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FEBRUARY 21 – 27, 2018 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

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School, friends, family, work and finding their voice: A peek at what local teens are thinking about right now

Youth

The

Issue


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THIS WEEK On Valentine’s Day, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, a former student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, shot and killed 17 students and teachers and injured 14 others. The incident marked the 18th school shooting since the start of the year—that’s one every three days. In a letter to the editor this week, Palmyra resident Dr. Liz Addison writes that it is “now statistically more likely our children will be killed when we wave goodbye to them [on] a school morning in America than if we sent them to Afghanistan, Iraq or Syria. Combined. How on earth did that happen?” That’s the question that Parkland students—and citizens around the country —are demanding an answer to. Teens quickly took to social media to denounce the “thoughts and prayers” from lawmakers, including President Donald Trump. Instead, they want stricter gun control laws. And on March 24, thousands of teenagers and their families will descend on Washington, D.C., for the March for Our Lives, a demonstration insisting public safety become a priority. This week marks our inaugural Youth Issue in which we talk about issues teens face, what they care about most and how they spend their time. A reverberating takeaway is that this is an activist generation, one that refuses to sit idly by and witness injustices. This yet-to-be-named generation will certainly make a name for itself soon enough, and we should be thankful.—Jessica Luck

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NEWS 9 10 School catches heat after athlete lands in E.R. 11 Construction to begin on $2 million skate park. 12 What to do when the cops bust the party. 12 Counselors help students cope with trauma. 14 Taking control of contraception. 15 The scoop from high school newspaper editors.

ARTS 17 19 Calendar Listings 20 Feedback: Joshua St. Hill’s play is fit for A King.

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22 The Works: Setting the stage for youth in the arts. 24 Preview: CHS’ South Pacific confronts racism. 24 Profile: 14 Stories has the classics covered. 25 Screens: Black Panther is a revolutionary film.

THE BIG PICTURE

LIVING 40 40 Backpack confidential 43 JUULing gains steam among teens. 45 The secrets to their success. 46 Crossword 47 Sudoku 48 Free Will Astrology

54 What would you tell your teenage self knowing what you know now?

COMIC 19 Jen Sorensen

Volume 30, Number 8

STEPHEN BARLING

CLASSIFIEDS 49 Q&A

The place to be They’re not old enough for bars, concerts can be too expensive and UVA basketball tickets are impossible to come by. So where’s a teen in this town supposed to hang out? Two words: Cook Out. Located on Emmet Street near Barracks Road, the North Carolina-based chain is an über-popular spot for evenings of high school co-mingling. On weekend nights especially, the place is packed with public and private school students who can’t get enough of each other or Cook Out’s burgers, barbecue, hot dogs and fries. And then there are the more than 40 milkshake flavors and Cheerwine and Coke floats. Bottoms up!

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Thursday, February 22 • 7:30 pm Friday, February 23 • 7:30 pm Saturday, February 24 • 7:30 pm Sunday, February 25 • 3:00 pm

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

South Pacific


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SWEET ON C-VILLE?

WILL IT BE EASY?

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 23,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434-817-2749 Fax: 434-817-2758 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Instagram: @cvilleweekly

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WILL IT BE WORTH IT?

EDITORIAL EDITOR Jessica Luck (x20) editor@c-ville.com NEWS EDITOR Lisa Provence (x14) lisa@c-ville.com STAFF REPORTER Samantha Baars (x40) news@c-ville.com ARTS EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS EDITOR Caitlin White (x45) caite@c-ville.com ARTS & LIVING REPORTER Erin O’Hare arts@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL INTERNS Sam Padgett, Jake Pierce

Foster Parents Needed

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CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, C. Simon Davidson, Elizabeth Derby, Mike Fietz, Erika Howsare, Kristofer Jenson, Raennah Lorne, Nick Rubin, Jen Sorensen, David Levinson Wilk

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March 11 & 12, 2018 The Paramount Theater Charlottesville www.SNPTrust.org The festival supports the Shenandoah National Park Trust and the adventures found in your backyard.

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C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly THE BASICS C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 23,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. CONTRIBUTIONS Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. SUBSCRIPTIONS First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. THE LAW ©2018 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

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03-09 | Tim O’Brien Band (ft. Noam Pikelny, Mike Bub, Shad Cobb and Jan Fabricius) with Amanda Anne Platt 03-11 | AHS Jazz Band 1st Annual ‘Swing into Spring’ Benefit Concert 03-14 | Matisyahu with Eminence Ensemble 03-16 | Rockn’ to Lockn’ 03-22 | Wild Child with special guests The Wild Reeds 03-24 | Matt & Kim with CRUISR and TWINKIDS 03-26 | Drive-By Truckers with Erika Wennerstrom of Heartless Bastards 03-29 | Delta Rae 03-30 | Dark Star Orchestra 03-31 | Cigarettes After Sex 04-07 | Cry, Cry, Cry 04-08 | An Evening with Yo La Tengo 04-20 | Dr. Dog with Kyle Craft 04-21 | The Record Company 04-24 | Anderson East 04-28 | Margo Price

Tickets: Greenberry’s, New Dominion Bookshop, UVA Culbreth Theater Box Office, virginiaconsort.org, or at the door, if available. Call for handicapped parking. INFORMATION: 434-244-8444 The Virginia Consort is an affiliate of the McIntire Department of Music at the University of Virginia. The Virginia Consort is supported in part by the Virginia Commission for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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8th grade to now...still get the butterflies. I love you ❤ #2/18/18 @AlexaJenkins_ —UVA sophomore guard Kyle Guy proposes to his longtime girlfriend during the No. 1 basketball team’s eight-day break

NEWS

PAGE 10

Mental health focus

IN BRIEF Flu fatality

The first flu-related death in the Charlottesville area was reported February 16 at the University of Virginia Health System, where clinicians have categorized this flu season as “moderately heavy,” and have seen 450 confirmed cases since October.

After the summer’s white supremacist torch rally that ended in a brawl on Grounds, UVA School of Law Dean Risa Goluboff is leading the charge to re-examine how the school regulates events. Her recommendations to the faculty senate require people who aren’t students, faculty or staff to reserve their space ahead of time, with reservations capped at 25 people for up to two hours on weekdays.

Stops and frisks

Their efforts appear to have paid off. The Deeds-backed Senate bill passed 39-1 February 13, and the House bill got a unanimous nod that same day.

Johnson has been interested in politics and policy for years and says this “has only furthered” his interest, especially as it could bring actual change.

“We came out of our health classes knowing nothing about mental health.” MONTICELLO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT LUCAS JOHNSON

TRACKING TOP SONGS

CHARITO YAP

Run, Kate, run

Drake

Based on the results of C-VILLE’s online poll, rock hits and rap wits share common ground when it comes to the unique blend of area high schooler’s musical taste, showing the world that the next generation of humans might not be so doomed after all. And even if they are, they’ll have some awesome playlists to accompany the apocalypse. Drake took the No. 1 spot with his song “God’s Plan,” followed closely by Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow.” And a surprising tie for third was a mix of old and new, with Billy Joel and Frank Ocean fans making their voices heard. Rounding out the results was an eclectic mix of genres ranging from Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and Queen’s “Killer Queen,” to Lil Skies’ “Nowadays” and Ed Sheeran’s “Perfect.”

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Scottsville Town Council voted on a trapneuter-return program as a humane way to deal with the town’s feral cat colonies on February 20 after C-VILLE Weekly went to press. Scottsville Weekly reported in 2013 that the town’s Cat Man—Bud Woodward—had trapped more than 100 cats and taken them to be spayed. Apparently the problem persists.

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FILE PHOTO

Cat’s out of the bag

Lucas Johnson (Monticello High School), Choetsow Tenzin (Albemarle High School) and Alex Moreno (Western Albemarle High School) testify before a House subcommittee February 5 in support of more mental health instruction in the ninth and 10th grades.

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

Charlottesville Police detentions of those who are not arrested continue to be predominantly African-American (around 70 percent), and have increased, according to documents civil rights attorney Jeff Fogel obtained under the Freedom of Information Act. He says last year’s 151 detentions far exceed previous years, and that former chief Al Thomas ordered tracking of the stops halted.

ucas Johnson isn’t old enough to vote yet, but the 17-year-old Monticello High senior and his peers from two other county high schools—Choetsow Tenzin at Albemarle and Alex Moreno at Western Albemarle—didn’t let that stop them from demanding the General Assembly support more school instruction on mental health. “I had a best friend who admitted to me she wanted to drive her car through a guardrail,” says Johnson. “That really shook me. Alex had to go to two funerals for people who’d committed suicide. And Choetsow had numerous friends who struggled with mental health.” The teens want more time devoted to mental health in ninth and 10th grade health classes, and they have proposed changes to the Code of Virginia to say mental health must be included. “We came out of our health classes knowing nothing about mental health,” says Johnson. “We were concerned we didn’t know how to help.” The three met at the Sorensen Institute High School Leaders Program last summer, and did preliminary work on the bill there. They met with state Senator Creigh Deeds, who has been a leading advocate for strengthening mental health services in Virginia after his son, Gus, committed suicide in 2013. And they have powerful allies in the House of Delegates, where Rob Bell is patron of the bill and Delegate Steve Landes, chair of the House Education Committee, is copatron. “We went to Richmond on January 27 to lobby,” says Johnson, and they have been two other times since the General Assembly has been in session, scheduling a “slew of meetings” to get copatrons and testifying.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

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University regs

Kate Fletcher, a 43-year-old English teacher at Louisa County High School, will attempt to run for 24 continuous hours starting at the high school’s track at 8:30am on March 29, in an effort to raise money for the LCHS newspaper class and college-bound seniors.

Boiling point


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NEWS

Danger zone Mom on a mission after soccer practice sends son to E.R. By Lisa Provence lisa@c-ville.com

Ryan and Patrick Clancy both felt ill after a soccer practice on a heat advisory day. When their mom, Emily, couldn’t cool Patrick down, she took him to the E.R. Now she’s wondering why the practice took place under such conditions.

Emily Clancy knew Patrick was in trouble as soon as he came in the house. He was crawling up the stairs, had stopped perspiring and couldn’t talk. violation of VHSL guidelines, which says the maximum heat index should be 105 degrees for an outdoor practice. That was not the conclusion athletic director Pearman reached. He writes in an email that when the practice began at 8am, “the air temperature was 80 degrees with a heat index of 83.” When practice ended at 10am, “The air temperature was 88 degrees with a heat index of 92,”

SUBMITTED PHOTO

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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atrick Clancy, his brother Ryan and nine other teens went to an 8am soccer practice at Monticello High School on an artificial turf field July 21, the second day of a National Weather Service heat advisory. The two-hour practice ended around 10am, when the heat advisory officially kicked in. By 11:30am, Patrick was in the emergency room at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital being treated for heat exhaustion. C-VILLE Weekly has spoken to the parents of three other boys who were affected by the heat that day. The response from Monticello High: Conditions were not adverse, the practice met Virginia High School League guidelines and Patrick should have brought more water. His mother, Emily Clancy, doesn’t buy that response. A soccer player herself and a former soccer coach, she’s convinced VHSL guidelines were not followed and she’s on a crusade to get the word out about the dangers of practices on heat advisory days. Because she worries that if she hadn’t been home that day, Patrick could have died. It’s happened before in Albemarle County. In 2005, 18-year-old Kelly Watt, a recent Albemarle High grad and cross country runner, was preparing to go that fall to the College of William & Mary, where he’d been recruited. He took a run on a scorching July day and died from heat stroke. Patrick, 16, went to the out-of-season practice because he wanted a position on the starting team. “We felt like we needed to prove it to the coach by showing up,” he says. He brought two 32-ounce bottles of water and says on the artificial turf field, “you could feel [the heat] through your cleats.” About two-thirds of the way through the practice, “I stopped sweating,” Patrick says. He also says he stopped feeling hot, but didn’t feel cool, either. “I was in a weird state of feeling dizzy and sick.” “I’ve been playing soccer all my life,” says Ryan Clancy, now 18. “That day was the worst I ever felt. I felt like throwing up. One kid had to sit out because of the heat. Others said to me, ‘It’s so hot I think I’m going to die.’” After the practice and helping put away equipment, by 10:15am Patrick was having a hard time getting into the car and he could hardly talk, says Ryan. “I thought when he was in the car, the air conditioning would help. I had to carry him into the house. He was so pale and shaking.” Emily Clancy knew Patrick was in trouble as soon as he came in the house. He was crawling up the stairs, had stopped perspiring and couldn’t talk. “I got him in the shower immediately,” she says. “He couldn’t stand. He had to sit on the shower floor. His fingers were turning blue and he threw up.” When he didn’t seem to be cooling down in the shower, she moved him to the bathtub

EZE AMOS

and tried to give him water, but he threw up again, she says. He was having trouble breathing, and his toes and fingers were blue. That’s when she took him to Martha Jefferson. After many IVs and several hours later, Patrick walked out of the emergency room with a diagnosis of heat exhaustion. “I was mad,” says Emily Clancy. “Those conditions should never have happened.” The coach, Stuart Pierson, emailed Clancy July 23 to say he’d gotten the medical note that Ryan brought July 22, was happy to hear Patrick was feeling better and reminded her that each player was supposed to bring a 2-liter jug of water to each practice. “He blamed it on my 16-year-old son for not bringing enough water,” says Clancy, who says she’s licensed by the U.S. Soccer Federation and has coached for 11 years. “I’m very familiar with what coaches are supposed to know.” Pierson, who is no longer coaching at Monticello High, declined to comment. Clancy doesn’t believe the practice should have taken place outdoors during a heat advisory on a day with no cloud cover, no shade breaks and with no extra water offered to the players. Matthew Pearman, the athletic director at Monticello, says there was an adequate supply of bottled water available in the coach’s vehicle parked inside the stadium, a water fountain available next to the stadium restrooms and water and ice available in the concession stand that students and coaches can access. That water was never offered to the students and the concession stand was locked, says Clancy. According to the National Weather Service, the heat index factors in both the temperature and relative humidity to measure how hot it really feels. And on days with full sun, the heat index can increase up to 15 degrees. The artificial turf field exacerbated the problem, says Clancy, and VHSL guidelines say to add 35 to 55 degrees to the heat index if not playing on grass. By 8am she calculates the heat index on the turf field in full sun was 108 degrees and by 10am it was at least 127 degrees—all in

