +15.7 ImmuCell WstnRefin 20 29.50 +.29 Biolase 2.83 +.38 +15.5 CSVS2xInPlt37.76 -4.78 -11.2 NokiaCp 790390 4.62 -.08 WstnUnion 7 13.80 -.34 -10.8 741049 5.69 -.23 DoverSadl 3.90 +.50 +14.7 ASpecRlty 2.81 WmsCos 22 33.47 -.02 SprintNex -.43 -10.0 621969 44.66 +.19 ColonyBk 4.95 +.58 +13.3 EducMgmt 3.88 Windstrm 43 10.00 +.04 iShEMkts 12.29 +1.41 +13.0 Cirrus 28.62 -2.96 -9.4 617557 16.95 +.79 Dell Inc WT India q 20.03 +.38 HewlettP XL Grp cc 26.44 -.16 XcelEngy 15 27.08 -.09 YSE IARY ASDA IARY Xilinx 20 35.84 +.04 1,502 Total issues 3,138 Advanced 1,147 Total issues 2,568 Yamana g 19 17.29 -.12 Advanced 1,506 New Highs 235 Declined 1,282 New Highs 139 YoukuTud dd 22.59 +.62 Declined 130 New Lows 3 Unchanged 139 New Lows 9 YumBrnds 19 66.15 -.72 Unchanged Volume 2,951,362,172 Volume 1,847,983,078 Zynga dd 2.62 +.03

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$37.59

$40 $31.17 35 30

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;12

Operating EPS

est.

$1.04 -$0.11 3Q â&#x20AC;&#x2122;12

Price-to-earnings ratio:

3Q â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13 19

based on past 12 monthsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; results Source: FactSet

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YTD Name NAV Chg %Rtn American Beacon LgCpVlIs 22.42 -0.01 +3.6 American Cent EqIncInv 8.04 ... +2.8 GrowthInv 27.61 -0.08 +2.7 InfAdjI 13.13 ... -0.4 UltraInv 26.85 -0.11 +3.1 ValueInv 6.61 +0.01 +3.8 American Funds AMCAPA m 22.35 ... +3.0 BalA m 20.90 +0.02 +2.5 BondA m 12.93 ... -0.1 CapIncBuA m 53.58 -0.04 +1.5 CapWldBdA m21.17 +0.02 -0.1 CpWldGrIA m 38.16 +0.04 +2.6 EurPacGrA m 42.06 +0.06 +2.0 FnInvA m 42.09 -0.02 +3.2 GrthAmA m 35.48 -0.03 +3.3 HiIncA m 11.48 ... +1.3 IncAmerA m 18.40 +0.02 +1.9 IntBdAmA m 13.74 ... -0.1 IntlGrInA m 32.28 +0.05 +1.8 InvCoAmA m 31.17 -0.02 +3.3 MutualA m 29.07 +0.01 +2.5 NewEconA m 29.43 +0.04 +3.5 NewPerspA m 32.15 -0.01 +2.8 NwWrldA m 55.28 +0.06 +1.4 SmCpWldA m 41.01 +0.05 +2.8 TaxEBdAmA m13.23 +0.02 +0.6 USGovSecA m14.17 ... -0.2 WAMutInvA m 32.07 +0.03 +2.8 Aquila ChTxFKYA m 11.11 +0.01 +0.4 Artisan Intl d 25.25 +0.08 +2.7 IntlVal d 31.15 -0.02 +2.5 MdCpVal 21.57 +0.03 +3.8 MidCap 39.13 +0.15 +4.2 BBH TaxEffEq d 17.89 ... +3.1 Baron Growth b 55.46 -0.05 +3.4 Bernstein DiversMui 14.87 +0.01 +0.4 IntDur 14.05 ... -0.2 TxMIntl 14.30 +0.01 +2.3 BlackRock Engy&ResA m 29.20 -0.15 +0.9 EqDivA m 20.42 +0.02 +2.7 EqDivI 20.46 +0.02 +2.7 GlobAlcA m 20.11 +0.01 +1.9 GlobAlcC m 18.72 +0.01 +1.8 GlobAlcI 20.20 +0.01 +1.9 HiYldBdIs 8.19 +0.01 +1.4 HiYldInvA m 8.19 +0.01 +1.4 Cohen & Steers Realty 65.92 +0.14 +2.1 Columbia AcornIntZ 41.70 +0.05 +2.1 AcornZ 31.48 +0.06 +3.4 DivIncZ 15.20 ... +3.1 StLgCpGrZ 14.66 +0.01 +5.8 TaxEA m 14.37 +0.01 +0.7 DFA 1YrFixInI 10.33 ... +0.1 2YrGlbFII 10.04 ... 5YrGlbFII 11.13 ... -0.2 EmMkCrEqI 20.83 +0.10 +2.1 EmMktValI 30.73 +0.22 +3.0 EmMtSmCpI 21.82 +0.12 +3.1 IntSmCapI 16.66 ... +4.3 RelEstScI 26.93 +0.06 +2.2 USCorEq1I 12.78 ... +3.5 USCorEq2I 12.60 -0.01 +3.4 USLgCo 11.58 -0.01 +3.2 USLgValI 23.76 +0.03 +3.8 USMicroI 15.08 -0.01 +3.3 USSmValI 27.07 -0.04 +3.3 USSmallI 23.44 -0.01 +3.4 DWS-Scudder GrIncS 19.02 +0.06 +4.0 Davis NYVentA m 36.19 -0.06 +4.1 NYVentY 36.57 -0.07 +4.0 Delaware Invest DiverIncA m 9.35 +0.01 +0.1 Dimensional Investme IntCorEqI 10.99 +0.01 +3.1 IntlSCoI 16.44 -0.01 +3.2 IntlValuI 17.23 +0.05 +3.8 Dodge & Cox Bal 80.46 -0.10 +3.1 Income 13.88 +0.01 +0.1 IntlStk 35.76 +0.02 +3.2 Stock 126.87 -0.20 +4.1 DoubleLine TotRetBdN b 11.39 ... +0.5 Dreyfus Apprecia 45.19 -0.08 +2.9 FMI LgCap 17.66 +0.01 +3.3 FPA Cres d 28.77 +0.03 +2.2 NewInc m 10.59 ... +0.2 Fairholme Funds Fairhome d 31.46 +0.08 +0.1 Federated StrValI 5.11 -0.01 +2.4 ToRetIs 11.41 ... -0.1 Fidelity AstMgr20 13.21 ... +0.6 AstMgr50 16.71 +0.01 +1.6 Bal 20.58 -0.03 +2.0 BlChGrow 50.44 -0.15 +2.8 CapApr 30.32 -0.05 +3.2 CapInc d 9.62 ... +1.5 Contra 79.85 -0.30 +2.9 DivGrow 30.85 -0.07 +3.2 DivrIntl d 30.56 +0.03 +2.1 EqInc 48.58 +0.06 +3.2 EqInc II 20.13 +0.04 +3.3 FF2015 11.98 ... +1.4 FF2035 12.10 +0.01 +2.3 FF2040 8.45 +0.01 +2.3 Fidelity 36.96 -0.08 +3.2 FltRtHiIn d 9.97 ... +0.6 Free2010 14.32 +0.01 +1.4 Free2020 14.54 +0.01 +1.6 Free2025 12.18 +0.01 +1.9 Free2030 14.52 +0.01 +2.0 GNMA 11.73 -0.01 GovtInc 10.55 ... -0.2 GrowCo 96.23 -0.16 +3.2 GrowInc 21.90 -0.02 +3.0 HiInc d 9.43 ... +1.2 IntBond 11.13 ... IntMuniInc d 10.69 +0.01 +0.5 IntlDisc d 33.72 ... +2.0 InvGrdBd 7.98 -0.01 -0.2 LatinAm d 47.43 +0.20 +2.4 LowPriStk d 40.65 +0.03 +2.9 Magellan 75.74 -0.03 +3.4 MidCap d 30.36 +0.06 +3.3 MuniInc d 13.64 +0.02 +0.6 NewMktIn d 17.80 +0.02 +0.2 OTC 61.73 -0.50 +1.9 Puritan 19.81 -0.02 +2.1 RealInv d 32.77 +0.01 +2.0 ShIntMu d 10.87 ... +0.3 ShTmBond 8.60 ... SmCapRetr d 24.90 -0.02 +3.4 StratInc 11.40 +0.01 +0.4 Tel&Util 18.94 -0.09 +1.6 TotalBd 10.94 ... USBdIdx 11.86 ... -0.2 USBdIdxInv 11.86 ... -0.2 Value 79.11 +0.05 +3.6 Fidelity Advisor NewInsA m 23.41 -0.09 +2.9 NewInsI 23.69 -0.09 +2.9 StratIncA m 12.72 +0.01 +0.4 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 52.10 -0.05 +3.2 500IdxInstl 52.10 -0.05 +3.2 500IdxInv 52.09 -0.05 +3.2 ExtMktIdAg d 41.57 +0.02 +4.2 IntlIdxAdg d 35.14 +0.05 +2.5 TotMktIdAg d 42.61 -0.03 +3.3 First Eagle GlbA m 49.29 -0.07 +1.4 OverseasA m 22.20 -0.08 +0.8 Forum AbStratI 11.08 ... FrankTemp-Frank Fed TF A m 12.82 +0.02 +0.6 FrankTemp-Franklin CA TF A m 7.57 +0.01 +0.7 Growth A m 52.04 -0.01 +2.8 HY TF A m 11.01 +0.02 +0.8 HighIncA m 2.11 +0.01 +1.5 Income A m 2.28 ... +2.3 Income C m 2.30 ... +2.2 IncomeAdv 2.26 ... +1.9

NY TF A m 12.18 +0.02 RisDv A m 38.98 +0.04 StrInc A m 10.77 +0.01 US Gov A m 6.78 ... FrankTemp-Mutual Discov A m 29.21 +0.02 Discov Z 29.60 +0.02 QuestZ 17.03 ... Shares A m 23.05 +0.01 Shares Z 23.23 +0.02 FrankTemp-Templeton Fgn A m 7.19 +0.02 GlBond A m 13.53 +0.03 GlBond C m 13.55 +0.02 GlBondAdv 13.48 +0.02 Growth A m 20.29 +0.04 World A m 16.44 +0.04 Franklin Templeton FndAllA m 11.49 +0.01 GE S&SUSEq 46.15 -0.07 GMO EmgMktsVI 11.94 +0.09 IntItVlIV 21.66 +0.04 QuIII 23.05 ... QuVI 23.06 +0.01 Goldman Sachs HiYieldIs d 7.39 ... MidCpVaIs 40.50 -0.02 ShDuTFIs 10.66 ... Harbor Bond 12.48 ... CapApInst 43.94 -0.10 IntlInstl d 63.25 +0.11 IntlInv m 62.66 +0.11 Hartford CapAprA m 35.59 +0.01 CpApHLSIA 44.83 +0.02 DvGrHLSIA 22.26 +0.01 TRBdHLSIA 12.02 +0.01 INVESCO CharterA m 18.48 ... ComstockA m 18.47 +0.02 EqIncomeA m 9.43 ... GrowIncA m 21.68 -0.01 HiYldMuA m 10.17 +0.01 Ivy AssetStrA m 26.60 ... AssetStrC m 25.94 ... JPMorgan CoreBdUlt 12.06 +0.01 CoreBondA m 12.05 ... CoreBondSelect12.04 ... HighYldSel 8.25 ... IntmdTFSl 11.37 ... LgCapGrSelect24.74 -0.06 MidCpValI 28.71 +0.03 ShDurBndSel 11.00 ... ShtDurBdU 11.00 ... USEquit 11.61 -0.01 USLCpCrPS 22.96 -0.03 Janus BalT 26.77 ... GlbLfScT d 31.66 +0.09 PerkinsMCVT 22.00 +0.01 John Hancock LifAg1 b 13.29 +0.01 LifBa1 b 13.83 ... LifGr1 b 13.84 ... LifMo1 b 13.52 ... Lazard EmgMkEqtI d 19.86 +0.14 Legg Mason/Western CrPlBdIns 11.68 +0.01 Longleaf Partners LongPart 27.64 +0.24 SmCap 30.01 -0.08 Loomis Sayles BondI 15.39 +0.02 BondR b 15.33 +0.02 Lord Abbett AffiliatA m 12.50 ... BondDebA m 8.24 ... ShDurIncA m 4.66 ... ShDurIncC m 4.69 ... MFS IsIntlEq 19.56 -0.03 TotRetA m 15.59 +0.01 ValueA m 26.41 +0.01 ValueI 26.53 +0.01 MainStay HiYldCorA m 6.18 ... Manning & Napier WrldOppA 7.93 ... Matthews Asian China d 24.03 +0.15 India d 17.74 +0.22 Merger Merger b 15.67 -0.20 Metropolitan West TotRetBdI 10.91 ... TotRtBd b 10.91 ... Morgan Stanley Instl IntlEqI d 14.63 -0.04 MdCpGrI 36.07 +0.10 Natixis InvBndY 12.74 +0.02 StratIncA m 15.81 +0.02 StratIncC m 15.90 +0.02 Neuberger Berman GenesisIs 50.29 +0.06 Northern HYFixInc d 7.63 ... StkIdx 18.24 -0.02 Nuveen HiYldMunI 17.32 +0.03 Oakmark EqIncI 29.13 -0.06 Intl I 21.79 +0.03 Oakmark I 50.20 +0.03 Oberweis ChinaOpp m 11.63 +0.10 Old Westbury GlbSmMdCp 15.08 +0.03 LgCpStr 10.27 -0.02 Oppenheimer DevMktA m 36.17 +0.17 DevMktY 35.74 +0.17 GlobA m 66.76 +0.18 IntlBondA m 6.61 ... IntlBondY 6.61 +0.01 IntlGrY 31.23 +0.04 LmtTmMunA m15.15 +0.01 LtdTmNY m 3.40 +0.01 MainStrA m 38.19 -0.11 RocMuniA m 17.17 +0.03 RochNtlMu m 7.68 +0.01 StrIncA m 4.39 +0.01 PIMCO AAstAAutP 11.17 +0.01 AllAssetI 12.73 +0.02 AllAuthA m 11.15 +0.02 AllAuthC m 11.11 +0.02 AllAuthIn 11.17 +0.01 ComRlRStI 6.67 +0.05 DivIncInst 12.30 ... EMktCurI 10.64 +0.03 EmMktsIns 12.49 ... FloatIncI 9.03 -0.01 ForBdIs 10.80 +0.01 ForBondI 10.81 ... HiYldIs 9.74 ... InvGrdIns 11.16 -0.01 LowDrA m 10.50 ... LowDrIs 10.50 ... RERRStgC m 4.39 +0.01 RealRet 12.23 ... RealRtnA m 12.23 ... ShtTermIs 9.88 ... ToRtIIIIs 9.89 ... TotRetA m 11.24 ... TotRetAdm b 11.24 ... TotRetC m 11.24 ... TotRetIs 11.24 ... TotRetrnD b 11.24 ... TotlRetnP 11.24 ... Parnassus EqIncInv 30.26 +0.02 Permanent Portfolio 49.18 +0.12 Pioneer PioneerA m 33.49 -0.01 Principal L/T2020I 12.88 +0.01 L/T2030I 12.79 ... LCGrIInst 10.23 -0.03 Putnam GrowIncA m 15.39 ... NewOpp 60.48 -0.15 Royce PAMutInv d 11.89 ... PremierInv d 19.79 -0.01 Russell StratBdS 11.30 +0.01

Spring season outlook?

Holiday shopping

Wall Street anticipates that Lennar's fiscal fourth-quarter earnings will surpass its results from a year earlier. The homebuilder has benefited from a gradually improving housing market over the past 12 months that's fueled demand for new homes. Investors will be listening today during Lennar's earnings conference call to see if management gives its outlook for the upcoming spring home-selling season.

Economists will get more evidence today to help them gauge how sales fared during the holiday shopping season. The Commerce Department is due to report retail sales figures for December. Early reports suggest that the U.S. holiday shopping season was respectable, but not robust. In one measure of holiday spending, retail sales rose only 2.5 percent for the November and December period, boosted by a last-minute shopping surge.

