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PLAY ACTION

Can this year's UVA football team defy the odds and be a contender?

Orion and the Melted Crayons wax poetic on new album

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SUPPLIED PHOTO

Latest draft of land use map has community up in arms (again)

VOL. 30 NO. 35 n SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A RLOTTE

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INSIDE

MATT RILEY / UVA ATHLETICS

SEPTEMBER 1 – 7, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

Quarterback Brennan Armstrong will lead the charge for the Cavaliers.


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Royal Boil

Family Style Low-Country Boil Featuring Anderson's Seafood, Live Music and Blanc De Blanc Release

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Visit eastwoodfarmandwinery.com for tickets. Walk-ins welcome while supplies last.

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EDITORIAL

FEATURE 15

EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com

Game plan The UVA faithful are back in the stands, and hopes are high for a winning football season. NEWS

9

10 School’s back in session— will COVID cases surge? 11 The latest on the city’s Future Land Use Map. 13 Activists and legislators discuss environmental justice solutions.

CULTURE

21

23 Galleries: A look at what’s on view this month. 26 Feedback: Orion Faruque finds The Good Stuff in his debut album.

27 The Working Pour: Getting your drink on in Staunton and Waynesboro.

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Alana Bittner

28 Sudoku

INTERN Amelia Delphos

29 Crossword

CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Carol Diggs, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Erika Howsare, Desiré Moses, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

31 Free Will Astrology

Q&A 32 How will the UVA football game-day experience change now that alcohol’s allowed in the stands?

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C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. ©2021 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

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THE 22ND ANNUAL

September 9 & 14 at 7:30pm The Paramount Theater September 12 & 19 at 3pm, September17 at 7:30pm Old Cabell Hall (UVA) Dvorak, Beethoven, Brahms, Paula Prestini, Jessie Montgomery, and more… September 10 at 12:30pm Free Community Concert at The Paramount September 13 at 6:15pm “Bach to Bluegrass” at King Family Vineyard featuring fiddler Tessa Lark September 18 at 8pm Free Pop-Up Concert at The Quirk Hotel Art Gallery info@cvillechambermusic.org • www.cvillechambermusic.org • 434.295.5395

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com facebook.com/cville.weekly


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THIS WEEK

Hurricane Ida crashed through Louisiana on Sunday afternoon, making landfall with 150-mileper-hour winds and leaving a million people without power. The Category 4 storm hit on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed more than 1,800 people. The power outages from Ida threw the sewage system out of whack, and damaged water mains as well, leaving at least one Louisiana parish without water “for some part of the foreseeable future,” reports CNN. As climate change makes severe weather events more common, it’s more important than ever to remember that natural disasters aren’t felt equally. People who live in unstable conditions, people who don’t have the money or flexibility to evacuate, people who are already physically vulnerable—these people feel the wind’s gusts most sharply. We see the same effect play out closer to home, time and time again, as pipelines get run through rural areas and sea levels swallow coastal communities. Fortunately, the next generation is on the case. This week, activist groups got together with some of Virginia’s best and brightest legislators for a conference to discuss the next steps for climate justice in the commonwealth (p. 13). The future is bleak, but all is not lost yet. We’re going to have to save the world—and we’re going to have to make sure we save it for everybody.—Ben Hitchcock

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10-21 | SAINT MOTEL 10-26 | SPAFFORD WITH EGGY 10-29 | THE MOUNTAIN GOATS 10-30 | TAUK WITH LITZ 11-05 | STEEP CANYON RANGERS 11-06 | DONNA THE BUFFALO 11-12 | SHAKEY GRAVES WITH SUN JUNE 11-17 | ANDREW MCMAHON: THE THREE PIANOS TOUR WITH ZAC CLARK 11-20 | DELTA RAE 12-04 | MIPSO

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Skooma is Charlottesville's first boutique CBD dispensary specializing in CBD flower, edibles, gummy‘s, pre-rolls, tincture’s, oils and lotions. 434.980.6205 301 E. Main St.; Charlottesville, Virginia www.skoomaboutiquedispensary.com


“This is about righting wrongs. We all deserve a criminal justice system that is fair, equal, and gets it right—no matter who you are or what you look like.”

9

—Governor Ralph Northam, granting a posthumous pardon to seven young Black men from Martinsville who were given unfair trials and executed for the alleged rape of a white woman in 1951

NEWS

Hard cases PAGE 10

IN BRIEF McAuliffe scoffs at lawsuit

The Republican Party of Virginia filed a lawsuit last week, alleging that Democratic candidate for governor Terry McAuliffe had failed to properly fill out his campaign paperwork and arguing that the former governor shouldn’t be allowed on the ballot this fall. The Associated Press reports that several state election law experts expect the lawsuit to fail.

Hospital mandates vax UVA Health enacted a vaccine mandate for its employees last week, meaning the 2,000 employees who had so far not gotten the shot will need to get vaccinated or hit the road. The hospital system made the move in light of rising case counts in the region, and also after the FDA approved the Pfizer vaccine for full use.

Ball together A

ll eyes were on Tonsler Park Sunday night for the Banks Collage Basketball Association Championship. Some fans set up lawn chairs around the court, and others leaned on the fence. Kids played on the playground while parents cheered on their teams. Some people drank beer, others bought sno-cones.

The Charlottesville-based summer and winter basketball league draws high-level amateur players from all over the commonwealth. The championship is the culmination of months of play in Tonsler Park. This year, Team Legends, coached by George Rivera and Eugene Davis, faced off against the defending BCBA champions Team Takeover, coached by Antoine Johnson and Justin Shiflett. Takeover held the

lead for the majority of the game, until a turnover early in the second half led to a Legends layup from John “Prototype” Fitch, who then was fouled and went to the line for a one-andone. Prototype performed under pressure and tied the game, but not long after, a Takeover layup by Demario “Logo” Mattox put them decidedly in the lead, where they stayed for a final score of 55-45.

Mailing it in

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Slow mail delivery continues to be a problem in Charlottesville. A local source tells C-VILLE that post office management’s poor treatment of carriers has caused area postal employees to quit, call in sick, and look for other places to work.

“Their work is also incredibly hard and draining. They are driving in unairconditioned trucks, and walking in the heat and cold.” Multiple mail carriers didn’t want to speak to the press about the situation, for fear of retribution from bosses. Due to the staff shortages, the stretched-thin carriers have no choice but to work overtime to finish their deliveries, often working in the wee hours of the morning or late in the evening. Some work as many as 72 hours per week, the source claims. “People are quitting,” says the source. “They’re not showing up to work, calling in sick, finding other employment.” The Charlottesville Post Office is now holding three job fairs every week, in addition to advertising jobs through mail and online. The starting pay is $18.01 an hour for city carriers, and $19.06 an hour for rural carriers. Warner said he will return to Charlottesville in three months to make sure the mail delays are solved.

@cville_weekly

For years, residents have complained about slow mail delivery in Charlottesville and Albemarle County. After receiving hundreds of messages from constituents about the delays, U.S. Senator Mark Warner visited the Char– lottesville Post Office on Route 29 last week, demanding the office address its mail carrier shortage and poor management. Warner and Senator Tim Kaine also sent a letter to U.S. Postal Service Virginia District Manager Gerald Roane urging him to fix these issues. “I’ve been getting a higher volume of complaints about mail delivery in Charlottesville by far than anywhere else in the commonwealth,” said Warner, according to NBC29. “If you don’t have 14 of your carriers and you need 85, you’ve got to do a better job of hiring folks.” But according to one local resident with intimate knowledge of the Charlottesville Post Office, office management needs to make it worth working there. “The treatment of carriers is demanding and dehumanizing. They are treated so badly,” says the source.

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Christopher Newport’s Wason Center polled 800 likely voters and found Terry McAuliffe with a 50 percent to 41 percent edge over GOP candidate Glenn Youngkin. Democratic lieutenant governor and attorney general candidates lead by similar margins. Earlier in August, Roanoke College polled 558 likely voters and found McAuliffe with a 46-38 edge.

EZE AMOS

Polls show Youngkin trailing


NEWS

10

Early returns City, county, university see COVID cases spike with return of students By Ben Hitchcock editor@c-ville.com

SENTARA MARTHA JEFFERSON HOSPITAL IS OFFERING A

FREE BREAST HEALTH SCREENING

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ast week, city and county public schools welcomed students back for five-days-a-week, in-person instruction for the first time since March 2020. Both districts have already reported COVID-19 cases among students, but say they still feel confident in their health and safety precautions. After the first day of classes, two city schools students reported symptoms, and Assistant Superintendent Jim Henderson sent a message to families. “This week, we have had several students report COVID diagnoses, including two who spent time at our schools. These situations are unfortunate but, in a pandemic, they are not unexpected,” Henderson wrote on August 25. “We are doing our part by following all CDC recommendations. We continue to tweak our implementation to keep everyone as safe as possible.” “The health department remains confident in our mitigation measures,” wrote CHS Principal Eric Irizarry after the first day. “While we anticipate that this incident is contained, it’s a good reminder for all of us to promote healthy behaviors.” At press time, city schools reported 13 total student coronavirus cases and nine staff cases so far this year. Albemarle County Public Schools report that 18 students and eight staff had con-

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COVID is “worse than last August. We have less flexibility, and the kids are back in class…It feels like we’re in the twilight zone. This is crazy.”

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CITY SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER LASHUNDRA BRYSON MORSBERGER

On Grounds “Meanwhile, at UVA, the first two weeks of classes have seen 114 cases among faculty, staff, students, and contract employees. As of Monday, the university reports 84 active cases. Early-semester COVID case spikes were to be expected. Last fall, the rolling sevenday average of total new cases peaked at 26.9, in late September, before declining and leveling off until the beginning of the spring semester. The seven-day average for new cases at UVA right now is 10.4. On August 29 of last year, it was 12.7. As of August 29, UVA hospital had 50 COVID-positive patients in the building for treatment, including three who had been newly admitted on the 29th. A little further afield, Liberty University has put a campus-wide quarantine in effect, just four days after students returned for the fall semester. Unlike other Virginia schools, such as UVA and William & Mary, Liberty didn’t require students to get vaccinated before returning to Lynchburg, and the university reports 159 active cases as of August 25.

• You are 40 or older; and • It’s been over a year since your last mammogram, or you’ve never had one For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 1-800-SENTARA (1-800-736-8272). Special thanks to The Women’s Committee of the Martha Jefferson Hospital Foundation for its support of this important event.

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ALBEMARLE COUNTY SCHOOLS

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COVID-19 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

firmed COVID cases between August 23 and August 30. Those were concentrated in elementary schools—Agnor-Hurt and Stone Robinson have reported five and six student cases, respectively. In the area, roughly 70 percent of children aged 12 to 17 are vaccinated, according to the Blue Ridge Health District. The city schools require employees to be fully vaccinated by September 15, or they’ll be required to show a weekly negative COVID test. City school board member Lashundra Bryson Morsberger expressed some frustration with the state of COVID preventions in schools and the commonwealth. COVID is “worse than last August,” she wrote on Twitter last weekend. “We have less flexibility, and the kids are back in class…It feels like we’re in the twilight zone. This is crazy.”

County schools saw an increase in COVID cases when students returned for five-days-a-week, in-person classes.


NEWS

11

Map quest Latest draft of city’s land use map scales back proposed housing density By Sean Tubbs

SUPPLIED IMAGE

T

Here are some of the changes in the latest version of the city’s proposed Future Land Use Map. In the circled areas, the previous version of the map included mixed-use nodes, meaning commercial and residential buildings of up to five stories would have been allowed. Those areas are once again designated for residential-only construction.