Emily Clancy coached her sons’ SOCA team, which won the Virginia Soccer Festival tournament in Richmond in June 2014. Ryan is in the back row, second player from the left. Patrick is in the first row, third player from the left.

conditions “well within the VHSL Heat Guidelines, which recommend no outside activities when the heat index/humiture is 105 or higher.” The discrepancy, believes Clancy, is that Pearman does not add 15 degrees for the full sun, nor did he include the artificial turf factor. Pearman says VHSL guidelines were followed that day. He conducted his own investigation on a day in which he says the weather conditions were the same as July 21. Clancy scoffs that such a comparison is possible. “How in the world can you duplicate heat advisory conditions?” In an email to Clancy, he says when he measured the turf with a psychrometer, it was 4 degrees warmer than grass. “Our determination remained, after this comparative reading, that the conditions on the morning of July 21 were not adverse,” he writes. Not satisfied, Clancy appealed to the school’s principal and then filed a complaint with the Albemarle County schools administration. And her sons began to experience bullying from other students and from the school administration, she says. “Last year a lot of players were harassing me, saying, ‘What’s your mom doing? We’re trying to win,’” says Ryan Clancy. “I said, ‘My brother almost died.’ They said, ‘I don’t care.’” And then Ryan found he was blocked on Pearman’s @MonticelloAD Twitter account. “I already felt bullied,” says Ryan. Says Pearman, “@MonticelloAD is my personal, not school, Twitter account.” He’s says it’s not unusual to block “when a person responds to one of these posts with negative


NEWS

Daily grind

“Our primary focus is on providing our student-athletes a safe environment in which to represent Monticello High School while participating in the sports/activities they love,” he says. “Any team’s chances of winning are immaterial to that focus.” That’s one thing about which he and Clancy can agree. “I still have nightmares that I can’t wake my son,” she says, haunted by the thought, “What if I wasn’t home?”

By Samantha Baars

social space” open to bikes and in-line skaters, too. Features of the park, scheduled to open in November, include a butterfly bowl and a flow bowl, a half pipe, a pump bump, a sculptural brick bank and several grinding ledges. “There will be an emphasis on programming at the facility, with various levels of skate camps and classes to include beginner, intermediate and advanced private lessons, local and regional competitions and special events,” adds Daly. During the buildout, access to the south side of McIntire Park from the westbound 250 bypass will be limited to construction, service and emergency vehicles. Though the city contributed most of the $2 million in funding, it wasn’t alone. The Tony Hawk Foundation, founded by one of the country’s most prominent skating legends, donated $25,000 for the park. “Tony is a great guy,” says Juers. “My friends and I appreciate his donation, and we hope he comes out opening day to skate with everyone. He made it possible to get a skate park that will put Charlottesville on the map.”

news@c-ville.com

T

here aren’t many places to skateboard in Charlottesville. The city closed its skate park on McIntire Road during construction of the U.S. 250 Bypass and John Warner Parkway interchange in 2012 and moved it to McIntire Park. And last month, it closed the second location, too. Nineteen-year-old Piedmont Virginia Community College student David Juers says it’s been tough to find a place to break out his board—and he and his skater friends still hit the desolate park from time to time to get their fix. “We kind of just hop the fence and skate it,” he says. “Every once in a while, cops will come and kick us out.” His other haunts include the splash pad at Tonsler Park and a couple of skate spots around UVA, but Juers says he’s waiting with bated breath for the completion of the $2 million McIntire Skate Park that’s been on the books since 2012. “All those delays happened and it’s been pushed back so many years now,” Juers says. “The excitement had gone down, but now that the project is starting up again, it’s definitely exciting. When it does get done, it’s going to be so awesome.” The city announced in January that it would finally begin building two projects that City Council approved six years ago under McIntire Park’s master plan. Construction of the skate park and a $2.5 million pedestrian bridge across the Norfolk Southern Railroad—which will connect the east and west sides of the city park—is scheduled to begin March 5. Parks & Recreation Director Brian Daly says the new park will be a “wheel-friendly

John MacKnight, medical director for sports medicine at UVA, says the symptoms of heat exhaustion—fatigue, lethargy, headache, nausea, cramping— can “absolutely” turn to heat stroke if the victim has stopped sweating, is “grossly disoriented” and loses consciousness. If a person is no longer cognitively present—”if they can’t give facts—they’re in the heat stroke range,” he says. A rectal temperature of 104 degrees is the “catastrophic” range when one loses function because he’s too hot. “Once you’ve lost the ability to dissipate core temperature, then the wheels really fall off the cart,” he says. With heat exhaustion, cooling with cold towels, shade, air conditioning, shower and drinking water or Gatorade “usually perks them up,” he says. If that doesn’t turn the person around, it’s time for more aggressive treatment, he says, and that’s why cold tubs are at sporting events. “Time is brain, time is muscle, time is heart,” says MacKnight. And while the practice used to be to call an ambulance, MacKnight says every minute counts, and cooling should start immediately because “every minute that your body is subjected to markedly high temps has a potential for damage. The longer the time, the more the damage. Try to bring the temperature down immediately.” He also says that people who’ve been ill are more likely to be dehydrated from

TOM DALY

URGENT COOL DOWN

Construction on city’s $2 million skate park ramps up

medications they’ve taken, which can

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

“push you over the edge.” And for people with attention deficit disorder who are

@cvillenews_desk

taking stimulants, that’s not good for training in heat and makes it harder for their bodies to get rid of heat. “I don’t think there’s any question” that playing on artificial turf makes for hotter conditions, MacKnight says. “If the ambient temperature is 95 degrees, the field could be 125 degrees.”

events. “Temperature doesn’t play as much a role as humidity,” he says. “With no cloud cover, kids are going to struggle.” And when it’s hot, humid and sunny, “the stars align.” Says Macknight, “Most of the time when people have an issue, it’s almost always a perfect storm condition.”—L.P.

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

Where he’s most likely to see heat exhaustion is at cross country and distance

The $2 million skate park will feature three main “bowls,” including a butterfly bowl and a flow bowl, a half pipe, a pump bump, a sculptural brick bank and several grinding ledges. Gnarly, bro. David Juers (top) is wearing out unauthorized skate spots around town until the new park opens in November.

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or inaccurate information,” a situation Ryan denies happened—and is unhappy that Pearman would make that allegation. B.J. Morris’ son was also at the July 21 practice. “I found my son sprawled out under a tree,” she says. “He felt bad with a headache and nausea.” Not all parents think conditions July 21 were that bad. “My son was at the same practice,” says Gregg Scheibel. He says the coach told him his son was “huffing and puffing” and sat him down and gave him some water. Scheibel says the practices were voluntary and the temperature was in the low 80s. “When you play in the heat, you take on certain risks,” he says. That’s why the athletes have physicals, he adds. Scheibel started a petition to bring Pierson back, and he says the coach resigned because of Clancy’s complaints. The school has had four soccer coaches in the past few years. “We’ve got an unhinged woman who has a vendetta against coaches at Monticello High,” he asserts. “If I’ve seen a coach harming a child, I’ve spoken up,” says Clancy. “If that means I’m unhinged…” Clancy says she’s been asked to meet with the county’s Student Health Advisory Board. And she appeared before the Albemarle County School Board February 8, and says she gave them information on what can be done to avoid such situations as the weather warms up, including posting signs warning about the extreme heat on artificial turf fields in hot weather. “I didn’t just complain,” she says. “I have a deep fear of this happening again and I came up with solutions.” She says she’s had parents blame her for allowing her sons to practice that day. And she says she’s blamed herself for trusting that the coach would not have them playing outdoors in full sun on a heat advisory day. She’s also been reminded that her sons could have sat out if they were too hot, but both Patrick and Ryan say they wouldn’t have done that. “Boys don’t do that,” Clancy agrees. “You think as an athlete you have to get to the next level. You push through.” And boys don’t think their coach would put them in harm’s way, she adds. Because of the heat exhaustion, Patrick will be susceptible to heat in the future, she says. Patrick, who was on the varsity team as a freshman last year, will not be playing soccer this spring, and he opted for the swim team over the winter. “Ryan and I really do like soccer, but with the coaching staff and what’s going on,” he says, they decided to forego the season. He doesn’t want what happened to him to happen to anyone else. “I felt lucky,” says Patrick. “It could have been much worse.” While denying that conditions were dangerous July 21, Pearman says the school will take additional precautions in the future. Certified athletic trainers will be present at summer practices and the school division’s Student Health Advisory Board will be reviewing the VHSL heat guidelines “to determine if we need to make the guidelines we follow more restrictive,” he says.

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NEWS

First brush with the law Know your rights when encountering police By Lisa Provence

“If you’re not physically under arrest, you can walk away,” says Heilberg. You’re under no obligation to take a breathalyzer, he says, “but if they smell alcohol, they may arrest you for possession.”

lisa@c-ville.com

L

et’s just go ahead and get the obligatory warning out of the way: Don’t do illegal stuff. But we know that some of you will, and when you encounter police, at least be aware of your rights so you don’t get yourself in more trouble than you’re already in. For legal advice, we consulted attorney David Heilberg, who reiterates: Don’t do illegal stuff. Don’t possess anything on your person, in your home or in your car that you don’t want the police to find in a search. Here’s his advice for those who don’t heed that advice and find themselves in these typical situations.

Stopped on the street “If accosted on the street, without being rude or impolite or a jerk, you’ve got to assert your rights,” says Heilberg. Again, you don’t have to talk to police unless you’re in a traffic accident when you are required to exchange personal, vehicle and insurance information with anyone else involved and police. Remember these questions: Am I under arrest? Am I free to go?

The most common question Heilberg gets when he talks to sororities or fraternities is what to do if an officer asks you to consent to a search of your car. Decline permission. “That’s like waving a red flag in front of a bull,” he concedes. “They’re going to come up with a way to do it. The police can smell marijuana better than ordinary folks whether it’s there or not. Often they will try to detain you long enough for backup to arrive with a drug-sniffing K-9 to justify your search and arrest.” However, “You have to assert your rights,” he says. And we don’t have to tell you that would be the Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable and warrantless searches, right?

FILE PHOTO

Pulled over by police Make sure dashboard camera footage is preserved. And don’t talk to officers if they find anything.

Underage drinking party raid “Don’t have a party, don’t have alcohol,” stipulates Heilberg. First, dump the contraband. Should you run into the woods?

Help solve a crime In the 2007 alleged smoke bomb plot in which a disturbed teen talked about blowing up two Albemarle high schools, a 13-year-old boy was asked to come to the police station to help with the case—and he was charged with conspiracy. If you’re asked to come down to the station for a friendly chat, “That’s when you call your lawyer,” says Heilberg. And make sure your parents are involved to stop the questioning until you have a lawyer, he advises. Heilberg’s pet peeve: “Most people don’t know police are allowed to lie to you. I don’t think this should ever be permitted when the suspect is a juvenile. Why should your first encounter with the law teach you you can’t trust police?”

Traumatized teens deal with aftermath of horrific events Young people in Parkland, Florida, are dealing with an unspeakable act that killed 17 people and destroyed countless lives and feelings of safety in their daily routines, much like what students in Charlottesville had to cope with at the beginning of the school year after the August 12 white supremacist invasion left three dead and a community grappling with post-traumatic stress disorder. Sarah Elaine Hart, a guidance counselor at Charlottesville High School, saw the effects firsthand. “We held freshmen orientation on August 14. Some students walked in to the building with physical and emotional wounds from the terrorist attack and violence on August 12. Other students were trying to comprehend events even the adults in their lives found incomprehensible. Still others appeared most worried about starting high school, nervous about navigating a new place.” “We had students involved in the resistance,” says Fré Halvorson-Taylor, co-editor of CHS’ The Knight-Time Review. “Many felt incredibly unsafe and unsettled. It was a reminder people hate them because of their religion or race.” CHS counselors logged more than 1,750 individual student sessions in the first six

weeks of school, with about one in three for personal emotional support, a ratio that has continued, says Hart. Six months after the Unite the Right rally, some students are still healing, physically or emotionally, she says. And some are thinking about how they can make their world better than they found it. “The violence and hatred they witnessed on August 11 and 12 has inspired many teenagers to take action, whether by becoming more involved in causes within our community or by dedicating themselves to become better informed citizens,” says Hart. “As the CHS staff processed our own sorrows following August 11 and 12, many found inspiration in our students. In the midst of challenging times, our students remind us that the future is bright.”—Lisa Provence

THERE’S HELP It’s not easy being a teen. Luckily, our community has a plethora of free resources to help you through whatever you’re dealing with, from finding a doctor who won’t deny your sexuality to connecting with a counselor who can help with family drama.—Erin O’Hare

Charlottesville Pride Community Network Cvillepride.org Click on the website’s “resources” tab for information about LGBTQ-friendly and -affirming doctors and counselors, support groups, social events, housing resources, places of worship and service organizations, plus a list of local businesses with gender-neutral bathrooms.

Ready Kids 296-4118 24-hour Teen Crisis Hotline: 972-7233 The Ready Kids counseling program supports children and teens (and their families) seeking stability. It is equipped to help teens who are vulnerable to running away or being kicked out of their home.

Sexual Assault Resource Agency 24-hour hotline: 977-7273 SARA serves anyone who has personally experienced or has been affected by any kind of sexual violence, including rape, stalking, sexual assault, incest, sexual harassment or unwanted touching. This group offers trauma-informed therapy, support groups, emergency room and legal system advocacy and more.

EZE AMOS

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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“Most people don’t know police are allowed to lie to you. I don’t think this should ever be permitted when the suspect is a juvenile. Why should your first encounter with the law teach you you can’t trust police?” DAVID HEILBERG

Charlottesville High School guidance counselor Sarah Elaine Hart says more than 1,750 individual student sessions were logged the first six weeks of the school year.


