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SUMMER GUIDE INSIDE!

VOL. 30 NO. 22 n JUNE 2 8, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T WWW.CAAR.COM HE CHARLOTTESVILL E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

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Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene,

Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange,

Augusta

Well-defined home offices are replacing makeshift arrangements

Home & Garden Trends:

Update Your

“VIBE”

Inside and Out BY MARILYN PRIBUS

INSIDE

5 races! 18 candidates! Full voter guide!

JUNE 2 – 8, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

PAGE 10

Hoofin’ it to the polls Pin the tail on the Democrats: Local and state primary primer


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DAIRY DAYS A WEEK OF CELEBRATORY & OPENING EVENTS AT THE DAIRY MARKET

JU NE 1 4 - 1 9, 20 21 MONDAY, JUN E 14

TU ESDAY , JU NE 1 5

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WORKOUT WEDNESDAY

DINE OUT DONATIONS TO CITY OF PROMISE

KIDS CARNIVAL INCLUDING PETTING ZOO, ACTIVITIES & MOO THRU COWS

SPENGA WORKOUT CLASSES ON THE PATIO & IN THE BRICK CELLAR

T HURSD AY , JUNE 17

FRID AY, JU NE 18

S ATUR DAY, J UNE 19

RIBBON CUTTING

BRICK CELLAR GALLERY OPENING

COMMUNITY CELEBRATION

RIBBON CUTTING WITH SPECIAL GUEST RITA MCCLENNY

ART OPENING WITH ARTISTS FRANK PHILLIPS & CHRISTEN YATES

MUSIC, ART & STORYTELLING AT OLD TRINITY CHURCH & DAIRY MARKET

DETAILS & REGISTRATION AT DAIRYMARKETCVILLE.COM/EVENT/DAIRY-DAYS

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No. 22

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

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FEATURE 10

EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com

Meet the candidates who’ll be on June 8 Democratic primary ballot.

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com

8 City Council looks for parking garage alternatives. 9 Push for Mountain View fifth graders to stay put.

27 Screens: The Columnist is a bloody look at free speech limits. 29 Small Bites: Pastries, steaks, and an Airstream getaway. 30 Sudoku 31 Crossword

CULTURE

32 Free Will Astrology

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ART DIRECTOR Max March (x16)

33 What seasonal events are you excited to see return?

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NEWS 7

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26 The Works: Peter Coy’s plays are collected in new book. CORRECTION In “Dancing our way: Charlottesville’s dance clubs keep moving during COVID” (May 26-June 1) we misspelled the last name of Edwin Roa in the story’s photo caption.

Real Estate Weekly Page 37

COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Alana Bittner, Deirdre Crimmins, Amelia Delphos, Carol Diggs, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Erika Howsare, Desiré Moses, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

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THIS WEEK

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It’s a well-known horror story at this point: The QAnon-spewing, Trump-loving set of cousins shows up for Thanksgiving, and after an hour of judiciously steering the conversation towards turkey and football, someone mentions Colin Kaepernick, or the Civil War, or the police, and all hell breaks loose. That’s not how my family works. Even if you include a kooky uncle here or there, the right flank of my family is comprised of Biden supporters. We all agree on most of the big stuff. But that sure doesn’t mean we agree on everything. You want to see the knives come out? Put a dozen of my family members around a table and ask who they voted for in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, and why. Before long, someone’ll be shouting at the top of their lungs about Medicare, and the gravy boat will have been flung across the room. In the coming years, American liberals and progressives will continue to have heated debates over the Democratic party’s goals and methods. Next week, Dems in Charlottesville and Virginia will head to the polls to vote in a handful of important party primaries. For a full rundown of the candidates, take a look at our election preview on page 10. And if you’re a conservative, I suppose you can just sit back and watch—for now.—Ben Hitchcock

6.2.21

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June has multiple birthstones to choose from including Pearl, Alexandrite and the lesser known, Moonstone. Moonstone is a sought-after feldspar that has continued to grow in popularity. It comes in a variety of colors including gray, white, peach, blue and green. Some moonstones appear white with a flash of blue or rainbow within the stone; these are the White Rainbow Moonstones, an extremely popular variety! Featured here is the more recent find from Madagascar- Black Moonstone.

BEING # 1 IN THE REGION MEANS THAT YOU RECEIVE THE VERY BEST!

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“We can see in real time that the more people get vaccinated, the fewer people get COVID. It is very simple math.”

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—Governor Ralph Northam, speaking alongside Joe Biden at a press conference in an Alexandria climbing gym last week. (Props, Gov, for resisting making a “climbing out of the pandemic” pun. We wouldn’t have had the same restraint.)

NEWS

No parking? PAGE 8

Stick with it

IN BRIEF Northam lifts restrictions

UVA men’s lacrosse wins second straight title

All of Virginia’s social distancing and indoor capacity restrictions were lifted by Governor Ralph Northam on Friday. “With #COVID19 vaccines now widely available, it is time to begin our new normal,” Northam tweeted. The state government continues to urge people to wear masks, especially in schools where most young students have not yet been vaccinated.

Let’s talk about land use, baby

Central Virginia has been spared of this year’s cicada swarm, and it’s a good thing, too— northern Virginia has cicada fever. One Leesburg chef started serving cicada tacos in his restaurant, reports the Loudoun TimesMirror...until the health department put the kibosh on it. Apparently, you’re only allowed to serve cicadas if they’re sourced from an inspected and certified farm.

T

TV station apologizes

The core of the current Cavaliers’ team has been through a lot together, winning the 2019 national championship, sitting through a canceled COVID season, and then going on another run in 2021. “At the end of the day, it just came down to our chemistry,” said star midfielder Jared Conners. “Being able to look at each other and knowing that we could rely on each other.”

EZE AMOS

Memorial Day cemetery cleanup A group of Charlottesville volunteers spent Memorial Day in Oakwood Cemetery, reflecting on the service of our veterans through acts of service of their own—the volunteers spent the morning cleaning the gravestones of the roughly 400 veterans buried there. Do Good Cville and The Chris Long Foundation helped coordinate the effort, and Hathaway Paper, Packaging and Janitorial donated the cleaning supplies.

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A Richmond TV station formally apologized to Delegate Sam Rasoul for asking an Islamophobic question during a lieutenant governor forum last week. A moderator asked Rasoul if he could “represent all Virginians regardless of faith or beliefs” after having received significant campaign contributions from Muslim groups. The question was widely condemned by VA politicos. After the debate, Rasoul tweeted a photo of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, which hangs in the House of Delegates.

UVA entered the tournament as the country’s fourth-ranked team, and dispatched Georgetown and top-ranked UNC in its run to the final. It’s the seventh title for the Cavaliers since the first NCAA lacrosse tournament was held in 1971. Only Johns Hopkins and Syracuse have more wins than the Hoos. Coach Lars Tiffany was hired in 2016, and has already picked up two national championships.

@cville_weekly

he UVA men’s lacrosse team won its second consecutive national championship on Monday. The Hoos topped Maryland 17-16 in the final match, with a last-second save from goalie Alex Rode making the difference. Redshirt freshman Connor Shellenberger and junior Matt Moore each had four goals and two assists in the title game.

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

They’re doing what with the cicadas?

MATT RILEY

Charlottesville has extended the public comment period on the Future Land Use Map to June 13. The map, a non-binding, advisory document, lays out which neighborhoods in the city could be considered for increased housing density when the city rewrites the zoning code in the coming months. To learn more about it, read our cover story from last week, and to submit a comment, email engage@cvilleplanstogether.com.


NEWS

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There’s no place like

home. Inside. Outside. Home. APRIL/MAY 2021

A view of South River prompts a Stanardsville family to add a pool

English influences

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

At Waterperry Farm, a former writer’s retreat becomes a garden oasis BUZZWORTHY Mudhouse’s latest space has a modern twist OUTSIDE THE BOX An eye-catching passive house in Batesville IN THE ROUND Eleven30 condos utilize the courtyard concept

Central Virginia’s No. 1 home magazine has never looked finer. ABODE has given readers an inside look at the region’s most interesting homes for over a decade. Look for ABODE at over 100 locations across Charlottesville, Albemarle, Orange, Lovingston, Crozet, Staunton, Waynesboro and Fishersville at major grocery stores, gyms, restaurants and retail locations and online at c-ville.com.

Inside. Outside. Home.

City Council pauses proposed parking garage By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

A

fter years of heated debate and public backlash, Charlottesville City Council seems to have decided to shelve a proposed multi-million dollar downtown parking garage, opting to explore cheaper—and potentially greener—options. During a May 25 work session, the councilors discussed how the city should fulfill a 2018 promise to provide 90 parking spots to Albemarle County courthouse employees. Because of a perceived parking shortage, the county had previously considered moving its courts out of the city. The proposed 300-space garage would be located at the corner of Ninth and Market streets, the current home of Lucky 7 and Guadalajara Mexican restaurant. Ninety spots on the ground level would be reserved for county court employees and visitors during regular court hours, while the rest of the garage would be available to the public. It was expected to cost a whopping $11.3 million. But there are several other ways the city could keep up its end of the deal, explained Director of Economic Development Chris Engel during the meeting. The city could instead construct a smaller parking garage with 140 to 200 spaces at the same proposed location, costing an estimated $6 to $8 million. Or to drastically reduce costs, it could build an approximately $1 million surface lot with 30 to 40 spaces. Though the proposed surface lot would still require the city to set aside parking spaces for the county at an additional location, councilors agreed that it was the safest option, in light of the abundant parking already available downtown. “I haven’t seen a lot of data to back up [the idea] that there is a severe parking shortage,” said Councilor Michael Payne. “Even before COVID, there were always spaces available in the Water Street garage when the Market Street garage was full.” “[Market Street Garage] only reaches peak capacity occasionally during midday on weekdays, so we’re spending $15 million to address a problem that exists for a couple of hours, which could always be resolved by someone going to the Water Street garage,” he added. “That’s in addition to all of these other private spaces.” Payne also urged the rest of council to find a way to build the surface lot without demolishing Guadalajara and Lucky 7, which would only add eight parking spaces. Councilor Lloyd Snook emphasized how the pandemic has reduced downtown parking demand. Many employees continue to work from home, and may do so permanently.

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Charlottesville City Council is considering a 30- to 40-space surface lot downtown instead of an $11.3 million parking garage with 300 spaces.

“Particularly at a time where we have a lot of crunch in our capital budget, it seems to be a good time to not commit to spending that money,” said Snook. Mayor Nikuyah Walker added that rideshare, along with diverting people from the criminal justice system when possible, should be a priority for the city and county. While Councilor Heather Hill agreed that the pandemic could have a lasting impact on downtown parking, she pointed out that the 46-year-old Market Street garage would need to be replaced soon. Regardless of parking demand, City Manager Chip Boyles said the county still needs 90 spaces for the new joint general district courthouse, but would likely be open to alternatives to the proposed garage, such as designated surface parking. During public comment, local residents echoed council’s concerns over the garage, especially given that the city has promised to drastically cut down on carbon emissions over the next decade. “[Data] strongly suggests that with better parking management, there’s all the parking we need downtown,” said Jamelle Bouie. “Do we want our children or grandchildren to have a downtown Charlottesville that is dominated by looming parking structures, in a time that we know we’re transitioning away from car centric development?” City Planning Commissioner Rory Stolzenberg pointed out that over 500 private parking spaces will be added downtown with projects like the Center of

Developing Entrepreneurs. Instead of building more parking, the city should incentivize more employees to park in the Water Street garage, he said. However, several downtown business owners wanted to move forward with the 300-space garage, pointing to the parking spaces that have been or will be lost to projects like the Belmont Bridge replacement. “This [garage] is going to replace the parking that’s being lost,” said Joan Fenton, owner of Quilts Unlimited and chair of the city parking advisory panel. “If you talk to any one of the [entertainment] venues, they’ll all say that they see the need for additional parking.” Paramount Theater Executive Director Chris Eure said the venue recently sold out a comedy show within a few hours, proving “downtown will be coming back.” “Frankly, hearing the conversation that the parking garage isn’t going to be built, it’s almost like a kick in the stomach after working so hard to remain open during this crisis and do what we can for the downtown area,” added Eure. Construction on a parking lot must begin no later than May 1, 2022, and be completed by November 30, 2023. If council decides to scrap the project, the city must provide 100 spaces at Market Street garage to the county during court hours, or give it exclusive control over the surface parking lot currently at Seventh and Market streets. Council will vote on an official resolution during its June 7 meeting.

“Do we want our children or grandchildren to have a downtown Charlottesville that is dominated by looming parking structures?” JAMELLE BOUIE, LOCAL RESIDENT


NEWS

COMMITTED TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM

New view? Albemarle parents upset about fifth graders being transferred to COMMITTED TO middle school By Brielle Entzminger

“Fifth graders, wherever they live in Albemarle County, should be given access to the same resources and experiences,” says parent Karl Shuve. “How is this equitable?” Parents also accused the school district of intentionally shutting them out of the decision-making process. During a parent meeting with Mountain View’s principal on May 18, a discussion about the fifth graders was the last thing on the agenda. And during last Wednesday’s community meeting about plans for the upcoming school year, parents claim the administration did little to ease their concerns. “The county put together a propaganda piece,” says one teacher. “There is an absolute pattern of dismissive behavior for the parents here.” Administrators have emphasized that the move would just be for one year, and a final decision will not be made until at least the end of June, when the district will have a better picture of what enrollment numbers look like for the fall. “The school now is approaching 100 students over capacity [and] enrollment for the fall will be over projections once again,” explains Giaramita. The district has set aside $6.2 million to add six classrooms to Mountain View, and plans to look into long-term solutions, like redistricting or building another school. Parents say overcrowding has been an issue for a long time at the school as developments have grown across the county, and the district has been slow to act. They urge the school to consider adding trailers to the elementary school or moving the preschool to a different facility. Parents would like superintendent Dr. Matt Haas and the rest of the administration to take responsibility for their mishandling of the situation too. “They should at least say this is our mistake, and we’re asking fifth graders to pay for [it],” adds Shuve.

reporter@c-ville.com

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM

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arlier this month, Jennifer McArtor went online to enroll her kids in Mountain View Elementary’s afterschool program for the upcoming school year, only to find out she could not register her rising fifth grader. Through another parent, she was surprised to learn that her daughter might be transferred to Walton Middle School, 10 minutes down the road. Due to overcrowding at the elementary school, around 115 fifth graders could be sent to Walton in the fall. They’d be taught by Mountain View teachers, but would ride buses with middle schoolers and follow a middle school schedule, which is two hours longer than an elementary school day. Over the past two weeks, many parents in Albemarle County have called out the school district for its lack of com­ munication and transparency, and registered disapproval about the potential transfer to Walton. “I don’t think 10-year-olds are [mature] enough to be in a school with middle school kids,” says McArtor, who is the president of the school’s Parent Teacher Organization. “Their conversations are going to be vastly different from what a 10-year-old may be talking about.” At Walton, parents fear their students will not have access to a playground or after-school care. They also may not have elementary-level guidance counselors, librarians, or teachers for electives like music and PE. The students will also miss out on being “leaders of their school,” says parent Justin Alicea, pointing to the various leadership positions available to fifth graders. Additionally, some students would have to move again after just a year because they are zoned for Burley Middle School for sixth grade. According to district spokesman Phil Giaramita, Walton principal Josh Walton is “in discussions” about adding recreational equipment and after-school programming for the young students. Families have invoked equity concerns as well. Mountain View is the secondlargest and among the most diverse schools in the county, serving many low-income Latino students from the Southwood Mobile Home Park.