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The Charlottesville Low-Income Housing Coalition is handing out yard signs that express support for reforming the zoning code.

restoration of the second map so that more triplexes and quadplexes can be built across the city. “It appears the revised [map] you are considering this week will likely significantly limit Charlottesville’s ability to meet its goal of providing additional multifamily housing without furthering displacement,” reads the letter. “In some cases, the latest draft makes it harder to build new homes than the status quo.” Other changes in the map reflect rezoning applications that are making their way through the process. Piedmont Housing Alliance is seeking to build 145 units on a section of Park Street, north of the U.S. 250 bypass. That land is currently designated as low-intensity residential but the new map has increased that to “high-intensity residential.” The latest draft also includes a proposed overlay for “sensitive communities” in areas with households believed to be prone to displacement. The city’s Housing Advisory Committee argues that the new plan should limit new high-density developments in communities like 10th and Page and Fifeville. “Retaining existing homes and residents, and supporting homeownership and generational wealth-building, is important throughout the city, but there are sensitive areas that may require additional affordability requirements, incentives, or other tools to support these goals,” reads a portion of RHI’s presentation to the Planning Commission. The Planning Commission discussed the land use map at a meeting on Tuesday night that took place too late for this edition. Cville Plans Together will host a public steering committee meeting over Zoom on Wednesday, September 1. Watch this space for updates on the Comprehensive Plan process in the coming weeks.

@cville_weekly

SUPPLIED IMAGE

an improvement over the May version. The spokesperson did not want to be identified, but the group’s physical address is the law firm Flora Pettit. “We are happy to see some of the more obviously inappropriate Mixed-Use Nodes have been nixed, a few Medium Intensity Residential zones have been pared back, emphasis on actual affordable housing production has been increased, and verbiage has been added to suggest multifamily buildings should be ‘house-sized,’ consider the context of surrounding neighborhoods and respect more reasonable height limits,” reads the email. Another group, Livable Cville, has formed to advocate for increased density across the city. Its letter to the Planning Commission asks for the

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

he latest version of the Future Land Use Map, a much-debated document that will guide Charlottesville’s development as the city begins to rewrite its zoning code, is out for review. The map is intended to steer Charlottesville toward a future with more affordable places to live. “We believe this draft continues to support the goal of increasing housing options and affordability throughout the city, by supporting multifamily residential at a variety of scales, on all residential parcels,” said Jennifer Koch of the firm Rhodeside & Harwell (RHI). Others aren’t so sure, including at least one member of the Planning Commission. “We were promised a process that would be intentional about centering the voices of those who haven’t historically been considered in land use decision making,” said Rory Stolzenberg in a comment on Twitter this past Sunday. “Now it appears that [Cville Plans Together] is specifically prioritizing our wealthiest landowners.” In late 2019, the city hired RHI to restart a review of the city’s Comprehensive Plan. The first step of that process was to enact an affordable housing plan, which City Council did in March. One highlevel priority in the plan is “to address the legacy of exclusionary zoning and constrained housing supply in Charlottesville.” In order to meet that goal, RHI drafted a land use map, showing where zoning could change in the city to allow more density. In late March, the Planning Commission saw the first version of the map, and a majority of commissioners asked for higher by-right density across the city, particularly in neighborhoods that are currently predominated by single family homes. RHI took those comments into consideration and released a second map in late April. At that point, some residents of singe-family neighborhoods expressed concerns that their land was being designated for “medium-intensity residential” with as many as 12 units allowed per lot. Several “neighborhood mixed-use nodes,” spots where commercial buildings could be added to residential neighborhoods, were spread around the city, which also drew the ire of some homeowners. A group called Citizens for Responsible Planning formed to oppose the changes. At the same time, the Charlottesville Low-Income Housing Coalition led a campaign to push for higher densities. The latest map scales back many of the more ambitious proposals in from the April version. In the April map, the Lewis Mountain neighborhood had been designated as medium-intensity. In the newest iteration, that has mostly changed back to general residential. Similar scope reductions were made in the Barracks/Rugby and North Downtown neighborhoods. The text definition for “general residential” has changed as well, reducing theoretical building height from 3.5 stories to 2.5. However, four units would be allowed on each lot if the fourth one was kept below market value. The first two maps limited that to three. A person speaking for Citizens for Responsible Planning said in an email that the latest version is


12

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Friday Noon-6 Saturday 10-6 Sunday 11-4 Find more information at www.cvillerocktober.com AND save all October long on rocks and minerals! www.mineralsandmystics.com Facebook.com/MineralsMystics 345 Hillsdale Drive Charlottesville VA 22901 434-284-7709

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Sept 3rd – Sept 26th

FIRST FRIDAY

Opening reception: Friday, Sept 3, 5:30 – 7:30PM Erica Lohan : What I Sea

Macbeth

Dark magic and darker urges prevail in this tale of unchecked ambition, with murder begetting murder and blood thirsting for blood.

NOW THRU NOV 26

All’s Well That Ends Well

Part fairy tale, part farce—a hilarious journey through courtship and class, danger and desire, ridicule and redemption.

NOW THRU NOV 27

David Currier: Mysticism vs. Cynicism McGuffey Members: Black & White

Henry V

Swashbuckling adventure and romance burst at the seams in this chronicle of England’s greatest monarch.

NOW THRU NOV 26

Left to Right: Susan Patrick, Abgail Wilson, Lisa Phillips, Anna Fox Ryan

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WORLD PREMIERE

Keene

By Anchuli Felicia King Directed by Mei Ann Teo A wry look at love, ambition and betrayal in academia, as a young grad student of color navigates a sea of white colleagues.

OCT 7–NOV 28

AmericanShakespeareCenter.com 540.851.1733 or 1.877.MUCH.ADO


NEWS

13

Growing in conference reporter@c-ville.com

E

Once the battle over the Atlantic Coast Pipeline was won, environmental activists turned their attention to a variety of other issues, including western Virginia’s Mountain Valley Pipeline and rising sea levels in Hampton Roads.

socially just, and racially and economically uplift communities,” he adds. “We must have these conversations in an intersectional way.” Throughout the retreat, speakers emphasized how environmental issues around the state intersect with ongoing efforts to improve equity in the state. For instance, the

AFTER

State Delegate Sam Rasoul participated in last week’s Climate Equity Work Group conference that emphasized the importance of environmental justice.

transition to electric cars must coincide with a drastic improvement in public transportation, particularly for low-wealth communities that cannot yet afford electric cars. “In trying to think through what their priorities ought to be, [politicians] hear these as separate issues,” says Harris. “What we’re trying to do is help them see from a larger framework that they’re all connected.” The Climate Equity Work Group hopes to host the retreat annually, and feature more speakers and legislators next year. “I hope that we will be able to take what we learned and really integrate it into our policies,” says Rasoul. “It’s not just enough to advocate for renewable energy—we have to be more holistic in our approach and make sure that environmental and intersectional justice is front and center.” “I took away a sense of hope about what’s possible for Virginia, and ultimately for our planet,” says Harris. “What we do here has a long reaching impact.”

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Paul Davis provides professional residential & commercial emergency restoration services for disasters of all sizes. Paul Davis professionals are available 24/7 to clean up and repair damage.

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

nvironmental activists celebrated last summer when Dominion Energy announced it was canceling the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which would have brought natural gas 600 miles from West Virginia to North Carolina, crossing right through central Virginia and disrupting a historically Black community in rural Buckingham County. Activists have since turned their focus to the many other environmental issues across the state, from the controversial Mountain Valley Pipeline in western Virginia to rising sea levels in Hampton Roads. Last week, state legislators learned more about the importance of addressing such issues through an equity lens at the firstever Virginia Environmental Justice Retreat, hosted by the Climate Equity Work Group. Founded in 2019, the organization—composed of representatives from activist groups Appalachian Voices, New Virginia Majority, Progress Virginia, Chesapeake Climate Action Network, Virginia Interfaith Power & Light, and Virginia Organizing—advocates for environmental reforms with a strong focus on racial and economic justice in Virginia. The two-day virtual retreat featured a dozen speakers, including activists, lawyers, scientists, and more. Thirteen legislators were in attendance, including state Senator Creigh Deeds, who represents Charlottesville and part of Albemarle County. “Our goal was to meet with, convene with, co-learn, collaborate, and have shared dialogue with our state leaders who have been clearly supportive on these issues in the General Assembly, [and] in their districts,” says Tyneshia Griffin, environmental policy research analyst for New Virginia Majority, a progressive legislation advocacy group. “We

really wanted to come together with them, and go a little bit deeper on these issues, so we work from the same foundation and values.” “This was a way [legislators] could take a bird’s eye view of their work, and why it’s so important they center climate and environmental justice,” adds Faith Harris, co-director of Virginia Interfaith Power & Light, which encourages religious communities to adopt sustainable living practices. “They can accomplish most of their environmental goals by centering climate and environmental justice.” The retreat focused on the equity issues that come with transitioning to renewable energy, like wind and solar, and the communities often left behind, such as coal miners. “There needs to be thought and expertise given to how we make that move without bringing harm to those communities that have been based in the fossil fuel industry,” says Harris. “How do we retrain people, recreate services, and rebuild communities based on the loss of the fossil fuel industry?” Speakers also highlighted a new environmental-justice mapping tool, commissioned by the Virginia Environmental Justice Collaborative, which identifies communities in Virginia that face a disproportionate pollution burden, and therefore could require strategic investment and resources. According to the tool, parts of Charlottesville have a high pollution burden, including Ridge Street, Cherry Avenue, and Greenbrier Drive. “It was great to learn there are tools that can actually map out communities,” says state Delegate Sam Rasoul, who also attended the retreat. “There are related policies that will hopefully be able to be crafted with all of that in mind. As we’re developing the communities of the future, we need to ensure we have these tools at our disposal.” “Any environmental plan must be environmentally just, in a sense that it must be

SUPPLIED PHOTO

By Brielle Entzminger

MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATCH

Activists host environmental justice discussion for state legislators


14

Exciting Changes are Happening… Wealth Management • Retirement Planning

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HOOS READY 15

BY AMELIA DELPHOS

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MATT RILEY / UVA ATHLETICS

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

With fans back in the stands, UVA football looks to improve on 2020


16

Rocky will be at the Eternal Attic on Friday, September 3rd 10 – 4

paying you top dollar for your gold and silver and antiques.

gold and silver are still up! now is the time to sell!

Rocky pays more for gold, silver and many other items he can resell

ROCKY BUYS: GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM JEWELRY (EVEN BROKEN) GOLD, SILVER PLATINUM COINS, BULLION HE PAYS EXTRA FOR GEMSTONES AND DIAMONDS HE CAN RESELL ROCKY WILL PAY UP TO $3000 FOR A GOOD ONE CARAT DIAMOND SOLITAIRE STERLING FLATWARE, HOLLOWWARE ANTIQUE GUNS AND AMMUNITION, SWORDS, CIVIL WAR ITEMS POST CARDS, OLD QUILTS, OLD CLOCKS, ANTIQUE FURNITURE SOME GLASSWARE SOME COSTUME JEWELRY SOME POCKET AND WRIST WATCHES LIKE ROLEX, PATEK PHILIPPE, OMEGA, AND MORE RUNNING OR NOT SHENANDOAH VALLEY POTTERY

Backto

buying gold silver and antiques daily jewelry repairs done on the premises often while you wait Bench Jeweler wanted $40,000 to $60,000 a year plus benefits - call for details.