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NEWS

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Wishes To Congratulate

Kate Faulconer Property Manager

Let’s talk about sex Teens are turning to longer-lasting birth control By Samantha Baars news@c-ville.com

I In just two short years with the firm, Kate has become the leading Property Manager Realtor in Central Virginia*. Thanks to Kate’s tireless work ethic and professionalism, the firm is able to provide truly full service real estate brokerage services to our buyers and sellers. 434-977-4005 • kate@loringwoodriff.com *Per CAAR, #1 Rental Agent by total rent volume and highest average rental amount

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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W W W. L O R I N G WO O D R I F F. C O M

Where: Spring Creek Golf Club Zion Crossroads, VA • • • •

When: May 16, 2018

Reception and awards following golf Sponsorship opportunities are available Registration forms will be sent out shortly Contact C.P. Staley for more information at charles.staley@skanska.com

The Virginia Institute of Autism (VIA) helps people overcome the challenges of autism through innovative, evidence-based programs in education, outreach and adult services. VIA is a nonprofit agency based in Charlottesville, VA. VIA serves hundreds of families in 17 Virginia counties through the James C. Hormel School, outpatient services and the adult academy.

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t was 2008 when teenagers across the country were rapping along to Lil Wayne’s “Lollipop” remix, singing: “Safe sex is great sex, better wear a latex, cause you don’t want that late text, that ‘I think I’m late’ text. So wrap it up.” But a decade later, it appears as though the rap legend’s socially conscious lyricism is a bit outdated. Condoms are out and birth control implants and intrauterine devices are in—at least that’s the case at UVA’s Teen and Young Adult Health Center, where clinician Dyan Aretakis says about 75 percent of patients requesting birth control choose a contraceptive implant called Nexplanon, or IUDs such as Mirena and Kyleena. These options are referred to as LARCs, or long-acting reversible contraceptives, and last between three and 10 years. When a patient comes in to the West Main Street clinic to talk about birth control, Aretakis asks them when they’d like to have their first child. “They say, ‘Not for a long time,’” the clinician says. “And we say, ‘There are only two types you need to look at.’” The implant and IUD are proven to be significantly more effective than previously popular methods such as condoms and birth control pills. Adds Aretakis, “When you’re a teenager or in your early 20s, you are so fertile. Why would you use the least effective methods when you’re most fertile?” Though teens seeking birth control do not need parents’ permission for a prescription

or to insert an implant or IUD at a clinic like the Teen and Young Adult Health Center or the Virginia Department of Health, Aretakis says procedures can cost around $2,000 without insurance, and patients do need consent to use their parents’ health insurance. “To be honest, it’s more of helping a young person figure out how to have that conversation with their parents,” she says. “Most parents do not want their kids pregnant.”

PREVENTING PREGNANCY There are more effective ways to dodge teen pregnancies—25 in Charlottesville in 2015 and 39 in Albemarle—than by using condoms and the pill. Teens are now opting for implant and intrauterine contraceptives, but don’t forget that condoms are the only contraceptive that protect against sexually transmitted infections. Below are the most effective to least effective methods of birth control, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Implant: 0.05% Levonorgestrel intrauterine device (IUD): 0.2% Copper IUD: 0.8% Injectable: 6% Pill: 9% Patch: 9% Ring: 9% Diaphragm: 12% Male condom: 18% Female condom: 21% Withdrawal: 22% Sponge: 24% Spermicide: 28% *Percentages are based on one out of 100 women who experienced an unwanted pregnancy while using each method.


NEWS

Two newspaper editors share the real stories By Lisa Provence lisa@c-ville.com

W

hat’s it like to be a teenager in 2018? We figured nobody’s better plugged in than newspaper editors, so we checked in with the editors at Charlottesville High and Western Albemarle. Here’s what we learned about the differences between city and county schools—and what they have in common.

Olivia Gallmeyer Biggest issues: “A lot of people are socially conscious. The statues were a big deal before August 12.” Student stress and academic pressure are “huge,” she says, and there’s parental pressure as well. Of the three Albemarle County high schools, half the students at Monticello and Albemarle take AP courses. At Western, “three-quarters do,” says Gallmeyer.

EZE AMOS

17-year-old senior at Western Albemarle High School Co-editor of The Western Hemisphere

Olivia Gallmeyer technology than they do. “If a teacher doesn’t know how to run a projector, we don’t know how to run the projector.” Also, “some of us like to read books.” Obsolete in your lifetime? DVDs, CDs and watching a physical TV. “We do a lot more streaming.”

Characterize WAHS: High achieving. “I don’t think people care about what they’re learning. It’s get through this so I can go to college and begin my life.” Also, “we are much whiter than the other schools.” And sport heavy. WAHS is “fanatic,” says Gallmeyer. “It’s all about football in the fall.” And “Spirit Week is crazy here. You’re kind of ostracized if you don’t want to dress up.”

Describe your generation: “I think what’s going to be huge is coming of age after the 2016 election in such a polarized time.” Some kids have been out since they were 12 or 13. “Feminism and LGBT activism at our age is common.”

Coolest thing about Western: Lots of options. “We have a lot of support for independent study that people don’t know about,” says Gallmeyer, who has taken drama and worked on the newspaper for four years, and is taking statistics online. She’s also taking a women’s studies class, and she says there are lots of extracurricular activities, including a “super strong” robotics team.

Worst thing about the school: The systemic issues, about which more communication and transparency would be “awesome.”

17-year-old senior at Charlottesville High School Co-editor of The Knight-Time Review

Hangout: Cook Out, where all high schools convene. Risky behaviors: “There’s a lot of vaping.” And social media provides a platform for sexist and racist posts, which because they aren’t posted on school grounds, the administration can’t do anything. “That’s the most elusive beast we have,” says Halvorson-Taylor.

August 12: Discussion in class began August 23. “To me it was hard to talk about,” she says. Teachers wanted to do it from an academic perspective.

EZE AMOS

What do adults get wrong? Many see technology as an evil that keeps them from seeing the good it does, she says. “I see Facebook as a way to get involved,” and a tool with a lot of potential. “It really is a revolution.”

Fré Halvorson-Taylor

Message to adults: “Listen to us. Engage us in conversation. Talk to us. We each have our unique voice.”

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Describe your generation: “I’m still pretty hopeful. Local activism is getting younger. I still think we’re going to be the ones to address issues. We grew up with the message of hope in 2008 and 2012. Trump is pretty scary for us. And this wave of bigotry is something we have to actively address.”

Risky behaviors: Vaping and JUULing. Alcohol use is common, and “weed is a problem also.” Not big: cigarettes and hard drugs.

What adults get wrong: “A lot try to lump our age group with millennials.” They also assume teenagers know more about

Coolest thing about CHS: “I love its diversity. Every student I come into contact with is passionate about something.” And teachers are their partners in crime, she says. “We aren’t just apathetic, slacking off teenagers. We have our interests. That’s what keeps me going.”

Fré HalvorsonTaylor

Worst thing about your school: Although it’s improved a lot, Gallmeyer says Western has a huge culture of student stress, and mental health and substance abuse issues. “It’s considered the norm to be stressed, and students brag about, ‘I got four hours of sleep last night.’”

Hangout: Brownsville Market for the potato wedges.

Biggest issues: Little diversity in the upper-level classes. After talking to the city schools’ superintendent, Halvorson-Taylor is wondering what social and economic barriers are keeping black students out of AP and honor classes. “Black students are asked, ‘Are you sure you’ll feel comfortable?’ I wasn’t asked that.”

@cvillenews_desk

Condoms are out and birth control implants and intrauterine devices are in.

High school beat

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

Students in Albemarle County and Charlottesville schools are taught a sex education curriculum called Family Life from kindergarten through high school. It starts with developing an awareness of positive ways in which family members show love and affection, and transitions into studying forms of contraception and sexually transmitted infections. According to the family life curriculum for ninth-graders in county schools, “the student will identify sexual abstinence as the appropriate choice for adolescents and identify appropriate methods for expressing feelings and affection.” But the UVA clinic recommends birth control based on the guidelines of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which says 42 percent of teens from ages 15 to 19 have had sex. At least one other community resource aims to educate kids beyond abstinence. The Thomas Jefferson Memorial ChurchUnitarian Universalist on Rugby Road hosts a class called Our Whole Lives, which is a program taught to all age levels in churches across the country. Locally, eighth and ninth grade members of the congregation typically take the course. “Public schools are probably not where you should get your sex education,” says Lorie Craddock, a 25-year member of the Unitarian Universalist church who has had three children go through the program. “I didn’t have any expectations that city schools were going to have this conversation with my kids—this is something that we as parents were taking care of.” Before it begins, parents attend an informational session to review course materials. Kids aren’t quick to spill what they learned in their sex ed classes, but Craddock says this way, parents know the drill. “We certainly knew what they were talking about in class, but they weren’t coming to us saying, ‘Hey, we put a condom on a banana,’” she says. Topics covered run the gamut, and include sexual orientation, gender expression, pleasure, love making, pregnancy, consent, parties, drugs and more. “I’ve heard from more than one parent—including me—that once your kid goes through this class, they really do become a resource for other kids,” says Craddock. “They know it all. There is no stone left unturned.”

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The local authority These women mean business You’re in luck

Cocktail party! Let our Booze Issue—on stands March 21—wet your whistle with five wines for spring, “healthy” cocktails (uh huh), a blind beer tasting and more. Drink up.

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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Want to party like your Irish? C-VILLE’s Clover Takeover from 11am-4pm Saturday, March 17, at Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery offers festivities galore from serving up pints of craft beer, a cornhole tournament, family-friendly activities and more. Ticket details on C-VILLE’s Facebook page.

What to do?

The inaugural issue of our new business magazine, C-BIZ, enters into the national conversation about women and work. We’ve asked local experts about the undercapitalization of women-owned businesses, how HR plays a role at the office and why diversity is good for the bottom line. Plus, meet 11 local women who are cracking the glass ceiling. You’ll also find: How much your peers are making. A better bicycle for all shapes and sizes. What to expect from net neutrality in our area. A local 3-D printed shoe promoting foot health. And more!

It’s all of our business. SPRING 2018

Inside the i.Lab

A look at the city’s most prolific incubator How net neutrality affects our area A locally made 3-D printed sneaker

Liza Borches, President and CEO of Carter Myers Automotive

WOMEN&WORK

While #MeToo and Time’s Up illuminate workplace inequality nationally, who’s leading the local charge for a better balance of power?

Can innovation hubs Reinventing agriculture survive in Charlottesville? at Sylvanaqua Farms

Online all the time Make c-ville.com your go-to website for breaking news and trending topics. It’s where you’ll find all of our stories from the newspaper and magazines, as well as web-only exclusives—videos, photo galleries, playlists and more. C-VILLE Weekly, the

Social scene

alternative voice for everything happening in our city, is your source for news that affects your life. We cover the arts, music, food and community topics you need to know. We’ll tell you where to go, what to see, what to do, what to eat. This is our town—live it up.

Connect with us on social media to stay up-to-date on news and events as they happen in real time. Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: Community news: @cvillenews_desk Food and drink: @eatdrinkcville The arts: @artscville Instagram: @cvilleweekly

How much do your peers get paid?

What you were reading The top five articles on C-VILLE Weekly’s Facebook page last week: 1. Conspiracy theory? Petitioner wants videos of fatal crash released 2. Escafé has served as a gathering spot for many different groups 3. Fifty Shades Freed pales as softcore porn 4. ARTS Pick: Asher McGlothlin’s musical limbo 5. Keeping out the militia: Law group says legal remedies exist to prevent another August 12

For your complete guide to can’tmiss events (and to submit your own!), visit events.c-ville.com.

This is our town.

.com


Long live the king

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SATURDAY 2/24

ROCK STEADY

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reasons to come in out of the rain THURSDAY 2/22

MIC HAND-OFF Can’t get Drake’s “God’s Plan” out of your head? Think you’ve got the pipes to take on Rhianna or ya feel some old school Jay-Z comin’ through? Spit it out at Hip-Hop Karaoke where SGtheDJ calls the role as the line for the stage fills with local MCs and wannabes, cued to drop rhymes from their headphone heroes. Contact bookwithsg@gmail.com with song info to sign up in advance. $5, 8pm. All ages. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. W. 284-8561.

SATURDAY 2/24

FIGHTING BACK The fourth annual WinterSongs brings together hundreds of local female vocalists using their voices as a weapon to fight violence against women in our community. After a day of “joyful empowerment” where they “mix, share, support, cheer and sing for each other,” student ensembles from Charlottesville, Albemarle and the University of Virginia will perform a celebratory public concert organized by Craig Jennings, choral director at Burley Middle School. All funds raised go to the Shelter for Help in Emergency. Donations accepted at the door, 5pm. Monticello High School, 1400 Independence Way. 244-3100.

ON THE MOVE

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Psychedelic, space-rock band Ruckzuck finds its unique sound through pulsing synths, fuzzy riffs and, at times, dark but entrancing lyrics that drive the three-piece’s soundscapes. Hailing from the mountains of Pennsylvania, the group’s name has numerous meanings, all of them having to do with moving forward and moving fast—a perfect title for this progressive, futuristic band that writes, produces and records its own music. Free, 9pm. All ages. Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar, 414 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9947.

@artscville

SATURDAY 2/24

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

Country superstar Luke Bryan’s hit songs put a contemporary spin on broken hearts and driving trucks, allowing him to shift from mainstream to the hip-hop, rock world of brocountry—a term he rejects, but it seems appropriate for a guy who’s been named Entertainer of the Year by the Academy of Country Music and Country Music Association, and has released songs titled “Country Man” and “Country Girl (Shake It for Me),” as well as “Huntin,’ Fishin’ and Lovin’ Every Day.” He’s on the road, playing tracks from What Makes You Country, released in December. $53.75-93, 7pm. John Paul Jones Arena, 295 Massie Rd. 575-8497.