+0.7 +3.1 +0.8 -0.3 +3.3 +3.4 +2.9 +3.3 +3.3 +4.7 +1.1 +1.0 +1.0 +4.4 +4.4 +3.1 +3.9 +1.7 +3.5 +3.2 +3.2 +1.3 +3.1 +0.2 +3.3 +1.8 +1.8 +3.5 +3.4 +3.7 +0.2 +2.9 +3.7 +2.6 +3.5 +0.7 +2.8 +2.8 -0.1 -0.2 -0.2 +1.4 +0.4 +3.3 +2.6 +0.1 +0.1 +3.6 +3.8 +2.1 +5.8 +3.1 +3.1 +2.1 +2.7 +1.5 +1.6 +0.2 +4.7 +3.9 +1.8 +1.8 +4.0 +1.4 +0.3 +0.3 +1.6 +2.5 +4.2 +4.2 +1.1 +2.3 +2.4 +1.3 -1.0 +0.3 +0.2 +2.0 +3.8 +1.0 +2.2 +2.2 +3.2 +1.3 +3.2 +1.3 +2.2 +4.1 +3.4 +4.6 +2.7 +2.5 +2.5 +2.5 +3.5 +0.6 +0.6 +1.7 +0.5 +0.5 +3.0 +1.2 +1.0 +0.9 +0.7 +1.2 +0.7 +0.7 +0.7 +0.5 +0.7 +0.9 +0.1 +0.9 +0.2 -0.7 +1.2 +0.5 +1.9 -0.3 -0.3 +0.1 +0.1 +0.1 +0.1 +0.1 +0.1 +3.6 +1.1 +3.2 +2.1 +2.3 +3.6 +3.6 +3.3 +3.4 +3.3 +0.1

Schwab 1000Inv d 39.73 -0.03 S&P500Sel d 22.90 -0.02 Scout Interntl d 33.89 +0.06 Sequoia Sequoia 172.99 +0.10 T Rowe Price BlChpGr 47.34 -0.17 CapApprec 22.75 -0.01 EmMktBd d 14.19 +0.01 EmMktStk d 34.47 +0.10 EqIndex d 39.62 -0.04 EqtyInc 27.32 +0.05 GrowStk 38.94 -0.16 HealthSci 43.71 +0.05 HiYield d 7.07 ... InsLgCpGr 19.56 -0.06 IntlBnd d 10.06 +0.01 IntlGrInc d 13.28 +0.02 IntlStk d 14.71 +0.04 LatinAm d 38.99 +0.21 MidCapVa 24.80 +0.01 MidCpGr 58.17 +0.02 NewAsia d 17.03 +0.04 NewEra 42.94 -0.09 NewHoriz 34.54 +0.04 NewIncome 9.84 ... OrseaStk d 8.71 +0.02 R2015 13.12 ... R2025 13.42 ... R2035 13.73 ... Real d 21.45 +0.03 Rtmt2010 16.73 ... Rtmt2020 18.26 +0.01 Rtmt2030 19.40 +0.01 Rtmt2040 19.61 ... ShTmBond 4.85 ... SmCpStk 35.15 -0.03 SmCpVal d 40.54 +0.01 SpecInc 13.06 ... Value 27.38 +0.05 TCW EmgIncI 9.45 +0.02 TotRetBdI 10.34 ... TIAA-CREF EqIx 11.16 -0.01 Templeton InFEqSeS 20.23 +0.04 Thornburg IncBldC m 19.38 +0.02 IntlValA m 28.24 +0.04 IntlValI d 28.90 +0.04 Tweedy, Browne GlobVal d 23.76 -0.06 VALIC Co I StockIdx 26.93 -0.02 Vanguard 500Adml 135.56 -0.13 500Inv 135.56 -0.12 BalIdxAdm 24.22 -0.01 BalIdxIns 24.22 -0.02 CAITAdml 11.79 ... CapOpAdml 80.50 +0.08 DivGr 17.18 +0.02 EmMktIAdm 37.41 +0.19 EnergyAdm 113.92 -0.10 EnergyInv 60.69 -0.05 EqInc 24.91 +0.02 EqIncAdml 52.21 +0.05 ExplAdml 76.82 +0.11 Explr 82.60 +0.12 ExtdIdAdm 47.69 +0.02 ExtdIdIst 47.69 +0.02 ExtdMktIdxIP 117.69 +0.05 FAWeUSIns 91.59 +0.20 GNMA 10.88 ... GNMAAdml 10.88 ... GlbEq 19.24 +0.01 GrthIdAdm 37.74 -0.11 GrthIstId 37.74 -0.11 GrthIstSg 34.95 -0.10 HYCor 6.15 ... HYCorAdml 6.15 ... HltCrAdml 62.83 +0.07 HlthCare 148.94 +0.18 ITBondAdm 11.92 ... ITGradeAd 10.31 ... ITIGrade 10.31 ... ITrsyAdml 11.66 ... InfPrtAdm 28.43 -0.01 InfPrtI 11.58 ... InflaPro 14.47 -0.01 InstIdxI 134.68 -0.13 InstPlus 134.69 -0.13 InstTStPl 33.36 -0.02 IntlGr 19.86 +0.07 IntlGrAdm 63.17 +0.23 IntlStkIdxAdm 25.68 +0.05 IntlStkIdxI 102.68 +0.21 IntlStkIdxIPls 102.70 +0.21 IntlStkIdxISgn 30.80 +0.06 IntlVal 32.03 +0.01 LTGradeAd 10.81 -0.03 LTInvGr 10.81 -0.03 LifeCon 17.17 +0.01 LifeGro 23.87 ... LifeMod 20.93 ... MidCapIdxIP 115.01 +0.05 MidCp 23.27 +0.01 MidCpAdml 105.58 +0.05 MidCpIst 23.32 +0.01 MidCpSgl 33.32 +0.02 Morg 20.53 -0.03 MorgAdml 63.61 -0.10 MuHYAdml 11.34 +0.01 MuInt 14.44 +0.01 MuIntAdml 14.44 +0.01 MuLTAdml 11.87 +0.01 MuLtdAdml 11.16 ... MuShtAdml 15.92 ... PrecMtls 16.02 +0.10 Prmcp 72.09 +0.01 PrmcpAdml 74.78 +0.02 PrmcpCorI 15.44 ... REITIdxAd 95.42 +0.21 STBondAdm 10.62 ... STBondSgl 10.62 ... STCor 10.84 ... STFedAdml 10.79 ... STGradeAd 10.84 ... STIGradeI 10.84 ... STsryAdml 10.73 ... SelValu 21.70 +0.02 SmCapIdx 40.15 +0.02 SmCpIdAdm 40.17 +0.02 SmCpIdIst 40.16 +0.01 SmCpIndxSgnl 36.19 +0.02 Star 21.23 ... TgtRe2010 24.43 ... TgtRe2015 13.60 ... TgtRe2020 24.29 +0.01 TgtRe2030 23.94 ... TgtRe2035 14.46 ... TgtRe2040 23.82 ... TgtRe2045 14.95 ... TgtRe2050 23.73 +0.01 TgtRetInc 12.29 ... Tgtet2025 13.88 ... TotBdAdml 11.06 ... TotBdInst 11.06 ... TotBdMkInv 11.06 ... TotBdMkSig 11.06 ... TotIntl 15.35 +0.03 TotStIAdm 36.84 -0.03 TotStIIns 36.85 -0.03 TotStISig 35.56 -0.03 TotStIdx 36.83 -0.03 TxMCapAdm 73.51 -0.08 ValIdxAdm 23.76 +0.03 ValIdxIns 23.76 +0.03 WellsI 24.38 +0.01 WellsIAdm 59.06 +0.01 Welltn 34.68 ... WelltnAdm 59.90 +0.01 WndsIIAdm 53.75 +0.01 Wndsr 15.68 -0.01 WndsrAdml 52.88 -0.04 WndsrII 30.29 +0.01 Virtus EmgMktsIs 10.42 +0.06 Waddell & Reed Adv AccumA m 8.39 -0.02 SciTechA m 11.56 -0.02 Wells Fargo UlSTMInI 4.82 ... Western Asset MgdMuniA m 17.33 +0.02 Yacktman Focused d 21.26 +0.12 Yacktman d 19.84 +0.10

Retail sales - excluding autos Seasonally adjusted change in percentage 1.0%

est.

0.5

0.3 0.0

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D

Source: FactSet

+3.3 +3.2 +1.6 +2.8 +3.7 +2.2 +1.2 +3.2 +3.3 +3.1 +6.0 +1.5 +3.6 -0.3 +2.5 +2.2 +2.5 +3.2 +3.0 +1.3 +2.5 +4.1 +2.5 +1.9 +2.3 +2.6 +2.1 +1.6 +2.1 +2.5 +2.7 +0.1 +3.3 +3.5 +0.6 +3.8 +1.4 +0.5 +3.3 +3.2 +3.1 +2.9 +2.9 +2.2 +3.2 +3.2 +3.2 +1.9 +1.9 +0.5 +3.7 +3.2 +1.7 +2.5 +2.5 +3.1 +3.1 +3.9 +3.9 +4.0 +4.0 +4.0 +2.4 -0.2 -0.2 +3.1 +3.0 +3.0 +3.0 +0.9 +0.9 +4.0 +4.0 -0.2 -0.3 -0.4 -0.3 -0.4 +3.2 +3.2 +3.3 +3.1 +3.1 +2.5 +2.5 +2.5 +2.5 +2.7 -0.2 -0.2 +1.2 +2.4 +1.8 +3.5 +3.6 +3.5 +3.6 +3.5 +3.2 +3.1 +0.6 +0.5 +0.5 +0.7 +0.2 +0.1 +0.4 +3.7 +3.8 +3.4 +2.3 +0.2 -0.1 +0.2 +0.2 -0.1 +3.4 +3.6 +3.6 +3.6 +3.6 +2.1 +1.2 +1.6 +1.9 +2.4 +2.6 +2.8 +2.7 +2.8 +0.8 +2.1 -0.2 -0.2 -0.2 -0.2 +2.5 +3.3 +3.3 +3.3 +3.3 +3.3 +3.6 +3.6 +1.1 +1.1 +2.5 +2.5 +3.1 +3.8 +3.8 +3.1 +1.1 +2.4 +3.8

+0.7 +3.6 +3.8


8 • Daily Corinthian

Kentucky still in search of team chemistry BY GARY GRAVES Associated Press 

LEXINGTON, Ky. — John Calipari is hoping his young Kentucky Wildcats finally get the message after their latest lesson in what it takes to win . His team appeared to be progressing from a disappointing nonconference showing. Then came Saturday’s loss to Texas A&M — Kentucky’s first at home in Southeastern Conference play under Calipari. The Wildcats (10-5, 1-1 Southeastern Conference) believe there’s time to regroup and fulfill expectations of winning another league title, and Tuesday night’s game against Tennessee (8-6, 0-2) offers a good opportunity to reboot. Calipari hopes that the 83-71 loss to the Aggies will finally help his young Wildcats squad understand and “buy in” to his philosophy of being successful through commitment, hustle and trust — traits Kentucky has sporadically demonstrated this season.

Sports

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Armstrong ‘sorry’ to Livestrong staff BY JIM VERTUNO Associated Press 

AUSTIN, Texas — Lance Armstrong stopped at his Livestrong Foundation before heading to an interview with Oprah Winfrey on Monday and delivered an emotional apology to staff members, some of whom broke down in tears, a person with direct knowledge of the meeting told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the discussion was private. Stripped last year of his seven Tour de France titles because of doping charges, Armstrong addressed the staff and said, “I’m sorry.” The person said the disgraced

cyclist choked up and several employees cried during the session. The person also said Armstrong apologized for letting the staff down and putting Livestrong at risk but he did not make a direct confession to the group about using banned drugs. He said he would try to restore the foundation’s reputation, and urged the group to continue fighting for the charity’s mission of helping cancer patients and their families. After the meeting, Armstrong, his legal team and close advisers gathered at a downtown Austin hotel for the interview. The cyclist was to make a limited confession

to Winfrey about his role as the head of a long-running scheme to dominate the Tour with the aid of performanceenhancing drugs, a person with knowledge of the situation has told the AP. Shortly before the interview began around 1 p.m. local time, nearly a dozen of Armstrong’s closest friends and advisers gathered in the hotel lobby and were escorted to the room where the taping was taking place. The group included Armstrong attorneys Tim Herman and Sean Breen, along with Bill Stapleton, Armstrong’s longtime agent, manager and business partner. All declined comment.

Winfrey and her crew had earlier said they would film the session, to be broadcast Thursday, at Armstrong’s home. As a result, local and international news crews were encamped near the cyclist’s Spanish-style villa before dawn. Armstrong still managed to slip away for a run despite the crowds outside his home. He returned by cutting through a neighbor’s yard and hopping a fence. During a jog on Sunday, Armstrong talked to the AP for a few minutes saying, “I’m calm, I’m at ease and ready to speak candidly.” He declined Please see ARMSTRONG | 9

Local Schedule Today Basketball Pontotoc @ Corinth, 6 (WXRZ) Kossuth @ Ripley, 6 Central @ Belmont, 6 Biggersvillle @ Jumpertown, 6 Hickory Flat @ Walnut, 6 Soccer Corinth @ New Albany, 5:30

Thursday Basketball Central @ Hardin Co., 6

Friday Basketball Belmont @ Kossuth, 6 (WXRZ) Walnut @ Strayhorn, 6

Saturday Basketball Middleton @ Central, 5

Monday, Jan. 21 Basketball (B) Corinth @ Rumble in the South  

Tuesday, Jan. 22 Basketball Itawamba AHS @ Corinth, 6 (WXRZ) Central @ Ripley, 6 Walnut @ Calhoun City, 6

Friday, Jan. 25 Basketball Holly Springs @ Central, 6 (WXRZ) Pine Grove @ Biggersville, 6 Corinth @ Baldwyn, 6 Kossuth @ Mantachie, 6 Bruce @ Walnut, 6

Saturday, Jan. 26 Basketball (G) Corinth @ Lady Viking S/O (B) Kossuth @ Hot Bed Classic

Shorts ACHS Baseball Boosters There will be a booster club meeting at the new field house on Monday, January 15 at 6 p.m.

AC Football Boosters The ACMS/ACHS Football Booster Club will hold a meeting on Monday at 6 p.m. in Coach Landers room.

Volleyball League The Sportsplex is offering a coed volleyball league open to those 14 and older. A female must strike the ball once among the legal three hits. Entry fee is $125 per team. Play begins on Thursday. If interested, call 287-4417.

Youth Soccer Sign ups for the youth soccer league at the Corinth Sportsplex will run through January 25. Members of the Sportsplex can sign up for no cost, and non-members can register for $45. Age groups include 4-5, 6-7, 8-9 and 10-12. Children ages 13-15 may also sign up, though these groups will only participate if there is enough interest. The soccer season will include 10 games and a tournament, all to be played inside the Sportsplex on astro-turf. For more information, contact Havis Hurley at 643-3561.

Staff photo by Steve Beavers

Hoop Shoot

A trio of Alcorn Central Middle School students qualified for the Elks Lodge Hoop Shoot district event. John Riley Williams (from left), Lauren Young and Tate Perriman all won the local contest to advance.