School If your child is entering 7th grade they must have the Meningitis, HPV, and Tdap vaccines in order to enroll. Talk to your doctor and vaccinate them now!

SCAN ME

HOURS: tues - sat 9:30 - 5 • 1-800-296-8676 Antiques open at 9:00

rockysgoldandsilver.com

TWO LATEST BOOKS & MORE

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

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from local Author William A. James, Sr.

In, A MURDER ON FIFTH AND DICE AND THE RUIN OF FIFEVILLE,

James shows how drug-dealing and gang violence led to the condemnation, demolition, and gentrification of Fifeville. It is a Sequel to his IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, 2007. (He is writing a play based upon this latest Book)

IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, James

reveals how fear and misunderstandings caused The Charlottesville City Council to condemn and Demolish a 20 Acre Tract (30 Black businesses and 600 residents) from the Downtown area from 1958-1964.

In, HARD TIMES AND SURVIVAL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN AFRICANAMERICAN SON,

James relates His Story and the Reader learns what He means when He Says: “Do not GiveIn to Adversity, but overcome it by Steady and Constant Perserverance.”

A great book for your summer reading list! Local Author William A. James, Sr. Call or Write, William A. James, Sr. 434-985-8987 PO Box 6991, Charlottesville, VA 22906 Wjpublications@aol.com

SOLD AT: The University of Virginia Bookstore 400 Emmet Street, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (on UVA Grounds). Patsy Goolsby, Manager, 434-924-1075 | bookshop@virginia.edu 2nd Act Books 214 East Main Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902 Daphne Spain, Owner, 434-202-0754 | daphnespain@gmail.com


UVA will shine on offense this season.

T

his Saturday, the Virginia Cavaliers will return to a full-capacity Scott Stadium for the first time in almost two years. The team will face considerable opposition if it wants to repeat its ACC Coastal Division-winning 2019 performance: Most preseason polls have UVA finishing fifth of eight teams in the Coastal, trailing UNC, Miami, Pitt, and Virginia Tech. UNC and Miami in particular boast strong, star-packed rosters. But for the Wahoo faithful, there’s plenty of reason to believe. The Cavs handled the tumult of the pandemic remarkably well in 2020, winning four of their last five games to finish the season at 5-5. And heading into 2021, the roster has quite a few players who were a part of the memorable 2019 season, which saw Bryce Perkins lead the Cavaliers to their first ACC Championship appearance in program history.

Dontayvion Wicks, who was out last season due to injury, and Ra’Shaun Henry, who racked up 206 yards and four touchdowns in 2020, are valuable options for Armstrong as well. The Cavaliers have three play-making running backs available to start: senior Wayne Taulapapa, sophomore Mike Hollins, and senior Ronnie Walker, Jr. Taulapapa returns for the Hoos after rushing for 395 yards in 2020. He’ll look to add to his 17 career touchdowns. Hollins opted out of the 2020 season but secured three touchdowns in 2019. Walker ran for 66 yards in four games after transferring from Indiana halfway through last year. At tight end, Armstrong has an exciting new target to aim for: Jelani Woods, a 6'7", 275 lb transfer from Oklahoma State. When he arrived at UVA, Woods selected the number 0 for his jersey, because, Woods says, 0 is the number of people who can stop him. Now that’s the right attitude.

ON DEFENSE

17

The secondary will make or break the season for UVA. In 2020, the defense struggled, in part due to injury, giving up an average of 442.9 yards per game (10th in the ACC), 6.4 yards per play (14th in the ACC), and 29.6 points per game (ninth in ACC). The defensive backfield allowed 304 passing yards per game, which ranked last in the ACC and 123rd out of 127 FBS teams. On the bright side, last season’s Hoos finished fourth in the ACC in rushing yards allowed per game, sixth in sacks with 32, and sixth in interceptions with 11. These aren’t extraordinary numbers, but at least the team has a foundation to build on entering the season. Nick Jackson is the linebacker to watch. As an inside linebacker, he earned a spot on the all-ACC Third Team in 2020 after leading the Hoos with 105 tackles on the inside (ranked sixth nationally) and averaged 10.5 tackles per game (second in the ACC). Jackson was named to the preseason watchlist for the Butkus Award, which goes to the best linebacker in the country. Senior safeties Joey Blount and De’Vante Cross are ready to rectify the mistakes of last season. Blount, an all-ACC performer in 2019, missed time in 2020 due to an injury but still managed one interception, one forced fumble, and a sack. Cross started all 10 games in 2020 and finished the season with 29 tackles, two interceptions, one sack, and six passes defended. CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

ON OFFENSE

MATT RILEY / UVA ATHLETICS

The Cavaliers are 16-2 at home over the last three seasons. They’re 6-13 when playing away from Charlottesville during the same stretch. That home-field advantage should continue this season, as Scott Stadium will be open to its full 61,500-seat capacity to start the season.

Joey Blount, who was injured for half of last season, is making up for lost time as a “super senior,” one of three UVA players who is taking advantage of an extra year of eligibility. Senior wide receiver Billy Kemp IV, who will also be the team’s punt returner, rushed for 644 yards and one touchdown last year. De’Vante Cross, another super senior, started all 10 games for the Cavs in 2020, and finished the season with 29 tackles, two interceptions, one sack, and six passes defended.

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Home sweet home

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

UVA will shine on offense this season. The 2020 unit averaged 30.7 points per game, the first time UVA has averaged more than 30 points per game in the ACC. Quarterback Brennan Armstrong, the 6'2", 215-pound redshirt junior from Shelby, Ohio, will lead the charge. Armstrong threw for 2,117 yards and 18 touchdowns, and was the Cavaliers’ leading rusher with 552 yards in 2020. He also threw 11 interceptions, more than competitors like UNC’s Sam Howell (seven) and Miami’s D’Eriq King (five). Armstrong is one of seven returning quarterbacks in the country with a ProFootballFocus rating over 90. With spring and summer training curtailed by COVID in 2020, he struggled to find rapport with his offense, especially in the early part of the season. After a full season as the starter and a full offseason of work, Armstrong should be better than ever come fall. The secret to UVA’s success this year will be keeping the team’s signal caller healthy and out of harm’s way—which is where the Cavaliers’ offensive line comes in. The OL has six key linemen returning: Olusegun Oluwatimi, Ryan Nelson, Chris Glaser, Ryan Swoboda, Bobby Haskins, and Joe Bissinger. Although the starting five have yet to be announced, it’s safe to say that Armstrong has experienced men protecting him. A good quarterback is nothing without quality receivers and running backs, and luckily Armstrong has plenty. Senior Keytaon Thompson, who serves as a back-up quarterback and wide receiver, returns for the Hoos after rushing 39 times for 234 yards and three touchdowns, and catching seven passes for 98 yards and three TDs. Senior wide receiver Billy Kemp IV is a solid option for Armstrong as well, after rushing 644 yards and securing one touchdown in 2020. Kemp will also be the team’s starting punt returner. Big man Lavel Davis, Jr. made waves last season with 20 receptions for 515 yards and five touchdowns before tearing his ACL. Davis was originally slated to return in November, but in a recent press conference Head Coach Bronco Mendenhall teased a potential earlier return.


18

LIGHT HOUSE STUDIO

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

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presents

Join us Sept. 12th to celebrate some of the top films of 2021 selected from over 300 student works! https://lighthousestudio.org/events/youth-film-festival


MATT RILEY / UVA ATHLETICS

19

Coach Bronco Mendenhall has high hopes for this year’s UVA football team. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17

ON THE COMPETITION The Cav’s opening game against William & Mary should get the team off the mark with a win. After that, things quickly get more difficult: UVA has September road games against the season’s two highest-ranked ACC opponents, UNC and Miami. Both programs boast star quarterbacks: UNC starting

UVA Class of 2019 star quarterback Bryce Perkins has impressed in this year’s NFL preseason—Perkins threw for more than 450 yards and three touchdowns over the course of the Los Angeles Rams’ three preseason games. The Arizona native went undrafted in 2019 and spent 2020 on the Rams’ practice squad, but now looks set to enter the season as L.A.’s third-string passer.

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Old friends

Heading into 2021, the roster has quite a few players who were a part of the memorable 2019 season, which saw the Cavaliers make their first ACC Championship appearance in program history.

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Senior cornerback Nick Grant is aided by the addition of grad transfer Anthony Johnson. Grant had 31 total tackles (25 solo), one forced fumble, and two interceptions in 2020. In 2019, Johnson had 27 total tackles, six points defended, three forced fumbles, and one interception at Louisville. The defensive line is filled with experienced returning starters: Mandy Alonso, Adeeb Atariwa, Aaron Faumui, and Jahmeer Carter, plus freshman Bryce Carter, UVA’s highestranked recruit for 2021.

passer Sam Howell is on the watchlist for the Heisman, and dynamite Miami quarterback D’Eriq King returns for the Hurricanes after tearing his meniscus and ACL. The Hoos have a dismal record on the road in recent years. They went 2-3 on the road in 2019 and 0-4 in 2020. Even so, UVA has beaten UNC for the past four years, including last season with Howell under center. Miami, however, is a different story. UVA has lost to Miami on the road three times in the past four years. The Cavs beat Miami in 2018, when the Hoos and Hurricanes met at Scott Stadium, where UVA was able to pull off a three-point victory. Despite a stacked offensive roster, the Cavaliers may need a miracle to win at Miami on September 30. Later in the season, UVA can look forward to a tough home game against highly ranked Notre Dame, and a tricky matchup against Pitt in Pittsburgh on November 20. Then on November 27, Virginia Tech comes to town, and UVA will attempt to win the Commonwealth Cup for just the second time in the last 18 seasons. It’s the million dollar question, isn’t it: Will UVA beat Tech? The Hokies shouldn’t be any great shakes this season, coming off a three-year run where the team accumulated a 19-18 record. Quarterback Braxton Burmeister had an injury-riddled, inconsistent season last year before leading Tech to victory over UVA in the annual November matchup. The Hokies lost their best offensive lineman and running back to the NFL, but added a transfer from Clemson along the defensive line. With any luck, a jam-packed Scott Stadium crowd will cheer the Hoos as they topple their arch rivals in November. We can dream, can’t we?


20

at

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

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thefesty.com

Relax in the Meadow and Listen to the Music

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Loca

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rag Beve

Wine

Hard Cider

Beer

Kombucha


CULTURE

21

FRIDAY 9/3

TOTALLY MENTAL Mentalist and illusionist Craig Karges opens PVCC’s live performance season with a challenge: If you can prove that volunteer audience members are actually coached ahead of time, and planted at his show, he will donate $100,000 to charity. The entertainer dazzles audiences around the globe by reading minds and performing baffling tricks. Karges has appeared on “Larry King Live” and “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” and even prompted comedian Dennis Miller to exclaim: “This weirds me out!” $10-12, 7:30pm. PVCC’s V. Earl Dickinson Building, 501 College Dr., pvcc.edu/performingarts.

SATURDAY 9/4

FALLING FOR IT

WEDNESDAY 9/1

SOUTHERN GOODNESS

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SUPPLIED PHOTO

@cville_culture

Brent Cobb found fame in Nashville, but his heart remained in his home state of Georgia. Now that he’s based in the Peach State again, he’s taking a more intuitive approach to his music, and the resulting album is soft, reflective, and soulful. South Carolina’s Nikki Lane pairs her “vintage ’60s country-pop swagger” with Cobb’s conversational songwriting for a versatile evening of music here in Charlottesville. Andrew Combs opens. $25, 7:30pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall, jeffersontheater.com.