Luke Bryan brings his What Makes You Country tour to the John Paul Jones Arena on Saturday.


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TASTINGS • BREWERY TOURS • GAMES • LIVE MUSIC • KIDS CONTEST • GIVEAWAYS

tickets on sale for brews, swag & fun

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GREEN:

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February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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ARTS THIS WEEK Wednesday 2/21

Friday 2/23

music

music

Bachata Fusion. Edwin Roa teaches an introductory bachata lesson before DJ Butchata spins an eclectic Latin mix for a social dance. $5-8, 8pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561.

Adrian Duke. Piano-playing singer-songwriter combines blues, Americana and soul. Free, 10pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

Open Mic. Neal Goodloe hosts a night of musical fun. Free, 7pm. Durty Nelly’s, 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. Rhett Miller. Alt-country artist takes a break from Old 97’s to play material from his solo record, The Traveler. With Evan Felker. $25-40, 7pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 245-4948. Sammy Horn. Local piano virtuoso sets your evening mode to “relaxed.” Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. Universal Sigh. A high-energy metamorphic jazz fusion rock show. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526.

stage Go, Dog. Go! P.D. Eastman’s classic book springs to life in a frolicking musical dog party. $10-42, 6pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 979-1333. Top Girls. Caryl Churchill’s groundbreaking theatrical exploration of the challenges women face in defining their own lives, strengths and resilience. This is a pay-what-you-can performance. 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177.

words Fun for the Young. Author Aimee Hunt hosts this opportunity for children to explore a book through observation, movement, play and simple hands-on projects. Free, 10am. The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA, 155 Rugby Rd. 924-3592.

Thursday 2/22 music Jr. Moments Last Stand. Playing good tunes for good times. Free, 7pm. Durty Nelly’s, 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. MerleFest on the Road. The Way Down Wanderers, The Barefoot Movement and Andy May play “traditional plus” music. $1820, 6pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. 977-5590. The Michael Elswick Gathering. Epic jazz ensemble with influences ranging from hard bop to New Orleans-style jazz. Free, 7pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. Tyler Dick Band. Original rock and some wellloved covers with a funky twist. Free, 10pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

stage

Bob Bennetta. Playing jazz for your listening pleasure. Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. Caleb Einwechter. Local musician provides an intimate acoustic performance of original music. Suggested donation $5, 7pm. The Space Lab, 705 W. Main St. 228-1120. DJ Tova. Versatile DJ will have you dancing until closing time. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526. John Wyant Band. Island-style Americana originals and covers. Free, 7pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561. J. Roddy Walston and The Business. Rock with Southern roots and a punk spirit. With Futurebirds. $18-20, 9pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 245-4948.

Craig Dodson. Blending country Western roots and classic rock. Free, 5pm. James River Brewery, 561 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-7837.

Rapunzel’s Jazz Sessions. The lineup includes Dwight Spencer and friends, The Johnny Clark Jazz Ensemble and The Accidentals. Free, 8pm. Rapunzel’s Coffee and Books, 924 Front St., Lovingston. Lovingston. 263-6660.

Duck Brothers. DJ Ducksauce and DJ Ducktape scratch, slash, cut and juggle their unique funk, hip-hop and dance rock in on-the-spot mixes. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526.

Ruckzuck. Psychedelic space-rock band from the mountains of Pennsylvania. With Jaguardini and Sundream. Free, 9pm. Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar, 414 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9947.

Gabriel Planas. Local pianist slides onto the piano bench to jazz up the evening. Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

The BLNDRS. Playing classic folk-rock with eclectic flair. 21-plus. Free, 10:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549.

Greg Ward. Reggae, roots and rock with a unique twist. Free, 7pm. Wild Wolf Brewery, 2461 Rockfish Valley Hwy., Nellysford. 361-0088. Ian Gilliam & The FireKings. Mixing rock ‘n’ roll, rockabilly, honky-tonk, surf, blues and whatever else happens. Free, 6:30pm. The Batesville Market, 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001.

Laetitia Sonami Colloquium. Interactive electronic sound artist creates sound installations with audio and kinetic elements embedded in ubiquitous objects such as light bulbs, rubber gloves and toilet plungers. Free, 3:30pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA. 924-3052.

Johnny B and The Goodes. Blues, soul and who knows what else. Free, 9pm. Tin Whistle Irish Pub, 609 E. Market St. 202-8387.

Martin Sexton. Soulful Americana with hints of folk and rock. With Rebecca Haviland and Whisky Heart. $25, 8pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. 977-5590.

Jonathan Richman and Tommy Larkins. The Modern Lovers frontman plays solo material with Naked Prey and Giant Sand drummer. With Ane Diaz. $15-17, 8:30pm. The

MRC Compilation Release Party. The Music Resource Center celebrates its 2017 best-of album with live performances from some of Charlottesville’s emerging young artists. Free, 5pm. Music Resource Center, 105 Ridge St. 979-5478.

The Freeway Revival. Blending rock, blues, country, funk and soul for a sound that feels strangely familiar yet remains entirely unique to itself. Free, 6:30pm. Starr Hill Brewery Tap Room, 5391 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet. 823-5671. The Gladstones. Playing music that’ll make you boogie. Free, 8pm. Durty Nelly’s, 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. The Invasion! Stripped-down and energetic tribute band plays British rock ‘n’ roll from the 1960s and ‘70s. Free, 10pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. CONTINUED ON PAGE 21

Pickin’ and Grinnin’. Instrumental and vocal jam open to the public. Free, 7pm. James River Brewery, 561 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-7837. Practically Einstein. Modern vintage rock with a heavy dose of ‘90s and a touch of soul. Free, 9pm. Tin Whistle Irish Pub, 609 E. Market St. 202-8387. Technosonics XVIII. Come experience UVA’s digital music and sound composition festival, with creations from students and outside composers. Free, 8pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA. 924-3376. The Sally Rose Band. Original and eclectic songs with colorful notes and tasteful textures from a variety of genres. Free, 6pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. 975-0094. Timi Ryalls. An evening of honky-tonk. Free, 8pm. Durty Nelly’s, 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. Whiskey Rebellion. Americana band with a sound deeply rooted in the folk traditions of Appalachia and the raw elements of American rock ‘n’ roll. 21-plus. Free, 10:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549.

stage Disney Live! There’s a surprise at every turn of the knob at Mickey and Minnie’s doorway to magic. $20-45, 4pm. John Paul Jones Arena, 295 Massie Rd. 243-4960. Improv Comedy Night. Bent Theatre delivers improv so fresh and organic it’s grown right in front of you. $10, 8pm. The Bridge Progressive Arts Initiative, 209 Monticello Rd. 984-5669.

Top Girls. See listing for Wednesday, February 21. $20-25, 7:30pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177.

South Pacific. See listing for Thursday, February 22. $5-10, 7:30pm. Martin Luther King Jr. Performing Arts Center, 1400 Melbourne Rd. 979-9532.

Love’s a Bitch. See listing for Thursday, February 22. $8-14, 8pm. Ruth Caplin Theatre, UVA. 924-3376.

Top Girls. See listing for Wednesday, February 21. $20-25, 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177.

GET LISTED The C-VILLE Weekly arts calendar submission process allows arts community partners to enter events directly into the calendar via computer log-in. Please contact us by e-mail at arts@c-ville.com to request account information. DEADLINE INFO: Events must be entered into the online calendar system by 5pm on Tuesday, one week prior to publication. We list events that are art-related or have entertainment value and are open to the public. We do not guarantee event listings in print and we typically don’t include faith-based, environmental, medical or instructional events that are outside the realm of art.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

South Pacific. Charlottesville High School’s production of the musical set on an island paradise during World War II, where two parallel love stories are threatened by the dangers of prejudice and war. $5-10, 7:30pm. Martin Luther King Jr. Performing Arts Center, 1400 Melbourne Rd. 979-9532.

UVA MFA Reading. Creative writing students Sasha Stein Prevost and Katie Rice read from their work. Free, 8pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-2552.

Christopher Williams. Songwriting storyteller with a percussive guitar style and years of experience. $20, 7pm. C’ville Coffee, 1301 Harris St. 817-2633.

Midnight Spaghetti & The Chocolate GStrings. A combination of classic funk, conscious frenetic rap, a killer horn section and a contagious enthusiasm for life. With The Transmitters. $10, 8pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561.

@artscville

Love’s a Bitch. When her boyfriend leaves her for a richer woman in the big city, Doña Juana discovers what she’s really made of in David Dalton’s adaptation of Don Gil de las Calzas Verdes by Tirso de Molina. $8-14, 8pm. Ruth Caplin Theatre, UVA. 924-3376.

music

Luke Bryan. Country music star brings his heartfelt songs to the stage. With Kip Moore and The Cadillac Three. $53.75-93, 7pm. John Paul Jones Arena, 295 Massie Rd. 243-4960.

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

Hip-Hop Karaoke. Show off your inner MC. $5, 8pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561.

Saturday 2/24

Afro-Fusion. Irish-American bluegrass combined with Afro-pop and Malawian styles. $15-18, 8pm. The Front Porch, 221 E. Water St. 242-7012.

Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. 977-5590.

©2018 Jen Sorensen www.jensorensen.com Twitter: @JenSorensen

LG and Friends. Bassist brings a group of friends together for blues, jazz, R&B and a little rock ‘n’ roll. 21-plus. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549.

Young Frankenstein. Journey to Transylvania for Mel Brooks’ hilarious musical full of adult humor and gags. $10-15, 7:30pm. St. Anne’sBelfield School, 2132 Ivy Rd. 296-5106.

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Run, Kids, Run!

Spring/Summer Kids Events Supported by the Ragged Mountain Family 3/31 BBBS Kids 1K 4/7 Kids UVA Track Clinic 4/14 Run for Autism 400 4/29 CDS Panorama Runs

5/5 Discovery Dash June - Bruce Barnes Mile July - CTC Summer Track Meets July - YMCA Saturdays in the Park

For more information go to raggedmountainrunning.com

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

@artscville

facebook.com/cville.weekly

“The best kid’s running shoe selection and prices!”

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All structural corrections are made without any twisting, popping and cracking. Every visit Dr. Lynch shows you what’s wrong, corrects it, and then shows you what’s better. All treatment is quick, effective and painless.

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ARTS FEEDBACK

Monticello High School student Joshua St. Hill was motivated by the stories of black men who have died as a result of police violence to write (and perform in) his drama, A King’s Story. “The power of storytelling is legacy. Even if the story that you’re telling is tragic, even if the story that you’re telling is [that] of somebody who isn’t with us, you can always keep them alive in that,” says St. Hill.

Ignorance is not bliss Teen playwright Joshua St. Hill discusses A King’s Story By Erin O’Hare

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*Atlas Orthogonal: A scientific instrument program to realign the top 2 bones of your spine without popping and cracking the neck.

arts@c-ville.com

I

n April 2017, Monticello High School student Joshua St. Hill began writing a play. He had been bitten by the theater bug during the school’s production of In the Heights, and his drama teacher, Madeline Michel, asked if he’d like to write something for the stage. He did. Black men who have died as a result of police violence had been on his mind, and St. Hill wrote a script about James King, a fictional Charlottesville teenager who, while reaching into his pocket for his phone, is shot and killed by a police officer. St. Hill is quick to note that the 30-minute, one-act play, A King’s Story, wasn’t a solo effort—he had input from Michel and classmates, especially the show’s director, Amaya Wallace. The play takes place after King’s death and focuses on King’s best friend, Elijah, played by St. Hill, and how his reactions compare to those of others. Many have applauded the play’s content and message while some have criticized it as being too

violent and anti-police (St. Hill suspects those folks haven’t taken the time to watch the play, which is available on YouTube). St. Hill discusses some of the themes and issues explored in A King’s Story. C-VILLE: Why did you write A King’s Story? Joshua St. Hill: It needed to be told. When we started the early drafts, people questioned me, “Why are you guys always telling stories about race? What’s so big about it?” And the [answer] is, because it’s still relevant, it’s still happening; it’s still a problem that needs to be addressed. People like to say it’s not happening in our town; it’s not happening around here. It was a horrible coincidence that July 8 and August 12 [the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi/white nationalist rallies in Charlottesville] happened [while I was writing this]. I think that opened up a lot of people’s eyes to what happens. The less you talk about it, the more willing people are to still do you wrong. If you’re not making any noise, people are going to still do what they’re doing without any change. A closed mouth does not get fed.


ARTS THIS WEEK In A King’s Story, you play Elijah, a high school student who’s just lost his best friend to police violence. How much of Elijah is you? Fifty percent of Elijah is me and 50 percent is a character. The part that’s me is the intelligent kid with historic knowledge, with a little bit of fire. The part that’s not me, the part that is the character, is the way he went about it. The thing about Elijah is, he has the best heart, and he has his head in the right place at the wrong time. But he has to understand that one person can’t tackle the world, or the whole town, by himself. James King being killed by a police officer wasn’t just one incident; it’s not as simple a problem as “it was wrong that the officer shot him.” It’s a complex problem that’s been going on for longer than Elijah’s even been alive. And he gets that, but he doesn’t get that. How much of the play is based on things that have happened in your own life—the conversations with parents about wearing hoodies at night, teachers saying “passing” instead of “murder,” heated conversations with classmates about racism and police violence? Never the classroom scene to me, personally, but it’s happened to other people, but definitely the hoodie discussion....and the sugarcoating! Oh my gosh, too much of the sugarcoating. Sometimes, adults think that children don’t fully understand what they’re talking about, or they try to overprotect children without realizing that we can notice that. We’re underestimated. That overprotection, sometimes it’s put in the wrong place. For instance, the question isn’t whether or not you should be wearing the hoodie at night, but, why are you judged for wearing the hoodie at night?

Tunes in the Hood. Great Irish music and good craic. Free, 5pm. Tin Whistle Irish Pub, 609 E. Market St. 202-8387. Wesley Diener. UVA opera singer Wesley Diener performs for his distinguished major recital. Free, 3:30pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA. 924-3376. Willie DE. Nationally-touring local artist who plays original folk-rock. Free, 2:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. 297-2326. Winter Songs. Local female vocalists use their voices as a weapon to fight domestic violence. Donations for the Shelter for Help in Emergency accepted at the door, 5pm. Monticello High School, 1400 Independence Way. 244-3100.