Golden era for QBs, great stories around NFL BY RACHEL COHEN Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The two kids from Northern California burst from NFL afterthought to championship contender in eerily similar fashion a decade apart. Tom Brady and Colin Kaepernick, each playing in a conference title game this weekend, are bookends to a fortuitous moment in quarterback history. On one side are the likes of Brady, Peyton Manning and Drew Brees, still scintillating in their mid30s. On the other are Kaepernick, a second-year player, and the brilliant class of rookies with Andrew Luck, Robert Griffin III and Russell Wilson leading their teams to the playoffs. Young, old and in between,

the current crop of NFL quarterbacks is not only deep but dynamic and diverse. “We’re in a little bit of a boom right now. We’re flowing a little bit, especially young players,” Hall of Famer Steve Young said last week. “If those guys continue to develop, we’ll have a period of time here, kind of a Camelot of quarterbacking.” The depth of the position shows in the other two guys joining the Patriots’ Brady and the 49ers’ Kaepernick in the conference championship games. Atlanta’s Matt Ryan and Baltimore’s Joe Flacco were first-round draft picks in 2008, and for all their successes, they’re probably low on the list when fans think of the most dominant NFL quarterbacks. Yet here they are a win away

from the Super Bowl after leading stirring comebacks that answered many doubts about each. Quarterback has long been the glamour position of all of sports, but it seems even a bit more glamorous right now. Rule changes favor a wideopen passing game, which makes a superior quarterback more valuable. Colleges and high schools run more sophisticated offenses, and the best athletes gravitate to quarterback then develop into polished passers who happen to be able to scramble. “I can’t remember — even though this is a quarterbackdriven league — as many remarkable and compelling stories on the quarterback side as you’re seeing this year,” CBS Sports chairman Sean McManus said.

There was that brief stretch less than 15 years ago when Trent Dilfer and Brad Johnson won Super Bowls, and it seemed perhaps championship teams didn’t need a star at the position. Since then, here’s the roll call of victorious quarterbacks: Brady, Ben Roethlisberger, both Manning brothers, Brees and Aaron Rodgers. Twenty-five of the 46 Super Bowl MVPs have been quarterbacks, but now it’s five of the last six. In the half-dozen years before that, four were nonQBs, including two defensive players. “It ebbs and flows, no question. There’s some dark times where you have two or three guys that can truly do it,” said Young, Kaepernick’s forerunner as a dual-threat San FranPlease see GOLDEN | 9

Twins caravan stirs excitement, despite tough sell BY DAVE CAMPBELL Associated Press 

MINNEAPOLIS — In the sunshine of spring training, fresh-start excitement emanates from all major leagues teams. The Twins fire up the optimism earlier than that, even in the frozen dark of a January morning in Minnesota. Their annual winter caravan began on Monday, with manager Ron Gardenhire in the first group to go out. “You start talking baseball and you get to see all the players, and it kind of gets you really pumped up for it,” Gardenhire said. “And you get excited to get down there and get going again. We have a lot to prove and a lot to do.” Gardenhire joined new bench coach Terry Steinbach, middle infielder Brian Dozier, television announcer Dick Bremer and a handful of other Twins employees at the K-TWIN radio station studio

across the street from Target Field. With a cup of coffee in his hand, Gardenhire was his usual joking, jovial offseason self. He recounted his recent travels, including motorhome trips to Oklahoma and California with his wife and mother. “I found out what DEF is: diesel exhaust fluid,” Gardenhire said. “And if you run out of it, your engine stops. I didn’t run out, but it was flashing. I’m going, ‘What ... is this?’” The Twins, coming off consecutive finishes of 99 and 96 losses, are counting on a smoother ride in 2013. Gardenhire is in the final year of his contract, with notable improvement by the team likely necessary for him to be retained. But as the 12th-year manager prepared to get on a luxury bus for a four-day journey around southern Minnesota, northern Iowa and eastern

South Dakota, he said his enthusiasm wasn’t deterred by a club currently in developmental mode. “You’re always teaching them, and it’s a constant. They’ll tell you, ‘You never stop learning the game,’” Gardenhire said. This ritual of reconnecting with fans over five states is designed to stir interest in the upcoming season, and that’s a harder sell for the Twins these days. But with a revamped coaching staff, a rotation that will likely be 80 percent new and the probability of significant roles for some of the organization’s top prospects, there are plenty of potential reasons to follow this team, even if the playoffs don’t appear to be a realistic goal. Gardenhire lamented the loss of outfielders Denard Span and Ben Revere in separate trades, but that was the price required to fetch some front-line starting pitching.

Alex Meyer and Trevor May aren’t part of the plans for this year, but Vance Worley, also acquired from Philadelphia for Revere, is. Free-agent signings Kevin Correia and Mike Pelfrey are also slotted in with Scott Diamond, their closest to a staff ace last season. “We can score runs. We just needed to stay in the games a little bit longer, and hopefully that’s what we’ve accomplished. We’ll see,” Gardenhire said. The Twins also aimed to give Gardenhire some more support, so they hired two former players, Steinbach and hitting coach Tom Brunansky, as part of a staff shakeup that left only pitching coach Rick Anderson returning to the same job. Steinbach will work closely with the catchers. That can’t hurt the team’s beleaguered starting pitching, Please see TWINS | 9


Tuesday, January 15, 2013

GOLDEN

Scoreboard Pro basketball NBA standings, schedule

CONTINUED FROM 8

cisco QB and now an ESPN analyst. Jimmy Johnson, who won two Super Bowls with future Hall of Famer Troy Aikman as his quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys, was talking to Bill Belichick last summer about the recent shift. Belichick has won three championships with Brady, but even as of a few years ago, both coaches believed a title was possible behind a strong defense and running game. Not anymore, they agreed. “Now, the only thing that matters is if you get a great quarterback,” said Johnson, now a Fox commentator. Of this year’s playoff teams, the only one without great stability at quarterback was Minnesota. And the Vikings had a guy named Adrian Peterson. The bottom of the standings is full of clubs with uncertainty at the position: from the Chiefs and Jaguars to the Eagles, Cardinals and Jets. This year, 20 quarterbacks started every regular-season game, nearly two-thirds of the league.

TWINS CONTINUED FROM 8

which ranked third-to-last in the majors last year with a 4.77 ERA. “I enjoyed, when I was catching, the mental part of the game. Game calling, setting up hitters and going with your gut feeling and trying to pick up on what the hitter might be tipping off, what they’re trying to do, what the situation is,” Steinbach said, adding: “I just think that there’s things the catchers can look for and pick up on and hopefully try to work that guy.”

ARMSTRONG CONTINUED FROM 8

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 24 13 .649 — Brooklyn 22 15 .595 2 Boston 20 17 .541 4 Philadelphia 16 22 .421 81⁄2 Toronto 14 23 .378 10 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 24 11 .686 — Atlanta 21 16 .568 4 Orlando 13 24 .351 12 Charlotte 9 28 .243 16 Washington 7 28 .200 17 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 23 15 .605 — Chicago 21 15 .583 1 Milwaukee 19 17 .528 3 Detroit 14 24 .368 9 Cleveland 9 30 .231 141⁄2 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 29 11 .725 — Memphis 24 12 .667 3 Houston 21 17 .553 7 Dallas 16 23 .410 121⁄2 1 New Orleans 11 26 .297 16 ⁄2 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 29 8 .784 — Denver 23 16 .590 7 Portland 20 17 .541 9 Utah 20 19 .513 10 Minnesota 16 19 .457 12 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 29 9 .763 — Golden State 23 13 .639 5 L.A. Lakers 16 21 .432 121⁄2 Sacramento 13 24 .351 151⁄2 Phoenix 13 26 .333 161⁄2 ——— Sunday’s Late Game L.A. Lakers 113, Cleveland 93 Monday’s Games Washington 120, Orlando 91 Boston 100, Charlotte 89 Chicago 97, Atlanta 58 L.A. Clippers 99, Memphis 73 Dallas 113, Minnesota 98 Oklahoma City at Phoenix, (n) Miami at Utah, (n) Cleveland at Sacramento, (n) Today’s Games Indiana at Charlotte, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Toronto at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Houston, 7 p.m. Portland at Denver, 8 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Chicago at Toronto, 6 p.m. Indiana at Orlando, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 7 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Boston, 7 p.m. Memphis at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Cleveland at Portland, 9 p.m. Washington at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Miami at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

Clippers 99, Grizzlies 73 L.A. CLIPPERS — Butler 3-5 0-0 9, Griffin 3-8 4-6 10, Jordan 3-6 0-2 6, Bledsoe 4-9 6-9 14, Green 3-6 0-0 6, Odom 2-8 2-2 6, Crawford 5-14 6-6 16, Barnes 6-11 2-2 16, Hill 3-5 2-2 8, Turiaf 1-1 1-1 3, Hollins 2-3 1-2 5. Totals 35-76 24-32 99. MEMPHIS — Allen 3-9 2-2 8, Randolph 5-16 5-9 15, Gasol 4-13 0-0 8, Conley 2-11 0-0 5, Ellington 4-9 0-0 11, Arthur 4-10 2-2 10, Bayless 1-4 0-0 3, Speights 1-5 0-0 2, Selby 1-5 0-0 3, Haddadi 0-0 0-0 0, Wroten 2-7 4-4 8. Totals 27-89 13-17 73. L.A. Clippers 25 28 20 26 — 99 Memphis 19 15 18 21 — 73 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 5-14 (Butler 3-4, Barnes 2-5, Green 0-1, Odom 0-2, Crawford 0-2), Memphis 6-20 (Ellington 3-6, Selby 1-2, Bayless 1-3, Conley 1-5, Allen 0-1, Wroten 0-1, Arthur 0-1, Randolph 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 58 (Barnes 8), Memphis 57 (Randolph 12). Assists—L.A. Clippers 20 (Griffin 5), Memphis 14 (Allen 4). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 19, Memphis 26. A—15,837 (18,119).

Chicago 26 22 23 26 — 97 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 2-14 (Korver 1-2, Jenkins 1-3, Tolliver 0-1, J.Teague 0-2, Williams 0-2, Harris 0-2, Smith 0-2), Chicago 6-14 (Cook 2-3, Deng 2-3, Butler 1-1, Robinson 1-3, Radmanovic 0-1, Hamilton 0-1, Belinelli 0-1, Hinrich 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 47 (Horford 11), Chicago 67 (Noah 16). Assists—Atlanta 15 (J.Teague 5), Chicago 18 (Robinson, Boozer, Hinrich 3). Total Fouls— Atlanta 24, Chicago 16. Technicals— Smith, J.Teague, Atlanta defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—Harris. A—21,430 (20,917).

Celtics 100, Bobcats 89 CHARLOTTE — Kidd-Gilchrist 5-10 0-1 10, Warrick 6-11 4-6 16, Biyombo 1-3 2-2 4, Walker 4-16 2-2 12, Henderson 4-8 2-2 10, Gordon 5-14 1-1 12, Haywood 0-2 0-0 0, Sessions 5-11 5-6 16, Adrien 0-0 1-4 1, Taylor 3-4 0-0 8. Totals 33-79 17-24 89. BOSTON — Pierce 6-16 5-8 19, Bass 3-6 0-0 6, Garnett 2-11 3-4 7, Rondo 8-11 1-1 17, Bradley 6-10 0-0 16, Sullinger 4-4 0-2 8, Terry 0-3 0-0 0, Collins 1-2 1-1 3, Green 4-8 2-2 11, Lee 4-7 0-0 9, Barbosa 1-2 2-2 4. Totals 39-80 14-20 100. Charlotte 18 27 25 19 — 89 Boston 28 28 20 24 — 100 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 6-15 (Taylor 2-2, Walker 2-5, Sessions 1-2, Gordon 1-5, Haywood 0-1), Boston 8-21 (Bradley 4-7, Pierce 2-8, Green 1-1, Lee 1-4, Terry 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Charlotte 48 (Kidd-Gilchrist 8), Boston 52 (Garnett, Rondo 10). Assists—Charlotte 15 (Walker 4), Boston 27 (Rondo 12). Total Fouls—Charlotte 20, Boston 21. Technicals—Gordon, Walker. Flagrant Fouls—Henderson. A—18,624 (18,624).

Wizards 120, Magic 91 ORLANDO — Jones 3-5 0-0 6, Nicholson 3-8 0-0 6, Vucevic 6-10 1-2 13, Nelson 6-17 4-4 19, Afflalo 1-11 0-0 2, Redick 4-8 2-2 12, Davis 6-8 1-2 13, O’Quinn 2-3 0-0 4, Harkless 2-4 0-0 4, McRoberts 2-4 1-2 5, Smith 1-4 0-0 2, Moore 1-5 3-3 5. Totals 37-87 12-15 91. WASHINGTON — Webster 2-3 3-3 8, Nene 1-4 0-0 2, Okafor 8-13 3-4 19, Price 5-9 5-6 18, Beal 7-10 2-2 17, Seraphin 8-15 2-2 18, Wall 3-8 6-6 12, Ariza 4-7 0-0 9, Vesely 5-7 0-2 10, Temple 3-5 0-0 7, Singleton 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 46-82 21-25 120. Orlando 22 31 24 14 — 91 Washington 28 31 37 24 — 120 3-Point Goals—Orlando 5-18 (Nelson 3-7, Redick 2-6, Harkless 0-1, Afflalo 0-1, Moore 0-1, Smith 0-2), Washington 7-11 (Price 3-5, Temple 1-1, Beal 1-1, Ariza 1-2, Webster 1-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 46 (Vucevic 13), Washington 47 (Okafor 11). Assists—Orlando 23 (Nelson 12), Washington 32 (Price, Wall 6). Total Fouls—Orlando 16, Washington 21. A—14,648 (20,308).

Mavericks 113, Timberwolves 98 MINNESOTA — Kirilenko 3-9 4-4 10, D.Cunningham 6-18 0-0 12, Pekovic 8-11 4-10 20, Ridnour 3-9 0-0 7, Shved 1-7 4-4 7, Rubio 2-3 2-2 6, Barea 6-13 5-5 21, Williams 4-10 1-2 9, Stiemsma 2-5 2-2 6. Totals 35-85 22-29 98. DALLAS — Marion 2-8 1-2 5, Nowitzki 5-12 0-0 10, Kaman 5-6 0-0 10, Collison 7-11 8-8 23, Mayo 8-11 1-1 20, Brand 10-13 0-0 20, Carter 3-5 3-3 10, Da.Jones 1-2 0-0 2, Beaubois 1-3 2-2 4, Wright 0-0 0-0 0, Crowder 3-4 0-0 7, M.James 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 4677 15-16 113. Minnesota 19 26 25 28 — 98 Dallas 26 29 36 22 — 113 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 6-20 (Barea 4-7, Shved 1-3, Ridnour 1-4, Williams 0-3, Kirilenko 0-3), Dallas 6-13 (Mayo 3-4, Collison 1-1, Carter 1-1, Crowder 1-2, Marion 0-1, Da.Jones 0-1, Nowitzki 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Minnesota 53 (Pekovic 12), Dallas 36 (Marion 8). Assists— Minnesota 19 (Rubio 6), Dallas 33 (Mayo, Collison 9). Total Fouls—Minnesota 15, Dallas 23. Technicals—Rubio, Collison. A—19,486 (19,200).

4. Kansas (1) 14-1 1,416 6 5. Michigan (1) 16-1 1,415 2 6. Syracuse 16-1 1,284 7 7. Arizona 15-1 1,205 4 8. Gonzaga 16-1 1,141 9 9. Minnesota 15-2 1,041 8 10. Florida 12-2 1,019 11 11. Ohio St. 13-3 939 15 12. Creighton 16-1 896 13 13. Butler 14-2 855 14 14. NC State 14-2 836 20 15. San Diego St. 14-2 704 16 16. Kansas St. 13-2 670 18 17. Missouri 12-3 598 10 18. Michigan St. 14-3 426 22 19. New Mexico 15-2 368 25 20. Notre Dame 14-2 295 17 21. Oregon 14-2 238 — 22. VCU 14-3 212 — 23. Illinois 14-4 199 12 24. UCLA 14-3 185 — 25. Marquette 12-3 177 — Others receiving votes: Cincinnati 121, UConn 70, Georgetown 56, Mississippi 55, UNLV 26, Wisconsin 25, Boise St. 9, Miami 9, Wichita St. 6, Temple 5, Pittsburgh 2, Baylor 1, Utah St. 1, Wyoming 1.