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H OT SE ATS The three Dems vying for two council spots answer questions about the housing crisis, criminal justice, and priorities upon assuming office BY GEREMIA DI MARO CHARLOTTESVILLE’S GOVERNMENT FACES a wide

array of big issues: A housing crisis. Ongoing criminal justice system inequities. A bureaucracy that’s had difficulty getting on the same page. This summer, three candidates are competing in the Democratic primary in hopes of securing the party’s nominations to run for two contested seats on the Charlottesville City Council in the November general election. Juandiego Wade is a member of the Charlottesville School Board and chair of the Board of Directors for United Way of Greater Charlottesville; Carl Brown is a lifelong city native with a background in youth mentorship, consulting, and nonprofit work, and Brian Pinkston is a UVA project manager with a Ph.D. in philosophy. In the fall, the two winners will run against independents Mayor Nikuyah Walker and entrepreneur Yasmine Washington.

Ju a nd iego Wa de How would you address Charlottesville’s housing crisis and the rising cost of living in the city? My position on affordable housing is that you have to take a multi-pronged approach. You have to continue to support nonprofits, like Habitat for Humanity and AHIP [Albemarle Home Improvement Program], which are out there building homes or fixing up homes to allow people to stay. One of the things that I would do is to get the localities to collaborate more. Charlottesville is doing most of the pulling, and we can’t do it alone. Additionally, the Uni-

versity of Virginia needs to have a role in this, and I think that they have, with the announcement that they’re going to be building some affordable housing I think over the next 10 years or so.

What role do you think the city’s Police Civilian Review Board should play in ensuring accountability for law enforcement? I think that we need to have the Civilian Review Board. I think that they need to have the power to review complaints, and that they need to have a diverse and wide range of representatives on that committee. I just don’t want the CRB to be telling the officer or the police chief, “We need to do A, B, and C.” If elected to council, what would be your top priority upon assuming office? Criminal justice reform, affordable housing, continuous support, public education, economic development, and climate justice are what I would focus on if I’m elected. We, as councilpersons, would have to be rowing in the same direction, and I think it is vital to get to know them.

What is the role of UVA in ensuring affordable living conditions in the city? Transportation is vital. I did transportation planning for [Albemarle] County for 20 years. Housing is so expensive here that many of the lower-wage workers have to commute in. But all that causes congestion on the roads. You need to provide more alternative transportation, whether it’s free bikes, preferential parking if you carpool, incentives if someone walks to work. And you also need to work with VDOT, the county, and the city.

What are your thoughts on the function of City Council in recent years? I understand that people are very passionate about whatever issues that they’re talking about, and I don’t want to quell that in any form or fashion. All that I ask of everyone is that we respect everyone’s opinion. I think that that will go a long way. I think that we all love and care for the city and want what’s best for it, and with that foundation, we can move forward.

What changes would you make to the city’s criminal justice system and system of law enforcement? I am for accountability, not for micromanagement. I think that there is definitely a need to bridge the gap between the police department and particularly for communities of color that I believe was widened after the Unite the Right rally. The police can do more things like community policing, and getting to know the residents outside of emergencies. And I think that the community realizes this is a very difficult job that police officers have. One of the things that I would do if I’m elected is just to have some real, honest conversations and say, “It’s okay to disagree.”

How would you address Charlottesville’s housing crisis and the rising cost of living in the city? I’ve been working in the [city’s] public housing, and I think, more than anything, we need to be able to provide them with resources and support within their community. Hubs where youth are able to excel in the classroom, or have that opportunity within their community. Zoning is going to play a major part, but I think that’s another conversation.

Ca rl Brown

What is the role of UVA in ensuring affordable living conditions in the city? I see UVA as a major player in this. I think creating incentives for our public schools and things of that nature to connect


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What changes would you make to the city’s criminal justice system and system of law enforcement? [I hope to have] programming in the jails that’s going to be more catered to less incarceration, which is what we’ve been working on by providing more technical and vocational training and by being more supportive. De-escalation training has been something that’s been major. So when I see the budget breakdown, that’s what I’m really looking for. And if you don’t have that, that’s something that should be incorporated. I am totally for looking at [the police budget] and reallocating money to those areas in need. What role do you think the city’s Police Civilian Review Board should play in ensuring accountability for law enforcement misconduct? I think it needs to be a little more representative and a little more balanced. I think they’re going in the right direction. There are a lot of people in this community who have been working in that entity for a long time. I think it’s a work in progress, but I think it’s going in the right direction. What would be your top priority upon assuming office? The most important aspects from my standpoint are leadership, trust, respect, creativity, and excellence. I’m going to bring that to the table. This is not a situation where my aspirations are to be a politician. The direction the city needs to go in is one where we have stability, accountability, and transparency. Individuals from the community suggested that I do this for the good of the community. So I’m not doing it for me—this is much bigger than me.

B ria n Pinks to n

died, really needs to be taken on board. Particularly in a Southern city like this with a history of racism in general. I support the Police Civilian Review Board—I think it should have teeth—understanding that the General Assembly has [expanded its possible powers] due to laws that were recently changed. I want to err on the side of transparency. I want to err on the side of us being really clear about what’s in the police budget. I think that knowing what the police are tasked to do is very much within our rights as citizens. I would love to see some of the services that police are paid for put over to community services for Region Ten. And it’s important that we listen to actual persons of color that live in Tonsler precinct or live in some of these housing projects. I have a young Black man on my campaign helping me, and I asked him what he thinks, and he said, “Well, we need the police. We want police in certain places, and at certain times.” I think it’s important that we listen to the people actually affected, and not just do progressive wish fulfillment. What would be your top priority upon assuming office? The main thing I want to do is inject—people don’t like the word civility—but a level of collegiality into the council. I’m grateful to the current mayor for shining a strong light on our city’s past, and ways in which we thought we were so great but really weren’t. I think that she’s done an admirable job in that. I do think she’s struggled, for whatever reason, to create the positive change that she’s wanted, and I’m hopeful that the next council can do that. What are your thoughts on the function of City Council in recent years? The City Council needs to function well. This turmoil we have on council spills over to social media, which has been really disruptive. It affects actual operations, because people may or may not want to work for a city that has that level of instability at the top. I want to [build] strong working relationships on council, so that people who work for the city know that we’re a credible body, that we’re going to make decisions to stick with them, that we care for them and care for their careers.

CITY COUNCIL FUNDRAISING

CARL BROWN

Juandiego Wade

ON T H E MON E Y In May, The New York Times asked each candidate for mayor of New York City to tell it, from memory, the median sales price for a home in Brooklyn. The guesses ranged widely, and some candidates wound up with egg on their face. Investment banker Ray McGuire said “It’s got to be somewhere in the $80,000 to $90,000 range.” Maya Wiley, a former aide to Mayor Bill de Blasio, said $1.8 million. The correct answer is $900,000. With rising real estate prices an important topic in town, we put the same question to our council candidates. No googling allowed: What is the median home price in Charlottesville? Juandiego Wade: “I would say it’s about $300,000 or $400,000. A couple of weeks ago there was only one house on the market under $250,000.” Carl Brown: “Probably around $360,000.” Brian Pinkston: “The median home price in Charlottesville is about $375,000. I know that because my home is worth about that much.” The correct answer: In the first quarter of 2021, the median home sale price in the City of Charlottesville was $397,000, according to the Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors. Congrats, all—that’s a much better showing than the New Yorkers.

Amount raised through March 31, 2021

Brown reported zero campaign contributions.

BRIAN PINKSTON

JUANDIEGO WADE

$10,000

$20,000

$30,000

$40,000

$50,000

facebook.com/cville.weekly

What changes would you make to the city’s criminal justice system and system of law enforcement? I’m for reforming the police, or transforming, or whatever verb we want to use...I think that the high level feedback that we got last summer, with the protests after Mr. George Floyd

Brian Pinkston

@cville_weekly

If elected to council, how would you address Charlottesville’s housing crisis and the rising cost of living in the city? It’s affordability up and down the scale. The super rich don’t have to worry about finding a place to live, but the rest of us do—even folks who make a good salary like myself. We’ve considered moving, for various reasons, but it’s a fraught proposition, particularly if you want to stay in the city. Then when you include the factor of equity, and the glaring inequities of the past like redlining, how the zoning that we have reflects specifically racist covenants, and then the lack of investment over decades—now we’re faced with a really significant crisis. Then you add to the fact that you’ve got a world-class institution here that’s going to continue to be this magnetic pole for folks from all over the world, and the university can pay people enough to live here, so it’s a very complicated problem. Now we’re getting into the [Comprehensive Plan] landuse map and zoning changes, and that’s where the rubber meets the road. We should start seeing these things like the land-use map and Comprehensive Plan as living documents as much as possible.

Carl Brown

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

What are your thoughts on the function of City Council in recent years? My personality as a whole, I can be very straightforward. But my objective is to make City Council meetings boring when you come in, because we’re doing the work. You have to have that commitment. Coming from coaching sports teams, I understand what that brings. I’m not coming in to dominate, I’m coming in to be a part of it.

FILE PHOTOS

with UVA—those kinds of things haven’t been done before. I currently have UVA students from Charlottesville that I support and work with, and so I know that there are different things that can be done in this community.


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Public defender challenges Democrat incumbent for top prosecutor job BY BEN HITCHCOCK

Joe Platania and Ray Szwabowski are running for Charlottesville commonwealth’s attorney.

Where are the Republicans? Republicans held a drive-through convention to select their statewide candidates last month. Businessman Glenn Youngkin leads the ticket, and former House of Delegates members Winsome Sears and Jason Miyares secured the nods for lieutenant governor and attorney general, respectively. No Republicans have announced campaigns for any Charlottesville City or Albemarle County positions.

What’s up in the county? Albemarle’s six Board of Supervisors seats are all held by Democrats, and three of their terms end this fall. No primaries will be held for those seats, however. Diantha McKeel and Ned Gallaway are running unopposed for reelection. Liz Palmer is stepping down, and lawyer and physics professor Jim Andrews is running unopposed to take her place. Dem Primary voters in the county will receive a ballot with nothing but the three statewide races.

How do I vote? Early in-person voting is already underway. City residents should head to the City Hall Annex downtown, and county residents can go to the County Office Building on Fifth Street. Or wait until election day, when all voting precincts will be open as usual.

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“Generally speaking, a prosecutor should always be thinking, ‘I am wielding a very powerful sword. I should be careful swinging it.’” RAY SZWABOWSKI

W H O, W H AT, WHERE?

@cville_weekly

won elections for reform-minded prosecutors in places like Philadelphia and San Francisco. Platania says he’s proud of his progressive bona fides: The jail population decreased 12 percent in his first year in office, and has continued to decrease as many people have been transferred to house arrest as a COVID precaution. “We don’t use cash bail, we don’t charge mandatory minimum [sentences] without supervisor approval, and we reduce all nonviolent first-time felonies to misdemeanors,” Platania says. He’s also a founding member of Virginia Progressive Prosecutors for Justice, a statewide group made of up 12 of Virginia’s 120 elected prosecutors that has advocated for reforms like marijuana decriminalization. “Our philosophy is diversion and treatment over incarceration and prosecution, and jail as a last resort not a first option,” the prosecutor says. “But at the same time, we’ve tried to keep an eye on prosecuting violent offenses. It’s a complicated tension that we navigate through.” Szwabowski, however, says the way Platania’s office operates allows individual prosecutors too much discretion, and that cases have slipped through his fingers as a result. “I’ve heard Joe brag that culture eats strategy for breakfast,” Szwabowski says. “The idea is if you create the right office culture, then people who work for you will make the right decisions in the cases.” “Having lived through that on the defense side, I don’t think it works,” the public defender says. Szwabowski wants to bring a more policy-focused approach, and says that his office would have rules in place that would guarantee fewer people are put on probation,

probation terms are shorter, and drug possession felony charges would be downgraded to misdemeanors. At the candidate forum, Szwabowski put his frustration in straightforward terms. “Charlottesville has no systemic approach to criminal justice reform,” he said. Giving out fewer felonies is a key tenet of progressive prosecution, as a felony charge can derail a person’s life, making it harder to rent housing, take out loans, and find work. And drug felonies in particular are handed out to Black people at heartbreakingly disproportionate rates. Around the country, “African Americans and whites use drugs at similar rates, but the imprisonment rate of African Americans for drug charges is almost six times that of whites,” reports the NAACP. “Generally speaking, a prosecutor should always be thinking, ‘I am wielding a very powerful sword. I should be careful swinging it,’” Szwabowski says. The commonwealth’s attorney race might not jump off the page when you eye your ballot. Four years ago, Platania swept past local criminal justice lawyer and advocate Jeffrey Fogel, winning 62 percent of the vote in an election where less than 8,000 votes were cast. In 2011, Dave Chapman won re-election for his sixth term in a primary with just 2,500 votes. The results have real and immediate differences in the city, however. In a small race, in a small city, in a small legal community, personal relationships loom large. Platania and Szwabowski have been on opposite sides of plenty of cases in the last few years. “There’s a collegiality in the court system that I think is appropriate—we all are professional and try to treat each other with professional respect,” Szwabowski says. “And that’s why I think it was maybe a little surprising to Joe [that I ran]…There’s a way to advocate for change that is polite and professional but forceful.” Was Platania surprised? “I’m not politically sophisticated enough to predict or know,” he says. “I knew that I thought we had done a good job and I feel like our team should be rehired.” “For me, these issues are so important that you have to push past the awkwardness,” says Szwabowski. “He says his piece, I say mine, and the voters can decide.”