MidLife Crisis. Experienced musicians play a lively, danceable set. Free, 3pm. James River Brewery, 561 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-7837. Paulo Franco. Alt-country rocker plays songs of liquor, love and life. With Jimmy Slagle. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. 975-0094. Salsa Sunday. Edwin Roa teaches an introductory lesson before a social dance to a mix of eclectic Latin music. $5-8, 8pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561. The Burkes with Bill Staton. Jason Burke, Caroline Kirby Burke and guitarist Bill Staton play a set. Free, 1pm. The Batesville Market, 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001.

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Travis Elliott. Local singer and guitarist takes on songwriting subjects from love to spaceships, both badly in need of repair. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526.

Love’s a Bitch. See listing for Thursday, February 22. $8-14, 2 and 8pm. Ruth Caplin Theatre, UVA. 924-3376.

Zuzu’s Hot 5. Vintage jazz that will have your heart beating and your body moving. Free, noon. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

Scottsville V-Day: The Vagina Monologues. Benefit performance of Eve Ensler’s episodic play of female voices. $10, 4pm. The Scottsville Center for Arts and Nature, 401 Valley St., Scottsville. 989-8764. South Pacific. See listing for Thursday, February 22. $5-10, 7:30pm. Martin Luther King Jr. Performing Arts Center, 1400 Melbourne Rd. 979-9532. Top Girls. See listing for Wednesday, February 21. $20-25, 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177. Young Frankenstein. See listing for Friday, February 23. $10-15, 7:30pm. St. Anne’s-Belfield School, 2132 Ivy Rd. 296-5106.

words Henry Browne. Local architect reads from his new book that covers historically significant ruins in Virginia. Free, 4pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-2552.

etc. La Bohème. A Met Live in HD screening of the world’s most popular opera. $18-25, 12:30pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 979-1333.

stage South Pacific. See listing for Thursday, February 22. $5-10, 3pm. Martin Luther King Jr. Performing Arts Center, 1400 Melbourne Rd. 979-9532. Young Frankenstein. See listing for Friday, February 23. $10-15, 2pm. St. Anne’s-Belfield School, 2132 Ivy Rd. 296-5106.

etc. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. A Southern family gathers at its cotton plantation to celebrate Big Daddy’s birthday, and the scorching heat is almost as oppressive as everyone’s lies. This is a National Theatre in HD broadcast. $10-14, 7pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 979-1333.

Monday 2/26 music ATM Unit featuring Jonah Kane-West. An organ wizard meets a bass warrior for an epic adventure. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526.

The Big Lebowski. When The Dude is mistaken for a millionaire, he is commissioned to deliver a ransom for the real Lebowski’s kidnapped wife. $7, 9pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 979-1333.

Red & The Romantics. A blend of vintage folk and Americana music. Free, 7pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549.

Sunday 2/25

music

music Acoustic Open Mic. Acoustic open mic night featuring a variety of art and music. Free, 5pm. The Space Lab, 705 W. Main St. 228-1120. David Tewksbury. Around-town guitarist picks and strums the night away. Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

Kat Somers. Incorporating elements of acoustic alternative folk, indie and acoustic alternative pop. Free, 2pm. Wild Wolf Brewery, 2461 Rockfish Valley Hwy., Nellysford. Nellysford. 361-0088. King Golden Banshee. The right amount of raucous colors traditional Irish music. Free, 5:30pm. Tin Whistle Irish Pub, 609 E. Market St. 202-8387. Laura Cortese and The Dance Cards. Fourpiece band based in the lyrical rituals of folk

Bob Huntington. Hear everything from Gordon Lightfoot to The Beatles. Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. Karaoke Night. Calling all future pop stars. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526. Ragged Mountain String Band. Old-time Appalachian tunes carry songs with modern-day appeal and sensibility. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549. Travis Elliott. See listing for Sunday, February 25. Free, 10:30pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

stage

SHREDDING DAY Area fitness folks on last-minute workouts

SIMPLE PLEASURES HELPING HANDS 10 ideas for a smaller Charlottesville wedding

Three new vendors we love already

WINTER 2018

Here's the plan A monthly guide to the big day! PAGE 13

Love’s a Bitch. See listing for Thursday, February 22. $8-14, 8pm. Ruth Caplin Theatre, UVA. 924-3376.

Forever starts

LYAO Comedy Open Mic Night. Brandon Beswick hosts this opportunity for budding comics to try out new material. Signups begin at 7pm. Free, 8pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. 977-5590.

O N

Seven cuuuute couples— and how they said "I do"

now!

S T A N D S

N O W !

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Eggs Benefit Jazz Brunch. Weekly jazz charity brunch, with proceeds benefiting the Charlottesville Free Clinic. Free, 11am. Brasserie Saison, 111 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-7027.

Tuesday 2/27

@artscville

What can art do to address these issues? Art is so important, because it’s the safest way to do this. With art, people open up a new thought process to creativity, to how the art is being depicted. I can’t change a person’s mind for them; that comes down to the person himself. But if [my art] can do something to help that person alter, or make themselves want to alter, that’s the beauty of art. That’s the beauty in arguments, talking, lessons—to spark somebody’s thought process. And I think that’s what this play did.

Saturday 2/24

music explores new territories of rhythm and sonics. $12-15, 7:30pm. The Front Porch, 221 E. Water St. 242-7012.

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

What’s behind Elijah’s line, “I’m sick and tired of being sick and tired?” Most of the minorities in America who suffer from oppression, we don’t just find out about this oppression when we’re the right age...we always know about this oppression, it can be the subtlest thing as walking into a gas station and feeling the cashier eyeing you every single aisle you walk down. Or, you can see that your teacher automatically assumes you don’t understand most of the curriculum and talks to you softly in the corner about it. Since before 1776, oppression—racism—has been going on; it’s one of the pillars [of American society], sadly, which is why it’s so hard for me when people try to say racism doesn’t exist anymore.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19

HERE COME THE BRIDES

21


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ARTS THE WORKS

Stage coaching Budding artists learn in the spotlight arts@c-ville.com

W

hen I was a tween writing “X-Files” fan fiction, I never suspected my interest in storytelling would lead to an actual career as a writer. But then I enrolled in the creative writing program at a performing arts high school—and discovered my creative power. Dozens of local arts organizations offer Charlottesville children and teens opportunities to unlock their potential. From classes to summer camps to year-round workshops, the vast majority also provide financial support in the form of reduced costs, scholarships and free programming. Area arts organization leaders share what motivates kids to get involved in the arts— and why it really matters.

“Children and teens are not afraid to make mistakes,” says Deanna Gould, executive director of Light House Studio. “They understand the importance of learning from the process. As long as you establish a safe environment for young people to express themselves, they readily share ideas and are not afraid to take creative risks.” As the only dedicated youth film center in Virginia, Light House Studio teaches approximately 150 workshops to 1,200 students from 70 schools every year. Many student films are accepted to national festivals and even win awards, including a Peabody, a Gold World Medal at the New York Festivals World’s Best TV & Films and a CINE Golden Eagle. Gould explains that while older students recognize the potential for building their college and professional résumé through Light House, that isn’t the only goal. “Our objectives [include] encouraging self-expression [and] giving disadvantaged youth an opportunity to express their diverse perspectives,” she says. “By giving young people a voice, we are empowering them to become leaders and influence change.”

“When you have high expectations, kids and teens will excel and often outperform adults,” says Four County Players board of directors member Tres Wells. “Children and teens seem more willing to try and put themselves out there.” Four County Players offers two summer camps, one that focuses on production of a single youth-focused show, and another that offers multiple classes on topics like singing, dancing and improvisation, as well as a Friday showcase of student work. During the school year, young people participate in regular-season programming. A youth director program has produced two full-scale productions run by teens. And even the board of directors includes a youth director position “to represent the youth voice.” According to Wells, teens and kids have a natural love of the theater because, he explains, they bond more quickly than adults. “You just can’t explain the feeling of opening night after months of hard work and rehearsal,” he says. “The sense of pride and accomplishment with the thunderous applause of the opening night crowd is like nothing else.”

CHOOSE YOUR ROLE Four County Players fourcp.org/education Light House Studio lighthousestudio.org; lighthouse studio.org/summer-film-academy2018 Live Arts livearts.org; summeratlivearts.org Music Resource Center musicresourcecenter.org or drop by the studio for a tour The Paramount theparamount.net/education

Ike Anderson, now 31, choreographed his first dance at the MRC when he was in eighth grade, around the same age as some of the dancers he now teaches. “Dance was a huge confidence builder for me...it gave me a sense of purpose, and along with the confidence I gained from it, came evolution,” says Anderson.

“When you have high expectations, kids and teens will excel and often outperform adults.”

Music Resource Center At the Music Resource Center, students in grades six to 12 stay motivated by a points system that rewards members for accomplishments like taking a lesson or recording an album. According to Membership Coordinator Ike Anderson, the MRC gives tweens and teens access to musical instruments, studio equipment, artist support and lessons on topics like digital music composition, audio engineering, radio, songwriting and dance, regardless of their musical experience. “Everything done here can start at a beginner’s level,” says Anderson. “We’ve had a bunch of students graduate and join performing arts colleges.” Others go on to become recording artists, radio DJs, directors, instructors and choreographers. “Students aren’t just getting guitar lessons and a bag of chips,” Anderson says. “It is the vision of Music Resource Center to create a vibrant community through vibrant teens.

TRES WELLS, FOUR COUNTY PLAYERS

When you walk through our facility, you can feel that excitement and electricity.”

Live Arts

LIVE ARTS, LINDA HOGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

@artscville

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Light House Studio

Four County Players

EZE AMOS

By Elizabeth Derby

Live Arts’ education series recently offered a production of Peter Pan. The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee was performed as part of Four County Players’ summer camp in 2015.

“We create a lot of performances that involve young performers and crew members,” says Mike Long, director of education at Live Arts. “When they are given the chance and the training, they are every bit as capable of making great theater as adults.” In addition to casting school-age actors, Live Arts offers a mentor/apprentice program as well as a chance for teens to write, devise and perform their own original plays every fall. In the summer, students ages 4 to 20 participate in theater camps and productions, including Broadway musicals and Shakespeare plays. He sees kids and teens who are drawn to theater as a way to make friends become part of a theater community. “Many young people have been doing shows and camps at Live Arts for years, and when they get older it is common for previous campers to become Live Arts theater camp counselors and adult volunteers.”

The Paramount Theater Thanks to youth education programming at the Paramount, more than 158,000 students and teachers have taken field trips downtown to experience live theatrical and musical work as audience members since 2004.


home. Second home This old house

From Farmington to Esmont, a kitchen gets another chance

Inside. Outside. Home.

For a residential recycle, try these local resources

Bare bones

How to set your garden up for success during winter’s chill

part of TechnoSonics XVIII and the Making Noise Series Thursday, February 22, 5pm, UVA Music Library

Laetita Sonami Colloquium CCT*

Friday, February 23, 3:30pm, 107 Old Cabell Hall

Technosonics XVIII: DIY*

Friday, February 23, 8pm, Old Cabell Hall Saturday, February 24, 5pm, The Southern

Distinguished Major Voice Recitals*

Wesley Diener: Saturday, February 24, 3:30pm, Old Cabell Hall Josephine Miller: Saturday, March 24, 3:30pm, Old Cabell Hall

New Chicago Brass: UVA Brass Fest 2018*

More Info: http://music.virginia.edu/New_Chicago_Brass Saturday, March 16-17, 8pm, Old Cabell Hall

UVA Chamber Music Series - Albemarle Ensemble Sunday, March 18, 3:30pm, Old Cabell Hall

Telemetry at the Bridge*

featuring Anne La Berge, Matthew Burtner, Catherine Monnes Saturday, March 24, 8pm, The Bridge PAI

Charlottesville Symphony - Masterworks 4

DECEMBER 2017

A gift guide to stylish basics Shenandoah Joe’s new flavor

Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini Saturday, March 24, 8pm, Old Cabell Hall Sunday, March 25, 3:30pm, MLK Performing Arts Center

UVA Chamber Music Series - I-Jen Fang, percussion Wednesday, March 28, 8pm, Old Cabell Hall

Flute Forum*

A downtown office building gets back to its residential roots

Happy returns Central Virginia’s No. 1 home magazine has never looked finer. ABODE has given readers an inside look at the region’s most interesting homes for nearly a decade. From landscape to interior design, floor to ceiling, blueprint to fixture, each month our writers team up with the area’s top architects and designers to give you an insider’s view of the local homes you’ve always wanted to see inside.

Inside. Outside. Home.

Cello Studio Recital / Complete Cello Sonatas of Vivaldi* Saturday, March 31, 1pm, UVA Chapel

UNIVERSITY of VIRGINIA facebook.com/uvamusic | twitter.com/uvamusic

* denotes free events

music

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Look for ABODE at over 100 locations across Charlottesville, Albemarle, Orange, Lovingston, Crozet, Staunton, Waynesboro, and Fishersville at major grocery stores, gyms, restaurants, and retail locations and online at c-ville.com.

More Info: http://music.virginia.edu/flute-forum-2018 Saturday, March 31, 8:30am-5pm, Old Cabell Hall

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While the Paramount provides study guides, Standards of Learning connections and lectures, Education and Outreach Manager Cathy von Storch says feedback from local teachers reveals an impact beyond academics to include social and cultural enrichment. “It’s the overall experience of getting outside their comfort zone, learning manners and theater etiquette, being in public in a historic space with kids from all districts,” she says. “You bring an entire grade level together, from students whose parents bring them to shows all the time to those who only watch TV together as a family,” von Storch says. “But on that day, during that one hour at the Paramount, everyone shares the experience.” For students who want to have informed conversations, she says, “it levels the playing field.” Much like the arts themselves.