USA Today/ESPN top 25 The top 25 teams in the USA TodayESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 13, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Louisville (18) 15-1 753 4 2. Indiana (6) 15-1 718 5 3. Duke (7) 15-1 707 1 4. Kansas 14-1 680 6 5. Michigan 16-1 678 2 6. Syracuse 16-1 619 7 7. Arizona 15-1 574 3 8. Gonzaga 16-1 552 8 9. Florida 12-2 526 9 10. Creighton 16-1 489 11 11. Ohio State 13-3 436 14 12. Minnesota 15-2 433 10 13. Butler 14-2 370 17 14. San Diego State 14-2 366 15 15. N.C. State 14-2 321 21 16. Missouri 12-3 298 12 17. Michigan State 14-3 286 18 18. Kansas State 13-2 243 23 19. VCU 14-3 178 24 20. Notre Dame 14-2 155 16 21. New Mexico 15-2 147 — 22. Illinois 14-4 125 13 23. UNLV 14-3 109 19 24. Cincinnati 14-3 80 20 25. UCLA 14-3 38 — Others receiving votes: Oregon 37, Georgetown 32, Marquette 23, Wisconsin 23, Wichita State 19, Mississippi 14, Wyoming 13, UConn 10, Miami 8, Oklahoma State 8, Boise State 2, Bucknell 2, Utah State 2, Iowa State 1.

Daily Corinthian • 9

6. Stanford 14-2 787 5 7. California 13-2 755 7 8. Penn St. 13-2 724 8 9. Tennessee 13-3 670 9 10. Maryland 12-3 615 10 11. North Carolina 17-1 590 11 12. Purdue 13-2 536 12 13. Georgia 15-2 519 13 14. UCLA 13-2 468 14 15. Louisville 14-3 422 15 16. Oklahoma 14-2 410 16 17. Oklahoma St. 12-2 324 21 18. Dayton 13-1 276 22 19. South Carolina 14-3 256 18 20. Texas A&M 13-5 233 20 21. Colorado 13-2 232 23 22. Florida St. 13-3 182 18 23. Kansas 11-4 124 17 24. Iowa St. 12-2 88 25 25. Michigan 14-2 86 — Others receiving votes: Syracuse 39, Vanderbilt 23, Miami 12, Michigan St. 12, Nebraska 12, UTEP 8, Villanova 8, Iowa 5, Delaware 4, Arkansas 2, Creighton 1.

Monday women’s scores EAST CCSU 62, Sacred Heart 57, OT Fairleigh Dickinson 80, Robert Mor ris 68 Mount St. Mary’s 49, St. Francis (NY) 45 Quinnipiac 85, Bryant 62 St. Francis (Pa.) 63, Monmouth (NJ) 49 Wagner 74, LIU Brooklyn 70 SOUTH Appalachian St. 68, Wofford 65, 2OT Ark.-Pine Bluff 50, Alcorn St. 41 Belmont 59, Murray St. 50 Bethune-Cookman 55, NC Central 32 Chattanooga 64, Coll. of Charleston 53 Coppin St. 69, SC State 56 Delaware St. 76, Wesley 34 Elon 71, UNC-Greensboro 60 Florida Gulf Coast 77, SC-Upstate 54 Howard 56, Norfolk St. 45 Jacksonville 64, Kennesaw St. 52 Mercer 56, North Florida 43 Morehead St. 77, Austin Peay 71 NC A&T 73, Florida A&M 52 Samford 56, Georgia Southern 41 Southern U. 73, MVSU 62 Stetson 71, ETSU 55 Tennessee St. 68, SE Missouri 58 MIDWEST E. Illinois 89, Tennessee Tech 79 Purdue 82, Ohio St. 75, 3OT SIU-Edwardsville 80, Jacksonville St. 58 SOUTHWEST Prairie View 59, Jackson St. 53 Texas Southern 91, Grambling St. 64 FAR WEST Idaho St. 69, Weber St. 45

Monday men’s scores EAST Farmingdale 72, Mount St. Mary (NY) 66 Keystone 95, Rosemont 92 Louisville 73, UConn 58 NJ City 65, John Jay 62 NJIT 66, Fairleigh Dickinson 63 NY Tech 73, Wilmington (Del.) 72 Old Westbury 103, NYU-Poly 74 Rutgers-Newark 67, Moravian 62 William Paterson 86, Brooklyn 79, OT SOUTH Appalachian St. 83, UNC Greensboro 70 Coll. of Charleston 73, The Citadel 69 Coppin St. 79, SC State 58 Elon 80, W. Carolina 67 Furman 69, Wofford 65 Georgia Southern 70, Davidson 57 Hampton 70, Quinnipiac 64 NC A&T 68, Florida A&M 40 NC Central 75, Bethune-Cookman 66 Norfolk St. 54, Howard 49 Savannah St. 78, Morgan St. 70, 2OT MIDWEST Augsburg 61, Macalester 51 Bethel (Minn.) 78, Hamline 62 Gustavus 74, Carleton 54 St. John’s (Minn.) 63, St. Mary’s (Minn.) 46 St. Thomas (Minn.) 94, St. Olaf 64 SOUTHWEST Texas Southern 95, Grambling St. 50

Misc. Transactions BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended free agent C Bryan Henry and Tampa Bay C David Wendt 50 games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Agreed to terms with RHP Tommy Hunter on a one-year contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Agreed to terms with manager Bob Melvin on a a two-year contract extension through the 2016 season and C George Kottaras on a one-year contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with OF Colby Rasmus on a oneyear contract and OF Adam Loewen on a minor league contract. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Agreed to terms with RHP J.J. Putz on a twoyear contract. CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with C Nevin Ashley, INF Emmanuel Burriss, INF Cesar Izturis, OF Derrick Robinson, RHP Nick Christiani, LHP Wilkin De La Rosa, RHP Justin Freeman, RHP Drew Hayes, RHP Chad Rogers, C Tucker Barnhart, C Corky Miller, INF Kristopher Negron, OF Billy Hamilton, OF Ryan LaMarre and OF Denis Phipps on minor league contracts. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms with OF Delvy Castillo, SS Ravel Hernandez, OF Ariel Sandoval and RHP Miguel Urena on minor league contracts. American Association KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Signed LHP Devin Anderson and RHP Brian Murphy. Traded SS Spiker Helms to River City (Frontier) for a player to be named. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS — Released INF Mike Murphy. SIOUX FALLS PHEASANTS — Signed RHP Kirk Clark. WICHITA WINGNUTS — Signed RHP

Junior Guerra. Released RHP Edgar R. Martinez. Frontier League FRONTIER GREYS — Signed OF Mark Micowski. GATEWAY GRIZZLIES — Signed C Landon Hernandez to a contract extension. JOLIET SLAMMERS — Signed RHP Jacob Sanchez to a contract extension. Signed INF Alex Jones and RHP Dan Marcacci. ROCKFORD RIVERHAWKS — Signed LHP Chris Kirk, OF Logan Lotti, and INF Cameron Sherrer. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS — Signed LHP Nick Gillung, 1B Daniel Kassouf, LHP Dayne Quist, and LHP Richard Sullivan. WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS — Placed 1B Ryan Cuneo on the retired list. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS — Recalled F Terrence Jones from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). SAN ANTONIO SPURS — Recalled G Cory Joseph from Austin (NBADL). NBA Development League RIO GRANDE VALLEY VIPERS — Announced G Patrick Beverley was recalled by Houston (NBA). FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Named Danny Crossman special teams coordinator. DETROIT LIONS — Named Curtis Modkins running backs coach/run game coordinator, Bobby Johnson tight ends coach, Tim Lappano wide receivers coach and Jeremiah Washburn offensive line coach. Announced special teams coordinator Danny Crossman will not return. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed TE Brandon Bostick, QB B.J. Coleman, T Andrew Datko, C Garth Gerhart, G Joe Gibbs, LB Micah Johnson, CB James Nixon and S Chaz Powell to reserve/ future contracts. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Named Jimmy Raye vice president of football operations. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Named John Dorsey general manager. TENNESSEE TITANS — Signed G Casey Studdard, WR Michael Calvin and WR Roberto Wallace to reserve/ future contracts. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS — Recalled F Ryan Spooner, F Jamie Tardif, D Matt Bartkowski and D David Warsofsky from Providence (AHL). CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Recalled F Jimmy Hayes from Rockford (AHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Recalled F Cam Atkinson, F Matt Calvert, F Ryan Johansen, D Tim Erixon, D John Moore and D David Savard from Springfield (AHL). DALLAS STARS — Traded D Mark Fistric to Edmonton for a 2013 thirdround draft pick. MONTREAL CANADIENS — Reassigned F Ian Schultz from Utah (ECHL) to Hamilton (AHL). Traded D Brendon Nash to Florida for D Jason DeSantis. NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled D Victor Bartley from Milwaukee (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS — Reassigned F Jason Wilson from Greenville (ECHL) to Connecticut (AHL). TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS — Reassigned F Tyler Brenner from Bakersfield (ECHL) to Toronto (AHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Signed D Jim Vandermeer. American Hockey League HAMILTON BULLDOGS — Signed F Riley Armstrong and D Mark Isherwood to professional tryout contracts. PEORIA RIVERMEN — Announced F Phil McRae, F Evgeny Grachev, F Andrew Murray, D Cade Fairchild and D Mark Cundari were recalled by St. Louis (NHL). SPRINGFIELD FALCONS — Announced D Anton Blomqvist was reassigned to Evansville (ECHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer D.C. UNITED — Signed F Michael Seaton. COLLEGE ECAC — Announced the retirement of commissioner Rudy Keeling. ANGELO STATE — Named Shayla Sabin women’s assistant soccer coach. FIU — Named Josh Conklin defensive coordinator. ILLINOIS — Named Bill Cubit offensive coordinator. LIMESTONE — Named Craig Kerr offensive coordinator. NEW JERSEY CITY — Named Robert Cole men’s and women’s assistant volleyball coach. NOTRE DAME — Announced RB Cierre Wood will enter the NFL draft. SOUTHERN CAL — Fired men’s basketball coach Kevin O’Neill. Named men’s assistant basketball coach Bob Cantu interim coach.

to go into specifics. Armstrong lost all seven Tour titles following a voluminous U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report that portrayed him as a ruthless competitor, willing to go to any lengths to win the prestigious race. USADA chief executive Bulls 97, Hawks 58 ATLANTA — Korver 3-5 2-3 9, Travis Tygart labeled the dopWomen’s AP top 25 College basketball Smith 4-14 1-2 9, Horford 3-10 0-0 The top 25 teams in the The Asing regimen allegedly carried 6, J.Teague 2-8 2-2 6, Harris 0-5 0-0 sociated Press’ women’s college bas0, Williams 2-6 0-0 4, Jenkins 1-9 0-0 out by the U.S. Postal Service Men’s AP top 25 ketball poll, with first-place votes in 3, Pachulia 2-9 0-0 4, Johnson 1-5 0-0 The top 25 teams in The Associparentheses, records through Jan. 6, team that Armstrong once led, 2, Tolliver 0-2 0-0 0, Scott 4-5 2-2 10, ated Press’ college basketball poll, total points based on 25 points for a Petro 2-4 1-1 5. Totals 24-82 8-10 58. with first-place votes in parentheses, “The most sophisticated, profirst-place vote through one point for a CHICAGO — Deng 7-9 2-4 18, records through Jan. 13, total points 25th-place vote and last week’s rankfessionalized and successful Boozer 7-14 6-8 20, Noah 2-11 5-6 9, based on 25 points for a first-place ing: Hinrich 0-3 1-2 1, Hamilton 2-7 4-4 8, vote through one point for a 25th-place doping program that sport has Record Pts Prv Gibson 4-8 0-0 8, Belinelli 2-5 2-2 6, vote and last week’s ranking: 1. Baylor (34) 14-1 991 1 ever seen.” Robinson 4-8 0-1 9, Butler 2-5 3-4 8, Record Pts Prv 2. Notre Dame (1) 14-1 948 2 Mohammed 1-3 2-2 4, M.Teague 0-1 1. Louisville (36) Yet Armstrong looked like 15-1 1,591 3 3. UConn (2) 14-1 914 3 0-0 0, Cook 2-3 0-0 6, Radmanovic 0-2 2. Indiana (13) 15-1 1,527 5 4. Duke (3) 15-0 907 4 just another runner getting in 0-0 0. Totals 33-79 25-33 97. 3. Duke (14) 15-1 1,501 1 5. Kentucky 15-1 817 6 Atlanta 15 5 17 21 — 58 his roadwork when he talked to the AP, wearing a red jersey and black shorts, sunglasses and a white baseball cap pulled down to his eyes. Leaning into a reporter’s car on the shoulder of a busy Austin road, he seemed unfazed by the attention and BY ROB MAADDI who decided to stay at their man and president Don Smo- over that span. They didn’t finthe news crews that made stops ish higher than 19th in yards schools. They were Notre lenski this week. Associated Press at his home. He cracked a few The Eagles were granted per- and 24th in points in the last PHILADELPHIA — Add yet Dame’s Brian Kelly, Oregon’s jokes about all the reporters another name to the Philadel- Chip Kelly and Penn State’s Bill mission to interview Falcons of- three years. vying for his attention, then The 50-year-old Whisenhunt fensive coordinator Dirk Koetphia Eagles’ list of coaching O’Brien. added, “but now I want to fincandidates. Former Bears coach Lovie ter and former Syracuse coach began his coaching career as an ish my run,” and took off down Former Cardinals coach Ken Smith interviewed last week. Doug Marrone. Koetter signed assistant at Vanderbilt in 1995. the road. Whisenhunt interviewed with The Eagles previously met with an extension to stay in Atlanta He jumped to the NFL after two The interview with Winfrey Philadelphia on Monday morn- Atlanta assistants Mike Nolan and Marrone replaced Chan seasons, joining Ted Marchiwill be Armstrong’s first public broda’s staff as tight ends coach ing as the team’s search to re- and Keith Armstrong and Den- Gailey in Buffalo. response to the USADA report. Whisenhunt was 49-53 in Ari- in Baltimore in 1997. Whisenplace Andy Reid entered its ver offensive coordinator Mike Armstrong is not expected to zona, including 4-2 in two play- hunt spent two seasons with the McCoy. third week. provide a detailed account about The team has selectively re- off appearances. The Cardinals Ravens, was Cleveland’s tight Whisenhunt was dismissed his involvement, nor address in by Arizona on Dec. 31 after six leased information on inter- lost to Pittsburgh in the Super ends coach in 1999 and the New depth many of the specific alleseasons. He led the Cardinals to views, so there could be others Bowl following the 2008 season. York Jets’ special teams coach in gations in the more than 1,000A former offensive coordina- 2000. He went to Pittsburgh in their only Super Bowl appear- on the list. page USADA report. The Eagles interviewed for- tor with the Steelers, Whisen- 2001, serving as the tight ends ance in his second season and In a text to the AP on SaturArizona won its second straight mer Ravens coach Brian Billick hunt’s offense in Arizona fared coach his first three seasons and day, Armstrong said: “I told her NFC West title the following last Monday and Seahawks de- much better his first three sea- offensive coordinator the next (Winfrey) to go wherever she year. But after a 4-0 start this fensive coordinator Gus Brad- sons when Kurt Warner was the three. wants and I’ll answer the quesReid was fired a day after the season, the Cardinals lost 11 of ley on Saturday, according to quarterback. tions directly, honestly and canWith Warner, the Cardinals Eagles finished 4-12 in his 14th their last 12 to finish 5-11 for the three people familiar with the didly. That’s all I can say.” second time in three years. meetings. They spoke on condi- ranked 12th, fourth and 14th in season. He took over for Romeo After a federal investigation The Eagles also were sched- tion of anonymity because the total yards from 2007-09, and Crennel in Kansas City. of the cyclist was dropped withuled to interview Bengals of- team didn’t comment on those s e v out charges being brought last enth, fensive coordinator Jay Gruden interviews. year, USADA stepped in with Colts offensive coordina- t h i r d on Monday, bringing the total an investigation of its own. The number of known candidates tor Bruce Arians is expected to a n d agency deposed 11 former teamto 11. Among those were three meet with owner Jeffrey Lurie, 11th in mates and accused Armstrong high-profile college coaches general manager Howie Rose- p o i n t s of masterminding a complex and brazen drug program that included 5831 H Hwy 5 57 E., Michie, TN 38357 • 731-632-3287 steroids, blood boosters and a range of other performance-enhancers. Once all the informaPlaza Bowling Lanes tion was out and his repCOME OUT AND SEE WHY BOWLING IS THE #1 PARTICIPATING utation shattered, ArmTuesday – Thursday ONLY SPORT WITH OVER 70 MILLION PARTICIPANTS strong defiantly tweeted 2001 Shiloh Rd. • Corinth, MS a picture of himself on 662-286-8105 a couch at home with all www.topoftheriverrestaurant.com seven of the yellow leadSpecial Rates for Church and School Groups Open: Tues-Fri @ 4:30, Sat @ 4:00, Sun 12:00 - 8:30; Closed Mondays er’s jerseys on display in Call David Curry 286-8105 and reserve your lane!! frames behind him.