OUR GUIDE TO YOUR WEEK

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Just like local alt-weeklies, local alt-radio stations are fans of the well-crafted pun. Which is why WTJU’s Freefall Music Festival is exactly what it sounds like: concerts throughout the fall, completely free! The series kicks off with a Labor Day weekend cookout. Munch on hot dogs and chug local brews as WTJU DJs spin vinyl from the station’s collection. The live music begins with New Orleans honky-tonk outfit Zuzu’s Hot Five, then eases into Susie and the Pistols’ (above) mix of Americana and R&B before Ebony Groove closes out the night with some go-go. To top it off, there’s a chance to break a world record —the station needs 321 participants to create the world’s largest human music note. Free, 3pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St SE, ixartpark.org.


22

B E S T O F C -V I L L E 2 0 2 1 E N T E R TA I N M E N T | H E A LT H & F I T N E S S | F O O D & D R I N K | S H O P P I N G | S E R V I C E S | W E D D I N G S | K I D S & FA M I LY | C I T Y V I B E S

Thinking of going Green?

C-VILLE 2021

BEST OF

ALL NEW!

Kids & Fam ily P.123 City Vibes P.13 7

Right ’round

FI R ST C H A I R

Laura Mulligan Thomas on CHS’ rise to orchestral success

In appreciation of Bodo’s ballyhooed drive-thru

No limits

The gloves are off for comedian Chris Alan

WIN!

FOR THE

Your votes are in for 183 of the greatest things in Charlottesville—plus 60 of the C-VILLE staff’s own faves Podcast, activist, place of worship: We’ve added new categories!

You love to see it! Our annual Best of C-VILLE magazine is on stands now!

The cover, shown above, features Richelle Claiborne performing at Friday’s After Five, photographed by Tristan Williams.

The first 100% Natural Cemetery in Virginia, certified by the Green Burial Council.

This year’s magazine features winners and runners-up in 183 categories, plus stories and blurbs on dozens of staff favorites.

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September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

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23

IMAGES COURTESY THE GALLERIES

CULTURE GALLERIES

Rosamund Casey at Chroma Projects (left), The Printmaker’s Left at Les Yeux du Monde (below).

SEPTEMBER SHOWS Atlas Coffee 2206 Fontaine Ave.

BozART Located in Hot Cakes,

Barracks Road Shopping Center. “Local-scapes,” landscapes in oil by Julia Kindred.

on Sen Soley” showcases works by Haitian art collective Sen Soley. The Center at Belvedere 540 Bel-

vedere Blvd. In the Auditorium Exhibit Gallery, “Awakening to the Beauty of Pastels,” works by local group the Piedmont Pastelists. On the second floor, “Renewal: Finding Our Way Back,” oil paintings by Randy Baskerville.

Crozet Artisan Depot 5791 Three

Notch’d Rd. “2021 Collection,” Ninika Gordon’s handmade sterling silver, gold, and gemstone jewelry. C’ville Arts Cooperative Gallery

118 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. “Beyond the Garden,” ceramic fairy figurines by Kim Clarke. Eastwood Farm and Winery 2531

Scottsville Rd. “Oil and Water” paintings by Ryan Arnold. Opens September 3. The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

155 Rugby Rd. “Skyscraper Gothic” investigates the role of European gothic architecture in 20th-century America through art.

The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection 400 Worrell Dr. “Boo­

malli Prints and Paper” showcases art by the Aboriginal Australian art cooperative Boomalli, and “Breathe With Me: A Wandering Sculpture Trail” features pieces by students of sculptor Bill Bennett. Les Yeux du Monde 841 Wolf Trap

Rd. Recent works from collaborative team The Printmakers Left. Loving Cup Vineyard and Winery

3340 Sutherland Rd. Lea Bodea’s abstract visualizations on paper. McGuffey Art Center 201 Second

St. NW. In the Smith Gallery, “What I Sea,” acrylic, graphite, and colored-pencil works from Erica Lohan; on the first floor, “Mysticism vs Cynicism,” paintings and sculpture by David Currier; on

the first and second floors, “Black and White,” works by McGuffey Art Center members. Opens September 3.

Quirk Gallery 499 W. Main St. Kristen Peyton’s painting series “Ordinary Time.”

Northside Library 705 Rio Rd. W.

Whisper in the Night,” paper-cut and woven works by Sri Kodakalla.

Natalie Kohler’s paintings using sustainably harvested pigments. The Ruffin Gallery 179 Culbreth

Rd. “Wild Whimsey,” Emily Moores’ hand-cut and ornately layered installations. Second Street Gallery 115 Sec-

ond St. SE. “Teeny Tiny Trifecta 4,” work measuring 9x9 inches or smaller from 124 Virginia artists. In the Dové Gallery, LaRissa Rogers’ “On Belonging: The Space In Between,” which uses soil samples and archival imagery to explore culture, identity, and colonization. Opens September 3.

Studio IX 969 Second St. SE. “A

Unitarian-Universalist Church

717 Rugby Rd. Online exhibit of paintings by Sara Gondwe. Visible Records 1740 Broadway

St. “Tiajue Tocha (let’s go home)” showcases works exploring brickmaking by the Mexican art collective Rasquache. The Stage at WTJU 2244 Ivy Road.

WTJU, The Bridge PAI, and UVA Music partner for “We Hope This Art Finds You Well,” an exhibition and community arts time capsule in response to the pandemic. Opens September 11.

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The Bridge Progressive Arts Initiative 209 Monticello Rd. “Eyes

ginia, Third St. SE. Rosamund Casey’s “Working Below Sea Level,” and Bill Atwood’s “Some Abstractions.” Opens September 3.

@cville_culture

A selection of photographs by Katie Hickson.

Chroma Projects Inside Vault Vir-

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Julia Kindred at BozART (top), Susan Patrick at McGuffey Art Center (above left), Randy Baskerville at The Center at Belvedere (above right), Ryan Arnold at Eastwood Farm and Winery (right).


24

BACK TO SC SEPTEMBER

PRODUCE Organic Fuji Apples $2.49/lb

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

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Organic Red & Green Grapes $2.99/lb Organic Red Bell Peppers $3.99/lb

BULK Grind Your Own Almond Butter $6.99/lb (Reg. $9.99) Organic Medjool Dates $7.99/lb (Reg. $9.99) Organic Walnuts $8.99/lb (Reg. $14.99)

Apple varieties now available!

Organic Whole Cashews $8.99/lb (Reg. $14.99) OUR STANDARDS ALL OF OUR PRODUCE IS NON-GMO NO HYDROGENATED OILS ALL OUR CHEESE IS ANIMAL RENNET FREE NO PRESERVATIVES OR ARTIFICIAL COLORING NONE OF OUR PRODUCTS CONTAIN HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

923 PRESTON AVE. 293-4111 WWW.IYFOODS.COM


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CHOOL SALE 1ST – 30TH GROCERY Organic Valley Cheese Blocks 8 oz. 15% Off Kettle Chips 5 oz $3.69 (Reg. $4.19)

C2O Coconut Water 33.8 oz $5.69 (Reg. $6.89)

Megafood Probiotics 15% Off Emergen-C 30-Pack All Varieties 15% OFF Barlean’s Ideal CBD Oil 1.5 oz $45.99 (Reg. $69.99)

MON-FRI 8AM-8PM, SAT 9AM-6PM, SUNDAY 10AM-6PM

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Curbside phone orders available from open until 5 PM daily!

@cville_culture

Tony’s Chocolate Bars 6.35 oz $5.29 (Reg. $6.29)

All Gaia Herbs Brand Supplements 15% Off (New!)

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Lundberg Rice Cakes $4.99 (Reg. $5.69)

HEALTH & BODY CARE


CULTURE FEEDBACK

26

All good

RUNNER UP BEST DAY CARE

Orion Faruque finds the silver lining with debut album By Alana Bittner arts@c-ville.com

W

hen Orion Faruque was a child, and adults asked him, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” he remembers thinking, “I kinda just want to sit in my bedroom and play music.” Now, at 29, Faruque is a working musician, and also the founder of local recording and production studio RedMusic Productions. Through his solo project, Orion and the Melted Crayons, he’s released singles and played many, many gigs. But when the pandemic hit, Faruque found himself sitting in his bedroom, playing music—it became the perfect environment to write Orion and the Melted Crayon’s debut album, The Good Stuff. Faruque has experience creating under extreme circumstances. When he left Charlottesville to attend McNally Smith College of Music in Minnesota, he took nothing but a duffel bag and a guitar and slept on the floor of an empty apartment, until a concerned neighbor offered him a mattress. “I was 20 years old and like, ‘this is awesome!’” he laughs. Soon after graduating, he moved to his grandparents’ house near Asheville, North Carolina, to “go live on top of this mountain and study myself as a person and an artist.” He says that “during that time, I wrote something absurd, like 65 songs.” These experiences line up with Faruque’s musical philosophy. “I aggressively haven’t given myself the option to do anything other than music,” he says. “I could get another job to support it. But if I do that, I’m not gonna do what I need to do. I need to feel like I’m starving to make music.” Yet after moving back to Charlottesville in 2018 and jumping into the hectic pace

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of shows and tours, Faruque started to feel burned out. “You’re playing a bar show out of town, people have no idea who you are, and there’s a bunch of drunk people yelling for you to play some song you don’t know,” he says. “On some level, it’s like, ‘What am I doing?’” The pandemic gave Faruque time to reconnect with his music on an intuitive level. “I was just making sounds in my apartment,” he says. “I hear a song in my head, I’m gonna play it. I feel like there’s true beauty there.” A few months into the COVID shutdown, he realized he’d written enough songs to make an album. The Good Stuff will debut on September 3 on Spotify and Bandcamp, with a release party at The Southern Café & Music Hall on September 4. The album draws upon Appalachian roots, but Faruque also branches out. “If you take funk and jam band music together, then add the lyrical sensibilities of folk and the colors of jazz and sound,” he says, “it creates a really interesting sound.” On the funky, psychedelic tune “What Is Love,” he plays every instrument, and saxophonist Gina Sobel, Kendall Street Company’s Ryan Wood, Louis Smith, and Brian Roy help out on other tracks. While musically diverse, the album is centered around one theme: focusing on the good stuff. “E9” is a meditation on what we can learn from the pandemic, while “The Letter” explores Faruque’s grief around losing his dad at 14. Even then, he retains threads of hope. In “The Letter,” he sings: “If it’s raining / why is the sun shining through?” With the debut album done, what’s next for The Melted Crayons? “I really hope that I don’t have to make a record like this for a while, just because it was so much work,” Faruque jokes. But that seems unlikely for a musician who doesn’t give himself the option to do anything else.

Orion Faruque will celebrate The Good Stuff with a release party at The Southern Café & Music Hall on Saturday.


CULTURE THE WORKING POUR

Cheers to the west Sip your way through Staunton and Waynesboro at these choice spots

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Tips for tippin’ it back CRUCIBLE COFFEE ROASTERS The true rewards of buying from an area roaster is coffee that is extremely fresh. In addition to seasonal selections of single-origin producers, Crucible offers four house blends that cater to different tastes. Before the Dawn is a combination of Central and South American washed and natural beans. It’s a bold, darker roast full of chocolate and smoke flavors. ($10/12oz) cruciblecoffee.com

Ox-Eye Vineyards Riesling is the star at Ox-Eye. The 2019 Riesling ($18/750ml) is hightoned, off dry, with lemon-lime citrus flavors and hints of honeysuckle. The 2019 Scale House Reserve Riesling ($22/750ml) has more weight and texture, with flavors of white peaches and nectarines and a long citrus acidity on the finish. Both are excellent examples of what riesling can be in Virginia when grown in cooler-climate vineyards. oxeyevineyards.com

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Basic City Beer

The Ciders from Mars owners, who recently opened a tasting room in downtown Staunton, hope their new space is a spot for enjoying flights of cider (below) and experiencing area art and music.