There’s no place like

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February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

In the warm glow of a few strings of lights strung above the dance floor of the Music Resource Center auditorium, Ike Anderson leads a group of dancers through a hip-hop routine, demonstrating each toe touch and head bob as he calls: “One and two and three and four, five and six and seven and eight. Left, touch. Up, touch. Back, touch. Back, touch.” About a dozen teenage dancers, some of them official members of the Return of the Comeback dance crew, others hoping to ace the upcoming audition, are rehearsing for future performances and competitions, which in the past have included the Best of Both Worlds Dance and Step competition held annually here in town. “Who’s killin’ it and knows they’re killin’ it? I want you out front,” Anderson calls from the stage before cranking the music, Bruno Mars and Cardi B’s “Finesse.” And for the freestyle part, he reminds them, “Trust your body and let go.” For the dancers in Return of the Comeback, letting go is a big part of why they dance. Trená, an 11th-grader, says that when she dances, she feels “relaxed,” like she doesn’t have to think about anything but the dance. It’s an escape from the stress of school and a break from mountains of homework. It’s time away from home that allows for a certain amount of self-discovery that only happens on places like dance floors, athletic fields and in band classrooms. “When I dance, I feel...like I’m not even on Earth; I feel out there, just by myself, and happy,” says Trinity, a ninth-grader.—Erin O’Hare

events

All the right moves

Sasha Leitman - Artist Talk*


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ARTS PREVIEW

All hands on deck CHS community explores South Pacific By Raennah Lorne

and dance. “It’s probably one of the most lush, most memorable scores of musical theater written during the golden age,” he says. “What I was really interested in doing with the show was finding a way to bridge then with now.” Enter Torain Braxton, a senior who’s been dancing since she could walk. Becker asked her to add contemporary movement to Bloody Mary’s song “Happy Talk,” as well as some other numbers.

arts@c-ville.com

The diverse program includes LGBTQ students, students from different countries, first-year language learners and students of color. “That is Charlottesville,” David Becker says. of war. Hubbard describes his character as a warmonger who “has this sort of gut drive to keep the conquest going.” But he also “has this peripheral feeling of, what’s the end cost of this and are the measures that we’re taking really worth it?” One way Becker has tried to engage young people with these issues is through the music

South Pacific Martin Luther King Jr. Performing Arts Center at Charlottesville High School

EZE AMOS

February 22-25

Beau LeBlond, Kayla Gavin and Valery Duro confront modern issues through an updated approach to the 1949 musical South Pacific.

The diverse program includes LGBTQ students, students from different countries, firstyear language learners and students of color. “That is Charlottesville,” Becker says, and it’s important to him that kids acknowledge the diverse makeup of their community. “Theater is community,” he says, “We can learn about how to improve our communities if we go and see how theaters run and how they work because it’s all collaboration.”

ARTS PROFILE

14 STORIES ROCKS PRO RE NATA MUSIC SERIES

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ince forming nearly a year ago, local high school band 14 Stories has already played one of Charlottesville’s most distinguished stages—and delivered a full-length set to boot. Featuring Chris Kelly (guitar and vocals), Will Owens (guitar and vocals), Nadja Beauford (keyboards and vocals), Marcus Beauford (drums), Will Jones (bass) and Sophie Owens (vocals), the sextet played its first official gig last summer at the Jefferson Theater as part of a benefit concert spearheaded by guitar instructor Mark Kramer, who taught some of the members of the band. The young musicians all come from musical families, and their parents make sure they stay on task, provide technical guidance and even make song suggestions. As a result, 14 Stories performs covers from artists like the Rolling Stones and The Avett Brothers. “Every once in a while, we’ll hear a song that we like and then one of us will bring it up at practice and decide whether we want to play it or not,” says bassist Will Jones.

EZE AMOS

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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remiered on Broadway in 1949 and revived in 2008, South Pacific tells the story of American naval officers (both nurses and sailors) stationed on an island during World War II who are forced to confront their own racist attitudes amidst love and war. This month the musical comes to life on stage at Charlottesville High School. CHS drama teacher and director David Becker says he was compelled to do the show even before August 12, partly to inform his students about the musical theater songbook pre-1960, but also because, “We’re still trying to learn how it’s even possible that people can be bigoted or hateful,” he says. “And so, while it is what appears to be an old piece, its message is more relevant than ever.” Senior Kayla Gavin plays the female lead, Nellie, an American nurse, for three out of the four performances. Nellie is in love with Emile, a French ex-pat, but withdraws when she learns he had a previous relationship with a Polynesian woman and fathered two children with her. Over the course of the musical, Nellie has a change of heart. Although Nellie’s initial prejudices make her a challenging character to play, Gavin says, “I like the idea that love is greater than any kind of prejudice so that makes me feel more connected to the character.” Valery Duron, also a senior, plays Bloody Mary, a Tonkinese woman who sells local wares to the Americans, and encourages Lieutenant Cable to marry her daughter, Liat. While Cable and Liat love each other, Cable eventually declines her hand because of her race. “Especially now and in our community, I feel like this show can really get to people,” Duron says. Surrounding these interpersonal dramas is the larger-scale drama of the war itself. Through the character of Captain Brackett, senior Liam Hubbard explores the challenges

The result, Becker says, makes the show less “rigid and inaccessible. ...With older pieces we have to find ways to excite the viewer, the actors, the creative people, to entice them into being involved. Sometimes it takes pizza, too.” What has been most meaningful to Braxton about this collaborative experience is the “commitment and passion and love that we create in this whole production,” she says. “It’s going to be a really good show.”

While Braxton was drawn to the production through dance, senior Beau LeBlond, who plays Emile, was drawn to it through song. “I got into it because I started taking voice lessons for choir,” he says. He learned to sing “Some Enchanted Evening” as part of his vocal training well before auditions opened. When he learned Becker was putting on South Pacific, he thought, why not audition? Another student, Alyce Yang, lent her creative talents by drawing the scenic backdrops. Yang drew her inspiration chiefly from the 1958 film adaptation. “There were a lot of beautiful scenes and colors used that aren’t actually seen in nature,” she says. Moved by “the power of the colors,” she drew her own scenes with Adobe Illustrator. “We involve everybody when we put on our shows at CHS,” Becker says. In this production, that even includes two young children of faculty member Tina Vasquez, the English Language Learning chair at CHS. Her daughter and son, Ariana and Leo, will play Emile’s children, Ngana and Jerome.

Chris Kelly and his band 14 Stories cover a range of well-known rock favorites from The Rolling Stones to the Foo Fighters.


ARTS SCREENS

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Almost paradise Black Panther unites a fantastic vision By Kristofer Jenson arts@c-ville.com

In Marvel Cinematic Universe’s Black Panther, the superhero (Chadwick Boseman) battles an outside threat to the peace and harmony of his home nation Wakanda.

ly; there is no poverty, no gender inequality, and conflicts are settled immediately with a shared respect for tradition. We first met T’Challa in Captain America: Civil War, when he witnessed the death of his father, T’Chaka, the king of Wakanda, in a terrorist attack. Black Panther picks up

Black Panther brings the MCU back to Earth, literally and metaphorically, by forgoing the mysticism of Dr. Strange and the space saga building elsewhere. The Shakespearean royal intrigue is less about bloodline than it is about the world and values we inherit, and when the time comes to defy those whom we previously lionized, Boseman is effortlessly charismatic with a terrific glint in

Black Panther PG-13, 140 minutes; Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, Regal Stonefield 14 and IMAX, Violet Crown Cinema

PLAYING THIS WEEK z Alamo Drafthouse Cinema 377 Merchant Walk Sq., 326-5056 z The 15:17 to Paris, Early Man, Fifty Shades Freed, The Greatest Showman, Peter Rabbit, Sleepless in Seattle, Winchester z Regal Stonefield 14 and IMAX The Shops at Stonefield, 244-3213 z The 15:17 to Paris, Darkest Hour, Early Man, Fifty Shades Freed, The Greatest Showman, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, Maze Runner: The Death Cure, Mamil, Peter Rabbit, The Post, Samson, The Shape of Water z Violet Crown Cinema 200 W. Main St., Downtown Mall, 529-3000 z 2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts, The 15:17 to Paris, Call Me By Your Name, Darkest Hour, Fifty Shades Freed, I, Tonya, Peter Rabbit, Phantom Thread, The Post, The Road Movie, The Shape of Water, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

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his eye, indicating there is more to T’Challa than a title and a bulletproof suit. Jordan brings the same physicality to Killmonger as he did to Creed, every move he makes carrying the weight of his past experiences and demanding the world get out of his way. The supporting cast is pitch perfect, including Lupita Nyong’o, Daniel Kaluuya, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker and a scene-stealing turn by Andy Serkis. Coogler’s central question—if paradise can exist, should it?—makes this the most intelligent MCU film since Winter Soldier, and proof that blockbuster movies need not be lowest common denominator, that they can uplift while they entertain.

@artscville

we kind of need a bass player. I was like, yeah my friend Will Jones on my soccer team plays bass, I’ll ask him. So Will got in it. And Nadja played piano, so we were like, let’s have Nadja play.” Most began their training with individual instruction or at school. Sophie Owens started singing around age 4 and started guitar lessons last year. Will Jones first began playing the bass for the school jazz band and Marcus Beauford picked up the drums in second grade. Nadja Beauford, who at 16 is the oldest, started taking piano lessons when she was just 3 years old. “I haven’t really been playing rock music, so it was kind of new to join this band,” she says. “I’ve been playing classical and jazz music, but it’s fun!” Learning to play rock music is all about having a good time, riding the groove and being a source of mutual support. “I like ‘Falling Slowly’ the best, but I don’t even play on that one,” says Will Jones. “I just like listening. That one sounded really nice with Chris and Sophie and Nadja singing.” Judging by the success of 14 Stories’ first outings, there are many chapters yet to be written.—Desiré Moses

in the aftermath and the transition of power to T’Challa, which comes at a time of political uncertainty. Though isolated, Wakanda has spies and political operatives all over the world, and some believe that the time has come to reveal the truth and lead the world the way it ought to be led. Though never colonized, Wakandans understand its destructive past and continued effects on black populations the world over. The appearance of a mysterious American named Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan), who knows more about Wakanda than an outsider should, forces the question: Do they maintain the tradition of secrecy that has kept them safe and allowed their society to flourish, or do they reveal the truth, risking their way of life for the sake of outsiders who suffer from problems they know how to resolve? Coogler’s vision of Wakanda is the stuff of great science fiction, a civilization representing our hopes and dreams yet tormented by the suffering just out of view. Academy Award-nominated cinematographer Rachel Morrison (Mudbound) delivers one of the smoothest-looking superhero films since Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man, while production designer Hannah Beachler presents a compelling vision of a futuristic society that came to be free of European imposition.

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

“Also, Will Owens’ dad, Lew, is really big into music and lots of times he’ll recommend things.” As a parent, Lewis Owens says, the joy comes from seeing your children take these songs and run with them. It’s “an example of ‘never underestimate what kids can do,’” he says. “They get together and they’ve played and they’ve practiced and it is actually quite remarkable...it’s just shy kids getting up there and doing it.” 14 Stories caught the attention of Pro Re Nata’s Brian Combs, who started a local teen songwriters performance series on Sundays at the Crozet brewery. “I saw that they played Tom Petty and Foo Fighters, so I was like, well that’s pretty cool for 12- to 14-year-olds to take an interest in that kind of music that I like, and play it really well and confidently,” says Combs. He booked the band in late January, and they packed the house, filling a two-hour set (as long as most headlining sets from national touring acts). 14 Stories came together the way most bands do—by recruiting friends one instrument at a time. “At the first practice it was me, Will Owens and Marcus,” says Kelly. “They were like,

DISNEY/MARVEL

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ith the release of Black Panther, it’s tempting to reflect on how far the Marvel Cinematic Universe has come in 10 years, and how it has essentially reinvented the film industry and become the standard bearer for quality mass entertainment in a genre that has rarely risen above straight-to-video viability. But that would take away from the singular achievement of Ryan Coogler and crew, who have found exciting and unexplored corners of the superhero movie template while fearlessly discarding societal baggage along the way. Perhaps the first film of this scale to feature women and people of color in such prominent roles both in front of and behind the scenes, Black Panther delivers when it comes to the political and philosophical questions raised by its story. T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman), the Black Panther, leads a secretive African nation of Wakanda, which hides its highly advanced civilization behind a façade of being a so-called “third world nation.” Wakandan society is based around the use of vibranium, an ultrarare metal that is concentrated in Wakanda thanks to a meteor strike in ancient times. What followed was the uniting of previously warring tribes and the harvesting of vibranium’s power to surpass the world technologically and social-


February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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Introducing C-BIZ, C-VILLE’s quarterly business magazine for working folk—from the ground floor to the corner office. Each issue, we’ll take national conversations and zoom in to see how they’re playing out locally. You’ll meet the city’s movers and shakers and hear what they have to say about running a business in Charlottesville, Albemarle and, in some cases, beyond. No one is off limits. It’s all of our business.


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G U I D E

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SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Whether it is a camp that lasts a few days or all summer, we have your go-to guide right here! Locally or far away, each camp offers something for every child. The next several pages showcase a variety of camps in and around the area to help make summer decisions a bit easier!

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Camp Hidden Meadows Little Gym SOCA Spectrum Summer Camp Triple C Camp Camp Friendship Oakland School SOCA Summer Soccer Camp Woodberry Forest Summer Camp 10. Grymes Memorial

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February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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NATURE CAMP

at Burgundy Center for Wildlife Studies

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

@eatdrinkcville

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SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Capon Bridge, WV • 56th Season Hike the mountains, Swim with newts, Catch butterflies, Variety and laughter. Small groups. 2-week sessions Ages 11-15

Oakland School Oakland School Oakland School School 128 Oakland Farm Way, Oakland Troy, VA 22973 admissions@oaklandschool.net

1-week session Ages 8 - 10 Adult Weekend Ages 21+

Now Enrolling for our 2018 Now Enrolling 2018 Now Enrolling for 2018 Now Enrolling forfor ourour 2018 Summer Program! Summer Program! Summer Program! Summer Program!