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Wisdom

10 • Daily Corinthian

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Angry husband leaves home to find a friendly welcome DEAR ABBY: Recently my husband, “Byron,” and I had an argument, and he took off in his truck. He didn’t return until after work the following day. He had he spent the night at our friend “Arlene’s” house. She is divorced and lives alone. Byron assures me “nothing happened” between them. I want to believe him, but ever since this incident, Arlene will not look me in the eye or speak to me. I love Byron and trusted him until now. It hurts to think that our marriage may be ruined over a stupid argument. I know he was intoxicated, but why did he choose to go to her home? – BROKEN-

HEARTED IN W Y O MING DEAR B R O K E N Abigail HEARTVan Buren ED: He chose to Dear Abby go to her h o m e (even drunk as a skunk) because he knew he would be welcomed. It’s also the reason Arlene can’t look you in the eye. Marriage counseling for you and Byron may help you put this to rest. If he refuses to go with you, go without him. P.S. It appears Arlene has an agenda of her own – and Byron may be one of the items on it. You’d be wise to delete her from

your list of friends. DEAR ABBY: I have always been touched by the acts of kindness stories in your column. When I was 20, I went into New York City to attend classes. Upon my arrival, I was mugged in the bus station. It was rush hour and I was too scared to scream. After the mugger ran off, I picked up the few belongings that had fallen out of my handbag, walked across the street and down the stairs to the subway. It was then I realized I had no money to buy a token. I started crying and couldn’t stop. A middle-aged woman with a friendly smile arrived and stayed at my side until the authorities arrived. She calmed me

down and wouldn’t leave until she knew I was in safe hands. Before she left, she slipped some money into my pocket. After Sept. 11, I heard people say how “surprised” they were that New Yorkers “came together.” Not me, Abby. I have known since the day I was mugged that there are only a few bad apples in the Big Apple. I hope my good Samaritan will see your column and realize what her compassion and generosity meant to me that day and ever since. – STILL COMMUTING IN NYC DEAR STILL COMMUTING: Thanks for an upper of a letter, which proves that kindheartedness is universal -- and not

Today In History Today is Tuesday, Jan. 15, the 15th day of 2013. There are 350 days left in the year.

Today’s in History:  On Jan. 15, 1943, work was completed on the Pentagon, headquarters of the U.S. Department of War (now Defense).

On this date:

In 1559, England’s Queen Elizabeth I was crowned in Westminster Abbey. In 1777, the people of New Connecticut declared their independence. (The republic later became the state of Vermont.) In 1862, the U.S. Senate confirmed President Abraham Lincoln’s choice of Edwin M. Stan-

ton to be the new Secretary of War, replacing Simon Cameron. In 1913, actor Lloyd Bridges was born in San Leandro, Calif. In 1929, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta.  In 1947, the mutilated remains of 22-year-old Elizabeth Short, who came to be known as the “Black Dahlia,” were found in a vacant Los Angeles lot; her slaying remains unsolved.  In 1961, a U.S. Air Force radar tower off the New Jersey coast collapsed into the Atlantic Ocean during a severe storm, killing all 28 men aboard.  In 1967, the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League defeated the Kansas

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limited to any one area of the map. DEAR ABBY: Please help me and thousands of other payroll administrators with a public service message. I will be sending out W-2s this month to current and former employees. Last year, I got back about 10 percent of these W-2s because employees have moved and left no forwarding addresses. Often the phone has also been disconnected. Please remind anyone who has changed jobs and moved in the past year to make sure their former employer has their new address so their W-2 will arrive on the first try. I have a stack of these forms that have never been

claimed by former employees and no idea how to contact them. – PAYROLL ADMINISTRATOR, FORT PAYNE, ALA. DEAR ADMINISTRATOR: I’m pleased to pass along your message. The W-2 is proof the government needs to verify what someone has been paid and what has been withheld by the employer. Employers are required to provide one. (Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.)

Horoscopes City Chiefs of the American Football League 35-10 in the first AFLNFL World Championship Game, retroactively known as Super Bowl I. In 1973, President Richard Nixon announced the suspension of all U.S. offensive action in North Vietnam, citing progress in peace negotiations. In 1993, in Paris, a historic disarmament ceremony ended with the last of 125 countries signing a treaty banning chemical weapons. In 2009, US Airways Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger ditched his Airbus 320 in the Hudson River after a flock of birds disabled both engines; all 155 people aboard survived.

Ten years ago: White House budget director Mitchell Daniels predicted federal deficits would balloon to the $200-$300 billion range over the next two years. Mickey Mouse and The Walt Disney Co. scored a big victory as the Supreme Court upheld longer copyright protections for cartoon characters, songs, books and other creations worth billions of dollars.

The Pisces Moon is a spiritual teacher. She reminds us that the wild moments you create outside of yourself bring only temporary release. True freedom comes from bringing your inner world to a state of harmony. The expansive, unlimited joyful feeling was always there inside you, waiting for you to tap in. ARIES (March 21-April 19). Your senses are ready to take life in high definition. Sounds sparkle and colors appear brighter. This may have something to do with that interesting someone you keep running into. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You have plenty of charm to at your disposal, and you can dish it generously when needed. However, right now you may find that life is a lot less complicated if you simply tell the far-less charming truth about things. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). People seem to think you’re some kind of super hero these days. You’ll warm into the day, determined not to let a loved one’s long list of expectations overwhelm you. CANCER (June 22July 22). True history can be hard to find.

Happy New Year At the beginning of a New Year, it is always good to take heed to some exhortations from the word of God. The Bible - “and the Lord spoke unto Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt, saying, this month shall be unto you the beginning of months: it shall be the first month of the year to you” (Exodus 12:1-2). The following is an acrostic of Happy New Year to point out some of the exhortations. All can be helped by reading the scripture references. H-old fast to your faith. Heb. 10:22-25, Lk. 18:8, 2 Tim. 4:7 A-ssemble with the saints when they meet. Heb. 10:25 P-ray earnestly every day. Matt 7:7, 11 P-repare to meet thy God. Amos 4:12 Y-ield not to temptation. Matt. 26:41; James 1:13-16; Heb. 4:15 N-eglect not your talents. Matt. 25:14-30 E-xamine yourself daily. 2 Cor. 13:5 W-ork deligently for the Lord. I Cor. 15:58 Y-ield your members to righteousness. I Cor. 15:34; I Tim. 6:11 E-xercise thyself to Godliness. I Tim. 4:7 A-im at sinless perfection. Heb. 6:1 R-edeem the time. Eph. 5:16; James 4:12-14 Happiness is a choice - a wise choice, Becoming a Christian is a choice, yes, a wise choice. Start the New Year off right. Hear the word of God - Believe the word - repent of a sinful life - Confess your faith in Christ - be baptized for remission of sin. Can we helpgive us a call. What can we learn? To obey Christ is a wise choice. Read your Bible every day. Welcome to Northside

Northside Church of Christ 3127 Harper Road - Corinth, MS - 286-6256 Minister - Lennis Nowell

Schedule of Services Sunday Morning Bible Study...........................................9:45 Sunday Morning Worship Service.................................10:35 Sunday EveningWorhship Service..................................5:00 Wednesday Night Bible Study.........................................7:00 You are cordially invited to attend every service.

Even those who are trying to stick to the facts cannot form an entirely impartial version. Listen for the spin and put everything in a context. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Just as soon as you figure out which job to do, you’ll get it done. The hard part is the forethought. Take all the time you need to get organized and prioritize your efforts. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You’ll be reviewed by your toughest critic — you! Did you do a great job? Yes, of course you did. Is there room for improvement? Yes, as usual. You should really give yourself a raise. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Saying “no” is freedom. If you can’t say “no” or if you believe you can’t, you’re in prison. Exercise your right to disagree, decline or walk away. To liberty! SCORPIO (Oct. 24Nov. 21). No one can make you want something you don’t or be interested in something that doesn’t interest you. Your attractions come naturally and for reasons that are mysterious even to you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). There are several people who have the credentials you need to fulfill a certain job. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). No one can tell you who you are. You can’t blame the ones who try, nor can you take their comments too personally. Their suggestions have nothing to do with you really. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18). Romantic attention will make you swoon inside, though it’s likely that your outside will remain unfazed. It has to be this way if you’re to stay in control. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You’re all heart now, overflowing with feeling and filled with passion for your endeavors. The Moon in your sign will embolden you all day and into tomorrow morning. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Jan. 15). This year puts you in touch with the simple pleasures that make you happy. You’ll find yourself wanting fewer things, talking less and enjoying the spaces in your schedule. Others sense how centered you’ve become, and you’ll be offered what seemed withheld from you before. March and July bring financial bonus. Cancer and Pisces adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 6, 23, 50, 1 and 17.


Variety

11 â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Corinthian

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ACROSS 1 Gun barrel cleaners 8 Be audibly sad 11 Poetic planet 14 Steel foundry input 15 Grounded flier since 2001 16 British lav 17 *Wanted poster picture, usually 18 Traces of gunpowder, e.g. 20 Big bird 21 *Well-positioned driver at Indy 23 Crib part 26 Volleyball divider 27 Biol. or geol. 28 Five-term sen., say 30 Coolers in windows, briefly 32 Med. care providers 35 *Sailboat built for speed 40 Before, in poems 41 Uriah was one 42 Female political refugee 44 Cycle starter 45 *Board meeting VIP 47 Rowdy bunch 49 Trains above the road 50 Fr. holy woman 51 Jug handle 53 Addams family cousin 55 Indian tourist destination 58 With 65-Across, a cappella group, and what the starts of the answers to starred clues comprise 62 Hosp. areas 64 Behind the eightball 65 See 58-Across 68 Chocolate shape 69 Kimono closer 70 Set free 71 Barnyard enclosure 72 1/60 of a min. 73 Tweezer target

DOWN 1 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The __ of the Ancient Marinerâ&#x20AC;? 2 South African lilies 3 Powerful person 4 BP takers, often 5 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look at that!â&#x20AC;? 6 Let fall 7 Determined to have 8 Emergency gear 9 Has obligations 10 On a need-toknow __ 11 Whippersnappersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opposites 12 Lecherous sort 13 Dutch South African 19 Calamine target 22 Pastoral places 24 Meeting with an atty. 25 Something to talk about 29 River in Hades 31 Dimwits 33 Popular dunker 34 Caught in the act 35 Train engine sound

36 Filmmaker WertmĂźller 37 Planned travel route 38 Down-to-earth 39 Michelangelo statue 43 Golfer Norman 46 Connecting strip of land: Abbr. 48 Yaks and yaks

52 Bank takebacks, for short 54 Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headgear 56 Chopper blade 57 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Am not!â&#x20AC;? rejoinder 58 Tops of overalls 59 Vet sch. course 60 Kimono cousin 61 Unimposing 63 Crock-Pot dinner 66 Brewpub brew 67 Burgle

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

Beetle Bailey

Wizard of Id

Dustin

xwordeditor@aol.com

01/15/13

Baby Blues

Barney Google and Snuffy Smith

By Gareth Bain (c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

01/15/13

Tuesday, January 15, 2013


Daily Corinthian • Tuesday, January 15, 2013 • 12

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ATTORNEYS AT LAW William W. Odom, Jr. bodom43@bellsouth.net

2760 S. Harper • Corinth

Rhonda N. Allred rallred@bellsouth.net

404 Waldron St • 662-286-9311 PO Box 1393 • Corinth, MS 38835-1393 Fax: 662-286-9312

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Mon. - Fri. 8 am - 4 pm Sat. 8 am - 11 am Call us for scrap pick-up.

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Visit our website www.kingkars.net 662-287-8773 916 Hwy. 45 South Corinth, MS 38834

Attorney & Counselor at Law 605 Taylor St • P.O. Box 992 Corinth, MS 38835-992 662-286-9211 • Fax 662-286-7003 www.corinthlawyer.com “Supporting Education”


Daily Corinthian â&#x20AC;˘ Tuesday, January 15, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ 13

Man pardoned by Barbour involved in fatal shooting JACK ELLIOTT JR. Associated Press

JACKSON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; One of the ex-prisoners who received a full pardon last year from then-Gov. Haley Barbour was involved in exchange of gunfire that killed another man last week, a northern Mississippi sheriff said. Calhoun County Sheriff Greg Pollan said Wayne Thurman Harris of Slate Springs and Chris McGonagill of Calhoun City got into an argument at a cookout and both of them fired guns. Both men were wounded, McGonagill fatally. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to put it all together. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a puzzle,â&#x20AC;? Pollan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know Harris was hit once

in the leg and McGonagill about six times.â&#x20AC;? Pollan said no charges have been filed because he has not had a chance to interview Harris. McGonagill died about 1 a.m. Friday at Baptist Hospital in Oxford. Harris was being treated at the North Mississippi Medical Center in Tupelo. The incident took place about three miles south of Calhoun City on Mississippi Highway 9. Calhoun City is about 150 miles northeast of Jackson. Harris received a full and unconditional pardon from Barbour on Jan. 10, 2012. Pollan said â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and state documents show â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Harris had completed his sentence for sale of mari-

juana when the pardon was issued. State prison system records show Harris was sentenced in Calhoun County on Jan. 19, 2001, for the sale of marijuana to 20 years in prison, with five years suspended conditioned upon his completion of three years post release supervision. He was given an official release on Dec. 21, 2007. Convicted felons typically are not allowed to possess firearms, but Pollan said that does not apply in Harrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; case because of the full pardon he received from Barbour. Pollan said at least three other people were at the cookout when the argument began.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;At this point we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think anyone else was involved,â&#x20AC;? he said He said investigators determined that McGonagill was carrying a 9mm pistol and shot Harris at least once in the leg. He said Harris pulled a .22-caliber rifle out of his truck, which was parked nearby, and fired at McGonagill, striking him multiple times. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At this point we know at least 13 total shots were fired,â&#x20AC;? Pollan said. However, he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We cannot confirm who fired first.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once I talk to (Harris) weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll meet with the district attorney and go over the case and decide then about charges,â&#x20AC;? the sheriff said. Barbour, a Republican,

sparked an uproar when he pardoned nearly 200 people as his second term was ending in January 2012. The total included four convicted murderers and a robber who worked as inmate trusties at the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mansion. Crime victimsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advocates and families across the state called for the pardons to be revoked. Barbour has said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at peace with the pardons because his Christian faith teaches about redemption. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe in second chances and I try hard to be forgiving,â&#x20AC;? Barbour said in an interview last year. The issue went to the Mississippi Supreme Court which ruled last

March that the pardons were valid. Barbourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actions also prompted a short-lived legislative debate about changing the governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pardoning powers. However, lawmakers made no changes. Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s custom of using convicted killers and others serving long sentences as workers at the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mansion is somewhat unusual. For decades, it was the custom of governors to grant those workers some type of early release. Gov. Phil Bryant, a Republican who succeeded the term-limited Barbour, stopped the program. He also said he would not issue such pardons.