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

HERE’S ONE NUMBER to cut right to the heart of Tuesday’s Democratic primary for Charlottesville commonwealth’s attorney: 19. That’s how many times Joe Platania’s office says it has prosecuted felony simple possession of hard drugs as a standalone charge in the last two years. Platania says that the statistic proves his office isn’t punishing people who break the law too harshly. “In the 19 cases that I had pulled, almost all resulted in treatment and dismissal,” he says. “Very few ended up serving active jail sentences.” He also notes that those cases represent a tiny fraction of the thousands that come across his desk. Ray Szwabowski, a public defender running to unseat Platania, sees things differently. “I’m not okay with 10 extra, unnecessary, racist felonies every year, and I won’t be if I’m elected prosecutor,” Szwabowski said at a candidate forum hosted by The People’s Coalition last week. He’s challenging Platania from the left, and the key plank in his platform is a promise not to hand out any felonies for drug possession. The race between Szwabowski and Platania, who himself worked as a public defender early in his career, offers a peek at the path forward for reforming the groaning, serpentine American criminal justice system. The United States incarcerates more of its own citizens than any other country in the world, by a comfortable margin. Both Szwabowski and Platania agree that one driver of that over-incarceration is overly aggressive prosecutors, who seek harsh punitive sentences for crimes that could be handled more gently—in particular, progressive prosecutors argue that drug infractions should result in treatment rather than jail time. That argument has recently

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Terry McAuliffe

Jennifer Carroll Foy

Jennifer McClellan

Lee Carter

I N A STAT E

Lee Ca rter Previous experience: House of Delegates member from Manassas, 2018-present

On June 8, Democrats will decide who will represent their party in three key November statewide elections. Get to know the candidates below. BY EVA SUROVELL AND BEN HITCHCOCK

GOV E R NO R Terr y M c Aul i f fe Previous experience: Governor of Virginia, 2014-2018 Key endorsement: Hillary Clinton

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

MCAULIFFE HAS THROWN his hat in the ring for a second

non-consecutive term as governor, and the former executive’s name recognition and piles of money have made him the front-runner in the race. McAuliffe spent most of his first term vetoing bills from the Republican-controlled legislature. This time around, the Macker is running on a more proactive platform, with his stated goals including increasing teacher pay, investing in broadband internet, raising the minimum wage to $15 by 2024, and declining any campaign contributions from Dominion Energy. In his first term, McAuliffe allowed three executions to take place, but now says he supports the state legislature’s recent decision to repeal the death penalty. Virginia has shifted blue over the last few years, but the state hasn’t really embraced progressive candidates, with moderates Ralph Northam and Joe Biden easily dispatching challengers from the left in past statewide races. McAuliffe and his backers hope to keep that trend going.

Jennifer Carrol l Foy Previous experience: House of Delegates member from Prince William County, 2018-2020 Key endorsement: Gloria Steinem CARROLL FOY IS

a VMI graduate and former public defender who has positioned herself as a progressive challenger to candidates like McAuliffe and Jennifer McClellan, who have more legislative experience. She flipped a Republican House district in 2017 while pregnant, and then sponsored Virginia’s ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment during her second term, before resigning in 2020 to devote herself to the governor’s race.

Justin Fairfax

Carroll Foy wants to end qualified immunity for police officers, lower health insurance premiums, and create a permanent voteby-mail system. She’s a gifted public speaker who won the endorsement (and the $500,000 campaign contribution) of Charlottesville-based Democratic megadonor Michael Bills and his anti-corruption advocacy group Clean Virginia.

Key endorsement: Marianne Williamson CARTER HAS CARVED

out a niche for himself as the Virginia legislature’s garrulous socialist. The former Marine, electronics repairman, and Lyft driver was a Virginia co-chair of Bernie Sanders’ 2020 campaign. He made headlines last year when he spearheaded a bill to cap insulin prices at $50 per month, and he’s introduced bills to ban corporate campaign contributions and repeal the right to work law, which limits union activity. He plans to lobby for universal health care, and says in the meantime he’ll create a state office to directly reimburse some out-of-pocket medical expenses. Carter faces an uphill battle in a state with a fondness for moderate Democrats.

Jus tin Fa irfa x Previous experience: Lieutenant Governor, 2018-present

Je n n ife r McCle llan Previous experience: Virginia House and Senate member from Richmond, 2006-present Key endorsement: Former U.S. Representative Leslie Byrne MCCLELLAN HAS MORE legislative experience than any

candidate in the race, having worked in the state government for a decade and a half. She passed the Clean Economy Act, the Reproductive Health Protection Act, the Voting Rights Act of Virginia, and more. As governor, she would work to eliminate open carry gun laws, end felony disenfranchisement, and strengthen Virginia’s hate crime penalties. Self-proclaimed outsiders are in vogue in politics these days—meanwhile, Tim Kaine officiated McClellan’s wedding. By day, she’s a corporate lawyer with Verizon. Also of note around here: McClellan picked up her law degree at UVA, making her the only Hoo in the governor’s race.

GOVERNOR FUNDRAISING

Key endorsement: Fairfax has not picked up any endorsements from American elected officials, but he has been endorsed by conservative British politician Nicholas Fairfax, the 14th Lord Fairfax of Cameron. The two became acquainted after genealogical research revealed that Nicholas’ ancestor enslaved and subsequently freed Justin’s great-great-great grandfather. FAIRFAX WAS SEEN

as a rising star in Virginia politics after running a close attorney general primary against Mark Herring in 2013 and winning the LG race in 2017. In 2019, however, two women accused him of sexual assault. Fairfax denies the accusations and has not bowed to pressure to resign, though he did part ways with the law firm he worked for, and he left his post on the board of Duke University’s public policy school. His gubernatorial campaign has failed to gain any real steam.

Amount raised through March 31, 2021

JENNIFER CARROLL FOY LEE CARTER JUSTIN FAIRFAX TERRY MCAULIFFE JENNIFER MCCLELLAN

$2,000,000

$4,000,000

$6,000,000

$8,000,000


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state’s economy and create green jobs. In addition, Perryman proposes ending all cooperation between the commonwealth and ICE, eliminating state taxes for feminine hygiene products and diapers, and banning private prisons.

LIEUT E NA NT G OV E RN O R Sam Ra s oul

Sam Rasoul

Xavier Wa rren

Hala Ayala

Previous experience: Sports agent

Previous experience: House of Delegates member from Roanoke, 2014-present

Key endorsement: Arlington Circuit Court Clerk Paul Ferguson

Key endorsement: Senator Elizabeth Warren

WARREN HAS spent much of his life working as a businessman,

FOCUSED ON THE three core values of “truth, love and

so it comes as no surprise that his top priority is jobs. (His website declares that his “focus is JOBS!”) He promises to create a livable wage for everyone in the state, as well as invest in early childhood education and strengthen relationships with career and technical centers, community colleges, and HBCUs.

grit,” Rasoul’s People’s Platform emphasizes his desire to give constituents the power to advocate for their needs, as well as clear up misconceptions and confusion about the legislative process. Specifically, Rasoul aims to identify and mentor potential Democratic candidates early and streamline the party’s resources. Rasoul also supports early childhood education, uplifting working families, and expanding voting rights, among other priorities. If he wins the primary, he would become the first Muslim candidate to run statewide in the South.

Mark Levine

Andria McClellan

AT TORNEY G ENERAL Ma rk Herring

Previous experience: House of Delegates member from Prince William, 2018-present

Previous experience: Attorney General, 2014-present

Key endorsement: Governor Ralph Northam AS THE HOUSE

Democratic Whip, Ayala has helped spearhead some of the Democratic Party’s recent successes, such as abolishing the death penalty and expanding Medicaid access. If elected, Ayala would build bridges between the commonwealth’s government and its constituents. More specifically, her campaign centers on stopping gun violence, affordable health care, criminal justice reform, the environment, and the economy. Ayala— who already made history as the first Afro-Latina elected to the Virginia state legislature—would become the first woman of color elected to a statewide office.

Mark Levin e Key endorsement: Falls Church News-Press PROPELLED INTO POLICYMAKING

LT. GOVERNOR FUNDRAISING

Xavier Warren

IF REELECTED FOR

characterized herself as a “pragmatic progressive”—served as the vice chair of the Democratic Party of Virginia from 2014 to 2015. She has also advocated to improve Norfolk’s flood mitigation, public transit, and civic engagement, among other initiatives. Her campaign prioritizes addressing the climate crisis, expanding access to high-speed internet, and supporting small business owners.

a third term, Herring promises to continue to promote economic development, defend women’s rights, and reduce gun violence. The incumbent attorney general has garnered support from many Democratic leaders across the commonwealth, including Speaker of the House Eileen Filler-Corn and Democratic Majority Leader Charniele Herring, and the Post editorial board writes that “No Virginia attorney general in recent memory has made such a positive difference in the lives of ordinary people.” Herring’s tenure in Richmond has not been without controversy, though—less than a week after Virginia’s Democratic Party was thrown into turmoil following the discovery of a racist photograph on Ralph Northam’s medical school yearbook page, Herring admitted that he had worn blackface as an undergraduate student.

Se an Pe rr y man

Jay Jones

Previous experience: President of the Fairfax County NAACP

Previous experience: House of Delegates member from Norfolk, 2018-present

An d r ia McCle llan Previous experience: Norfolk City Council member Key endorsement: Representative Elaine Luria MCCLELLAN—WHO HAS

Key endorsement: Democrats Work for America

Key endorsement: Governor Ralph Northam

THE YOUNGEST-EVER

president of the Fairfax County NAACP, Perryman has led the charge to address issues of racism within public schools—including renaming Fairfax’s Robert E. Lee High School. His campaign reimagines policing and criminal justice through defelonizing all drugs and ending mandatory minimum sentences. He also backs a Virginia Green New Deal, which would decarbonize the

JONES HAS CHARACTERIZED

himself as a “voice to progressive energy.” Throughout his time in the House of Delegates, he has worked to deconcentrate poverty in urban areas and create an earned income tax credit for Virginians. As attorney general, Jones would end inequalities within the commonwealth’s judicial system and work to improve policing and end police brutality. Additionally, he has called on Herring to support a repeal of qualified immunity, and worked to abolish the death penalty earlier this year. Notably, Jones has gained the support of Governor Northam, a fellow resident of Norfolk. If elected, Jones would become Virginia’s first Black attorney general.

Amount raised through March 31, 2021

HALA AYALA

ANDRIA MCCLELLAN SEAN PERRYMAN SAM RASOUL FILE PHOTOS

XAVIER WARREN

$300,000

$600,000

$900,000

$1,200,000

Mark Herring

Jay Jones

facebook.com/cville.weekly

MARK LEVINE

@cville_weekly

by the murder of his sister in 1996, Levine has been passionate about fighting on behalf of survivors of domestic and sexual violence throughout his political career. An early advocate for marriage equality in the United States (he co-founded Marriage Equality California and wrote the bill that became D.C.’s marriage law for same-sex couples), Levine would also ensure reproductive rights and promote transparency within the state government. He would be the first full-time lieutenant governor in Virginia’s history, as well as the first Jewish and openly gay candidate elected statewide.

Sean Perryman

Key endorsement: The Washington Post Editorial Board

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

Previous experience: House of Delegates member from Alexandria, 2018-present

FILE PHOTOS

H al a Ayal a


June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

2021 C-VILLE SUMMER GUIDE 16

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2021 C-VILLE SUMMER GUIDE

The Shenandoah Valley’s

Most Exciting Day Trip

Massanutten WaterPark is the perfect hangout for summer fun in the sun!

Have a splashin’ good time all summer long at Massanutten WaterPark! Summer Season Passes starting at $131! Rates go up after June 14. Summer Season Passes are valid May 29 – Sep 6, 2021.

Open year-round! Just a short, 15-minute drive from Harrisonburg

@cville_weekly

WWW.MASSANUTTENWATERPARK . C OM

June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

Experience the thrill of riding one of our brand-new water slides. Massanutten also offers ziplines, two golf courses, mountain biking, and much more!

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2021 C-VILLE SUMMER GUIDE

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American Regional American Regional CuisineCuisine Featuring Featuring steaks, scallops, salmon, pork chops, steaks, scallops, salmon, pork chops, chicken, pasta & other fresh food fresh food chicken, pasta & seasonal other seasonal We offer several gluten-free, vegan vegetable We and offer severalchoices gluten-free, vegan

and vegetable choices

Onsite catering, wedding & banquet facilities available

Check Our Website (www.callieopiesorchard.com) for Current Hours of Operation, Check Our Website (www.callieopiesorchard.com) Scheduled Entertainment & Happenings

Onsite catering, wedding for Current Hours of Operation, Rt. 522, 4533Entertainment Zachary Taylor Hwy., Mineral Va & banquet facilities availableMinutes from the lake onScheduled & Happenings 540-894-4343 • www.calliesopieorchard.com

June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

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Minutes from the lake on Rt. 522, 4533 Zachary Taylor Hwy., Mineral Va 540-894-4343 • www.calliesopieorchard.com


Here are some HOT staff picks for a COOL summer in Central Virginia: Kings Dominion

Tubing or kayaking on the James or Rivanna

Richmond Museums (Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and Virginia Science Museum)

ACAC outdoor pool Greenleaf and Belmont Spray Parks

Camping in the Blue Ridge

Chris Greene Lake

Crabtree Falls

Decipher Brewing

Main Beach at Lake Monticello Looking Glass at IX Your friend's neighborhood or apartment-complex pool!