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Ciders from Mars The highly recommended Pathfinder ($16/750ml) is one of two flagship blends at Ciders from Mars. It balances a bright fruit acidity with just a hint of residual sugar. The result is crowd-pleasing and easy drinking without being overly sweet. You’ll find a bottle disappears much more quickly than expected. cidersfrommars.com

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he foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains rise quickly as you drive west from Charlottesville. Snake into those hills a little bit and you’ll find Waynesboro and Staunton, where a wealth of history and wonderfully preserved architecture surrounds several craft beverage producers worth seeking out. If you’re getting an early start, head over to Crucible Coffee Roasters, located in the Staunton Wharf Area Historic District. Owners Brandon Bishop and Kean Ivey have converted a former auto garage into their coffee roastery and cafe. Bishop and Ivey have been friends since they attended Miller School together, and each brings coffee industry experience to the partnership. Both Bishop and Ivey are originally from small mountain towns, and they opened in Staunton because it’s a place where they knew they could build relationships with regular customers. Crucible has also sought out local partnerships and provides espresso service at nearby Reunion Bakery. Just a few steps away, you’ll find the tasting room of Ox-Eye Vineyards. The vineyards themselves are in the Shenandoah Valley, an area becoming known in the Virginia wine industry for cooler temperatures, lower rainfall, and limestone soils. At their highest point, Ox-Eye’s vineyards reach 1,830 feet with east-southeast facing slopes, allowing sun exposure during the day while

on sourcing local apples for cider and other local fruits for co-ferments. Prior to opening, they established an apple orchard in western Augusta County to grow apple varieties specifically suited for cider making, and West, a geochemist by training, did coursework at the Cider Institute of North America. In her role as cidermaker, West’s background in science is part of the brand identity, emphasized by the 100ml laboratory beakers used to serve tasting flights. West also clearly sees cider as an artistic endeavor and seeks synergy between science and art. Ultimately, the goal for the downtown Staunton space is that it becomes not just a place for their cider, but a community space to experience local music and art.

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preserving cooler temps at night. Owners John and Susan Kiers specifically chose this site in order to focus on German and Austrian grapes, which are less common locally. Ox-Eye is well regarded for its riesling, which is among the best expressions of the grape in Virginia. The vineyard’s 100 percent estate-grown wines are also noteworthy for varieties such as grüner veltliner, traminette, pinot noir, and lemburger (also known as blaufränkisch). For excellent beer, head to Basic City Beer Co. in Waynesboro. Historically, Basic City was an industrial town focused on steel making, located next to Waynesboro at the crossroads of two railroads. Present day Waynesboro is the result of a merger of the two cities, but in the old times, the Waynesboro side of the river was dry, and Basic City was the place to get a beer. The brewery was founded in 2015 by the Lanman brothers and is housed in a former industrial complex once home to metalcrafters. The renovated space speaks to this history, and features indoor and outdoor seating, a large selection of taps at the bar, and food service. While the success of the brewery led to a second location in Richmond in 2018, this is a truly local producer that takes its name and inspiration from its Waynesboro roots. And if you get bored of central Virginia, blast off to the red planet. Or, at least, check out Ciders from Mars, which opened a tasting room, production space, and laboratory in downtown Staunton this May. Co-owners Nikki West and Jeremy Wimpey are focused

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

By Paul H. Ting

A full range of styles is available on tap and there are also cans for purchase. The Thresh ($9.99/6-pack), is an excellent version of traditional hefeweizen that is smooth and easy drinking with forward banana and clove flavors. Also recommended, the Motown Maibock ($10.99/6-pack), a German-style lager traditionally released in spring. Basic City uses the increasingly popular New Zealand Pacifica hop in its version, lending floral and orange citrus aroma to a bready, malty body that’s slightly reminiscent of graham crackers. basiccitybeer.com


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SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

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September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

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#1

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CULTURE PUZZLES

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CROSSWORD

Sweet dreams BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK 56. Curry on TV 57. “You get the point” 58. Ran the headline 1. “Antiques Roadshow” “Rapper failed at his channel marriage to Kim Kar4. Ill will dashian”? 9. “OMG, that is soooo 62. “Well, aren’t ____ pair!” funny!” 63. Cosmic payback 14. Bollywood star Aish64. Word from the Hebrew warya ____ for “teaching” 15. “Rodeo” composer 65. Blowup: Abbr. Copland 16. ____ Jackson, real name 66. Hawaii, on many maps 67. How pastrami is often of Ice Cube served 17. Rocket interceptor, for 68. Pres. when Sputnik short was launched 18. Elicits reverence from others? DOWN 20. Pesters, Chihuahua-style 22. She, in Portuguese 1. Seeks divine help from 23. Big Pharma watchdog: Abbr. 2. Gilda Radner character on “SNL” 24. With 36-Across, what Annie Lennox sings in a 3. Person with a fatuous 1983 hit song ... and a smile literal description of 18-, 4. 1978 Peace co-Nobelist 51- or 58-Across 5. Medicare prescription 27. Show ____ drug section 28. Like green apples 6. 401(k) alternative 29. Rose of Guns N’ Roses 7. Lug 30. Largest number in 8. Close tight Sudoku 9. Purchases on 14 31. Be behind de febrero 32. Judge’s seat 10. Sunrise direction, in 34. Go (for) Stuttgart 36. See 24-Across 11. 1960s-’70s crime drama starring 41. “____ & Oh’s” Efrem Zimbalist Jr. (Elle King hit) 12. Supply, as data 42. Spain’s “King of Clay” 13. French obstetrician 43. Fri. preceder Fernand 45. Smoke shop brand 19. Popular street name 48. Coppertone tube fig. 21. Inflexible 49. Take a cleaver to 25. ____ McNally (mapmaker) 50. Letter-shaped addition 26. Reader’s Digest offering 51. Introduces oneself to 30. To the ____ degree people in the shallow end? 32. Biker’s stunt bike, briefly 55. Trio with the 1999 #1 33. Wiimote batteries album “FanMail” 34. Askew

ACROSS

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© 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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ANSWERS 8/25/21

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

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35. Grp. that may discuss online classes 37. Sushi fish 38. Stumblebums 39. Words with a ring to them? 40. Losing wishbone remnant 44. High-end 45. Kawasaki vehicle with no wheels 46. Emmy winner Tracey 47. Belly aches? 48. Phrase on a mailing label 49. Org. that created a Vaccine Schedules app 51. 2000 U.S. Open champ Safin 52. 180 degrees from WSW 53. “As ____ in my country ...” 54. Words with earliest or least 59. Letters in some church names 60. Carried the day 61. Show one’s humanity, perhaps


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By Rob Brezsny

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.22): Several states in the U.S. have statutes prohibiting blasphemy. Saying “God damn it” could theoretically get you fined in Massachusetts, South Carolina, and Wyoming. In the coming days, it’s best to proceed carefully in places like those, since you’ve been authorized by cosmic forces to curse more often and more forcefully than usual. Why? Because you need to summon vivid and intense protests in the face of influences that may be inhibiting and infringing on your soul’s style. You have a poetic license to rebel against conventions that oppress you.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Everyone dreams at least three dreams per night. In a year, your subconscious mind generates over 1,100 dreams. About this remarkable fact, novelist Mila Kundera writes, “Dreaming is not merely an act of coded communication. It is also an aesthetic activity, a game that is a value in itself. To dream about things that have not happened is among humanity’s deepest needs.” I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because September is Honor Your Dreams Month. To celebrate, I suggest the following experiments. 1. Every night before sleep, write down a question you’d like your dreams to respond to. 2. Keep a notebook by your bed and transcribe at least one dream each time you sleep. 3. In the morning, have fun imagining what the previous night’s dreams might be trying to communicate to you. 4. Say prayers of gratitude to your dreams, thanking them for their provocative, entertaining stories.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In her autobiography Changing, Sagittarian actor Liv Ullmann expresses grief about how she and a loved one failed to communicate essential truths to each other. I propose we regard her as your anti-role model for the rest of 2021. Use her error as your inspiration. Make emotionally intelligent efforts to talk about unsaid things that linger like ghostly puzzles between you and those you care about.

Capricorn

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “I often wonder who I am and where is my country and where do I belong and why was I ever born at all,” wrote Virgo author Jean Rhys. I don’t think you will be agitated by those questions during the next eight weeks, Virgo. In fact, I suspect you will feel as secure in your identity as you have in a long time. You will enjoy prolonged clarity about your role in the world, the nature of your desires, and how you should plan your life for the next two years. If for some inexplicable reason you’re not already enjoying these developments, stop what you’re doing and meditate on the probability that I am telling you the bold truth.

be immoderate, volatile, excessive, and rampant every day for the rest of your long life. But I think you will generate health benefits and good fortune if you experiment with that approach in the coming weeks. Can you think of relatively sane, sensible ways to give yourself this salubrious luxury?

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): While wading through the internet’s wilder terrain, I found a provocative quote alleged to have been uttered by the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates. He supposedly said, “My ultimate goal is to look totally hot, but not be unapproachable.” I confess that in the past I have sometimes been fooled by fake quotes, and I suspect this is one. Still, it’s amusing to entertain the possibility that such an august personage as Socrates, a major influencer of Western culture, might say something so cute and colloquial. Even if he didn’t actually say it, I like the idea of blending ancient wisdom with modern insights, seriousness with silliness, thoughtful analysis with good fun. In accordance with astrological omens, I recommend you experiment with comparable hybrids in the coming weeks. (PS: One of your goals should be to look totally hot, but not be unapproachable.)

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): “If you don’t know what you want,” writes Piscean novelist Chuck Palahniuk, “you end up with a lot you don’t.” Very true! And right now, it’s extra important to keep that in mind. During the coming weeks, you’ll be at the peak of your ability to attract what you want and need. Wouldn’t you prefer to gather influences you really desire—as opposed to those for which you have mild or zero interest? Define your wants and needs very precisely.

Aries (March 21-April 19): Aries poet Anna Kamienska wrote, “I’ve learned to value failed conversations, missed connections, confusions. What remains is what’s unsaid, what’s underneath. Understanding on another level of being.” In the coming weeks, I suggest you adopt her perspective as you evaluate both past and present experiences. You’re likely to find small treasures in what you’d assumed were wastelands. You may uncover inspiring clues in plot twists that initially frustrated you. Upon further examination, interludes you dismissed as unimportant or uninteresting could reveal valuable wrinkles.