With too much rain, crawfish swimming out of ponds BY JANET MCCONNAUGHEY Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; As rain followed rain in southwest Louisiana, crawfish farmers saw their livestock swim over the levees around their ponds while fish swam in to feast on those remaining. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even though a road may be passable, a bridge can ice quickly causing drivers to lose control quickly causing accidents and injuries,â&#x20AC;? the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency cautioned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is very important that our residents remain weather aware during the next 24 to 48 hours,â&#x20AC;? said agency Director Robert Latham. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As is typical in our state, we could experience a wide variety of weather threats including winter weather, ice, flood-

ing and severe thunderstorms.â&#x20AC;? Rain is in the forecast at least until Wednesday in the southwest and possibly into Thursday in southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi, meteorologists said. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a warm rain â&#x20AC;&#x201D; temperatures in southeast Louisiana dropped from the mid-70s to the mid50s as a cold front moved through Sunday, said meteorologist Robert Ricks in Slidell, La. Parts of southwest Louisiana got up to a foot of rain last week. And more was coming. In the Jefferson Davis Parish town of Lake Arthur, Mayor Robert B. Bertrand suggested on Saturday that people in lowlying areas leave town. On Sunday, he said there was some street flooding and

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is very important that our residents remain weather aware during the next 24 to 48 hours.â&#x20AC;? Robert Latham Director Mississippi Emergency Management Agency water in at least one house in an area along the lake, where water had come over the levees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water in yards along the lake but not in homes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not too bad as long as water doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t continue to come up,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our pumps have kept the town mostly water-free.â&#x20AC;? Although more rain was likely, he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;at least the windâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out of the north.â&#x20AC;? South winds will push water farther up the streams and bayous, but a north wind will help push it out toward the Gulf of Mexico. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All it needs to do is go

down two or three inches and we could all breathe a little easier.â&#x20AC;? Those south winds brought water higher than David Savoy of Church Point had ever seen it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had water over the slab of the carport one time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one inch â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and that was during a hurricane. I had water a foot deep over my carport this time,â&#x20AC;? he said. It also flooded about 35 percent of his crawfish ponds, which cover 1,700 acres. One problem, he said, is that crawfish do better in lower areas, which

are the ones that flood first. At one spot, he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I could have just scooped them out and filled a 5-gallon bucket with little crawfish, the size of my little finger, with one big scoop.â&#x20AC;? Those are just the crustaceans heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d hoped to harvest later in the year. Another big problem is that water high enough for crawfish to leave means that fish can swim in. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What we call gully perch, catfish, buffalo fish, garfish â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all tend to swim over those levees,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buffalo fish as long as my arm get in on two inches of water. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And they eat, man. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in heaven. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll eat until you have nothing left. And thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no way to get them out of there.â&#x20AC;? Stephen Minvielle, who farms 80 acres of crawfish in New Iberia and is director of the state Crawfish

Research and Promotion Board, estimated that perhaps 10,000 to 25,000 of Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 250,000 acres of crawfish ponds were under water. His own ponds were safe so far, he said, but about half of his two neighborsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 700 acres of ponds had been flooded. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I put in extra time when I built them 12 years ago, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m glad I went that extra foot higher,â&#x20AC;? he said. Southeast Louisiana only got about a half-inch or so of rain by Sunday afternoon, meteorologist Phil Grigsby said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re expecting the rain to be a bigger issue tonight and tomorrow. The frontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to stall.â&#x20AC;? That could bring 1 to 2 inches of rain, possibly up to 3, in southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi, he said.

Freezing cold grips West Coast, some citrus groves damaged Associated Press

FRESNO, Calif. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; As an unusual cold gripped the West Coast for the fifth day, some California citrus growers began to see damage on Monday while strong winds added to the misery of bundledup city residents. The extreme chill in the West comes as the Eastern U.S., from Atlanta to New York City, is seeing spring-like weather. In the San Joaquin Valley, where farmers are fighting to protect about $1.5 billion worth of citrus fruit on their trees, Sunday temperatures dropped to 25 degrees in some areas and stayed low longer than previous nights. Prolonged tempera-

tures in the mid-20â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or below cause damage to citrus crops. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was our coldest night to date,â&#x20AC;? said Paul Story of Exeter-based California Citrus Mutual, an association of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3,900 citrus growers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think mandarin growers are going to see a range of significant damage, enough that they will have to separate their crops.â&#x20AC;? Mandarins are more susceptible to cold than other citrus and start to freeze at about 32 degrees, Story said. Because many mandarin trees were planted in recent years as the fruitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popularity soared, they are grown in colder areas outside the traditional citrus belt.

Other citrus crops saw little or minimal damage, Story said. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high sugar content in oranges helped protect them, he said, because sugar inhibits freezing. Growers deployed wind machines to keep the warm air closer to the ground and irrigation to raise the temperature in the groves. Rows farthest away from the protection could be damaged, Story said. And farmers who do not have wind machines could lose crops. Lindsey-based Robert LoBue â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who grows 1,000 acres of citrus, including mandarins â&#x20AC;&#x201D; said wind machines were critical in his groves, but saving the crop doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come cheap. LoBue runs one

wind machine for every 10 acres and has to employ a crew to man them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very diligent, we run the wind and water all night,â&#x20AC;? LoBue said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re spending thousands of dollars to protect these crops.â&#x20AC;? And farmers are on the hook for a fifth cold night: a freeze warning remains in effect until 10 a.m. Tuesday for central California. In Southern California, strong winds helped to keep crops out of danger by keeping the cold from settling. Temperatures in downtown Los Angeles plummeted to 34 degrees, breaking the previous record of 36 degrees set on Jan. 14, 2007. Winds gusted to 41

mph in Riverside, while Santa Ana and Van Nuys reported gusts to 26 mph. In Angeles National Forest, where overnight temperatures have been dropping into the 20s, Arcadia hiker Danny Kim, 28, was found Sunday night after surviving 26 hours in the frigid West Fork wilderness. Kim was airlifted to a hospital for treatment of hypothermia. The body of a homeless man was found just before dawn Monday on a Los Angeles Skid Row sidewalk, but it was unclear if the death was caused by the record cold. In Beverly Hills, fans brought heavy coats and scarves as they waited along the red carpet hoping to catch glimpses

of stars arriving for the Golden Globes ceremony Sunday evening. Some of the actors shivered but werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t complaining. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather be nippy than boiling hot,â&#x20AC;? said actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who arrived in a strapless dress. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not wearing any leggings or long underwear.â&#x20AC;? In San Diego, zookeepers offered extra heat and shelter for some animals. The cold air was flowing east into neighboring Arizona, where metropolitan Phoenix was marking one of its coldest stretches in years. Temperatures over the weekend dipped to 30 degrees at Sky Harbor International Airport and fell well below zero in mountainous Flagstaff.

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14 • Tuesday, January 15, 2013 • Daily Corinthian

0208 Sales CIRCULATION SALES POSITION (Outside Marketing for Newspaper Subscriptions) •Some phone Solicitation •Some In-store Marketing "Experience a plus but will train" Applications can be picked up at The Daily Corinthian Newspaper office 1607 S. Harper Rd. Corinth, MS. Between the hours of 8:00-5:00 Monday-Friday

Medical/ 0220 Dental FULL TIME Dental Assistant position available. Experience preferred, but not required. Must be reliable, work well with others & be a team player. Send copy of resume to P.O. Box 465, Corinth, MS 38835.

0232 General Help Great employees are the lifeblood of any great company. Finding them is the hard part, and finding the time is even harder. With Power Resume Search, you’ll save both time and effort. It uses Monster’s 6Sense search technology to deliver the best-qualified candidates - sorted, ranked and compared side-by-side. So you get better matches to your job opportunities with unprecedented efficiency. And you can’t put a value on that.

Find the right person for your job today at www.dailycorinthian.com.

0121 Card of Thanks

CAUTION! ADVERTISEMENTS in this classification usually offer informational service of products designed to help FIND employment. Before you send money to any advertiser, it is your responsibility to verify the validity of the offer. Remember: If an ad appears to sound “too good to be true”, then it may be! Inquiries can be made by contacting the Better Business Bureau at 1-800-987-8280.

0244 Trucking

CARD OF THANKS The family of Herschel Brown would like to thank everyone for the food & flowers. Also, to McBride Funeral Home, Bro. Kenny James, and all pallbearers. Special thanks to Legacy Hospice, Margie Gray, and Tracey Treece for making his last days comfortable & being there for us during this time.

WANT TO make certain your ad gets attention? Ask about attention getting graphics.

0135 Personals *ADOPT:* ADORING young professionals will LOVE & CHERISH 1st baby. Expenses paid, 1-800-997-1720 *Morgan & John*

GARAGE /ESTATE SALES

The Brown Family 0128

EMPLOYMENT

NO TOUCH Truckload Division at Ashley Distribution Services! Must have a CDL A, at least 1 year OTR experience, good work history and clean MVR/PSP Reports. We pay .34 to .36 Cents per mile depending on experience with no touch dry freight. 2,850 average Miles Per Week with stop pay. Above average home time, well maintained equipment. Paid Safety Bonus and paid vacations with a great benefit package. Make this career change your last one-join the best! Call 1 -800-837-2241 8AM to 6PM CST for information and an application.

In Memoriam

0244 Trucking ATTENTION DRIVER Trainees Needed Now! No Experience Necessary. Covenant Transport needs entry-level semi drivers. Premium equipment & benefits. Call Today! 1-888-540-7364

Part-time 0268 Employment

NOW HIRING! Domino's Pizza now hiring 20 part-time team members. Earn up to $15/hr as a delivery driver. Must be 18 years old, pass background check, have a safe driving record, your own vehicle, proof of car insurance, customer service skills, previous job history with good references for all positions, including Pizza Makers & Customer Service Representatives. Apply in Person, 1102 Hwy 72 E., Corinth (old Kroger & Big Lots).

Businesses for 0280 Sale

Remembering loved ones we’ve lost..... in

2012

Please send your Memorial (Must be no more than 8 lines (approx. 4 words per line) With photo and payment of

$20 to:

Daily Corinthian Attn: Classified P.O. Box 1800 Corinth, MS 38835-1800 or drop off at: 1607 S. Harper Rd.

FREE BEAUTIFUL mixed 2 A/C UNITS, 110 & 220. b r e e d p u p s . 1 s t $100 for both. 427-9894 shots/wormed, 10 wks ANTIQUE SINGER treddle old. 662-287-1035 sewing machine, $350. 427-9894 or 802-9285. FREE KITTENS. 2 brothers, 4 mos. old, house WASHER FOR SALE. $50. broken, ready for a 662-212-2155 or 603good home. 662-643- 3 1 9 1 . 5022.

0512

IN MEMORIAM 2012 WILL BE PUBLISHED ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30TH, 2013 DEADLINE IS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23RD, 2013 AT 5:00 P.M.

Musical

Merchandise HOUNDS, 2 f. a d u l t s $100. Dm game roost- LARGE CONSOLE PIANO ers $25. 427-9894 w/bench, exc. wood finish, needs tuned. $225 obo. 662-415-6954 FARM after 5 p.m. 0518 Electronics

(5) COLOR TV's, (1) 13", HAY, SQ. BALES, fertil- (1) 10", (1) 19", $20-$60. ized ceresa/grass. $2 662-665-1587. bale, 662-415-0467 VICTORIAN ANTIQUE H A Y : S Q U A R E b a l e s , Maple stereo, has good $ 5 . 0 0 , B e r m u d a , radio, good cond., $100. sprayed, fertilized, dry 286-2952. in barn. 662-808-0291 Sporting after 6.

0450 Livestock CATTLE SELLOUT! 15 heads, comm. Angus, 1 bull, 8 cows, 6 calves. 808-0291 aft. 6

MERCHANDISE

0506 Antiques/Art

ANTIQUE BENCH with wide wood trim and red 146 HWY 1-72, Iuka - covering. $400. Call 662former Italian Restaur- 287-7673 ant - The Esparanza. Business is currently ANTIQUE DARK WOOD c l o s e d . G a z e b o h a s TOBACCO STAND. $375. been enclosed for ex- Call 662-287-7673 tra dining space (20x22). Brick BBQ grilling area ANTIQUE MARBLE TOP in back. Call Vicki WOOD CHEST. $300. Call Mullins with Mid-South 662-287-7673 Real Estate Sales & Auctions, 662-808-6011. ANTIQUE MARBLE WASHWEAVER'S BOUTIQUE & STAND for bowl and MERLE NORMAN - Busi- pitcher. $60. Call 662-287 ness and all inventory -7673 for sale. Lines including Yankee Candle, Wood Wick candles, Aro- ANTIQUE OLD RED matique, Willow Tree TRUNK WITH INTERIOR and many others. RE- TRAY $100. Call 662-287DUCED to $160,000. Call 7673 Vicki Mullins with MidSouth Real Estate Sales ANTIQUE SMALL MARBLE & A u c t i o n s , 6 6 2 - 8 0 8 - TOP SIDE TABLE. $80 Call 6011. 662-287-7673

L-SHAPED WALNUT OFFICE DESK. $200. Call 662 -287-7673

Wanted to 0554 Rent/Buy/Trade

M&M. CASH for junk cars & trucks. We pick up. 662-415-5435 or 731-239-4114.

Misc. Items for 0563 Sale (3) MIRRORS for dressers, $25. 662-665-1587.

(50) BASKETS. All sizes. $1 to $2. 662-665-1587.

3 LADY MANNEQUINS. $125 EACH Call 662-287 7673

45 PURSES, all types, $3.00 each. 662-6651587.

FREE ADVERTISING Advertise one item valued at $500 or less for free. Price must be in ad & will run for 5 days 0527 Goods in Daily Corinthian, 1 day in Reporter & 1 day EXER. MACHINE: Nordic- in Banner Independent. Track, exercise arm & legs, $75. 662-665-1587. Ads may be up to approx. 20 words including phone number. The 0533 Furniture ads must be for private (1) CHAIR, $35. 662-665- party or personal mdse. 1587. & cannot include pets & supplies, livestock (incl. (2) COUCHES (1 is Chase chickens, ducks, cattle, lounge couch). $100. 662 goats, etc) & supplies, -665-1587. garage sales, hay, firewood, & automobiles. (2) DARK curio cabinets with lights, $40 each. NO BUSINESS OR 286-2952. BASSET ANTIQUE china hutch, dark in color, exc. cond., $150. 2862952. C O U C H , $ 7 0. 6 6 2 - 6 6 5 1587.

COMMERCIAL ADS ALLOWED!

Email ad to: freeads @dailycorinthian.com

Or mail ad to Free Ads, CURIO CABINET WITH P.O. Box 1800, Corinth, ROUNDED GLASS FRONT. MS 38835, fax ad to 662$375. Call 662-287-7673 287-3525 or bring ad to 1607 S. Harper Rd., CorI R O N H E A D B O A R D & inth. FOOTBOARD, Unfinished, $150. Call 662-287- * N O P H O N E C A L L S PLEASE. INCLUDE NAME 7673 & ADDRESS FOR OUR REKITCHEN TABLE, $40. 662- CORDS. 665-1587. LARGE METAL SHOPPING LIGHT OAK entertain- CART w/wheels, $100 ment center with lights, 427-9894 or 802-9285. $75. 286-2952. MEN & WOMEN's all size TV ENTERTAINMENT center, $35. 662-665-1587.

coats, $3. 662-665-1587.

A N T I Q U E V I C T O R I A N TWO TIER GLASS TEA LOVE SEAT w/gold fab- CART W/WHEELS. $75. ric & decorative wood Call 662-287-7673 trim. $425 Call 662-2877673

WANT TO make certain 0539 Firewood your ad gets attention? WANT TO make certain Ask about attention ANTIQUE VICTORIAN RED F R E E F I R E W O O D : your ad gets attention? VELVET CHAIR. $125 Call Wenasoga area. You Ask about attention getting graphics.

Happy Ads

662-287-7673

cut. 901-870-0846.

getting graphics.

ATTENTION!