Saint Mary's Wilderness Humpback Rock Colonial Beach Wintergreen and the 151 trail

SUMMER DAY TRIP IDEAS:

Polo on Sundays at King Family Vineyards

Callie Opies at Lake Anna

Shenandoah Valley Music Festival and Wintergreen Music Festival

Massanutten Water Park

300 South Main Street, Gordonsville, VA 22942

We’re not just wine, but we have an extensive food menu! Restaurant open Thursday – Monday 11 am to 8 pm

June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

Sugar Hollow's Blue Hole

Barboursville Ruins (with a bottle of wine from Barboursville Vineyards) then BBQ Exchange or Champion Ice House for dinner on the way home

Tim's at Lake Anna

2021 C-VILLE SUMMER GUIDE

PLACES TO COOL OFF:

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Follow us:

300 South Main Street Gordonsville VA 22942 www.wellhungvineyard.com

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We’re open Thursday - Monday 11:00AM - 8:00PM We have indoor and outdoor dining available!

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www.WellHungVineyard.com


June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

2021 C-VILLE SUMMER GUIDE

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Gordonsville is calling you….home ❖ Apartments

❖ Houses

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540-832-7171

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WWW.FRONTPORCHCVILLE.ORG


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2021 C-VILLE SUMMER GUIDE

Tim’s at Lake Anna is known for home-cooked seafood, a unique atmosphere, scenic outdoor dining, and waterfront views in a family friendly environment. Tim’s serves all your favorite seafood including shrimp, oysters, scallops, fish, snowcrab, and hardshells (when available). Land Lubbers need not worry, as Tim’s Burgers are delicious as well as their Steak, Chicken, and Pork BBQ!!

Maymont Park, Belle Isle or Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond Swimming at Mint Springs then ice cream at Crozet Creamery

FAVORITE SUMMER TREATS: Fresh fruit and veggies from farmers' markets Heladas from Aqui es Mexico Peaches from Chiles Orchard Coffee ice cream from Chaps Tacos from Brazo's House Margarita Picante Level 2 from The Bebedero Splendora's gelato (now located at The Shops at Stonefield) La Flor Michoacana popsicles Kohr Brothers for soft serve Pinot grigio with an ice cube Drinks on the Quirk rooftop

Ramazzotti Rosato Spritz- Ramazzotti Rosato liqueur, bitters, and sparkling wine

ROMANTIC SUMMER DATE NIGHTS: Outdoor patio dining on the Downtown Mall and Belmont Thursday evening sunset at Carter Mountain Zoiree outdoor partner dancing at IX on Thursday nights

June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

Sangria on the patio at Mas

Mojito flight at Zocalo

Tastings at any of the amazing local vineyards and breweries Decades Arcade Charlottesville Opera events at IX and the Charlottesville Pavilion Any Corner restaurant or pick up food to go and picnic in the gardens at UVA Outdoor concerts at IX, Devils Backbone, Pro Re Nata and the Festy at Chisholm Vineyards...and of course shows at the Charlottesville Pavilion when it reopens this month!

Checkout Tim’s Facebook page for daily specials and updates

@cville_weekly

200 Boardwalk Way • Mineral, VA 23117 (540) 894-5011 timslakeanna.com

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DOWN WHAT’S DELISH AT LOCAL WINERIES?

53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD 2019 Chardonnay

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With a balanced mouthfeel, our Chardonnay is perfect for the warm summer days. Hints of meyer lemon, fresh yellow apples, and light touches of tarragon can be tasted on the palate. We recommend enjoying this wine with a chicken piccata or a grilled pork chop outside! We are open 7 days a week, 11am to 5pm offering our 100% Virginia wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights. Enjoy your visit at our intimate, meadow-like setting in rural Louisa County. we offer wellspaced indoor and outside seating and customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs and blankets. Children and pets are welcome, but pets must always remain outside of buildings and on a leash. Quality wine, friendly staff at a great escape! Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com on our operating procedures. Saturday, June 5th - Happy Tails Wine Trails 5k with the Louisa Humane Society with music by Justin McCurry and Strawberry Street Food truck! Buy your 5k tickets in advance via the Humane Society’s Facebook.

WINERY

DUCARD VINEYARD

Guide Map

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MADISON

33 HARRISONBURG

Open 7 days a week, 11 am – 5 pm 15

STANARDSVILLE

KILAURWEN WINERY 81

Friday, June 11th - Sunset in the Vineyard Concert Series featuring Saint Square with the Sandtopia Food Truck (5:00 – 8:30 pm)

13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

ORANGE

DUCARD VINEYARDS

HORTON VINEYARDS

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June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

29 GORDONSVILLE

2018 Norton

33 CROZET AFTON

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KESWICK VINEYARDS EASTWOOD FARM & WINERY

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS

LOUISA

CHARLOTTESVILLE ZION CROSSROADS

53RD WINERY & VINEYARD 64

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Norton is Virginia’s native variety, with a long and colorful history. With vibrant aromas of wildflowers, spices and bacon, this local favorite exhibits a strong personality that is unique and on the edge. 100% estate grown, this wine is primarily Norton with a slight blend of several other reds for balance and added complexity.

Especially limited production under100 cases per year. Our uncrowded rural Madison County area has mountains, streams and plenty of beautiful views along scenic back roads. The tasting room is near hiking and biking trails along the Shenandoah National Forest and is a perfect respite after your day out! Enjoy some peace and quiet relaxation in this challenging environment. Sit on our lawns and sip or pick up a bottle or three of our award-winning wines to take home. Reservations available and recommended (especially for Saturdays). No reservation fee or minimum purchase. Walk-ups accommodated on a space-available basis. To order wine for local delivery or UPS shipping, visit our website! Open daily – Mon-Thurs. 12-5 PM , Fri. 12-9 and Sat/Sun. 12-6 PM NEW: Offering tasting flights daily. Table service, well-spaced, led by DuCard staff host, crystal glassware, red, white or mixed flights. An elegant way to get to know our wines. Fridays- Friday Night out at DuCard (5:30 - 8:30 pm) come out and kick off the weekend with dinner and live music at DuCard.


Tasting Room Hours

May 22nd - Laughter and Wine outdoor comedy night, with Hidden Acres Food Truck from 6:30-8pm, show begins at 8 pm

Saturdays- Music on the Patio (2:30 – 5:30 pm) enjoy a wide variety of artists each Saturday 40 Gibson Hollow Ln • Etlan, VA 22719 (540) 923-4206 www.ducardvineyards.com

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY Blue Pom Wine Slushee Spring and summer seasonal drinks are available now at the winery. Among them, the Blue Pom Wine Slushee is a favorite! It is the perfect blend of Virginia Merlot, organic pomegranates, and blueberries. Deliciously fruity and refreshing, the Blue Pom Slushee is currently being offered in the Red Reserve Tasting Flight as well as by the glass in the Outdoor Tasting Room, The Barn, and on the Veranda.

June Hours: Wednesdays (4-8PM), Thursdays (4-8PM), Fridays (4-8PM), Saturdays (12-8PM), Sundays (12-5PM) 2531 Scottsville Rd. (5 mi from Downtown Charlottesville) Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

In 1989, Dennis Horton and longtime business partner Joan Bieda acquired 55 acres for the beginning of Horton Vineyards. The task of establishing the vineyard was given to Dennis’ wife Sharon, a nurse by trade, whose meticulous nature was reflected in the manicuring of the East Coast’s most unique vineyard. 1993 saw the first crush at the new Horton Cellars and in 1994 additional acreage came into production with plantings of Bordeaux, Portuguese, South African, Georgian and Spanish varietals with Pinotage and Rkatsitelli. Horton Vineyards continues to explore with new varietals and techniques to achieve the best that Virginia viticulture can produce. While we have a wide variety of wines to pick from, we offer different themed flights each month to highlight our wine throughout the year! Wine flights, glasses and bottles are available. To ensure time for a tasting please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to closing. Open Daily from 10 am – 5 pm Wednesdays- Wine Wednesday (77:30 pm) Join Horton Vineyards live on Facebook every Wednesday at 7pm to learn about a different wine each week! 6399 Spotswood Trail, Gordonsville, Virginia (540) 832-7440 www.hortonwine.com

KESWICK VINEYARDS 2020 LVA Pinot Gris With a pale color, and a light body, this pinot gris is perfect for the summer weather! Notes of ripe peaches and white flowers are balanced perfectly with light citrus flavors of lemon and orange pith. Pair this with a fresh seasonal summer salad, BBQ chicken, or on its own while watching the fireflies in the evening.

1575 Keswick Winery Drive Keswick, VA 22947 keswickvineyards.com • (434) 244-3341

KILAURWEN WINERY Kilaurwen Red A non-vintaged wine comprised of Touriga Nacionale, Cabernet Franc, and Cabernet Sauvignon, it has a deep garnet color and the aromas of cigar and leather. Rich black cherries and spice warm the palate with a touch of tobacco and licorice. This is a great wine to enjoy with Sunday roasts, venison steaks, or while sitting around a late-night fire pit! Weekend hours will be from noon - 6 pm. First come, first serve at outdoor umbrella tables in our Boxwood Garden. Enjoy the mountain views while sipping your favorite Kilaurwen wines which are available by the bottle, the glass and DIY tasting flights. You’re welcome to bring your own picnic or snacks to enjoy with our wine! Choose a table in our Boxwood Garden or bring your own chairs and blankets to spread out on a grassy spot. Bring your own picnic and enjoy it with a bottle of your favorite Kilaurwen wine while you enjoy the mountain views and soft breezes. Well-mannered pets on leashes are

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS 2019 Sparkling Rosé Our Champagne-style Sparkling Rosé features both floral and fruity characteristics on the nose and palate with a finish that is creamy with crisp acid. Those red varietals lucky enough to find their way into our Rosé are treated like our white wines: fermented and aged in stainless steel before receiving carbonization. Truly one of our most popular wines, this Rosé is worthy of celebrating any special occasion, including (sometimes) the fact that it is only Tuesday. Pippin Hill is a culinary vineyard in the heart of Virginia’s wine country. There are two types of standard reservations available: Indoor Table or Covered Veranda for table service. There is also the Vintner’s Table which must be booked at least 48-hours in advance. Upon arrival, please check-in at the host stand and you will be directed to your designated table. All seating areas have the same wine and food menu offerings. Our staff diligently IDs guests for our ABC licensure compliance and for guest safety. If your party has a guest who is under age 21, we require you to have a reservation at a table. Walk-ins are welcome based on availability. Reservations via Resy are recommended for indoor and Veranda seating. Hours: Tuesday – Thursday: 11 am – 5 pm; Friday – Sunday: 11am to 4:30pm Sundays - Live music on the hill! Each Sunday from 1-4 PM, Pippin Hill welcomes local musicians to perform on our Veranda. Check our website for varying artists. June 18th- Featured Farmer FridayCaramont Farms and their local cheese! June 23rd- Cut Flower Workshop (10 am-12 noon) Join us as Certified Horticulturalist Diane and Garden Assistant Celina show you how they plant and grow our flowers in a guided Kitchen Garden and grounds tour. 5022 Plank Rd., North Garden, VA 22959 (434).202.8063 www.pippinhillfarm.com

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June 12th - Vinyasa, Vines & Views: Join us for a one hour Vinyasa Yoga Class followed by a glass of wine. Tickets are $25 and will be available online soon (11:00 – 12:00 noon)

This wine was created in the traditional Methode Champenoise. It is 100% Touriga National. Erotes has beautiful summer berry aromas with raspberry and red currants. Crisp and dry for a sparkling rosé! It pairs wonderfully with fresh burrata, roasted red peppers, oysters, and s’mores.

1543 Evergreen Church Rd Stanardsville, VA 22973 (434) 985-2535 www.kilaurwenwinery.com

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New hours! Visit us for Wine Wednesdays beginning June 2, 2021. Indoor, outdoor, & covered outdoor tables are available on a first come basis. Couches in The Barn may be reserved on our website. Live music and food trucks every week. We also offer yoga, events for families and kids, winery hikes, and more. See the upcoming calendar of events for all the details.

Erotes Sparkling Rosé

June 1st – Tasting Tuesday 2017 Heritage Estate Reserve (7 – 8pm)

Special orders are available any day of the week to those preferring to arrange gate-side pick up at a date and time of your choosing. Place order by calling 434-985-2535.

June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

Eastwood is a women-owned business created by a group of wine lovers and agriculture enthusiasts producing award-winning Virginia wines. We embrace the power of storytelling and the vision that there is no ceiling you can’t break, and look forward to toasting you in one of our tasting rooms soon!

HORTON VINEYARDS

May 25th - Tasting Tuesday 2017 Cabernet Sauvignon Estate Reserve Block 7 (7 - 8pm)

An exhibit of decorative art pieces carved, painted and embellished with beads and trim is currently featured in the tasting room through the end of June. These works created by three members of the Art Guild of Greene make unique gifts and memories of time spent in the Blue Ridge area.

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2021 C-VILLE SUMMER GUIDE

We look forward to continuing to serve all of our wonderful guests this spring during our daily hours of 10am-5pm. Reservations can be made for Saturdays at no charge, however reservations are not necessary. We offer first come, first served seating at our outdoor courtyard tables or open seating for those who wish to bring their own blankets and chairs to spread out in our designated lawn area. Wine is available by the flight, glass and bottle, and only our outdoor areas can be accessed at this time. A selection of pre-packaged meats, cheeses, crackers, and spreads are available for purchase.

welcome. COVID regulations still in effect require 6 foot spacing, mask wearing except when seated at tables or on your own blankets or chairs, and group size limited to 6 people.


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2021 C-VILLE SUMMER GUIDE 24

Photos by Mary Carter


CULTURE

25

THURSDAY 6/3

RAMBLIN’ MAN Having called Colorado and Georgia home, Todd Murray of Sincerely Iris is now based in Richmond, Virginia. He’s spent a fair share of time on the road, and his songs, which he describes as “road trip music,” evoke dusty drives down Southern backroads, hand tapping on the wheel, heading toward a distant horizon. Murray’s traveling companion is a handmade guitar, built around his old Colorado license plate. See if you can spot it as you kick back and join him on his musical ride. Free, 5:30pm. The Greencroft Club, 575 Rodes Dr., 296-5597.