Taurus (April 20-May 20): After studying your astrological omens, I’ve decided to offer you inspiration from the ancient Roman poet Catullus. I hope the extravagant spirit of his words will free you to be greedy for the delights of love and affection. Catullus wrote, “Give me a thousand kisses, then a hundred; then another thousand, then a second hundred; then yet another thousand.” I’ll add the following to Catullus’s appeal: Seek an abundance of endearing words, sweet favors and gifts, caresses and massages, help with your work, and fabulous orgasms. If there’s no one in your life to provide you with such blessings, give them to yourself.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Gemini author Elif Batuman writes that the Old Uzbek language was rich in expressions about crying. There were “words for wanting to cry and not being able to, for loudly crying like thunder in the clouds, for crying in gasps, for weeping inwardly or secretly, for crying ceaselessly in a high voice, for crying in hiccups, and for crying while

uttering the sound ‘hay hay.’” I recommend all of these to you in the coming days, as well as others you might dream up. Why? It’s prime time to seek the invigorating release and renewal that come from shedding tears generated by deep and mysterious feelings.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): A blogger named MythWoven imagines an “alternate universe where I literally go to school forever (for free) so I can learn about art and literature and history and languages for 100 years. No job skills. No credit requirements. No student loans. Just learning.” I have longings like hers. There’s an eternal student within me that wants to be endlessly surprised with exciting information about interesting subjects. I would love to be continually adding fresh skills and aptitudes to my repertoire. In the coming weeks, I will give free rein to that part of me. I recommend you do the same, my fellow Cancerian.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): In 2016, the International Garden Photograph of the Year depicted lush lupine flowers in New Zealand. The sea of tall purple, pink, and blue blooms was praised as “an elegant symphony” and “a joy to behold.” What the judges didn’t mention is that lupine is an invasive species in New Zealand. It forces native plant species out of their habitat, which in turn drives away native animal species, including birds like the wrybill, black stilt, and banded dotterel. Is there a metaphorically comparable phenomenon in your life, Leo? Problematic beauty? Some influence that’s both attractive and prickly? A wonderful thing that can also be troublesome? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to try to heal the predicament. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888.

Beyond the Garden

This is our town.

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Ceramic sculpture by Kim Clarke featured at C’ville Arts during September Meet Kim on First Friday, Sept. 3, 5–7PM open daily | 118 E. Main Street | Downtown Mall | 434-972-9500 | www.cvillearts.org | Like us on Facebook!

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(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I could do with a bit more excess,” writes author Joanne Harris. “From now on I’m going to be immoderate—and volatile,” she vows. “I shall enjoy loud music and lurid poetry. I shall be rampant.” Let me be clear, Capricorn: I’m not urging you to

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Q&A How will the UVA football game-day experience change now that alcohol’s allowed in the stands? Students will stay longer and than 10 minutes.

Not a bit. PAUL ZAVADA/FACEBOOK

@NARANJO.RUSS/INSTAGRAM

Who asked. @_.ASHEER._/INSTAGRAM

It’ll put more people back in their seats instead of the beer garden. @JEN_MF_DEAN/INSTAGRAM

Alcohol in the stands at UVA? I’m shocked I tell you, shocked!

Seat belts required?

THOMAS GAYNER/FACEBOOK

@MOBILEGOBAR/INSTAGRAM

People will be less drunk because they won’t be slamming bourbon in the parking lot like a bunch of train-hopping hobos.

@READHEAD/TWITTER

Sticky seats.

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@TARAMLIFE/INSTAGRAM

September 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

JEREMY SHARP/FACEBOOK

Two years ago seemed a disaster to get a beer, took about half the game with the terrible administration, hopefully better going forward. JOHN SLAUGHTER/FACEBOOK

@MRJOHNNYWAFFLES/INSTAGRAM

I’m guessing more COVID for a while!

As if there was not ALWAYS alcohol in the stands.

Fans will be less likely to notice the TBIs! JASON SMITH/FACEBOOK

I will stop hiding my alcohol while I’m in the stands. @RTRJNHT/TWITTER

First I’m hearing of it. Now do Davenport! Would love to enjoy an overpriced beer during the 7th-inning stretch. RONDA CHOLLOCK/FACEBOOK

“History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” @PFARLEYARCH/INSTAGRAM

Next week’s question: How can Charlottesville be more welcoming to immigrants and refugees—and what do we already do well? Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

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Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities: Program Manager- Day Support, Louisa County. Part-time 20 hours per week. Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, pay range of $15-$17/hr.) Direct Support Professional- Floater (overnights, $16/hr.) Direct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr.) We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet and C’ville! Additional detail for each vacancy (including schedules) may be viewed on the Employment page of our web site. To see a full listing of all of our positions, to apply and to learn more about what The Arc is doing to support our community, please visit our web site at http://thearcofthepiedmont.org/ In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Advancing Healthcare Through

CLINICAL TRIALS

www.uvaclinicaltrials.com

Study for Family Caregivers Adults who provide in-home care to their adult loved ones with chronic health conditions are needed for a study about caregiving stress, sleep, and cardiovascular health. Participation involves 1 study visit lasting 90 minutes (home visit option available): completing questionnaires and getting noninvasive cardiovascular tests at the visit, and wearing a wrist-worn sleep tracker (7 days) and blood pressure monitor (for 24 hours) after the visit are required. Compensation: $80 at completion of participating. Principal Investigator: Jeongok Logan, PhD, RN. UVA School of Nursing Soojung Ahn 434.233.4593 | sa4ve@virginia.edu IRB-HSR #22260

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Don’s Florist is seeking candidates for a full-time delivery driver position. Our delivery area includes the greater Charlottesville area and extends to Ruckersville, Palmyra, Scottsville, and Crozet. Candidate must be able to work Saturdays. Contact brad@donsfloristandgifts.com or 434-977-5240, if interested.

call 434-566-8660 salesrep@c-ville.com C-VILLECLASSIFIEDS.com

September 1 - 7, 2021 c-ville.com

COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1-855-554-4616 (AAN CAN)

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CLASSIFIEDS ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 _ General District Court Charlottesville X Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court __ Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: a female child born to Latoya J. Ragland v. Latoya J. Ragland and Unknown Father or the Father Wendell Maurice Burton, Jr. The object of this suit is to: Terminate the parental rights of the Unknown Father or Wendell Maurice Burton, Jr., the Father of a female child born to Latoya J. Ragland on October 11th, 2016. It is ORDERED that the X defendant Unknown Father or Wendell Maurice Burton, Jr., appear at the abovenamed Court and protect his interests on or before October 5th, 2021 at 9:00 a.m. 7/23/2021 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316

September 1 - 7, 2021 c-ville.com

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_ General District Court Charlottesville

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X Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court __ Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: a male child born to Latoya J. Ragland v. Latoya J. Ragland and Ricky L. Ragland, Jr. The object of this suit is to: Terminate the parental rights of Ricky L. Ragland, Jr., the father of a male child born to Latoya J. Ragland on December 9th, 2014. It is ORDERED that the X defendant Ricky Lee Ragland, Jr., appear at the above-named Court and protect his interests on or before October 5th, 2021 at 9:00 a.m. 7/21/2021 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

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Career Mixer Monday, September 13, 12-9 p.m. Tuesday, September 14, 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Do you want to work at a place that strikes the balance between fun, family and work? Charlottesville’s only true resort is the place to be! Come join us for a one-of-a-kind hiring event where you will see what it means to be a part of a company that strives to deliver a family environment and memorable guest and member experiences. Interview, socialize, enjoy great food and beverage and have FUN!

FREE Food* • Music • Hotel Stays and Gift Certificates Door Prizes and Giveaways • Cornhole Complimentary Fitness Membership

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$500-$1,000 Sign-On Bonuses for All Positions** Interview for a Job, Get Hired for a Career, Become Part of a Family Join our team in a variety of positons and departments from entry level to management. All skill sets needed. Most positions pay above $15/ hour and commensurate with experience.

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Restaurant General Manager Cooks Bartenders Dishwashers Host/Hostess Supervisor and Servers Food Runner/Busser

Esthetician Licensed Massage Therapist Nail Technician Spa Receptionist/Attendants

Assistant Golf Pro Childcare Provider Golf Course Maintenance Outside Greeters and Starters Pro Shop Manager Fitness Floor Attendant

Benefits Include: Discounted Childcare, Health, Dental, Vision, 401k, Fitness Memberships, Resort Discounts, Travel Discount to Other Hotels *Upon completion of interviews, you will be given food and beverage tickets for redemption. **Sign-on bonuses vary by position and will be paid out with rules, starting with $250 on your first paycheck.

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Hotel Operations:

September 1 - 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Employee Golf Outing


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HELP WANTED HIRING? We can help you fill your open positions! Promote job listings regionally or statewide! Affordable Print and Digital Advertising Solutions reaching job seekers. Call this paper or Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804-521-7576, mailto:landonc@vpa.net landonc@vpa.net

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THYME & CO RESTAURANTS LLC Thyme & Co 104 14th St NW Ste 2 Charlottesville, VA 22902 The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) AUTHORITY for Wine and Beer License to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Rami Daniel, Owner

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Objections should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.


WWW.CAAR.COM 37

VOL. 30 NO. 35 n SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Beadles House

You Could Fall in Love with It BY KEN WILSON PHOTO CREDIT:By Harrisonkenneth

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Comfy Greene County:


EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

FOXWOOD FOREST

Beautiful 4-5 bedroom, smart wired home, nestled off the road in the neighborhood of Foxwood Forest with FIBER OPTIC INTERNET. 15 Minutes from Target/Harris Teeter. Minutes from NGIC and Research Park. MLS#619815 $795,000 Jennifer Moreira, 434.409.2844 (owner/agent)

KESWICK

Enjoy mountain views of the historic Southwest Mountains from this livable 4-BR residence on 6 private acres. Convenient and quick to Pantops, Historic Downtown Mall, and UVA. Within steps of all the amenities at Keswick Hall. MLS#611672 $989,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

HEART OF CROZET

Commercial listing on .906 acres with new Downtown Crozet District zoning that allows many uses. 2-bedroom home just under 1,000 sf., was doctor’s office and pre-school. Paved entrance/ exit roads and parking. MLS#619191 $775,000 Jim Faulconer,434.981.0076

EW

PR IC

E

OFF OF GARTH ROAD

Tranquility is abundant at this 12 acre country estate only 6 miles west of Charlottesville. This beautifully appointed manor home has over 5,600 finished square feet, and is a blend of traditional styling with many recent upgrades and additions including gorgeous gourmet kitchen and 2 master suites (total 4-5 bedrooms). Throughout the home are heart pine floors, high ceilings, and large windows. Beautifully landscaped, spring-fed pond, and great outdoor spaces. MLS#617622 $2,500,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.007 www.HollyHollowVa.com

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SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

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GALLISON HALL

Beautifully sited amidst 43 acres of expansive lawns and gardens stands this extraordinary, 1931-1933 Georgian Revival-style residence. Tranquil, private setting with magnificent Blue Ridge Mountain views, 3 miles west of town. MLS#617686 $8,450,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

GREY OAKS

In the heart of this exceptional country estate is an immaculate, 6-BR, 6.5-BA home offering outstanding views overlooking a 2-acre lake to the Blue Ridge Mtns. Total tranquility, over 53 rolling acres, wonderful outdoor spaces, and a 1,800 sf barn. MLS#617485 $4,165,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

OLD TRAIL

Classic brick Georgian, circa 2008, 5 bedrooms, including main level master suite, spacious and modern open floor plan. Views of the adjoining Old Trail Golf Course, buffered by small woods, and views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. MLS#614945 $1,385,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FARMINGTON

Exceptional 1954 Milton Grigg 8-BR residence carefully sited on over 2.5 manicured acres. Beautifully maintained, the original brick home has been enlarged, creating an elegant yet livable floor plan with open living and entertaining spaces, kitchen, and master suite on the main level. Pool, 2-story pool house, and 3-bay garage with fully equipped 1-BR apartment above. Fronting the 17th fairway in Farmington, gorgeous setting, and prime location only minutes to UVA and Downtown. MLS#606911 $4,950,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.320FarmingtonDrive.com

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


39

GREENTREES

188+ acres in Albemarle, 12 miles south of Charlottesville on Rt 20. This wooded tract, mostly in hardwoods, offers long road frontage with potential for eight 21-acre lots. There is conservation easement potential. MLS#614109 $1,299,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