American Camping Association Accredited

For more information: burgundycenter.org 703-842-0470 • michelem@burgundyfarm.org

ay: d es up to m ry ign mer G S t r a iles! /sum e mm r sm l.org u S me oo h um essc s s an grym e m

128 Oakland Farm Way, Oakland Troy, 22973 admissions@oaklandschool.net School Oakland Farm Way, VAVA22973 admissions@oaklandschool.net 128128 Oakland Farm Way, Troy,Troy, VA 22973 admissions@oaklandschool.net 128 Oakland Farm Way Troy, VA 22973 admissions@oaklandschool.net

GRYMES MEMORIAL SCHOOL

Joyful Learning A co-educational independent day school for Pre K - eighth grade in Orange, Virginia Spanish starting in Pre K Music, Visual Arts, Drama and Public Speaking for all ages Hands-on, active learning through a vibrant and lively curriculum Creative Writing Engineering “Rad Lab” 1:1 technology

grymesschool.org


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WOODBERRY FOREST SUMMER CAMPS

football camp

basketball camp

lacrosse camp

June 8–10 • Ages 5–10

July 11–14 • Ages 12–16

SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

father–son weekend

WOODBERRY FOREST SCHOOL woodberry forest, virginia

22989 • woodberry.org

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Since 1967, Woodberry Forest’s summer camps have been getting boys outside to play their favorite sports or try new ones. Visit woodberry.org/camps or call 540-672-6044 to register!

July 19–22 • Ages 12–16

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

July 15–18 • Ages 9–16


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GRAND CAVERNS

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

@eatdrinkcville

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SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Grottoes, VA

1.888.430.CAVE

www.GrandCaverns.com

NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARK

Ranked #2 cave in the USA by Parade Magazine as well as we are America’s oldest continually open show cave. Open since 1806. Recieve a $2 discount on adult ticket with this ad.

Call about our adventure tours, now available!

presents light house studio our award-winning

SUMMER FILM ACADEMY for rising 3rd graders through college freshmen

Movie Musical MusicVideo Animated Film Narrative Creative Game Making Virtual Reality Filmmaking Documentary 3D VFX Intro & Intermediate Filmmaking Movie Makers

Spots fill quickly! Register today at: lighthousestudio.org/summer-film-academy-2018


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we specialize in...

CHILD’S PLAY

@ Boar’s Head Summer Camps

SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Owned and Operated by the UVA Foundation

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SPORTS CAMPS | ROCK WALL | SWIMMING NATURE ACTIVITIES | TENNIS | SQUASH ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS | ARTS & CRAFTS Email Samantha: Sstrong@BoarsHeadResort.com www.BoarsHeadResort.com | phone: (434) 972-6031

BH - 021418 - C'VilleCamp Feb18 Full Page.indd 1

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

Join Boar’s Head Sports Club and receive a complimentary 8-week summer camp. For more information about summer camps or family memberships, contact Samantha Strong.

2/15/2018 8:09:48 AM


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SUMMER SOCCER CAMPS

SUMMER DAY CAMPS Music Brings Us Together Music! Yoga! Art!

Find your inner creative being! Learn fiddle and ukulele tunes, traditional dances and songs, make gorgeous art, plus yoga in the afternoons! Instructors: Anna Hennessey and Norah Caldwell Mon., June 18, 2018 – Fri., June 29, 2018 Ages 8-12 9am – 3pm $650, includes all materials

• • • •

Day Camps Summer Academy Striker/Keeper Blue RIdge Residential Academy • World Cup Camp • Year-round League Play • Adults, Youth, Coach Training, Ref Training

Front Porch String Band Camp

SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

July 16, 2018 – July 20, 2018 Kids – Adults 9am – 3pm Calling lovers of old-time string band music, fiddle tunes, songs, square dances, and jam sessions! Learnrepertoire for fiddle, guitar, banjo, mandolin, ukulele, and string bass. Cello, dulcimer, autoharp also welcome! $325

Rock Out!

Learn to write and record your original tunes, with friends! Open for students of all abilities. Instructors: Devon Sproule and Matt Curreri Mon., July 16 – Fri., July 27, 2018 Kids Ages 10-18 (students will be divided by age 10-13, 14+) 9am – 12pm $325

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Choose one day, a few days, or a few weeks! Ages 3-10 (Must be potty-independent) Half Day Options: Mon.-Fri. 1pm–4pm AND Mon. & Fri. 9am–12 pm

June 11-15 June 18-22 June 25-29 July 2-6 (closed 7/4) July 9-13 July 16-20 July 23-27 July 30 - August 3 August 6-10 August 13-17

Full Day Options: Monday: 9 am to 4 pm Friday: 9 am to 4 pm

Secret Agent: “Gym Bond” The Dragon’s Lair Slumber Party Master Builder LEGO Quest Hip Hop Karate Chop! Hawaiian Hide & Seek TLG Animal Planet Super Hero Training Camp Lights, Camera, ACTION! The Little Gym Summer Games The Missing Mermaid Palace

Members: $35/HALF DAY or $170/WEEK Members: $70/FULL DAY or $135/2 FULL DAYS Non-Members: $40/HALF DAY or $195/WEEK Non-Members: $80/FULL DAY or $155/2 FULL DAYS

The Shops at Stonefield

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@eatdrinkcville

SOCA 975-5025

Siblings receive 20% discount

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February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

Register at www.SOCAspot.org or call

SKILL THRILL CAMPS: Ages 6-12

WEDNESDAYS: 9 am – 12 pm

Grade School Skill Thrill Camp helps children take their gymnastics skills to the next level through a more intense three-hour program. Kids focus on learning specific beginner, intermediate or advanced level skills while reviewing and practicing all-around gymnastics skills. It’s the perfect combination of fun, skill-building, and success!

June 13 June 20 June 27 July 11 July 18 July 25 August 1 August 8 August 15

Caribbean Cartwheels & Hawaiian Handstands Amazing Aerials Front Handspring Festival Back Handspring Bonanza Back Tuck Beach! Vaulting Volcanoes! Caribbean Cartwheels & Hawaiian Handstands Front Handspring Festival Back Handspring Bonanza

2075 Bond Street, Suite #140 • Charlottesville, VA 22901 434-975-5437 • www.tlgcharlottesvilleva.com

Pricing::

Members $35/day ers: Non-Memb ay /d 0 $4

**In accordance with the Commonwealth of Virginia Dept. of Social Services, TLG Charlottesville is a licensed child day center!**


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fostering

exploration tradition outreach & engaGement

courage

SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMS

Arboretum Explorer Camp

Robotics Camp

Summer Honors Institute

June 24 - 30 | For rising high school juniors and seniors | $1,000 Get a first-hand look at college life as an Honors student! During your week-long stay at JMU, you will take courses with outstanding professors, and explore careers and academic majors. And don’t worry - afternoons and evening are saved for field trips and other activities exploring the Shenandoah Valley.

K-11th grade

Space Explorers Camp

July 9 - 28 | For rising 5th - 10th graders | $250 (full day), $125 (half day), $800 residential Are you interested in the mysteries of our universe? Explore the night sky and beyond at Space Explorers Camp! Enjoy a week of discovery through experiments, star-gazing, shows at the Planetarium, and maybe even a talk with someone from NASA.

Registration opens March 1st!

tripleccamp.com

Questions? Contact us!

heatwol@jmu.edu | (540) 568-422 | www.jmu.edu/outreach

th K-10TANDEM grade FRIENDS SCHOOL

SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

June 18 - 22 | For rising 5th - 8th graders | $300 Do you enjoy a challenge? JMU Robotics Camp pushes robots to the limit using the latest EV3 robot from LEGO.You’ll learn how to use advanced building and programming techniques with JMU physics professors who use LEGO robots in their college classes!

curiosity

June 18 - 22 | For rising 5 - 10 year olds | $80 The Arboretum Explorer Camp at the EJC Arboretum is a summer program designed to encourage a love of the outdoors, foster environmental stewardship, and inspire future scientists. Campers will catch bugs, learn about reptiles, investigate the pond, make crafts, and go on daily nature walks.

OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

SPECTRUM 2018

tripleccamp.com SUMMER PROGRAMS Only two hours west of C-ville

1- 4 Weeks Boys & Girls Ages 6-16 art | crafts | dance | cooking | theatre | fishing programs sewing | drumming | fencing | yoga | adventure

Session 1: June 11-22 • Session 2: June 25-July 6 Session 3: July 9-20 Rising 1st grade through 8th grade • Extended day option Director, Fran Smith | 434-760-3097 | fsmith@tandemfs.org

Register online at www.tandemfs.org/page/spectrum

Horseback Riding • White-Water Rafting • Climbing Tower • Sailing • Sports Mountain Boarding • Canoeing • Backpacking • Swimming • Arts & Crafts Organic Farm • Mountain Biking • Rock Climbing • 1,000 Ft. Zip Line • Performing Arts & more!

1-800-600-4752

camphiddenmeadows.com

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A SAFE HAVEN FOR CREATIVE SELF-EXPRESSION

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia


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The Pony Academy Where pony dreams come true

• English Saddle, Hunt seat, Trail riding • Practical instruction for the care and maintenance of horses • 1 and 2 week summer half-day camp sessions • Individual and group training for children and adults • Open to visitors outside Virginia • Please call for Camp Availability www.theponyacademycharlottesville.com 2149 Browns Gap Turnpike, Charlottesville, Virginia 22901 • 434-823-6929

FIND US ON FACEBOOK!

ur ps! o iss Cam t m ak ’ n re o D gB rin p S

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

@eatdrinkcville

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SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

The Pony Academy offers the ultimate horseback riding experience in Charlottesville...

Where being yourself comes naturally!

www.campfriendship.com


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rawing for Teens

Summer

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John A. Hancock

info: 434.939.7445, johnahancock.com/classes or HancockJohnA.Artist@gmail.com

STEM: Robotics, Coding, Virtual Reality, Drones, App.io & More! Arts: Sculpture, Movie-Making, 3D Art, Drama, Photography & More! Off-site academies:

John A. Hancock, 1/4 page advert, Cville Summer Camps...FEB. 2018 3rd-9th Graders) KidsCollege@PVCC: June 11-Aug. 10 (Rising KidsCollege@Fluvanna: June 4-15 (Rising 1st-9th Graders) KidsCollege@CATEC: June 18-29 (Rising 7th-10th Graders)

SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

June 11-August 10 • Rising 1st–10th Graders

April 2 KIDSCollege@PVCC y ! b d e W r e E t N gis e R if t n u Disco Over 100 STEM & Arts Summer Academies Early Bird

1st Session: Working Large & Bold, Monday, June 18th-22nd (@ McGuffey ) 2nd Session: Telling A Story with Images, Monday, June 25th -29th (@ McGuffey ) 3rd Session: Combining Printing & Drawing, Monday, July 9th-13th (@ Crozet Arts)

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“Know ye not why We created you all from the same dust? That no one should exalt himself over the other.” Bahá’u’lláh “Know ye not why We—created you all from the same dust?

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LIVING

Q&A: What would you tell your teenage self knowing what you know now? PAGE 46

What’s in my backpack ■ No. 2 pencils ■ Broken pencils and pieces of a broken ruler ■ Peanut butter cup wrapper ■ Stack of blank index cards (he’s carried these around for about three years)

Rachel Wang, 17 Albemarle High School senior

As Albemarle High School swim team captain, Rachel Wang’s day starts early. She wakes at 4:40am, drives herself to the pool for a 5:307:30am practice, then showers at the pool, eats breakfast and gets to school before it begins at 8:55am. After school, she eats dinner, does homework (usually between one and two hours a night, rarely more than three hours) and goes to bed early. She also teaches piano to younger kids three days a week. There are no lockers at AHS, so she carries her black-and-gray Patagonia backpack around all day. Wang, who’s thinking about becoming an engineer, takes a full course load, including government, physics, macroeconomics, literature, issues of the modern world, vector calculus and an engineering class. She’s currently waiting to hear back from colleges, though she’s already been accepted to UVA. Backpack weight: 12.4 pounds

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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Backpack contents: ■ MacBook Air (a hand-me-down from her mom, Wang says this is why her backpack is lighter than her friends’: It’s

By Erin O’Hare living@c-ville.com

T

ake a look inside a backpack and you’ll get a glimpse inside its owner’s life: perhaps notebooks and pens show evidence of his favorite color, or what he likes to do in his free time. There are folders full of assignments that indicate her potential career path, a book she reads for fun and keys that show the car she drives. It’s a peek into that person’s world and what absorbs her at the moment. We asked two local high schoolers to give us a look at the things they carry, and we talked to a local chiropractor about that ageold parental concern: My kid’s backpack is way too heavy.