HOLD YOUR HORSES Get off your high horse and grab a pool noodle pony at the Hobby Horse Derby. All ages are welcome to saddle up and try their luck in racing or dressage. Winners will have a chance to compete in a stick horse race at the Foxfield racetrack in the fall. Spectators can partake in mint juleps, or head over to the craft stand to create a show-stopping, Kentucky Derby-worthy hat. $5, 10am. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE, 207-2355.

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O U R G U I D E T O YO U R W E E K

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

SATURDAY 6/5

THURSDAY 6/3

Of all the trees in all of our yards, the mighty oak is extra special, according to Doug Tallamy, professor of agriculture and natural resources at the University of Delaware. In his latest book, The Nature of Oaks, Tallamy explains how oak trees support more life forms than any other tree genus in North America. (For instance, an oak produces millions of acorns during its lifespan, and interacts with over 800 caterpillar species.) He will answer questions about his research during a virtual talk hosted by the Piedmont Master Gardeners and Virginia Cooperative Extension. $15, 7pm. Register at piedmontmastergardeners.org.

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SOLID OAKS


26

CULTURE THE WORKS

WE’RE BOK CHOY

IN-PERSON Staging the psyche Comedy weaves with tragedy in Peter Coy’s collected plays

Charlottesville

SHOP IN-PERSON

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

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for fresh produce, herbs, plants, grass-fed meats, crafts, and baked goods from local vendors.

CITY MARKET

Saturdays at 100 E. Water Street May – October 8:00 am – 12:00 pm November – December 8:00 am – 1:00 pm

FARMERS IN THE PARK Wednesdays at 300 Meade Avenue May – September 3:00 pm – 7:00 pm October 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Managed and operated by City of Charlottesville Parks & Recreation

IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE PLAYWRIGHT

MARKETS

Nelson County playwright Peter Coy (below) published A House In The Country and Other Plays through Hamner Press in April.

By Mary Jane Gore arts@c-ville.com

I

n the plays collected in his new book, Peter Coy includes a range of extreme human behavior, from fears most dreaded to murders most foul, from rank dishonor to impish perversity. He also infuses characters with love, hope, forbearance, and sometimes forgiveness. A House in the Country and Other Plays gives its audience a shot of redemption in the five works, and also gives theater-goers and readers an opportunity to thoughtfully contemplate pressing issues. Meeting Coy, a genteel, seemingly easygoing man, it’s difficult to square his soft-spoken words with the imagined scenes he asks an audience to take on, the visceral images that materialize from dialogue, from characters’ memories and admissions. Coy has lived in Nelson County for 30 years, but says he can’t claim it, “because your grandparents have to be born there.” An all-American lacrosse player at UVA, he also trained as a director in the drama department before departing for a life of camaraderie in the theaters of New York and Washington, D.C. He’s a founding member of several theater troupes; the Earl Hamner Theater in Afton is his most recent company. He’s also

won a Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding New Play. “From the adaptation of a classic story, to the highly imaginative use of an oversized doll, to the use of music, and inventive uses of time, Coy explores the possibilities inherent and unique to the stage,” says the Charter Theatre’s Richard Washer of Coy’s five plays, which seem to spring from a quest to understand what makes a typical person despair enough to pursue the terrible. A House in the Country is a slightly toned-down version of a gruesome crime in Nelson County. It was inspired by a brief item in a newspaper, and it explores how Coy answered his own questions about such a traumatic event.


CULTURE SCREENS

AMAZON

The Columnist takes many satirical twists and turns

The Columnist stars Katja Herbers in a wild psycho-thriller about a writer pushed too far by online trolls.

By Deirdre Crimmins arts@c-ville.com

S

The film clearly understands that killing is wrong and that threatening people for their opinions is wrong too. But it gets thematically messy when it comes to the notion of silencing voices, and who has the right to hold the symbolic microphone. Femke is a likable, but her actions make us question her belief in her causes. And

The Columnist R, 86 minutes when her daughter takes up that same freespeech torch at school, Femke is forced to face her hypocrisy more directly than she anticipated. None of this tonal tightrope or freespeech scrutiny would be possible without Herbers’ determined performance. Her ability to translate the satirical victim turned monster into a person who looks like she’d be fun at a cocktail party is the work of a graceful actress. The Columnist is not subtle. It takes the fantasy of exposing the cowards who hide behind keyboards, and turns the vengeance up to 11. Bloody fun turns swiftly into an examination of the power of voice and the line between good guys and bad guys.

Femke keeps going, and her attacks against these vile armchair commenters escalate until she no longer resembles herself.

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atire feeds on the contemporary. As new social issues and interests arise, satire helps us inspect them and make sense of their value in our changing world. Satire can disarm or emasculate through humor, but it can also be twisted into horror and used to heighten danger. The Columnist does both. First, the film makes us laugh at the preposterous nature of online trolls and the emotional weight we give them—and then, with a violent escalation of events, it shows us that words have meaning and they can be weaponized. The Columnist takes an amplified look at trolls through the experiences of Femke Boot (Katja Herbers), a newspaper columnist and author in the Netherlands who is suffering from writer’s block. Her next book is due, and her publisher is waiting impatiently. But social media and construction near her home, where she writes, distract her to the point of inactivity. When threats on Twitter seem a little too real, she discovers that the police won’t help. She could take her protection into her own hands, but first she needs to write. That is precisely when a slew of trolls target her in the comments section of her online

column. Femke knows she shouldn’t read them, but she can’t peel herself away from the hateful messages spouting from the safety of internet anonymity. With an easy search, Femke locates one particularly active troll. His address, personal photos, and life events are there, and she follows these breadcrumbs to confront him. The man looks like the basement-dweller she suspects him to be, and in a moment of unbridled anger, she kills him—violently and joyously. She does not stop there. Femke keeps going, and her attacks against these vile armchair commenters escalate until she no longer resembles herself. As the bodies pile up, the tone of the film subtly shifts from a playful revenge fantasy to that of a woman who is no longer in control of her actions or words. Femke is aware enough to know that what she’s doing is wrong, but she has no intention of stopping. To add to the intensity, The Columnist carries the torch of free speech. Femke believes that people can, and should, have differing opinions and live in peace with one another. We see her writing about this and talking on television in support of the coexistence of multiple viewpoints. She argues for the rights of her commenters, and the irony of her hunting her dissidents is never lost in The Columnist.

@cville_culture

For more information about A House in the Country and Other Plays, as well as the upcoming audiobook, go to petercoyplay wright.com.

Punishing words

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

The believability in his plays comes from deep study, particularly around brain trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder. He researches areas of psychology and neuropsychology to learn about what might trigger certain types of behavior. “Making characters means creating behavior that is transparent to an inner psychology,” he says. “As a director, you try to find activities that keep things interesting on stage, and can morph, change, or reveal something about the character.” Imagination allows you to see things that are not present or obvious, Coy says. He was delighted, for instance, when he handed an actor a beer bottle, and in no time, the actor began peeling the label off. As tragic as his plays may seem, Coy carefully deploys comedy to keep things balanced. “Physical comedy is the most difficult acting of all,” he says. “In drama, actors can change timing in their scenes and still have the same impact. In physical comedy, scenes are much tighter.” If a character falls while managing to throw a hat onto a hook, it has to happen the same way each time. In some of his plays, he introduces the buffoon, who instead of playing the fool, ends up mocking the audience. The playwright is also versed in commedia dell’arte, an Italian form of comedy with character types that have lasted for centuries. In the 50 plays that Coy has written, there is complicated, lyrical, and antiquated language. Sometimes he makes it even more challenging. In Poe & All That Jazz, his Edgar Allan Poe—part clown, part doomsayer—speaks aloud the rhythmic, escalating verses of “The Raven.” At the same time, the actress who portrays his mother (and also embodies all of his ill-fated loved ones) cuts in by singing Cole Porter’s “It Was Just One of Those Things,” as she taps like the wretched raven at his door. Music is an important component in many of Coy’s plays, including one about Mozart (not in the book), and he clearly enjoys playing with lyrics, love letters, poetry, invented words, and uneasy stutterings. In two of the plays, Shadow of Honor and Will’s Bach, male protagonists suffer and speak as they do because of post-traumatic stress and to seemingly taunt a spouse, although the latter lines are eventually shown to burst from a dark source. Suspense is served liberally. In a re-imagined The Gift of the Magi, based on the O. Henry story, the writer casts the characters into a gritty 1907 New York. The audience is treated to two new sets of decisions that are as heart-wrenching as they are dangerous. Both the early 20th-century community tragedy and contemporary anguish in A Shadow of Honor yield cliff hangers, as do the shame and secrets of A House in the Country. When not writing or directing, Coy helps shape plays with Nelson County High School students, assisting them in conquering Shakespeare, Molière, and others. During his 13 years at NCHS, his students have won five first places and four second places in the Virginia High School League’s annual OneAct Play Festival.

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SAVE THE DATE C R

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RESTAURANT WEEK ™ FRIDAY, JULY 16THSATURDAY, JULY 24TH, 2021

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

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C-VILLERESTAURANTWEEK.COM

CHARLOTTESVILLE

EVERYTHING

Martin Sexton

Rising Appalachia

Eddie From Ohio

Kitchen Dwellers

AoifeWithO’Donovan Jesse Harper

SAT, June 5 Th

Sat, June 12

Th

SUN, june 6 th

FRI, june 25

Th

WED, june 9 Th & THURS, June 10 th

Chisholm Vineyards: Charlottesville, VA • T I C K E T S & I N F O A T :

THURS, JULY 29 Th

T H E F e s t y. C O M


CULTURE SMALL BITES

29

WE ARE DROOLING OVER NEW PASTRIES, STEAK, AND WINE TASTINGS Hello to Cou Cou

your fill of Filipino fare—and keep your eyes peeled for soon-to-open Citizen Burger Stand, the all-vegetarian GRN Burger, and Asian eats from Mashu Festival.

Charlottesville croissant connoisseurs and Danish devotees are buzzing about the debut of Cou Cou Rachou, the new bakery from Rachel De Jong. After receiving her pastry chef certification from Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, De Jong spent the last 12 years refining her skills in expert kitchens, including Gearharts Fine Chocolates and the three-Michelin star-rated The Inn at Little Washington. After her 2020 bakery launch was thwarted by pandemic restrictions, De Jong began working as the executive pastry chef at The Wool Factory’s The Workshop, where she will continue to proffer her pastries at the boutique wine and coffee shop after her flagship location opens in early summer. We are particularly excited to try the French onion croissant and sourdough boule when Cou Cou Rachou opens at 917 Preston Ave., next to Sticks and Mona Lisa Pasta.

Old concepts in a new way In 2018, chef Antwon Brinson founded his mission-based company Culinary Concepts AB, which develops passions by teaching real-world skills through the language of cooking. Over the years, Brinson has established several culinary training programs, including one in the local jail. After being forced to adapt to the pandemic environment, Brinson discovered that he enjoys teaching online: Joining aspiring cooks through virtual lessons has allowed the Culinary Concepts team to help people rediscover the limitless possibilities available to them in their own homes. As a result, Brinson will continue his cooking school virtually for the foreseeable future. The classes are designed for all skill levels, and come with an hour of live training, a shopping list, a recipe, and a recording of the lesson. The best part? You can learn to make a dish like steak au poivre with as many people as you can squeeze into your kitchen.

Rachel De Jong

Dairy Market’s dining options continue to grow with the addition of South and Central from Ten Course Hospitality Group.

The new upscale restaurant opened on May 20, and offers locally sourced, flame-grilled delights with thoughtful wine pairings and Latin-inspired entrées. Also new at Dairy Market is Manila Street, where you can get

STAFF PHOTO

Dairy Market adds some sizzle

The delicious smell of fresh-baked croissants will soon waft from Cou Cou Rachou bakery at Preston Plaza.

Ready to get out of your makeshift home office? Devils Backbone Brewing Company is offering nature lovers the opportunity to win a full month’s stay in a vintage Airstream at its Basecamp Brewpub and Meadows. Along with spending September away from everyday life, the winner will receive a $1,000 DB gift certificate, four passes to the DB campground, and weekly Slow by Nature experiences. These include tours of the property, a chef-curated picnic and hike, horseback riding, and an “elevated” dining experience at DB’s Arbor & Sheath restaurant, all surrounded by the beautiful scenery of the Blue Ridge Mountains. More details at dbbrewingcompany.com.—Will Ham

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Get out of the office again

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CULTURE PICKS SUNDAY 6/6

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Prepare to blast off with longtime Charlottesville favorite We Are Star Children. The band boasts peppy beats, catchy lyrics, and a sparkling smatter of horns, not to mention the vocal power of an eight-piece lineup. The performance benefits Roots and Wings, a program that provides comprehensive music education to kids throughout Charlottesville. $40-120, 6pm. Potter’s Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd., 244-2767.

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STARRY EYED


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CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

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#5

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

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#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


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CROSSWORD

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ACROSS

#3

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© 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

15

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#6 solution

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Rocky will be at the Eternal Attic on Friday, June 4th 10 – 4

paying you top dollar for your gold and silver and antiques.

Gemini

gold and silver are still up!

(May 21-June 20): “All I want to be is normally insane,” said actor Marlon Brando. Yikes! I have a different perspective. I would never want to be normally insane because that state often tends to be sullen and desperate and miserable. My preferred goal is to be quite abnormally insane: exuberantly, robustly, creatively free of the toxic adjustments that our society tells us are necessary. I want to be cheerfully insane in the sense of not being tyrannized by conventional wisdom. I want to be proactively insane in the sense of obeying my souls’ impulses rather than conforming to people’s expectations. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I believe the coming weeks will be a fruitful time for you to be my kind of insane.

now is the time to sell!

Rocky pays more for gold, silver and many other items he can resell

ROCKY BUYS: GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM JEWELRY (EVEN BROKEN) GOLD, SILVER PLATINUM COINS, BULLION HE PAYS EXTRA FOR GEMSTONES AND DIAMONDS HE CAN RESELL ROCKY WILL PAY UP TO $3000 FOR A GOOD ONE CARAT DIAMOND SOLITAIRE STERLING FLATWARE, HOLLOWWARE ANTIQUE GUNS AND AMMUNITION, SWORDS, CIVIL WAR ITEMS POST CARDS, OLD QUILTS, OLD CLOCKS, ANTIQUE FURNITURE SOME GLASSWARE SOME COSTUME JEWELRY SOME POCKET AND WRIST WATCHES LIKE ROLEX, PATEK PHILIPPE, OMEGA, AND MORE RUNNING OR NOT SHENANDOAH VALLEY POTTERY

we are now back open regular hoursTuesday – Saturday 9:30 to 5, antiques open at 9 for both buying gold and silver and shopping! jewelry repairs done on the premises often while you wait Bench Jeweler wanted $30,000 to $45,000 a year plus benefits - call for details.