Moms, Dads, Grandparents, Godparents, Aunts, Uncles or Friends, The Daily Corinthian will be featuring the “Babies of 2012” on January 27, 2013. If you or someone you know has had a baby in 2012, we want to feature that baby on this special page. Please send in form below with photo & payment of

$20 to:

Ella Swindle

Born July 9, 2012

Parents: Derek & Lauren Swindle

You may also email to: classad@dailycorinthian.com

Store/Office 0551 Equipment

( 4 ) L A M P S , $ 5 . 0 0 T O (1) DESK, $30. 662-665$25.00. 662-665-1587. 1587.

0320 Cats/Dogs/Pets

0430 Feed/Fertilizer

0114

IN MEMORIAM

Household 0509 Goods

PETS

Grandparents: Laura Holloway, Rodney & Carolyn Swindle, Danny Holloway Great Grandparents: Ginger Swindle, Linda Harris, Ray Gene & Betty Holloway & Peggy Bizwell

Babies of 2012 c/o Daily Corinthian P.O. Box 1800 Corinth, MS 38835-1800 or drop off at 1607 S. Harper Rd. • Corinth, MS You may also email to: classad@dailycorinthian.com

Baby’s name______________________________________________________ Date of Birth______________________________________________________ Parents Name____________________________________________________ Address_________________________________________________________ Phone #_________________________________________________________ Person’s signature & phone number who is placing ad______________________ ________________________________________________________________ Credit or debit card #________________________________________________

For any questions or more info, call 662-287-6147

Exp. date___________________Check#________________Cash________

Deadline is Monday, January 21, 2013 “Babies of 2012” will publish on Sunday, January 27, 2013


id Waste Department."

probated and registered by

the Clerk of said Court Daily Corinthian • Tuesday, January 15, 2013 • with15

Misc. Items for 0563 Sale

Mobile Homes 0675 for Rent

OLD MILK CAN. $50. CALL 3BR, 2BA, very clean, lg. back porch, overlooks 662-287-7673 lake, 2 ac. yard, garden MEN/WOMEN shirts & spot, ideal for retirees. pants, $1 to $2. 662-665$450 mo., $350 dep. 4621587. 3976 or 415-0146. TIFFANY STYLE PEACOCK LAMP. $150. Call TAKING APPLICATIONS: 2 662-287-7673 & 4 BRs. Oakdale Mobile W H I T E , L O N G s l e e v e , Home Pk. 286-9185. long train, beaded bodice, wedding dress, size REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 22, like new, worn once, $100. 286-2952.

Homes for 0710 Sale

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Unfurnished 0610 Apartments 1BR, ALL util, $500; 2BR, w/d, stv/ref, sat tv, CHA, $475. 462-8221, 415-1065. 2 BR & 3 BR, stove/refrig. furn., W&D hookup, CHA. 287-3257.

MAGNOLIA APTS. 2 BR, stove, refrig., water. $365. 286-2256.

CR 107, Corinth - Gorgeous 5 BR, 3 BA home with partial basement, game room, screened back porch, inground pool, shop, barn & room to roam on over 4 acres! Call Vicki Mullins with Mid-South Real Estate Sales & Auctions, 662-808-6011.

HUD PUBLISHER’S STUDIO APT., 1 BR, NOTICE downtown, $650 mo. All real estate adver287-5557. tised herein is subject WEAVER APTS. 504 N. to the Federal Fair Cass, 1 BR, scr.porch, Housing Act which w/d. $375+util, 286-2255. makes it illegal to advertise any preference, Homes for limitation, or discrimi0620 Rent nation based on race, 1011-B Douglas, 2 BR color, religion, sex, apt., $250 mo.; 2 BR handicap, familial status house, 1306 Tate St. or national origin, or intention to make any $225 mo. 415-1320. such preferences, limi3 BR, 2 BA, all stainless tations or discriminasteel appl., C/H/A, dbl. tion. carport, behind Box State laws forbid disChapel Church. $300 crimination in the sale, dep., $700 rent. 662-396- rental, or advertising of 1698. real estate based on 4 BR, 3 BA, C/H/A, 1619 factors in addition to E. Foote St. $550 mo., those protected under federal law. We will not $300 dep. 284-8396. knowingly accept any BUCHANAN ST., 2 BR, 1 advertising for real es1/2 BA, $495. 287-5557. tate which is in violaROCKHILL, (27 CR 156), tion of the law. All perAlcorn Cent. Schl. Dist. sons are hereby in2BA, 1BA, lg. LR, sbs re- formed that all dwellfrig. & stove furn., quiet ings advertised are area. $450 mo., $450 available on an equal opportunity basis. dep. 662-415-4555.

Mobile Homes 0675 for Rent 3 BR, 2 BA D/W, stove, refrig., W&D, Michie area. $400 mo. plus dep. Ser. inq. only! 731-2399840 or 731-439-0119.

Services

Mobile Homes 0741 for Sale

FINANCIAL

3 BR, 2 BA Southern Hospitality D/W, all appl., new HVAC pkg. unit under warr., must be moved. 662-415-9698 or 731-926-6964.

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF ALCORN COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

Manufactured

2001 DOUBLE Wide & 2001 16x80 Single Wide, both homes 3 BR, 2 BA, C/H/A, great cond. Only $19,900. Take your pick. Call 662-401-1093.

RE: LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF DOROTHY JEAN COLSTON, DECEASED

CAUSE NO. 2013-001502 Thirty (30) Cubic YardSelf

NO. 2013-0011-02

I PAY top dollar for used homes! Call 662-2965923 or 601-916-9796. TOP OF the line Home, 32x70 Franklin, 4 BR, 2 BA, finished sheetrock throughout, fireplace, overhead vents, thermal pane windows. Home comes with delivery & set up on your property. Call 662-3979339. WHY PAY rent when you can own? Like new 16x80, 3+2, all electric, all appliances, master, dining, living room furn., Jacuzzi tub. Delivered $18,900. Call 662296-5923 or 601-9169796.

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

The city of Corinth, Mississippi will receive sealed IN THE MATTER bids for the following deOF THE ESTATE OF scribed equipment until 11:00 JAMES RUSSELL BOYD, o'clock a.m. on the 14th day DECEASED of February, 2013, and shortly KIMBERLY H. BOYD, thereafter the bids shall EXECUTRIX opened and read aloud.

0955 Legals

0747 Homes for Sale

0955 Legals

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF ALCORN COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

LEGALS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE is hereby given that Letters Testamentary have been on this day granted to the undersigned, JAMES ROY COLSTON, on the estate of Dorothy Jean Colston, deceased, by the Chancery Court of Alcorn County, Mississippi, and all persons having claims against said estate are required to have the same probated and registered by the Clerk of said Court within ninety (90) days after the date of the first publication of this notice or the same shall be forever barred. The first day of the publication of this notice is the 8th day of January, 2013.

STATE OF MISSISSIPPI COUNTY OF ALCORN

Notice is hereby given that Letters Testamentary were on the 4 day of January, 2013, issued the undersigned by the Chancery Court of Alcorn County, Mississippi, on the Estate of JAMES RUSSELL BOYD, deceased, and all persons having claims against the said estate are hereby notified to present the same to Clerk of said Court for probate and registration according to law within ninety (90) days from this date or WITNESS my signature on they will be forever barred.

Contained Engine-Driven Leaf Collection Truck . Complete and detailed specifications may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, 300 Childs Street, Corinth, Mississippi (662-2866644 or email cortax@bell south.net). All bid envelopes should be clearly marked "Bid for a "Thirty (30) Cubic Yard Self Contained Engine Drive Leaf Collection Truck for the Solid Waste Department." The City reserves the right to reject any and/or all bids. Done at the direction of

this 3rd day of January, 2013.

This 4 day of January, the Board of Mayor and AlComputer JAMES ROY COLSTON, 2013. dermen 0515 at November 30,

TRANSPORTATION

EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE OF KIMBERLY H. BOYD DOROTHY JEAN COLSTON, DECEASED Publish: January 8, 15, 22,

0832 Motorcycles

2002 HONDA Rancher 4wheeler, 4x4, great shape, $2500 obo. Must 3t 1/8, 1/15, 1/22/13 14021 sell. 662-665-5753.

0142

Auto/Truck 0848 Parts & Accessories

(1) TRUCK sleeper camper, $100. 662-6651587. 4 WHEELS, American Racing Performance, american.com. $375. 287 -2509 or 808-3908.

0868 Cars for Sale WANT TO make certain your ad gets attention? Ask about attention getting graphics.

0955 Legals

1998 TOYOTA AVALON. 4 DR, LOADED, See to appreciate, $3900. Call 662415-7945.

2013 14023

2012 Board Meeting.

Vickie Roach, City Clerk

iPad2

Publish January 15, 2013 and January 22, 2013 14039

Lost

REWARD

$2000 REWARD for information that leads to arrest and conviction of persons involved in burglary at D & M Auto World. Call 662-423-7000 or 662-427-8416.

The City reserves the in ninety (90) days after the right to reject any and/or all date of the first publication of Legals 0955 0955 this notice or the same shall bids. Legals be forever barred. The first Done at the direction of day of the publication of this the Board of Mayor and Al- notice is the 15th day of Janudermen at November 30, ary, 2013. 2012 Board Meeting. WITNESS my signature on Vickie Roach, this 10th day of January, 2013. City Clerk JANICE LANCASTER SHADBURN, Publish January 15, 2013 and EXECUTRIX January 22, 2013 OF THE ESTATE OF 14039 EVONE LANCASTER, DECEASED IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF ALCORN 3t 1/15, 1/22, 1/29/13 COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI 14043 RE: LAST WILL AND STATE OF MISSISSIPPI TESTAMENT OF COUNTY OF ALCORN EVONE LANCASTER, DECEASED SUBSTITUTED NO. 2013-0026-02 TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE TO CREDITORS WHEREAS, on or about NOTICE is hereby given the 17th of October, 2007, that Letters Testamentary Sharon K. Bauman, an unmarhave been on this day gran- ried woman, executed a Deed ted to the undersigned, Janice of Trust to Emmett James Lancaster Shadburn, on the House or Bill R. McLaughlin, estate of Evone Lancaster, Trustee on behalf of REdeceased, by the Chancery GIONS BANK d/b/a RECourt of Alcorn County, Mis- GIONS MORTGAGE, benefisissippi, and all persons hav- ciaries, which Deed of Trust ing claims against said estate is filed for record in Instruare required to have the same ment No. 200706888 in the probated and registered by land records in the office of the Clerk of said Court with- the Chancery Clerk of Alin ninety (90) days after the corn County, Corinth, Missisdate of the first publication of sippi; and, this notice or the same shall be forever barred. The first WHEREAS, on November day of the publication of this 14, 2012, REGIONS BANK notice is the 15th day of Janu- d / b / a R E G I O N S M O R T GAGE, the beneficiary of the ary, 2013. above referenced Deed of WITNESS my signature on Trust substituted Jeanna D. this 10th day of January, 2013. Chappell as trustee in place of the original trustee as authorJANICE LANCASTER ized by said Deed of Trust. 1604 S. Harper Rd., Corinth, MS 38834 SHADBURN, Said Substitution of Trustee is 662-287-5158 recorded in Instrument No. EXECUTRIX OF THE ESTATE OF 201206625 in the Office of Chancery Clerk of AlEVONE LANCASTER, XBOX 360theGames DECEASED corn County, Corinth, MissisFIFA2013sippi. $40 3t 1/15, 1/22, 1/29/13 WHEREAS, default having 14043 • Laptop been Computers $399 made in the terms and • HP all-in-one PC $519 conditions of said Deed of Trust and default having been • LCD Monitors made on the promissory note • Desktopsecured PC starting at and $499 thereby, the entire indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust having Used PC been with declared new LCDtomonitor be due and starting atpayable $250pursuant to the terms of said Deed of Trust, and, REGIONS BANK d/b/a REGIONS MORTGAGE, as the holders of the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust have requested the undersigned Substituted Trustee so to do, I will, on the 7th of February, 2013 offer for sale at public outcry between the legal hours of 11:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., at the South Front door of the County Courthouse of Alcorn County, Corinth, Mississippi, and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit:

Tomlinson Computers, Inc.

iPad2 16GB White $399

While supplies last.

Store hours Monday-Friday 8-5

662-287-5158 ph. 662-287-6187 fax

BUSINESS & SERVICE GUIDE

Lying and being in the Northwest Quarter of Section 4, Township 2 South, Range 8 East, Alcorn County, Mississippi, more particularly described as follows:

Daily Corinthian And The Community Profiles RUN YOUR AD In TheFOR $ ONLY 200 A MONTH ON THIS PAGE (Daily Corinthian Only 165) $

CHIROPRACTOR

Dr. Jonathan R. Cooksey Neck Pain • Back Pain Disc Problems Spinal Decompression Therapy Most Insurance Accepted Mon., Tues., Wed. & Fri. 9-5 3334 N. Polk Street Corinth, MS 38834 (662) 286-9950

FACTORY DIRECT PRICING

All types of Counter Tops. Formica and Granite. We have them in stock and we can do all of the preparations for you.

Smith Cabinet Shop 1505 South Fulton Dr., Corinth, MS 662-287-2151

RUN YOUR AD IN THE

Loans $20-$20,000

BEAUTIFY YOUR KITCHEN FOR 2013 It’s very easy and affordable at...

Smith Cabinet Shop

40 Years

Corinth Industrial Park 1505 South Fulton Dr., Corinth, MS 662-287-2151

RUN YOUR AD IN THE

TORNADO SHELTERS

DAILY CORINTHIAN & COMMUNITY PROFILES ON THIS PAGE FOR ONLY $200 A MONTH (DAILY CORINTHIAN ONLY $165.00). CALL 662-287-6147 FOR DETAILS.

Large full size 6x12 tall x 6’9” concrete

SOUTHERN HOME SAFETY, INC. TOLL FREE 888-544-9074 or 662-315-1695

www.southernhomesafety.com

Beginning at the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of Section 4, Township 2 South, Range 8 East, Alcorn County, Mississippi; thence run South 1459.69 feet; thence run East 398.85 feet to the East side of a gravel road and the true point of beginning; thence run North along the East side of a gravel road 120 feet; thence run East 170 feet; thence run South 7 degrees 07 minutes 30 seconds East 120.93 feet; thence run West 185 feet to SELDOM YOUR LOWEST BID point of beginning conALWAYSthe YOUR HIGHEST QUALITY taining 0.49 acre, more or less.

JIMCO ROOFING.

$1,000,000 LIABILITY I will convey only such title INSURANCE as is vested in me as Substi-

tuted# Trustee. • SAME PHONE & ADDRESS SINCE 1975 • LIFETIME WARRANTIED OWENS CORNING WITNESS MY SIGNASHINGLES W/TRANSFERABLE WARRANTY TURE, this the 7th day of (NO SECONDS) January, 2013. • METAL, TORCHDOWN, EPDM, SLATE, TILE, SHAKES, COATINGS. Pierce P. C. • LEAKLedyard, SPECIALIST Box 161389 WE P.O. INSTALL SKYLIGHTS Alabama WORK 36616 & DOMobile, CARPENTRY (251) 338-1300

662-665-1133 PLEASE PUBLISH: 662-286-8257 January 15, 2013, January 22,

2013, 29, 2013 and JIMJanuary BERRY, February 5, 2013 OWNER/INSTALLER 14044

RUN YOUR AD IN THE DAILY CORINTHIAN & COMMUNITY PROFILES ON THIS PAGE FOR ONLY $200 A MONTH (DAILY CORINTHIAN ONLY $165.00). CALL 662-287-6147 FOR DETAILS. RUN YOUR AD IN THE

LET US SHOW YOU... Before you buy kitchen cabinets, let us show you what good quality should cost. Excellent prices. And we have been serving this area for many years.

Smith Cabinet Shop 1505 South Fulton Dr., Corinth, MS 662-287-2151

RUN YOUR AD IN THE

DAILY CORINTHIAN &

DAILY CORINTHIAN &

DAILY CORINTHIAN &

COMMUNITY PROFILES

COMMUNITY PROFILES

COMMUNITY PROFILES

ON THIS PAGE FOR

ON THIS PAGE FOR

ON THIS PAGE FOR

ONLY $200 A MONTH

ONLY $200 A MONTH

ONLY $200 A MONTH

(DAILY CORINTHIAN

(DAILY CORINTHIAN

(DAILY CORINTHIAN

ONLY $165.00).