LONESOME MOUNTAIN ROAD

5-acre lot with road frontage only 4 miles from Charlottesville. This country but close-to-town location is conveniently located with quick access to Historic Downtown Mall, Martha Jefferson Hospital, UVA, NGIC, airport and North Fork Business Park. MLS#593160 $250,000 C. Dammann, 434.981.1250

ESTES RIDGE

Beautiful 14.7-acre tract of pristine land with both open fields and mature woods. So many possibilities for the property-create a small estate parcel with main residence and dependencies or enjoy recreational activities. No HOA! MLS#621176 $289,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

HEMLOCK LANE

Located in the Preston Ave/Rugby Rd area in the heart of Charlottesville, this 2-BR, 1-BA ranch style house offers proximity to UVA and downtown. 1-level living with private fenced-in backyard, covered patio area, and garage/storage shed. MLS#620291 $325,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MISSION HOME ROAD

146.88 ac. in Albemarle & Greene County. Privacy & protection adjacent to the Shenandoah National Park! Full division rights & multiple home sites. Extraordinary timberland. Views of the mountains, along with easy access to trails & Skyline Drive. MLS#620276 $1,200,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville & UVA. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

KESWICK

Wonderful wooded, 10.58-acre lot in Keswick. Great location, convenient to Pantops, 10 minutes east of Charlottesville with exceptional privacy and frontage on Mechunk Creek. MLS#619380 $149,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FRAY’S GRANT

3 fabulous home sites mostly in beautiful hardwoods, gently rolling and priced below tax assessments! Each lot is 2+ acres on private setting. Only ten minutes to airport, excellent shopping, including Harris Teeter, Target, Kohls, Bonefish Grill, and Starbucks. Jim Faulconer 434,981.0076

BUFFALO RIVER ROAD

Elevated 21-acre tract, mostly mature hardwood forest and road frontage in northwest Albemarle. Elevated homesite offers potential panoramic Blue Ridge Mountain views with some clearing. Adjacent 21 acres also for sale. MLS#614424 $160,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

MURPHY’S CREEK FARM

Wonderful gently rolling parcel of land with just under 26 acres, 18 miles south of Charlottesville. The land is wooded (mostly hardwoods) with an elevated building site, stream/creek, total privacy, and long road frontage. MLS#619394 $285,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

WESLEY CHAPEL ROAD

Nice, mostly wooded residential building lot in Meriwether Lewis School District! Great privacy, 1.72± acres, beautiful rural setting in an area of large farm and estate properties. Located approximately 15 miles NW of Charlottesville. MLS#613685 $125,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

CLOWES HOUSE

C. 1870 residence in the heart of Gordonsville with historic character, original architectural detailing, & updated systems. Walk to the many amenities of Historic Main Street Gordonsville or take a short drive to Charlottesville and UVA. MLS#615710 $289,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

40

BUY AND SELL CVILLE

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

BUY AND SELL CVILLE

LOW INVENTORY

+ PATIENT L O WBUYERS INVENTORY

Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

WOODTHRUSH LANE

+ PATIENT BUYERS = A MORE CRITICAL THAN A TIME MOR E C REVER ITICAL TIME THAN EVER TO HAV TO HAVE...

Custom home in Northern Albemarle County. Set on 2 private wooded acres on a culde-sac. Enjoy the outdoors from the front porch, deck or patio. Large, built in place garden shed for storage or workshop. Open Main floor plan with great flow. Study/Library with built in bookshelves. Second floor with master and 3 additional bedrooms including Junior suite with skylights. Finished terrace level with separate access and radiant heated tile floors. Beautiful, landscaped terraced gardens. 2 miles from Preddy Creek Trail Park with 571 acre recreational area for hiking, mountain biking and riding. Owner/Agent $795,000

A PROFESSIONAL REALTOR The Buy and Sell Cville Team Seller'sGuide REPRESENT A shows PROFESSIONAL you THE MOST REALTOR aspects IMPORTANT REPRESENT YOU! sale YOU! of a successful Annie Gould Gallery JONNA STREET

Large, fabulous home set at the end of a quiet street and backs up to the Crozet Trail. 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths and 2 half baths. Kitchen/ Family room/Sunroom combination opens onto a large deck. Walk-in pantry. 1st floor home office. The master suite features a sitting area and 2 large closets. Terrace level family room/movie room/exercise room opens to a patio. A tremendous amount of storage room allows for expansion. Conveniently located in the heart of Crozet. $529,000

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

& the #1 thing you The Buy and should NEVER do SellCville Team when selling! Seller’s Guide shows you THE MOST IMPORTANT aspectsof a successful sale & the #1 thing you should NEVER do when selling!

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

NOMINATE ME

Buy and Sell Cville Team Nominees: Candice & Bert

A unique art gallery located inHelping the heart of historic Gordonsville. Passionate about

CALL CANDICE TODAY FOR A CONSULTATION! Candice van der Linde, Realtor

@Candice_Realtor

People SELL & BUY Residential Real Estate in the 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) Charlottesville Area. We can’t anniegouldgallery wait to connect with you & Share Some of our Best Adventures!

832-6352


41 SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

CHARMING HOME IN RAINTREE

BRIARWOOD BEAUTY, MOVE IN READY!

BELVEDERE NEIGHBORHOOD!

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

1023 Wildmere Place 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 2598 SQ FT $450,000 mls 621130 Jim McVay, 434-962-3420

THE MONTEGO

3915 Roundabout Road 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 1803 SQ FT $306,700 mls 621015 Susan Stewart, 434-242-3550

2355 Austin Drive 3 BR, 2.5 BA, 1322 SQ FT $234,900 mls 621109 Rod Brunelle, 434-760-4663

THE CHESAPEAKE

328 Jefferson Drive 3 BR, 2.5 BA, 1440 SQ FT $259,090 mls 621026 Susan Stewart, 434-242-3550

813 Belvedere Boulevard 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 2249 SQ FT $490,000 mls 621290 Ryan Ferguson, 434-665-1115

THE PINELAND

4786 Blue Run Road 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 1610 SQ FT $310,700 mls 620750 Susan Stewart, 434-242-3550

VIEW MORE LISTINGS ONLINE

5+ ACRES IN SADDLEWOOD FARMS

LEVEL OPEN LAND

Tilman Road Live on and enjoy 8.46 acres $450,000 mls 620954 Jim McVay, 434-962-3420

Charlottesville 434.951.5155 | Greene 434.985.2348 | Zion Crossroads 434.589.2611 | Western Albemarle 434.205.4355 WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

4166 Saddlewood Drive 4 BR, 3 BA, 2250 SQ FT $349,000 mls 621317 Warren Maupin, 434-962-8939


FEATURE

SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

42

Comfy Greene County: You Could Fall in Love with It BY KEN WILSON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

G

reene County, Virginia is the place Linda G. Willer (with RE/MAX Action Real Estate) has called home since 1997 when she moved there from Michigan. “We fell in love with Greene when we got here,” she says now. “It’s beautiful, rural, and friendly.” David Eddins of Bill May Realty will tell you the same. Born and bred in Greene, he has chosen to remain there his entire 67 years. “Ain’t that a lot of love?” as Levon Helm of The Band sings in a song that has been rumored—in this article—to have been written about Greene. Sure it was. And no wonder. This is a county with 60-acre Greene Mountain Lake, the trout-stocked South River, and a picturesque little slice of Shenandoah National Park. This is a county with the Ruckersville Antique District and the Greene Hills Golf and Swim Club. “How do I love Greene?” Shakespeare famously asked. We’re not through counting the ways. We haven’t mentioned the kind of dedication and community spirit you get with neighbors whose roots go back generations, and who expect their kids to stick around and carry on. We haven’t mentioned fast and easy access to Washington D.C. and northern Virginia, and mere minutes drives to Charlottesville and the Charlottesville-

Albemarle Airport. Add it up. That really is a lot to love. It was for all these reasons and more, no doubt, that Money Magazine named Greene as one of the “100 best places to live.” Established in 1838, and named for Revolutionary War general Nathanael Greene, Greene’s county seat is Stanardsville, where the historic district includes

18th and 19th century homes, the courthouse, and a couple of churches. Nearby is the Octonia Stone, a boundary marker at the westernmost boundary of the 24,000-acre Octonia Grant, made in 1722 in the name of King George the First by Lieutenant Governor Spottswood. The granite-type stone, part of a natural outcropping in a hayfield, is

engraved with two, nearly perfect circles comprising a figure eight with a cross touching the top. Beadles House sits on land originally part of the Octonia Grant. The two-story, chestnut and poplar log dwelling was built from 1788 to 1789 by Revolutionary War militia captain John Beadles and is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Eats and Antiques Only seven miles down the road is Ruckersville, a lovely little farming community—population 1,321 in 2020—located at the intersection of the county’s two major thoroughfares, U.S. Route 29, and U.S. Route 33. A good many antiques, fine arts, crafts and collectibles—75,000 square feet worth—cluster around this crossing, with such enchanting names as The Copper Poppy and The Wooly Lam. A day-long Ruckersville Antiques Tour makes stops for lunch and dinner. Hungry collectors (solo or en masse) can get breakfast before hunting or lunch between all-day hunts at Jack’s Shop Kitchen, a farm-to-table restaurant sandwiched (ouch) between antique dealers on the floors above and below, in a building that was originally a Wrangler brand jeans manufacturing plant. Chef and farmer Eric Bein and his family moved to Virginia in 2015. Six


43 SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

$1,500,000 • 6046 SOUTH RIVER RD • 6 BR • 5.5 BA • 75 ACRES * 6762 SQ. FT.

CELL: 434-531-7867 OFC: 434-978-7355 EMAIL: davidpeddins@gmail.com 390 Hillsdale Dr • Charlottesville Va

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

DAVID EDDINS

FEATURE

Peaceful Country Retreat, 75-acre estate offering long South River frontage at the end of a peaceful lane. Fully equipped working farm is ready forany livestock operation, well-fenced with 5 pasture water troughs. Pristine, turnkey, family-friendly home is perfect for gracious entertaining. True-stucco siding andmetal roof hides interior surprise of 2 complete living quarters thoughtfully connected for privacy and easy access: renovated 1940s 3BR/2BA farmhouse w/dining, EIK,fam room; and 2004 3BR/3. 5BA addition w/MBRs on both levels, light-filled great room w/vaulted ceiling, EIK w/pantry, finished basement. Quality materials. PerfectB&B, event venue. Outside surrounded by flower gardens and blooming shrubs along stamped concrete walkways, pergola covered patio and fenced pet play ground.


enjoy live acoustic (traditional Irish, old time and bluegrass) music. Participating artists will take questions and comments as they demonstrate how they make sculpture, pottery, and jewelry, and explain their signature technique. Kids will enjoy hands-on clay projects. Souvenir festival t-shirts will be for sale. Octoberfest in Stanardsville is scheduled for October 30, and the 15th annual Parade of Lights will be held there on Saturday, December 4. Pre-Parade activities and entertainment will take place throughout the day. The Virginia Artisans Studio Tour comes to Greene on the second weekend of each November. Thirty-seven artisans will take part this year, showing and selling ceramics, fiber, glass, metal, wood, and jewelry.