HOURS: tues - sat 9:30 - 5 • 1-800-296-8676 Antiques open at 9:00

rockysgoldandsilver.com

It’s All in the Open Air

Visit the gallery Monday–Thursday, 10AM – 6PM Friday–Saturday, 10AM – 7PM Sunday 12–5PM Or Shop Online Anytime

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https://cvillearts.org/store

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Landscapes in oil by Meg West featured at C’ville Arts during June Meet Meg on First Friday, June 4, 5–7PM open daily | 118 E. Main Street | Downtown Mall | 434-972-9500 | www.cvillearts.org | Like us on Facebook!

By Rob Brezsny

Cancer (June 21-July 22): “It’s one thing to make a mistake, it’s another to become wedded to it,” advised author Irena Karafilly. Let’s make that one of your key truths in the coming weeks. Now is a good time to offer yourself forgiveness and to move on from any wrong turns you’ve made. Here’s a second key truth, courtesy of composer Igor Stravinsky: “I have learned throughout my life as a composer chiefly through my mistakes and pursuits of false assumptions, not by my exposure to founts of wisdom and knowledge.” Third key truth, from Sufi teacher Pir Vilayat Inayat Khan: “Don’t be concerned about being disloyal to your pain by being joyous.”

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): According to my analysis of the astrological omens, the number of perfect moments you will experience during the next two weeks could break all your previous records. And what do I mean by “perfect moments”? 1. Times when life brings you interesting events or feelings or thoughts that are novel and unique. 2. Pivotal points when you sense yourself undergoing a fundamental shift in attitude or a new way of understanding the world. 3. Leaping out of your own mind and into the mind of an animal or other person so as to have a pure vision of what their experience is like. 4. An absolute appreciation for yourself just the way you are right now.

Virgo

This is our town. .com

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “There is strong shadow where there is much light,” wrote Virgo author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. That’s a good metaphor for you these days. Since I suspect you are currently shining as brightly as you possibly can, I will urge you to become acutely aware of the shadows you cast. In other words, try to catch glimpses of the unripe and unformed parts of your nature, which may be more easily seen than usual. Now, while you’re relatively strong and vibrant, investigate what aspects of your inner world might need improvement, care, and healing.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.22): According to physicists, it’s impossible for a human being to suck water up through a straw that’s more than 34 feet

long. So please don’t even try to do that, either now or ever. If, however, you have a good reason to attempt to suck water up a 33-foot straw, now would be an excellent time to do so. Your physical strength should be at a peak, as is your capacity for succeeding at amazing, herculean tasks. How else might you direct your splendid abilities? What other ambitious feats could you pull off?

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio poet Ezra Pound had character flaws that bother me. But he also had a quality I admire: generosity in helping his friends and colleagues. Among the writers whose work he championed and promoted with gusto were 20th-century literary icons James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, Hilda Doolittle, William Butler Yeats, Ernest Hemingway, William Carlos Williams, and Robert Frost. Pound edited their work, arranged to get them published in periodicals and anthologies, connected them with patrons and editors, and even gave them money and clothes. In accordance with astrological omens, I encourage you to be like Ezra Pound in the coming weeks. Make an extra effort to support and boost your allies. Assist them in doing what they do well. To do so will be in your own best interest!

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Poet Tess Gallagher praises those times “when desire has strengthened our bodies.” I want you to have an abundance of those moments during the coming weeks. And I expect that cultivating them will be an excellent healing strategy. So here’s my advice: Do whatever’s necessary to summon and celebrate the strong longings that will strengthen your body. Tease them into bountiful presence. Treasure them and pay reverence to them and wield them with gleeful passion.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “To live is so startling it leaves little time for anything else,” observed poet Emily Dickinson. That’s the truth! Given how demanding it is to adjust to the nonstop challenges, distractions, and opportunities of the daily rhythm, I’m impressed that any of us ever get any work done. According to my astrological analysis, you Capricorns are now experiencing a big outbreak of this phenomenon. It’s probably even harder than usual to get


Q&A work done, simply because life keeps bringing you interesting surprises that require your ingenuity and resourcefulness. The good news is that these surges of ingenuity and resourcefulness will serve you very well when the hubbub settles down a bit and you get back to doing more work.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarius-born August Strindberg was a masterful and influential playwright. He also liked to dabble in painting and photography. His approach in those two fields was different from the polish he cultivated in his writing. “I am an amateur and I intend to stay that way,” he testified about his approach in the visual arts. “I reject all forms of professional cleverness or virtuosity.” Just for now, Aquarius, I recommend you experiment with the latter attitude in your own field. Your skill and earnestness will benefit from doses of playful innocence, even calculated naiveté.

33

What seasonal events are you excited to see return? Tennis in the parks!

Elections.

@COACHKB_TENNIS/INSTAGRAM

@CVILLE_FAMILY/TWITTER

LOCKN’.

Dave concerts.

@TARAMLIFE/INSTAGRAM

@K.MC.WARD/INSTAGRAM

UVA football.

Fridays After Five!!

@NPD_BLUE/TWITTER

@RANDOLPHBENJAMN/TWITTER

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): Which of the astrological signs feels the deepest feelings? I say it’s you Pisceans. You’re connoisseurs of deep feelings, as well as specialists in mysterious, multi-splendored, brusheswith-infinity feelings. And right now, you’re in the Deepest Feelings Phase of your personal cycle. I won’t be surprised if you feel a bit overwhelmed with the richness of it all. But that’s mostly a good thing that you should be grateful for—a privilege and a superpower. Now here’s advice from deep-feeling author Pearl Buck: “You cannot make yourself feel something you do not feel, but you can make yourself do right in spite of your feelings.”

Aries

Taurus

Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888.

Fridays After Five.

I can’t wait to go back to Fridays After Five. Amazing music, tasty food, delicious beverages, and great atmosphere—I cannot think of anything better!

@SLOVIE64/INSTAGRAM

ERIN JARRELL/FACEBOOK

UVA students going home lol. JEFF SHAFAR/FACEBOOK

Running races with people. 5K to marathon. Anything. @CVILLEPORCHGUY/TWITTER

C’ville pools opening! @LEMASNEY/TWITTER

Students are already gone, I’m golden. @FUCKMEYOUNERD/TWITTER

Friday’s After Five.

Eat up! BAKERS! stars Three rising ish making del fresh bread

rything.

Taste is eve

@DRB3NAB/TWITTER

Farmers’ market.

Tom Tom festival.

@MSMESSAGE/TWITTER

@INANIEL/INSTAGRAM

Next week’s question: When the Lee statue comes down, what should go in its place? Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

TAKERS! Club C-Ville Supper to brings dinner your door

ICE CREAM MAKERS! ble A customiza hot-day treat SUMMER 2021

ME ET N MY O QU IN PEAR

THE CO-OWNER OND HER “SECONIN LIFE” SVILLE CHARLOTTE

Something’s fishy around here...could it be fresh salmon? JM Stock’s ham biscuit is always a winner.

er ern summ th u o S y r e v , yes A cheese, and, cken, mac ‘n’ ng up d chi Collards, frie our summer menu is heati biscuits—

New issue coming soon!

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(April 20-May 20): Your guiding wisdom comes from Taurus author Annie Dillard. She writes, “I think it would be well, and proper, and obedient, and pure, to grasp your one necessity and not let it go, to dangle from it limp wherever it takes you.” I suspect that Dillard’s approach will enable you to maintain a righteous rhythm and make all the right moves during the coming weeks. If you agree with me, your crucial first step will be to identify the nature of your “one necessity.” Not two necessities. Just the single most important.

@TERRILOUI/INSTAGRAM

June 2 – 8, 2021 c-ville.com

(March 21-April 19): “There is ecstasy in paying attention,” writes Aries author Anne Lamott. That’s always true for everyone, but it’s extra true for you Aries people. And it will be especially true for you during the next 20 days. I hope you will dedicate yourself to celebrating and upgrading your perceptual abilities. I hope you will resolve to see and register everything just as it is in the present moment, fresh and unprecedented, not as it was in the past or will be in the future. For best results, banish all preconceptions that might interfere with your ability to notice what’s raw and real. If you practice these high arts with exhilarating diligence, you will be rewarded with influxes of ecstasy.

James River #batteaufestival stop in #scottsvilleva!!


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In advance. We accept all major credit cards, cash, or check.

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1-30 words $20 31-40 words $23 41-50 words $26 51-60 words $30

logo $25 border $10 shaded $5 photo $15

HOWITWORKS AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH! Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855-569-1909. (AAN CAN) CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN) DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS. Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not - 24 Hour Response - Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877-266-0681 (AAN CAN)

EDUCATION EDUCATION ATTENTION ACTIVE DUTY & MILITARY VETERANS! Begin a new career and earn your Degree at CTI! Online Computer & Medical training available for Veterans & Families! To learn more, call 855-541-6634 (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED Come Join the Pavilion Operations Team (Downtown Charlottesville) The Pavilion is looking for a few hard-working additions to our Operations Crew. This is seasonal, part-time, mostly outdoor work from April thru November each year. It is physically demanding and takes place in all conditions as you set up and take down for all events. The Ops Crew is who makes the Pavilion run! You will get to see what happens behind the scenes and how shows come together. Hours will vary each week but will include some very long days and most Fridays. We pay a competitive starting wage and provide meals for most events. We also will pay you to get trained and certified with OSHA, ABC, Crowd Management, Fork Lift and Manlifts, etc. Your pay will rise as you become certified and as you show us your skill set and desire to contribute to the team. Shoot us an email at info@ sprintpavilion.com and tell us a little about yourself and why we need you on our team. Chef/Kitchen Manager and Line Cooks - The Light Well in Orange, Virginia

$0.35/word over 60

call 434-566-8660 salesrep@c-ville.com C-VILLECLASSIFIEDS.com

You must be available nights and weekends!!! Experience is preferred and please respond with a resume or work history. Chef/Kitchen Manager – $50,000

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Salary

Line Cooks - full and part-time $13$15/hour

A gathering place in historic downtown Orange for locals and tourists alike. Casual American fare, full bar and locally roasted coffee, in-house Brewery - Serving lunch and dinner, Sunday brunch

FINANCIAL

MISCELLANEOUS

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Jessica.Carter@hersorts.info (434) 906-8338 www.hersports.info/ welcometothesummer

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SERVICES CONTRACTORS

DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1-855-380-250

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 844-242-1100. (AAN CAN)

DO YOU OWE OVER $10,000 TO THE IRS OR STATE IN BACK TAXES? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am5pm PST)

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ESTATE OF JOHN JACKSON BREZNICK

June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

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NOTICE OF TAKING OF DEBTS AND DEMANDS Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities:

Upon request of the Administrators, I will be conducting a hearing for receiving proof of debts and demands against the decedent or the decedent’s estate on June 23, 2021, at 2:00 p.m., at the law office of Scott Kroner, PLC, 418 E. Water Street, Charlottesville, Virginia. Rebecca C. Hryvniak Commissioner of Accounts

Program Manager- Day Support, Louisa County. Part-time 20 hours per week. Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, pay range of $15-$17/hr.) Direct Support Professional- Floater (overnights, $16/hr.) Direct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr.) We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet and C’ville! Additional detail for each vacancy (including schedules) may be viewed on the Employment page of our web site. To see a full listing of all of our positions, to apply and to learn more about what The Arc is doing to support our community, please visit our web site at http://thearcofthepiedmont.org/ In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Advancing Healthcare Through

CLINICAL TRIALS

uvaclinicaltrials.com

Exercise Training and Drug Study

Study for Type 2 Diabetics

Non-smoking, inactive adults aged 21-50 needed for study on the effect of exercise and the drug liraglutide on blood vessels. You must have 3 of the 4 characteristics: overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high fasting blood sugar. Study requires three 1-hour and two 9-hour visits over 5 months in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. Participants are randomized to one of 4 groups: control, exercise training, study drug, or exercise + study drug. Compensation is $1,500. Principal Investigator: Zhenqi Liu, MD.

Men and women with type 2 diabetes aged 21-60 needed for study on the effect of exercise training and or an investigational drug on blood vessels. Subjects will be randomized to 4 months of either exercise training or taking the study drug or a combination of both. Study requires 4 outpatient visits of 2 hours and two 10 hour admissions in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. Compensation up to $1,200, paid in installments. Principal Investigator: Zhenqi Liu, MD.

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu HSR200065

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline, M.Ed. 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu IRB-HSR #20320

How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.


CLASSIFIEDS

35

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June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

*Includes product and labor; bathtub, shower or walk-in tub and wall surround. This promotion cannot be combined with any other offer. Other restrictions may apply. This offer expires June 30, 2021. Each dealership is independently owned and operated. **Third party financing is available for those customers who qualify. See your dealer for details. ©2021 BCI Acrylic Inc.

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36

CLASSIFIEDS Custodian (Part-Time) Monticello seeks an experienced custodian to clean and maintain Monticello’s Visitor Center and other Foundation buildings. Successful applicants will have the ability to: Operate vacuum cleaners, floor polishers, and buffers, as well as other standard cleaning equipment. climb ladders up to 6 feet and lift or maneuver up to 50 pounds. Satisfactory work record and references required. Driver’s license required. This is a 25 hour/week position. Flexibility to work one weekend day required. Open until filled.