ONLY $165.00).

ONLY $165.00).

CALL 662-287-6147

CALL 662-287-6147

CALL 662-287-6147

FOR DETAILS.

FOR DETAILS.

FOR DETAILS.

PLUMBING & ELECTRIC

Don’t Waste Your Money ... Shop With Us! 1X4X8 Pine........................................

• Bucket Truck Service • Backhoe

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COMMUNITY PROFILES 2 $ 50 2 ON THIS PAGE FOR $ 00 3 ONLY $200 A MONTH

1X6 or 1X8 White Pine 500m

1195 to$1695 $ 95 Crossties 6 while supplies last $ 95 662-396-1023 5/8-T-1-11 Siding = 15 $ 99 1x4x14 PIne 3 JASON ROACH-OWNER R $ 05 1x4x16 PIne 5 1159 B CR 400 Corinth, MS 38834 $ 70 1x6x12 Yellow Pine 2 $ 60 1x6x16 Yellow Pine 3 $ 25 Year 3 tab shingle 5495 Paneling

...

DAILY CORINTHIAN &

$ 00¢

1x4x10 Pine ........................................

Licensed & Bonded

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$

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Laminate Floor From

39¢ - $109 $ Round Commodes 4995 $ Handicap Commodes 6995 $ 00 yd Turf 1 Smith Cabinet Shop Smith Discount 1505 South Fulton Dr. Home Center Corinth (Industrial Park) 662-287-2151

.................................................

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412 Pinecrest Road 287-2221 • 287-4419 Fax 287-2523

RUN YOUR AD IN THE DAILY CORINTHIAN & COMMUNITY PROFILES ON THIS PAGE FOR ONLY $200 A MONTH (DAILY CORINTHIAN ONLY $165.00). CALL 662-287-6147 FOR DETAILS.


land records in the office of the Chancery Clerk of Alcorn County, Corinth, Mississippi; and,

16 • Tuesday, January 15, 2013 • Daily Corinthian

0955 Legals

WHEREAS, on November 14, 2012, REGIONS BANK d/b/a REGIONS MORTGAGE, the beneficiary of the above referenced Deed of Trust substituted Jeanna D. Chappell as trustee in place of the original trustee as authorized by said Deed of Trust. Said Substitution of Trustee is recorded in Instrument No. 201206625 in the Office of the Chancery Clerk of Alcorn County, Corinth, Mississippi. WHEREAS, default having been made in the terms and conditions of said Deed of Trust and default having been made on the promissory note secured thereby, and the entire indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust having been declared to be due and payable pursuant to the terms of said Deed of Trust, and, REGIONS BANK d/b/a REGIONS MORTGAGE, as the holders of the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust have requested the undersigned Substituted Trustee so to do, I will, on the 7th of February, 2013 offer for sale at public outcry between the legal hours of 11:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., at the South Front door of the County Courthouse of Alcorn County, Corinth, Mississippi, and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit:

Income Tax

holders of the Promissory Note and Deed of Trust have requested the undersigned Substituted Trustee so to do, I0955 will, onLegals the 7th of February, 2013 offer for sale at public outcry between the legal hours of 11:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., at the South Front door of the County Courthouse of Alcorn County, Corinth, Mississippi, and being more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Lying and being in the Northwest Quarter of Section 4, Township 2 South, Range 8 East, Alcorn County, Mississippi, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of Section 4, Township 2 South, Range 8 East, Alcorn County, Mississippi; thence run South 1459.69 feet; thence run East 398.85 feet to the East side of a gravel road and the true point of beginning; thence run North along the East side of a gravel road 120 feet; thence run East 170 feet; thence run South 7 degrees 07 minutes 30 seconds East 120.93 feet; thence run West 185 feet to the point of beginning containing 0.49 acre, more or less.

run East 170 feet; thence run South 7 degrees 07 minutes 30 seconds East 120.93 feet; thence run West 185 feet to Legals 0955 the point of beginning containing 0.49 acre, more or less.

Handyman

HANDYMAN'S Home I will convey only such title care, anything. 662-643 as is vested in me as Substi- 6892. tuted Trustee. WITNESS MY SIGNATURE, this the 7th day of January, 2013. Pierce Ledyard, P. C. P.O. Box 161389 Mobile, Alabama 36616 (251) 338-1300 PLEASE PUBLISH: January 15, 2013, January 22, 2013, January 29, 2013 and February 5, 2013 14044

HOME SERVICE DIRECTORY

Appliances A.A. Appliances, 662-2879629. We buy, sell & repair all makes & models of appliances. Will pay more than scrap metal prices for broken appliances.

Home Improvement & Repair

BUTLER, DOUG: Foundation, floor leveling, bricks cracking, rotten wood, basements, shower floor. Over 35 yrs. exp. Free est. 731-239-8945 or 662-284-6146.

Storage, Indoor/ Outdoor AMERICAN MINI STORAGE 2058 S. Tate Across from World Color

287-1024

MORRIS CRUM MINI-STORAGE 286-3826.

I will convey only such title as is vested in me as Substituted Trustee.

TAX GUIDE 2013 Holder Accounting Firm

TOMLINSON ACCOUNTING

Free Electronic Filing with paid preparation. Fully computerized tax preparation. • Authorized IRS-Efile Provider Office hours: Mon.-Fri. 8am-8pm • Individual, Corporate & Partnership Sat. 9am-5pm • Sun. By appt. only • More Than 25 Years Tax Service 2003 Hwy 72 E, Corinth, 662-286-1040 • Open year-round (Old Junkers Parlor) Hours: 8-6 M-F Sat. 8-12 508 W. Chambers St., Booneville, 1604 S Harper Road- Corinth 662-728-1080 662-287-1995 1210 City Ave., Ripley, 662-512-5829

1407-A Harper Road Corinth, Mississippi 38834 Kellie Holder, Owner There are several changes to our taxes for 2012. Our staff is ready to help you. Open year-round. Thank you for your business and loyalty. Telephone: 662-286-9946 Fax: 662-286-2713

0840 Auto Services

GUARANTEED Auto Sales 470 FARM/LAWN/ GARDEN EQUIP.

804 BOATS

868 AUTOMOBILES

864 TRUCKS/VANS SUV’S

Lying and being in the Northwest Quarter of Section 4, Township 2 South, Range 8 East, Alcorn County, Mississippi, more particularly described as follows:

WITNESS MY SIGNATURE, this the 7th day of January, 2013.

Pierce Ledyard, Advertise P. C. Advertise Your Your P.O. Box 161389 Alabama 36616 Tax Service Mobile, Tax Service (251) 338-1300 Here for PLEASE PUBLISH: Here for Beginning at the Northwest January 15, 2013, January 22, $95 A Month 2013 andA Month corner of the Northwest 2013, January 29, $95 Quarter of Section 4, Town- February 5, 2013 Call 287-6147 ship 2Call South, 287-6147 Range 8 East, 14044 Alcorn County, Mississippi; forrunmore details for more details thence South 1459.69 feet; thence run East 398.85 feet to the East side of a gravel road and the true point of beginning; thence run North along the East side of a gravel road 120 feet; thence run East 170 feet; thence run South 7 degrees 07 minutes 30 seconds East 120.93 feet; thence run West 185 feet to the point of beginning containing 0.49 acre, more or less.

Advertise your CAR, TRUCK, SUV, BOAT, TRACTOR, MOTORCYCLE, RV & ATV here for $39.95 UNTIL SOLD! Ad should include photo, description and price. PLEASE NO DEALERS & NON-TRANSFERABLE! NO REFUNDS. Single in advance. Call 287-6147 to place your ad. I willitem convey only. only suchPayment title as is vested in me as Substituted Trustee.

864 864 WITNESS TRUCKS/VANS MY SIGNATRUCKS/VANS TURE, this the 7th SUV’S day of SUV’S January, 2013.

DUCED REDUCED Pierce Ledyard, RE P. C.

BUSH HOG 61” ZERO TURN, COM28 HP KOEHLER, 45 HOURS, NEW MERCIAL,

$6900 662-728-3193

16’ Aqua bass boat 70 HP Mercury, 4 seats, trolling motor,

$3,500 $4,000 662-287-5413 662-287-5413.

or cell 284-8678

2000 Saab, 9-3 Convertible. 123,000mi. GREAT FUN CAR.

$2200 OBO. 662-396-1333 REDUCED!

ALUMA CRAFT 14’ BOAT, 40 H.P. JOHNSON, TROLLING MTR., GOOD COND., INCLUDES TRAILER,

$1200 OBO OR WILL TRADE.

731-610-

8901 OR EMAIL FOR PICS TO AYLASISCO@GMAIL.COM

‘65 FORD GALAXIE 500,

1959 Ford diesel tractor 3000 series, new rear tires & tubes $

4000

662-750-0607

1996 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Exc. cond., 1-family owned, 141,000 miles. $3100. 662-415-8682

rebuilt trans., tool box, wired for elect. brake trailer

$1,950

2000 Ford

PLEASE PUBLISH: 2006 GMC YUKON F-350 January 15, 2013, January 22, Exc. cond. inside & out, 2013, January 29,super 2013 and duty, diesel, 106k miles, 3rd row February 5, 20137.3 ltr., exc. drive seat, garage14044 kept, front train, 215k miles, & rear A/C,tow pkg., exc. mechanically loaded

$13,995

662-286-1732

1985 1/2 TON SILVERADO

1995 Chev. S-10

305 ENG., AUTO., PS, PB, AC, NEEDS PAINT, READY TO RESTORE, DRIVEN DAILY.

$2500

$3,000

2009 HYUNDAI ACCENT

P.O. Box 161389 Mobile, Alabama 36616 (251) 338-1300

662-462-8391

4dr sedan, 390 Eng., 4 bbl. carb, no broken glass, good paint, good tires, cast alum. wheels, new brake sys., everything works exc. clock, fuel gauge & inst. lights,

731-439-1968.

868 AUTOMOBILES

1992 FORD F-250

REDUCED

287-1213 AFTER 4 P.M.

4-dr., 41,000 miles, dark blue ext. & gray int., 4 cyl. auto., CD/ XM radio, 36 mpg. payoff is

2002 Chevrolet Z-71,4-dr., 4W.D., Am.Fm cass./CD, pewter $11,054 in color, $6200. 731-610-7241 662-643-5908 or 662-643-5020

Advertise Your Tax Service Here for $95 A Month Call 287-6147 for more details

w/body defects.

$7800.

662-664-3538.

2007 Franklin 36 ft. camper, fully furnished, washer/ dryer, A/C, 2 slideouts: Sits on 2 private acres w/ playground, CABIN INCLUDED, fully furnished, lots of extras. $55,000.

662-643-3565 or 415-8549

camper, 2 slides, fiberglass ext., awning, holding tanks, full sofa sleeper, refrig., micro., glass shower, recliner, sleeps 6,

662-286-8547

340-626-5904.

REDUCED

2006 Wildcat 30 ft. 5th wheel

King Cab, 4.3 mtr., auto., overdrive, 2 owners, PB, bed liner, perf. cond., 168k miles, 25-27 mpg, $2750

2004 Ford F350 work truck, V10, underbed tool boxes, towing package, DVD. $8600 obo. Truck is in daily use. Please call for appt. to see,

832 816 832 RECREATIONAL MOTORCYCLES/ MOTORCYCLES/ VEHICLES ATV’S ATV’S

2000 Custom Harley Davidson Mtr. & Trans., New Tires, Must See

$10,500 $9,500 $12,000

662-415-8623 or 287-8894

2004 KAWASAKI MULE

3010 Model #KAF650E, 1854 hrs., bench seat, tilt bed, 4 WD & windshield, well maintained. Great for farm or hunting. $6500.

$18,500

731-212-9659 731-212-9661.

2012 STARCRAFT CAMPER

2003 YAMAHA V-STAR CLASSIC

662-223-0056.

2000 DODGE CARAVAN,

$1500. 731-645-0157 AFTER 4 P.M.

REDUCED

fiberglass, 18 ft. bunkhouse launch, wt. 2,750 lbs, 26 gallon freshwater tank, cargo carrying capacity-895 lbs, gray & black water tanks, cable ready.

$11,000

looks & rides real good!

$3000 662-603-4786

662-396-1390.

REDUCED

99 CADILLAC DEVILLE

804 BOATS

New Toyo tires, good cond., black w/leather interior. Asking $3250 obo. 662-415-3976

1987 Honda CRX, 40+ mpg, new paint, new leather seat covers, after market stereo, $3250 obo.

340-626-5904.

864 TRUCKS/VANS SUV’S

2000 Dodge Ram 1500 Van, too many

extras to list, good travel or work van, will trade or sell. Reduced to

$2,300

662-287-1834.

2004 DODGE RAM 1500 V-8, QUAD CAB, GREAT COND.

$9000

CONTACT 662-603-1407.

‘90 RANGER BASS BOAT

361V W/MATCHING TRAILER & COVER, RASPBERRY & GRAY, EVINRUDE 150XP, 24-V TROL. MTR., 2 FISH FINDERS, NEW BATTS., NEW LED TRAILER LIGHTS, EXC. COND.,

$7,900.

662-808-0113.

1984 CHRYSLER LEBARON convertible, antique tag, 39,000 actual miles.

$5000 286-2261

2000 Chevy Venture 91,000 miles, V-6, auto., CD player, new Goodyear tires, rear heat & air, very nice van,.

$3250

662-665-1995

1991 Ford Econoline Van, 48,000 miles, good cond., one owner, serious interest. $6500 287-5206.

1967 CHEVY Needs paint & body work $4000. 504-952-1230

816 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

2008 NISSAN ROGUE S

2001 HONDA REBEL 250

Cruisemaster Motorhome by Georgieboy, 1997 GM 454 ci chassie, 37’ with slider, 45,000 miles with white Oak interior. $19,500. $14,999 662-808-7777 or 662-415-9020

WITH EXTRAS, BLUE, LESS THAN 1500 MILES,

$1850

662-287-2659

1500 Goldwing Honda

Excaliber made by Georgi Boy

78,000 original miles, new tires.

1979 30’ long motor home, new tires, Price negotiable.

Black, 42K miles, new tires, excel. cond.

$12,900

662-287-6613

$4500

662-284-9487

662-660-3433

leave message or text

1996 FORD F150 4X4 ‘96 Challenger Radical One Pro Bass Boat, 130 HP Johnson, 24v motorguide trol mtr., onboard charger for all 3 batteries, Hummingbird Fish finder, good trailer w/new tires, looks good for ‘96 model & runs good. $4500 obo. 662-286-6972 or 415-1383.

1988 Cadillac Coupe DeVille 2-dr., silver gray, very good cond., sharp car.

$2500 287-0243 after 3 p.m.

stick, camouflage, 186,200 miles (mostly interstate driving), runs good. $3000 obo.

662-607-9401

Luxury V-8 Lone Star Dodge P/U, 19.5 mpg w/low miles, 52k, 2x4 2005 Model Quad Cab, SLT w/PS, PL, AC, CD. A great Buy @

$12,980. Call 731-239-9226.

1995 DODGE RAM 1500 4x4, Pwr. DL & Windows, Exc. Cond., Too Many Extras To List

$4500 OBO.

731-239-5770 OR 662-808-8033

2005 AIRSTREAM LAND YACHT

30 ft., with slide out & built-in TV antenna, 2 TV’s, 7400 miles.

$75,000. 662-287-7734

2007 HORNET CAMPER

27 ft., bought new, 5200 lbs., bunk beds in back, full sized bed in front. Kept in shed.

$9200.

662-808-0653

“New” Condition

’04 HONDA SHADOW 750

215-666-1374 662-665-0209

662-603-4407

2005 HONDA ATV TRX 250 EX

$1995

$

3900

Daily Corinthian E-Edition 011513  

Daily Corinthian E-Edition 011513

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