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Where the Living is Easy

piglets were Bein’s first purchase for what is now a grass based rotational grazing farm, where he appreciates caring for the livestock, tending to the garden, and enjoying Virginia’s four distinct seasons. The sophisticated menu he’s devised changes seasonally to highlight the bounty of local farmers like himself, but the sweet potato biscuits with chorizo gravy, a couple of poached eggs, and scallions ought to hold you till lunch, and the Quinoa “POWER” Salad should suffice after that—unless you’ve been good and had yogurt for breakfast and feel you’ve earned the duck hot dog with caramelized onion, pate, truffle mustard, and (token green vegetable) arugula.

Recreation and Good Family Fun

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Walking it off might be in order after indulging at Jack’s, and there are so many places to do that in Shenandoah National Park alone. A moderate to moderately strenuous 3.3-mile hike to Doyles River Falls begins with a steep descent, crosses a stream, and actually takes you to two waterfalls. The 63’ lower fall is a sheer drop and is all the more exciting for being close to the trail. The upper, 28’ waterfall, has an especially beautiful setting of trees and rocks. A mostly moderate four-mile hike with three stone-hopping stream crossings leads to President Hoover’s 164-acre Rapidan Camp, secluded among hemlocks at a point where two streams merge to form the Rapidan River. Hoover bought Doyles River Falls

9, participants can choose from four ride options: 40 and 62-mile road rides, and 37 and 57-mile gravel rides. The entry price of $35 includes lunch at the ride’s end. For the less intrepid, the Greene County Community Park has walking trails, plus a playground, soccer fields, an 18-hole disc golf course, a pavilion, and restroom facilities.

“Greene used to be a bedroom community for Charlottesville and Albemarle,” Eddins remembers. “Half the people I grew up with went to work for the University [of Virginia]. In those days, “we had a lot of entry level housing.” In addition, “lots of husband-wife teams would move into Greene and raise their families here,” contributing to the community as teachers and coaches or other professional capacities. “We’re into the second and third generations of those families in Greene County and the school system.”

Virginia Clay Festival

the land for his summer weekend retreat in 1929 and found it much needed after the October 1929 stock market crash that began the Great Depression. Three of the camp’s original buildings still survive, as do trails, man-made bridges, fountains, trout pools, and other landscape features. Mountain bikers in top shape and looking for a challenge will be tempted by the 14.4-mile ride along paved and gravel roads that goes to two scenic Appalachian sites: Stone Mountain Vineyards and the Blue Ridge School, home to two beautiful stone-built National Historic sites, Gibson Chapel and Martha Bagby Battle House. One good way to learn the lay of the land is the annual Tour de Greene through the county’s beautiful back roads. For the 15th tour, on October

Greene County Talent, Greene County Culture At Greene Farmers Market at Greene Commons in downtown Stanardsville, the county’s farmers sell fruit, vegetables, herbs, honey, eggs, dairy, meat and poultry, plants, crafts, coffee and more. The market is open on Saturdays, 8:00 a.m.to 12:00 noon, April through October. The Greene Farm & Livestock Show each August is a bevy of shows and demonstrations: rabbit shows, car and tractor shows, farm, blacksmith, food, and equestrian demonstrations, plus pony rides and music. Antiques, poultry, and other farm products are for sale. The sixth annual Virginia Clay Festival, September 18 and 19 in Stanardsville, will bring artists, entrepreneurs, and teachers together with students, pottery collectors, and musicians to explore clay in its many forms. Artisan food vendors will be on hand, and festivalgoers will

“But over the years, businesses started moving into the county,” Eddins recalls. Today, in a state consistently ranked in the top 10 of the Best State for Business by Forbes magazine, Greene is a growing center for retail and light industrial development, and for service industries including defense and security. Good jobs attract folks from all over. “I’ve helped settle many people in Greene from points north and south of here,” Eddins says, “people that had come into the area to retire. They wanted to be close to good medical services. They liked the four seasons we have in this part of Virginia, and proximity to Washington, DC; we’re only 100 miles away, so you can get to the big airports.” Naturally, the market has evolved. “We have some very high-end housing now,” Eddins notes. “A lot of folks have discovered that there are some very nice places to build housing. Nice custom homes are


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2085 Brownstone Lane STILL MEADOW

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are happening now,” Eddins says. Plans are now going forward for a 1,180-unit, 402-acre housing development along Preddy Creek Road near Ruckersville, to consist of 580 townhouses and 600 single-family homes. Among the amenities under discussion are a pedestrian bridge crossing the Cuddins Run trail and connecting to Preddy Creek Park— plus a public parking area. Homebuyers old enough for reduced price coffee at McDonalds are welcome in Four Seasons at Charlottesville, a small rural, active-adult community, actually in Greene. The neighborhood currently has 120-some single-family homes. Plans have been drawn for as many as 650 more. Social life at Four Seasons centers on the Clubhouse, with its ballroom, exercise room, indoor pool, kitchens, billiards room, library, and meeting rooms. Big things may be afoot, but Greene is still a small community, Eddins says, where “you know a lot of people. It’s like you have the best of both worlds: you can live out in the country, but you can be in the big city pretty quick.” “If you like quiet rural life with beautiful views that we are working very hard to maintain, Greene County is definitely a good option,” says Michelle Wallace, a homeowner since 2003, now evangelizing for her adopted home at the Greene County Visitor Center. It’s just like we’ve been saying: Greene is such an easy place to fall in love with.

SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

being built all over the county.” Some of the most popular lots still are at Greene Mountain Lake (one such parcel is currently on offer for $79,900). But three and four-bedroom homes in the $200 and $300 thousands are available in the neighborhood as well. Originally designed as a camp site and resort, the area now features private homes and a private lake. Residents can swim, fish, and boat (non-gasoline engines only). Others play volleyball at the lake. The Boy Scouts love it too. Another typical offering is a $399,000, 3,104 square foot home in the Greenecroft neighborhood of Ruckersville with four bedrooms, three and a half baths, a large breakfast room, a laundry room and office area on the first floor. Also in Ruckersville, Godalming offers estate homes with pastoral and mountain views on two-plus-acre sites. Prices are in high $500 thousands; lots go for $99,950. Some high-end homeowners may spend only part of the year in Greene, which is a boon to their wallets, thanks to tourists. “Tourism is still big in the county,” Eddins notes, and more and more part-time residents have found they can find short-term renters through Airbnb. Lower prices may be found in Greene Acres, a popular Stanardsville community on a small, lovely mountainside lake. More choices for buyers with modest incomes are coming soon. “I’ve watched Greene grow from just a crossroads, almost, to the big things that

5 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths • Hardwood Floors, Custom Bookcases, & Plantation Shutters • Stunning Moldings & Chair Railings • Professionally Landscaped for Privacy & Minimal Maintenance • Meticulously Maintained, includes a Generator • Convenient to Charlottesville’s Amenities & UVA MLS 621113 Offered at $675,000

John Seidler 434 996-3268 Associate Broker, GRI

2271 Seminole Trail • Charlottesville, VA

Back on Market! 308MainSt.FindHomesGreene.com

308 Main St. Stanardsville, VA 22973

308 Main 308 St.Main St. 308 Main St. Stanardsville, Stanardsville, VA 22973 Stanardsville, VA 22973 VA 22973 308 Main St. 308 Main 308 St. Main St. Stanardsville, VA 22973 Stanardsville, Stanardsville, VA 22973 VA 22973

Beautiful & Historic!

3 Bed

3 Bath

Mountain Views! Beautiful & Historic! Beautiful Beautiful & Historic! & Historic!

Built in 1770!

Cynthia Hash

Mountain Views!

434-337-3216

$265,000

Built in 1770! BuiltBuilt in 1770! in 1770!

Principal Broker

Integrity & Service is Our Motto! If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this is not considered a solicitation. Fair Housing Compliant. Licensed to sell real estate in Commonwealth of VA. Each office independently owned & operated.

145 Ednam Dr # 311 Boar’s Head Professional Center Charlottesville, VA 22903 434-218-0221

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Mountain Views!

2036 Sqft


SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

46

HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF AUGUST 29, 2021 THERE WERE 125 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS

(434) 939-7098

24 Hour Return

Hilltop Produce & Seafood Rentals include air conditioning, rub rails to 78 Zion Park Ct, Troy, VA 22974 protect your belongings and equipped with a hitch to tow a trailer rental. Cargo van at Zion Crossroads starting at $19.95, reserve your van today. Off I64, Exit #136, Rt.15 South Open 7days

U-Box Portable Storage One container fits about one and a half rooms. Perfect for a studio or dorm room.

n 42 were in Albemarle with an average price of $417,885 n 14 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $377,391 n 7 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $265,385 n 5 were in Greene with an average price of $314,380 n 9 were in Louisa with an average price of $274,333 n 6 were in Madison with an average price of $374,158 n 11 were in Nelson with an average price of $269,045 n 22 were in Orange with an average price of $341,818 n 4 were in Staunton with an average price of $186,975 n 5 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $238,310

Internal Dimensions: 95” X 56” X 83.5”

Call us at

434.817.9330

to Advertise Your Home!

CAAR

Real Estate Weekly

HOMES SOLD

THE 105 DORSET COURT CAMELOT

129 BIRDWOOD COURT BIRDWOOD COURT

650 JEFFERSON DRIVE LAKE MONTICELLO

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

1893 MT AIRY ROAD LOUISA

664 FINKS HOLLOW LN SYRIA

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

3038 GLADE ROAD SCHUYLER

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47 SEPTEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3035

CUSTOM HOME OVERLOOKING the JAMES RIVER

267 Horsley Ln | Buckingham, VA Tranquility abounds at this private riverfront retreat. If you are looking for gorgeous sunsets, mountain views, starry skies with no light pollution, look no further than this one-owner, custom built home perched on a bluff above the James River. Designed to incorporate the amazing natural setting and to bring the outside in, the centerpiece of the home is a great room with a wall of windows facing the river, with rolling farmland and mountains beyond. Private bedrooms, each with its own bath, a fully separate terrace level apartment with kitchen, 2x6 construction for enhanced energy efficiency, and more. There is a delightful screened porch off the great room that also captures the inspiring views, as well as a private deck off the master suite, with spa overlooking the pool, all enjoy views of the James River valley. The area around the house is private and nicely landscaped including a sunny garden spot, and the 7-acre lot extends all the way to the river, where you can launch kayaks and canoes, or just fish and swim. An adjacent 5.4 acre pasture is also available for purchase, that would support horses or other farming/gardening endeavors.

MLS 619587 | $525,000

View more photos and virtual tour: MONTAGUEMILLER.COM/619587

Carter Montague,

REALTOR® | 434.962.3419 | cartermontague.com

Annie Gould Gallery

500 Westfield Rd, Charlottesville, VA

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

WOODTHRUSH LANE

Custom home in Northern Albemarle County. Set on 2 private wooded acres on a culde-sac. Enjoy the outdoors from the front porch, deck or patio. Large, built in place garden shed for storage or workshop. Open Main floor plan with great flow. Study/Library with built in bookshelves. Second floor with master and 3 additional bedrooms including Junior suite with skylights. Finished terrace level with separate access and radiant heated tile floors. Beautiful, landscaped terraced gardens. 2 miles from Preddy Creek Trail Park with 571 acre recreational area for hiking, mountain biking and riding. Owner/Agent $795,000

JONNA STREET

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Large, fabulous home set at the end of a quiet street and backs up to the Crozet Trail. 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths and 2 half baths. Kitchen/ Family room/Sunroom combination opens onto a large deck. Walk-in pantry. 1st floor home office. The master suite features a sitting area and 2 large closets. Terrace level family room/movie room/exercise room opens to a patio. A tremendous amount of storage room allows for expansion. Conveniently located in the heart of Crozet. $529,000


KEEPING VIRGINIA

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