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June 2 - 8, 2021 c-ville.com

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED

Monticello, historic plantation and home of Thomas Jefferson, the author of Declaration of Independence, is seeking part-time guides eager to engage diverse audiences with the history of the founding of the United States. Tours of the site focus on the fundamental themes of innovation, freedom, self-governance, slavery, and its legacies. Monticello guides are committed to working as a part of a team to ensure an excellent guest experience. Candidates should be eager to engage with a broad variety of perspectives about the past. Availability to work weekends, evenings, and some holidays is required. B.A. degree with a major in a relevant field preferred but equivalent work experience will be considered. Application deadline is June 25th. The Thomas Jefferson Foundation is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Diverse candidates encouraged to apply. Please apply here: https://monticello.applicantpro.com/jobs/

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VOL. 30 NO. 22 n JUNE 2 - 8, 2021

FREE

JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3021

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Well-defined home offices are replacing makeshift arrangements

Update Your

“VIBE” Inside and Out BY MARILYN PRIBUS

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Home & Garden Trends:


JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3022

38

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers WOODLANDS

FARMINGTON

1954 Milton Grigg 8-BR residence on over 2.5 acres. Fronting the 17th fairway in Farmington, offering a quality-built home, gorgeous setting, and prime location only minutes to UVA and Downtown. MLS#606911 $4,950,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.320FarmingtonDrive.com

MERIDIEN

Private, peaceful, and perfect—a sophisticated country estate offering stunning Blue Ridge views from just over 40 rolling acres, 9 miles NW of Charlottesville. C.1840, modernized home, 5 BR & 3.5 BA. Under conservation easement. MLS#613521 $3,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.MeridienFarmVa.com

CASTLEBROOK

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A rare opportunity to own a little slice of heaven in Batesville! Stately 2-story brick home built circa 1890, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, enclosed sunporch, and so much more! Nestled on just over 19 tranquil acres, is the quintessence of understated elegance! MLS#616392 $1,595,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

Beautifully restored 1780s colonial house located on 293 acres in Northampton County. This historic home has 4 bedrooms, 3 full and 2 half baths, a chef ’s kitchen, and a sunroom overlooking the back patio gardens. Fine details include original millwork, heart pine floors, and 5 brick fireplaces. Property has access to the Machipongo River which flows into the Atlantic Ocean! Under conservation easement. Rare offering!MLS#614051 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 WoodlandsFarmVa.com

RIVANDALE FARM

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living within 20 miles of Charlottesville, 14 miles to CHO Airport. 177 private acres with c.1901 classic Virginia farm house, completely remodeled and updated. MLS#609244 $3,795,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.RivandaleVa.com

GREY OAKS

This exceptional 5-BR, 5.5-BA home is a one-ofa-kind gem. Nestled among mature plantings with outstanding views overlooking a 2-acre lake to the Blue Ridge Mountains and situated in the heart of the 53+ acre, gently rolling landscape. MLS#617485 $4,165,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

TOTIER HILLS FARM

Exquisite brick mansion, superb quality construction and features in over 9,000 finished square feet. On 98 gently rolling acres with total privacy, a stream, and pond. Only 5 minutes to shops, 15 miles to UVA. MLS#600284 $2,700,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.TotierHillsFarm.com

GALLISON HALL

Excellent potential in this classic Georgian Revival-style home sited on 43 private acs. in Farmington. Complete renovation has begun, offering unique opportunity for new owner to customize & finish the project with a dream home being the ultimate reward. MLS#617686 $8,450,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

LOVELY VIRGINIA BRICK RESIDENCE

The home was built in 1938 and designed by Marshall Wells at the very edge of the city on 5.7 acres with a lake and gardens. The house features wellproportioned rooms with high ceilings and extensive woodwork, 3 bedrooms, 3 full baths, nursery, study, and spacious eat-in kitchen. Surprisingly private setting plus a dependency with a large 1-bedroom apartment and a first-floor office/study/guest quarters with bath. Appointment only. MLS#618048 $1,150,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

KESWICK ESTATES

Exquisite English Country home on 2.5 acres. Very private with lovely views of the golf course and distant mountains. The architecturally designed, 7,000+ sf. residence offers LR, DR, gourmet kitchen, library, office, media room, and 5 BR. MLS#611738 $1,695,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


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MEADOWBROOK HILLS

Circa 1946 brick home on 1+ acre in desirable city location. Features main-level master bedroom and bath, eat-in kitchen, & sunroom. 3 bedrooms and 2 baths on second level. Lot may possibly be subdivided. MLS#615341 $2,150,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

CLOWES HOUSE

C. 1870 residence in the heart of Gordonsville with historic character, original architectural detailing, & updated systems. Walk to the many amenities of Historic Main Street Gordonsville or take a short drive to Charlottesville and UVA. MLS#615710 $289,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

LONESOME MOUNTAIN ROAD

FRAYS MILL

Mostly wooded preservation tract of 81.395 acres next to Frays Mill Subdivision in highly desirable northern Albemarle. This beautiful gently rolling land has a great, private homesite with Blue Ridge Mt. views, and creek on property. MLS#608509 $995,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and the University of Virginia. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

NORTH DOWNTOWN

Colonial Revival style c. 1913 residence restored to perfection. Flexible and updated floor plan with 2,970 finished square feet. Coveted private backyard and off-street parking. Walk to the amenities of the Historic Downtown Mall and UVA. MLS#608794 $1,449,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

FAIRVIEW

Circa 1880, 4-bedroom, 2.5-bath home on 2.34 acres, surrounded by a 288-acre farm protected with a conservation easement. Located near several vineyards and breweries in the Western Albemarle School District only 15 miles to Charlottesville. MLS#616135 $978,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

WESLEY CHAPEL ROAD

Nice, mostly wooded residential building lot in Meriwether Lewis School District! Great privacy, 1.72± acres, beautiful rural setting in an area of large farm and estate properties. Located approximately 15 miles NW of Charlottesville. MLS#613685 $125,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

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5-acre lot that has not been available for many years. This country but close-to-town location is conveniently located with quick access to Historic Downtown Mall, UVA, NGIC, airport, and North Fork Business Park. MLS#593160 $250,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

KESWICK COUNTRY CLUB

Bordering (Full Cry)Pete Dye golf course and lake, within grounds of Keswick Hall, 5-star luxury resort, is this magnificent 5-bedroom residence constructed of the finest materials with attention to every detail. MLS#603398 $4,200,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.FairwayDriveAtKeswick.com

JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3021

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

OLD VIRGINIA

Mostly open rolling Albemarle County parcel offering 51.8 acres, sweeping panoramic mtn. views, bold stream, pond, and old unrestored log cabin near old home site. Tract has division rights and is potential conservation easement candidate. West of Charlottesville. MLS#615504 $780,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

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BUFFALO RIVER ROAD

Elevated 21-acre tract, mostly mature hardwood forest and road frontage in northwest Albemarle. Elevated homesite offers potential panoramic Blue Ridge Mountain views with some clearing. Adjacent 21 acres also for sale. MLS#614424 $195,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076


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BROOK HOLLOW

HOMESTEAD FARM ROAD

• Private setting with English Cottage main home • 38 acres, 3 separate parcels • Spectacular westward mountain views and sunsets • Charming guest cottage • MLS# 614593 • $1,695,000

• Custom built elegance • 10’ ceilings • Main floor master suite • Lovely mature landscaping • MLS# 611677 • $1,475,000

BLACKWELLS HOLLOW ROAD • 65 acre western Albemarle parcel • Parcel has access through Patricia Ann Byrom Preserve Park. • Within 30 minutes of Charlottesville • MLS# 617660 • $695,000

LAKE ANNA • 82.91 acres • 3500 linear feet on Lake Anna • Rolling pasture and hardwoods • MLS# 610245 • $2,499,000

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

UNION MILLS ROAD, TROY • Custom home on 3.55 acres • 5 BR/3.5 BA, 2533 fin.sq.ft. • Bold stream at rear property line with huge 1000+ acre forest behind • MLS# 617760 • $549,900

SOUTH RIVER MEADOWS • 40.70 dividable acres • South River frontage • Blue Ridge Mountain views • MLS# 600761 • $595,000

KESWICK ESTATE • Private setting with mature hardwoods • Elevated building site • Situated on a cul-de-sac • MLS# 615730 • $294,500

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

stevewhiterealtor.com 28 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

1100 Dryden Lane Charlottesville


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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

UNIVERSITY CIRCLE

PENDING

Unique opportunity in the best University location. Over a half acre lot. Bright clean residence with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, hardwood floors, great room, dining room and eat-in kitchen. Property also offers 2, one bedroom apartments on the terrace level. Large deck. Lots of off street parking! $850,000

JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3021

Annie Gould Gallery

REDBUD LANE

Unique, contemporary tri-level home. Set on 2 acres with beautiful trees and mature landscaping. Home features; 3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, dining room, 2 decks, paved driveway and a 500 sq. ft. carport. $435,000

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

Semi-Custom Detached Villa Homes Surrounding ainBelvedere Pocket Park! From $549,900 Tour our Newest Model Homes and Old Trail Village Tour Tour our our Newest Newest Model Model Homes Homes inin Belvedere Belvedere and and Old Old Trail Trail Village Village Be One of the First to Pick Your Homesite!

Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 OPEN DAILY 12-5 Villa Model in |Old Trail Village | 406 Astel Crozet, 22932 Villa Model Villa Model in Old in434-987-6522 Trail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VAVA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northpointe MODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com MODEL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com

Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change

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Sales Center Now Open on-site off Rt 29 North!


FEATURE

JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3022

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Home & Garden Trends:

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Update Your

“VIBE” Inside and Out BY MARILYN PRIBUS

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s we emerge from the isolation of COVID-19, it almost seems like a brandnew year. Folks who’ve been working from home are weary of staring at Zoom screens and the wall coverings that were “hot” eight or nine years ago. Mowing the same old lawn and dragging out

the sagging summer seating for backyard or balcony have also lost their charm. Instead, we’re aware of all sorts of possibilities and a desire to create a new vibe in our homes—inside and out.

A Better Home Office Many people who have been working from home in a temporary way have

discovered unforeseen benefits and plan to continue, at least part-time. Hence, well-defined home offices are replacing makeshift arrangements. Some people adapt a guest room or one vacated by a child leaving home by choosing dual-use furniture. For example, desks are available that can be completely closed to conceal a computer and printer, while some file cabinets can serve as attractive bedside tables. Those old Murphy-bed installations that used to slide out from behind shellacked closet doors are now well-balanced units that, when folded up, show nothing but a decorative wall panel or painting. In more limited space, a closed-off area can be created using bookshelves or substantial folding screens as “walls.” Some folks convert a large closet into a workspace where the desk, file cabinets and computer set can be rolled out of sight when not being used. There can even be tax benefits for a home office. Many restrictions apply, but in some cases a percentage of home expenses such as mortgage interest, insurance, and utilities may be tax deductible. CAVEAT: The space must be your only office, used exclusively as an office. This means if you are working from home but are employed by an entity that has an accessible location, you don’t qualify. Consult with a tax professional.

New Season New Décor Redecorating is another tactic to improve your “vibe.” Replacing furniture and carpeting or updating kitchen coun-

ters and cabinets can bring a remarkable change to your home. A less expensive tactic can be as quick as painting or wallpapering an accent wall, replacing strategic light fixtures, or spotlighting fresh new colors for a bedroom duvet or bathroom towels and bathmats. Whether you repaint every room or simply create an accent wall, you can quickly update your style. Colors significantly affect moods, probably more than any other aspect of interior design. Some time ago, it was fashionable to have all-white walls, then neutrals gradually morphed into pale greys, blues, and greens. So what are today’s color trends? A good barometer of color is to visit new home models in the area and check websites for paint companies. This year, experts agree that quarantining and staying at home have strongly affected homeowners’ color choices. The grays popular in the last few years are being replaced by earthy, warmer neutral tones. Plantbased colors are also popular as more living plants are incorporated into home design. Consensus among designers is that Benjamin Moore’s Aegean Teal and Sherwin Williams Urbane Bronze will be the decorating color stars for 2021, while blues from denim shades to pale blues will continue to be popular for personal spaces like bedrooms and bathrooms. And for those accent walls? Brick or stone facades, and textured paints and wallpapers are particularly trendy. Sometimes, however, trends can be trumped. In our region for instance, cer-


3 DAYS SOLD IN ASKING E V O AB PRICE!

TING NEW LIS

COMING

312 JEFFERSON DRIVE

SOON

316 STARCREST ROAD

Wonderful Lake Monticello house ready to be Wonderful home in the sought after Mill Creek your new home! You’ll be welcomed home South neighborhood. First floor living is show2146 AVINITY LOOP with a beautiful front porch with plenty of room cased with the open concept connecting the for your guests. The first floor includes a spakitchen,dining area, and living room. Enjoy Location! Location! Location! Minutes to Downcious kitchen which overlooks the family room cooking in your updated kitchen with huge istown, UVA, Martha Jefferson, & I-64. The popuwith fireplace and a formal dining and living land. The large master suite has a walk-in closet lar Avinity community offers wine socials, food room. Off the family room you’ll find your large and attached bath. The laundry caps off the trucks,clubhouse, dog park, fitness center, and back deck perfect for your BBQs. Upstairs you first floor. Head upstairs to find three additional more! This spacious home has upgrades throughout starting with real hardwood floors throughout will find four bedrooms including your master bedrooms and full bath. Head downstairs to main level. Large kitchen is ready for your home bedroom with en suite bathroom with a showthe finished, walkout basement which is a rare chef with gas range & tons of counter/cabinet er and soaking tub to relax after a long day. find in the neighborhood. The large combinaspace. The open concept is perfect for entertainPlenty of space in the big walk-in closet for all tion room has plenty of room to create several ing. The large master suite with a beautiful tiled your clothes! The top floor is finished off with living spaces like a home office, rec room, and shower & double vanity. Two other bedrooms & a totally updated full bath and a large launeven a guest suite with the full bath. The view laundry complete the upstairs. The bottom floor dry room. Tons of potential in the basement! from the back deck is the wonderful fencedSunday 1-3 pm has a perfect guest suite or rec room along with There is a finished room (not pictured) which in lawn and a wooded common area to give a two car garage. Low maintenance living at is perfectCt for a home office or Avinity rec room. Loop more privacy than expected in a neighborhood. 2808 Magnolia Dr 2142 1544 Sawgrass its best lawn care included. Come see it now! $275,000 615586 $420,000 Peace & tranquility less than 15 minutes from Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhouseMLS# w/mountain Complete 1st floor living,MLS# lg MBR 618021 & BA w/laundry. $415,000

Price Drop!

Under Contract

Open House

!

JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3021

NOW IS THE TIME TO SELL!

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PUT YOUR HOUSE HERE: ys! Contract in 6 da

Under inventory is low and buyers are in the market. If you have thought about selling, now may be the perfect time. Contact me now to explore your options!

At B U Y A N D S E L L C V I L L E a home is inclusive of all aspect of enjoyment, entertainment and relaxatio We have the ideas you are looking for when getting ready to list and 434.305.0361 pdmcartor@gmail.com your home ! Contact us for all your staging and marketing needs. 2357 Middle River Rd

Hardwoods on main floor. Gourmet kitchen & loft open to LR. Outside patio. $410,000

views! Open floorplan, perfect for entertaining with private patio. $365,000

Downtown! Enjoy this wonderful house on over an acre with beautiful mature trees. $469,900

Come enjoy the peace and tranquility of your own lake front retreat! Single floor living home includes both MB & laundry on the main floor. $240,000

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& SELLERS CALL ME TODAY!

Buyers & Sellers! Call Me Today!

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Country living 15 minutes of Downtown & within Albemarle County. This single floor home has beautifully updated kitchen & bathrooms. $260,000

Here’s your chance to live in a 1906 farmhouse with all the style and character while enjoying the conveniences of a modern home. $130,000

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BUY AND SELL CVILLE

Selling? CONTACT US TODAY!

At Buy and Sell Cville a home is ienjoyment nclusive of , entertainment & relaxation . We have the

At Buy and Sell Cville a home is ienjoyment nclusive of , entertainment & relaxation . We have the

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At Buy and Sell Cville a home is ienjoyment nclusive of , entertainment & relaxation .

Contact me today to find out about our New Listing Program. Let’s get your home

FEATURE

GE T YO UR HO M E SO LD HE RE !


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FEATURE

JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3022

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tain colors are always in vogue—especially the hues of Williamsburg and Monticello. Remember, too, the best color choices are those that make you comfortable and happy in your home.

Spiffing Up Your Outdoor Space Whether your “outdoors” is a condo balcony or a couple of acres of lawn, your updates can be thrifty or significant. New lawn furniture is a great place to start, and re-staining or re-painting existing furniture works well, too. Be sure to prepare the surfaces with sanding or a brisk brushing and determined treating of any mildew. Rust-resistant paint on metals is also a must. Gardens experience trends just like any other area where style is key. A particularly poignant example emerged after September 11, 2001, when many people spontaneously planted gardens featuring red, white, and blue flowers. What’s the trend today? It seems to be a combination of “everything old is new again” and easy gardening using a variety of perennials with pops of annuals grown from seed or bought locally in six-packs. Historic Gardens are popular hereabouts. Perhaps people are trying to turn back the clock on the Age of the Zoom and get closer to nature and history. Locally, the Thomas Jefferson Center for Historic Plants collects, preserves,

and distributes historic plant varieties centered on Jefferson’s own horticultural interests and the plants he grew at Monticello. Just a few examples are Spiny Bear’s Breeches, Thread Leaf Amsonia, and Butterfly Weed—the last referred to as Pleurisy Root in Jefferson’s own listing of local native plants. Many of these seeds and plants date back to Colonial times and are available online or at the Monticello gift shop (which may be visited without paying admission). Another trend is toward low-maintenance gardens and native plants. More and more folks are employing the native plants that thrive in our area while increasingly rejecting exotic species, which sometimes become invasive. An excellent easy-care garden tactic is planting perennials which come up faithfully season after season. Some must be thinned or divided every few years, but they don’t need to be planted anew each spring and there’s a long list of reliable perennials to choose from depending on the composition of the soil and the amount of full sun or shade. Perennials include daffodils, tulips, and gladiola. Other popular choice are asters, foxglove, phlox, violets, bee balm, hyssop, verbena, coneflower, columbine, Virginia bluebells, and many more. For late-summer showiness, it’s hard to beat

deer-resistant Black-Eyed Susans, which self-seed freely. People spending more time at home may morph their “coffee breaks” into quick gardening breaks, and edible gardens are becoming more popular. People want to know what they are eating and they like the freshness of items they can bring directly from their garden to the kitchen. To this end, they are planting their own herbs and vegetables. In fact, many folks are planting mixed beds which recall historical “potager” gardens. This French word describes an ornamental vegetable plot, where flowers (often with edible blossoms like nasturtiums or pansies), are planted with herbs and vegetables to make a lovelier garden. Edibles might include artichokes, chard, kale, lettuce, and other vegetables. Herbs—in pots or as part of a flowerbed—are increasingly popular. Nurseries and farmer’s markets are good sources of young plants. The 1966 Simon and Garfunkel song about “Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme” highlights an excellent starting quartet for herbs, although omitting basil seems like a conspicuous oversight. Other easy-togrow herbs include chives, dill, tarragon, marjoram, oregano and, of course, mint for summer iced teas. For abundant information online or by phone, visit www.ext.vt.edu to gather plenty of gardening expertise.

Other Outdoor Enhancements People are now seeing a movement toward specially developed shrubs and flowers that bloom longer or have a second blossoming. Take lilacs, for example. Traditional lilacs suffer in Central Virginia’s summer heat, but Boomerang, is an improved hybrid that resists mildew and blooms a second time. It seldom grows more than five feet high, a plus in a small yard. Among azaleas, Encore reblooms in the fall in various colors. The fall display isn’t a big a one, but it’s certainly a bonus. Butterfly bushes, also known as buddleia, bloom almost all summer. In our area they can be killed back to the ground during a particularly hard freeze, but they readily (and rapidly) regrow from the roots to as high as 12 feet. They attract butterflies and beneficial insects like bees and ladybugs as well as hummingbirds.

Attracting Visitors In addition to planting beneficial plants, you can entice feathered neighbors, birds, by buying or making feeders. There are specific feeders for hummingbirds and finches and other birds who become regular customers. (One woman in North Garden reports when she didn’t have her hummingbird feeders out when the hummers arrived from wintering in the south, they hovered at her window, peering in expectantly.)

A wooden trellis is an inexpensive purchase or an easy project for the average do-it-yourselfer.


Patio and Balcony Gardens A wooden trellis, an inexpensive purchase or easy project for the average do-ityourselfer, can provide shade or privacy. Morning glories, moonflowers, or ivy are ideal climbing vines to train on the brackets. Dwarf versions of many shrubs are available and can provide color and even

some privacy on a patio or balcony. Consider investing in matching containers of various sizes. Almost anything works, so long as there is good drainage. You can find a wide range of containers at garden stores, thrift shops, and yard sales. Terra cotta is a longtime favorite with glazed containers holding moisture longer than unglazed. Wood is attractive

When Marilyn Pribus and her husband moved into their Albemarle County home almost 15 years ago, they replaced a thriving patch of poison ivy (not all native plants are good guys!) with a butterfly garden. They also created a birdbath by pouring instant concrete using the plastic cover of a garbage can as a mold. They buy sunflower seeds in 20-pound bags.

Find Homes Team

FEATURE

Fresh water in a birdbath or pond, especially one with audible dripping water, is another bird magnet. Birdbaths come in many styles and materials. It’s a good idea to promote visitor health by giving both feeders and birdbaths a quick weekly scrubbing and in some places it’s a must to bring feeders inside at night to foil bears, raccoons, and other wildlife.

45 JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3021

and redwood and cedar are naturally rot resistant. You can build or purchase window boxes in many sizes and wooden wine half-barrels are hard to beat for both form and function. Stone or molded concrete containers are heavy, but durable and dramatic and will weather to take on a mellow, long-established look. Plastic is widely used for containers, making up in practicality what it lacks in charm. It’s durable and lightweight, so it’s no surprise that most plants are in plastic when you bring them home from the store. Often you can simply hide the plastic inside a more attractive container without repotting. Purchase potting soil specifically formulated for container gardening. If the plants will be in the sun for a good portion of the day, add some water-saving polymers which are available at garden stores. They swell when exposed to water and then release the moisture slowly. The bottom line is that remakes and updates both indoors and out can enhance your life as we head carefully into a post-pandemic world.

REALTORS®

North Garden

North Garden North Garden 10 Minutes to Cville Mountain Views

5 bed, 4 bath 4396 fin. sf MLS : 616610

3539RedHillSchoolRd.FindHomesNorthGarden.com

Integrity & Service is Our Motto! Cynthia Hash

Associate Broker/Team Leader

434-337-3216

Keller Williams Realty 3510 Remson Ct # 301 Charlottesville VA 22901, 434-220-2200. If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this is not considered a solicitation. Fair Housing Compliant. Licensed to sell real estate in Commonwealth of VA. Each office independently owned & operated.

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$858k


JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3022

46

Live It Up

HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF MAY 30, 2021

THERE WERE 164 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 64 were in Albemarle with an average price of $553,792 n 19 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $440,079 n 9 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $391,605 n 10 were in Greene with an average price of $320,392 n 19 were in Louisa with an average price of $379,123 n 2 were in Madison with an average price of $355,000 n 8 were in Nelson with an average price of $377,938 n 17 were in Orange with an average price of $377,730 n 10 were in Staunton with an average price of $252,426 n 6 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $266,667

HOMES SOLD

Fine Properties VOLUME 27, ISSUE 1

A Publication of The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS®

www.caar.com

The Residences at 218 The RESIDENCES at 218 define luxury in Downtown Charlottesville. These lavish condos are offered both meticulously designed or finished to your particular taste. This premium location boasts the best in dining, shopping, and entertainment. Featuring awe-inspiring views of Charlottesville and the surrounding mountainscape, with floor to ceiling windows and expansive outdoor terraces.

John E. Neal (434) 906-3141 jneal@gemc.com

www.RESIDENCESat218.com

Homes of Distinction in Central Virginia Look for our latest issue where you pick up C-VILLE Weekly

THE 106 WEST PARK DRIVE KNOLLWOOD

336 NW 11TH STREET 10TH & PAGE

142 RURITAN RIDGE LN SCOTTSVILLE

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

6131 FLINTSTONE DRIVE BARBOURSVILLE

151 DEER RUN DRIVE SPRING CREEK

119 SHAWN CIRCLE STAUNTON

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47 JUNE 2 - 8, 2021 ISSUE 3021

6255 INDIAN RIDGE ROAD

VIEWMONT FARM • 354 ACRES

E A R LY S V I L L E | $ 9 9 5 , 0 0 0

CHARLOTTESVILLE | $6,300,000

Private, peaceful, easy living. Single level, architect-designed custom home. 3 bed, 3.5 bath, open floor plan ideal for modern living, entertaining and working from home. 10’ ceilings, oak flooring, coffered ceilings, 8’ doors, gourmet kitchen, covered terrace and great room with wood-burning fireplace. Private wing suitable as two room office or guest suite with separate entrance. Immaculate condition and very easy to maintain. Numerous nature trails and high speed internet.

Spectacular mountain and valley views in Bundoran Farm! Easy access to miles of trails, fiber optic internet, complete serenity all within 15 minutes of Charlottesville. Equestrian parcel, allowing owner to have horses.

Exquisite Carter’s Bridge estate on historically significant property. Stunning mountain and pastoral views, river frontage, only 10 miles to town. Gorgeous architecture and craftsmanship, luxury finishes — 10’ ceilings, wide plank oak floors, custom millwork throughout, copper roof, Rumford fireplaces, guesthouse /garage, fabulous pool. Bright living spaces that flow seamlessly indoors to out, designed to take in the remarkable natural surroundings.

P ETER WI LEY | 43 4 422 2090 | M L S 6 0 453 4

PE T E R WILE Y | 434 42 2 2 090 | MLS 614741

J U ST IN W IL E Y | 4 3 4 9 8 1 5 5 28 | M LS 6 0 8 1 7 8

1 32 E M AIN ST SU IT E A, ORAN G E VA 22960

540 672 3903

42 ACRES • WINSOME ORCHARD LN NORTH GARDEN | $615,000

W I LEY P RO P ERT Y. CO M

5 0 3 FAULCONE R D R SU I TE 6 , C HA R LOTTESV I L L E VA 229 0 3

434 2 93 3900

250 W MAIN STREET PENTHOUSE

600 FRAYS RIDGE ROAD

CULPEPER | $1,295,000

CHARLOTTESVILLE | $1,250,000

E A R LY S V I L L E | $ 1 , 6 7 5 , 0 0 0

Historic 182-acre farm estate, 4200 sq ft main residence with much of original charm intact including heart pine floors. Property has numerous dependencies—including a lovely stone cottage—and long frontage on Cedar Run. Currently farmed cropland, excellent conservation easement candidate.

Spacious, light-filled penthouse, 2600 sq ft and perfect for entertaining. Peaceful yet located in the heart of Charlottesville. Outdoor terraces with panoramic mountain views including UVA Rotunda and charming downtown steepled skyline. Quick walk through booming West Main district to UVA grounds. 2 parking spaces.

Beautiful, spacious and immaculate 5,500 sq ft (4 bed / 5 bath) residence on 21 bucolic acres, just 15 mins from town. Spectacular mountain views, long Rivanna River frontage with private beach, superb outdoor living spaces (pool, dining terrace, stone fireplace), gently rolling countryside ideal for keeping horses.

J U ST IN W IL E Y | 4 3 4 9 8 1 5 5 28 | M LS 6 1 7 47 2

P ETER WI LEY | 43 4 422 2090 | M L S 6 1 3 7 6 5

JU STIN WILE Y | 434 981 552 8 | MLS 617847

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

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Locally Grown Zucchini $2.99/lb

Organic Red & Green Grapes $3.49/lb

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Organic Thompson Raisins $3.99/lb (Reg. $4.99)

Organic Raw Almonds $11.99/lb (Reg. $17.99)

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GROCERY

Larabar Bars $1.79 (Reg. $2.19)

Lacroix Sparkling Waters 8 pack $4.99 (Reg. $5.59)

HEALTH & BODYCARE

Solaray Brand Supplements 15% Off

Flora Brand Supplements 15% Off

Dr. Bronner’s Soaps & Body Care 15% Off Annie’s Homegrown Mac & Cheese 25% Off

Kettle Potato Chips 25% Off

Acure Brand Body Care 15% Off

Barlean’s CBD Oils & Caps 20% Off

923 PRESTON AVENUE • 293-4111 • WWW.IYFOODS.COM

Profile for C-VILLE Weekly

C-VILLE Weekly | June 2 - 8, 2021  

C-VILLE Weekly | June 2 - 8, 2021  

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