Jack Keaveny, 14 Charlottesville High School freshman

Jack Keaveny gets to CHS by 8am every day; his mom (C-VILLE Arts editor Tami Keaveny) drives him to school. This semester, he’s taking Spanish, English, engineering, history of sports, geometry, biology and, his favorite, world history, where he’s enjoyed learning

about ancient Rome. Like most of his classmates, Keaveny carries his neon green-andblack Under Armour backpack around all day—nobody really uses the few lockers left at CHS. And, he carries his phone in his pocket—they’re not allowed at school, he says, but everyone uses them anyway. When school ends at 3:50pm, Keaveny does some combina-

tion of homework, hanging out with friends or working out at the Y. His evenings usually include music, which is really important to him: He plays guitar and makes beats. Backpack weight: 18 pounds Backpack contents: ■ School-issued Lenovo ThinkPad Chromebook ■ Green homework folder ■ Unused red spiral-bound notebook ■ Unused blue spiral-bound notebook ■ Black-and-white composition book for English class ■ PSAT practice test ■ Green binder for graded assignments ■ Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage, current reading for English class ■ Lunch box ■ Green patterned pencil case ■ Colored pencils, black pens, yellow highlighters ■ Retainer case ■ Axe spray deodorant ■ Chromebook charger ■ Tissues ■ School-issued student ID card ■ Green spiral keychain with house key and a pass for Brooks Family YMCA


a fraction of the weight of the school-issued Lenovo Thinkpad) ■ Black physics notebook ■ Folders for literature, government and physics classes ■ Barack Obama’s Dreams from My Father, which she’s reading for fun ■ Gray fabric pencil case ■ Pens, pencils, Sharpies, highlighters ■ Texas Instruments graphing calculator (math class requirement) ■ Car and house keys ■ Planner notebook (“I’m a very on-paper person,” she says about her choice to have a planner notebook instead of relying on her phone calendar) ■ Glasses ■ Headphones ■ Tide stick ■ Hand sanitizer ■ Wallet ■ Senior lunch pass, which allows Wang to leave campus for the long lunch period each Wednesday

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PACK DEFENSE Though long-term injuries from backpacks do occur, they’re somewhat rare, says Dr. Sam Spillman of Balance Chiropractic. And while backpacks seem to be getting lighter, due to the fact that more schoolwork is being done using tablets and laptops instead of heavy textbooks, it’s important to keep an eye on what’s being carried, why and how. Spillman suggests a few rules of thumb to make sure it’s done safely: ■ A kid’s backpack shouldn’t weigh more than 10 to 20 percent of his body weight. ■ Make sure a backpack is the right size for its carrier: The pack should not be longer than the carrier’s torso. ■ Pick a pack with wide straps, a chest strap and a waist belt to better distribute the weight. ■ There’s also the rolling backpack…though it’s not the coolest look. ■ Kids: Speak up! If your backpack feels too heavy, tell your parents. Parents: When your kids tell you their backpack feels too heavy, listen to them and see if a different backpack is in order. In fact, safely lugging a little extra weight around isn’t the worst thing a young person can do, says Spillman. Kids and teens today are more sedentary than previous generations, and carrying a backpack from class to class can actually help strengthen their spines and back muscles.

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MYLESCLARK96

LIVING

Even if you don’t recognize the JUUL itself, which resembles a USB thumb drive, its litter is becoming increasingly common. A walk around the Corner will put you within eyeshot of hundreds of the small plastic JUUL pod containers.

Vape escape Students light up over JUULing By Sam Padgett living@c-ville.com

T

@eatdrinkcville facebook.com/cville.weekly

A quick Google search on JUUL pulls up hundreds of headlines that point out the JUUL’s higher than normal average nicotine content for an e-cigarette and the candy-like flavors it comes in.

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

here’s a new verb hanging in the Charlottesville air: JUULing. If you have heard it, most likely from a high school- or college-aged kid, rest assured it isn’t some odd youth mining craze. A JUUL, pronounced “jewel,” is a small vaping device that can be found in nearly any local convenience store. The device itself is nearly indistinguishable from a USB thumb drive, with no visible buttons or dials, which appeals to teens who want to hide it from parents and teachers. A quick Google search on JUUL pulls up hundreds of headlines that point out the JUUL’s higher than normal average nicotine content for an e-cigarette and the candy-like flavors it comes in. The base device, which costs around $50, relies on replaceable pods that come in a variety of flavors, such as mango, mint, Virginia tobacco, fruit medley and crême brulée. Each individual JUUL pod, a slim translucent box about the size of a mahjong tile, is roughly equivalent to smoking a pack of cigarettes. (The JUUL uses nicotine salts found in the tobacco leaf.) Portable and refillable vapes such as the JUUL aren’t a new technology. Similar devices such as blu and Vuse have occupied shelf space behind gas station counters for several years. PAX Labs, the small California-based company that produces the JUUL, didn’t anticipate such success and has been struggling to keep stores stocked.

Teagan Lefey, a cashier at the Cohn’s on The Corner, says the convenience store sells roughly 20 packs of pods a night and usually runs out of stock every three or four days (customers must be 18 or older to purchase nicotine products). “Once we started carrying them,” he says, “we could barely keep them in stock.” Since JUULs are a significantly more discrete method of getting a nicotine buzz than cigarettes, they have exploded in schools across the country (vaping and JUULing top the “risky behaviors” list from two area high school newspaper editors on page 15). Teens interviewed for this article said although they JUUL, they didn’t want to talk on the record about the product. A local high school teacher told C-VILLE she has seen a fair amount of JUULs confiscated in the classroom and describes the JUUL phenomenon like a meme of sorts, a popular in-joke among students. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention makes clear on its website that “youth use of tobacco in any form is unsafe,” and while cigarette use among teens has dropped, e-cigarette use—vaping—is rising. According to data released by the CDC and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Tobacco Products, the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey showed that e-cigarette use among teens tripled between 2013 and 2014, while teen tobacco use has significantly decreased, dropping from 15.8 percent of high school students in 2011 to 8 percent in 2016.


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LIVING

45

Juggling act Teens who do it all share their secrets to success By Jessica Luck living@c-ville.com

I

n today’s busy world, teenagers are cramming in as much as possible. Meet two teens who are seamlessly navigating packed schedules of school, sports, family, friends and volunteer commitments, and learn why they wouldn’t have it any other way.

Evelyn Brown Senior at Tandem Friends School Classes: AP literature, AP government and politics, AP environmental science, discrete mathematics and applications, African-American studies Senior thesis: Recording her own EP Extracurriculars: The school’s rock band; varsity cross county (fall), basketball (winter) and soccer (spring); Conservation Lobby Day participant; musical theater (Meg in current production of Little Women) Dream job: Working for the United Nations’ World Health Organization

Typical daily schedule 7am: Wake up; hit snooze button once 8:30am-3:40pm: Attend morning meeting, classes and community time period 4-5pm: Play rehearsal or basketball study hall 5:15-6:30pm: Basketball practice

8-10 or 11pm: Finish homework 11:30pm: Go to sleep

Jackie Hartwig Senior at St. Anne’s-Belfield School Classes: AP biology, BC calculus, honors Spanish 5, honors English 12, 21st-century citizenship Senior capstone thesis: Studying refugee education in Charlottesville Extracurriculars: President of the Honor Council, varsity field hockey captain (fall) and varsity lacrosse captain (spring)

“The extracurriculars give me the opportunity to be on a team or be in a cast and work with different people than I would see every day in my classes.” EVELYN BROWN

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Whether she’s doing homework on the bus on the way back from a basketball game or running through her lines before a play rehearsal, Evelyn Brown says the most important part about being involved in so many things is focusing on what she’s passionate about. “I really appreciate all the extracurriculars that I do because it gives me the opportunity to be on a team or be in a cast and work with different people than I would see every day in my classes,” she says. And organization is key to making her life easier: She logs into Tandem’s student portal to keep track of all of her homework assignments and due dates, and she is constantly updating her online to-do list app. And just to make sure nothing is missed, she also writes everything down in her planner.

Jackie Hartwig embodies the term leading by example. Which is why the career STAB student (she started school there in pre-kindergarten) made sure she chose a topic for her year-long independent study capstone that would require her to get out into the Charlottesville community. Hartwig completed the majority of her reading and gathering of empirical data for her thesis project over the summer so that during the school year she could focus on conducting interviews (during free periods, no-school days and weekends) with members of Charlottesville’s refugee community (some STAB students and students at other high schools), as well as English as a second language teachers. Hartwig’s focus is on the gap between local policies and classroom curriculum and practices, and how effectively refugee students are supported and empowered. Hartwig chose her capstone topic based on her future goal of landing a job that looks at how the education system can be improved through public policy. Organization is definitely key to Hartwig’s success, and she admits that she’s not a “huge” technology person. Instead, she relies on a written planner, plasters her window in sticky notes and keeps track of everything in color-coded binders. Hartwig also understands the importance of a support system: She’s known most of her classmates and teammates since preschool, and says her teachers are like “second parents” who enable her to be involved so much. And Hartwig loves being in the leader Evelyn Brown role as well: Being a team captain means EZE AMOS making sure there’s camaraderie both on and off the field, she says. She meets once Dream job: Something that helps a week with her lacrosse coach to talk about improve the education system through “behind the scenes stuff,” such as which serpublic policy vice projects the team wants to complete. And her involvement in Honor Council since freshman year has inspired her to be Typical daily schedule involved in her college’s honor council as 6:15am: Wake up; walk Banxi, her well. She’s applied to six schools and is waitbluetick coonhound ing to hear back from four; she has been accepted to Rhodes College and UVA. 7:15am: Arrive at school for Honor The busy Hartwig says “getting to do evCouncil meeting (one day a week) erything I love is a great blessing,” but her 8:45am-3:15pm: Attend class advice to other teens is to not try to do it all. 3:45pm-6pm: Attend sports practice/ “I just honed in on what I did feel like was games fulfilling in my day-to-day life and I really 6:15pm-11pm: Eat dinner, shower and pursued it,” she says. “You really have to folthen start on homework low through and not give up when you hit 11:45pm: Go to sleep roadblocks.”

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

6:45-8pm: Dinner, shower and time with family

Brown estimates how long each task will take to ensure she’s not rushing to get something done and creating more stress. The hardest part about her hectic schedule is finding time to relax and reboot (she has to miss trips to the mall with friends after school to attend sports or theater practices). But one of her outlets—music—is also a main focus for her this year: She is recording her own EP, Edges, for her senior thesis project. Songwriting is cathartic for Brown, who sings and taught herself to play guitar, and she wrote most of the songs on the seventrack album (there might be one cover, she says). The songs are centered on the theme of Brown’s transition from a high school student who is dependent on her parents to being independent and finding herself. After participating in Model UN at Johns Hopkins University two years ago, Brown discovered her passion for public health, which she wants to study in college. She’s applied to 10 colleges and is waiting to hear back from six. So far she’s been accepted to VCU, Florida State, Allegheny College and her top pick at the moment: University of Maryland. And one of Brown’s favorite activities this year revolved around another of her passions: the health of the Chesapeake Bay (Brown is an avid sailor). She attended Conservation Lobby Day at the end of January in Richmond, and spoke to Delegate David Toscano and State Senator Creigh Deeds about offshore drilling in the state and preserving the Eastern oyster. “I didn’t understand I could make any kind of impact on environmental issues, so having this opportunity and learning that I really can just talk to my representatives, that was really transformational for my ideas about how I can make a difference,” Brown says.


LIVING CROSSWORD

46

Energy BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS

© 2018 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

@eatdrinkcville

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1. “Stop that!” 5. Degs. held by George W. Bush and Colin Powell 9. Anticipate 14. “Now ____ me down ...” 15. “I Got Plenty O’ Nuttin,’” e.g. 16. Baby monitor? 17. With the grid’s circled letters, what Ernest Moniz became in 2013 19. With the grid’s circled letters, Red Bull, e.g. 20. The FCC first authorized it on 12/17/1953 21. Walker who was “Dy-nomite!” on “Good Times” 22. Sent Manx messages, say 25. Caddie’s pocketful 26. With the grid’s circled letters, a brainiac uses a lot of it 30. Only U.S. state whose state seal was designed by a woman 32. Oxygen’s lack 33. Best of the best 34. Adversary 37. Its source is not depleted when used 41. Opposite of WSW 42. German neurologist ____ Alzheimer 43. “Bloody” 44. Coach with the most wins in NFL history 45. With the grid’s circled letters, it’s spent unproductively 47. Farm unit 50. Anteater, but not an ant 52. Donnybrook 54. “____ Greatest Hits” (1971 album that includes “Chain of Fools” and “I Say a Little Prayer”)

59. With the grid’s circled letters, exercise may increase this 60. With the grid’s circled letters, like using LED lights instead of incandescent light bulbs 62. Private remark 63. It may be junk 64. Silver of fivethirtyeight.com 65. Shades 66. 2014 Sam Smith hit “____ with Me” 67. Snowballed

DOWN 1. Part of CD-ROM 2. Nondairy item in the dairy aisle 3. Table salt, to a chemist 4. Beginner 5. “Apples to Apples” toymaker 6. “Well played!” 7. ____ guitar 8. Speak 9. “____ quote ...” 10. Begin liking 11. Japanese cartoon art 12. Navel type 13. They ride trikes and rhyme with trikes 18. “Never go to a doctor whose office plants have died” humorist Bombeck 21. Online singles service that allows users to browse its website in English and Hebrew 23. Hurt on camera 24. Brickell and Falco 26. Greedy cry 27. Opening setting of George Bernard Shaw’s “Back to Methuselah” 28. What the fourth little piggy had

29. One less than quattro 31. Mother ____ 33. Virus named for a river in the Congo Basin 34. Campus home for some 35. Shrek, e.g. 36. Observed 38. Baby’s cry in “The Wheels on the Bus” 39. Bill and Hillary, to Yale 40. Some TV drama settings, for short 44. Word on many bumper stickers in Texas after the 2012 U.S. presidential election 45. In a cautious way 46. Tina’s costar on “30 Rock” 47. Half-step above A 48. Joe Cocker’s “You ____ Beautiful” 49. “Alice” actress Linda 51. Word never spoken in “The Godfather” 53. Audrey Hopburn and Honey Boo Brew, for two 55. Sound of a fork on a wineglass 56. Catch wind of 57. Hold ‘em opener 58. Dish that may be ladled 60. Mayhem on the far left and far right? 61. Corpulent

2/14/18 ANSWERS

Bear


LIVING SUDOKU

47

Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#3

#4 #2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution

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#1 solution

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

#1


48

Aries (March 21-April 19): When you’re playing poker, a wild card refers to a card that can be used as any card the cardholder wants it to be. If the two of hearts is deemed wild before the game begins, it can be used as an ace of diamonds, jack of clubs, queen of spades or anything else. That’s always a good thing! In the game of life, a wild card is the arrival of an unforeseen element that affects the flow of events unpredictably. It might derail your plans, or alter them in ways that are at first inconvenient but ultimately beneficial. It may even cause them to succeed in an even more interesting fashion than you imagined they could. I bring this up, Aries, because I suspect that you’ll be in the Wild Card Season during the next four weeks. Any and all of the above definitions may apply. Be alert for unusual luck.

Taurus (April 20-May 20): If you gorge on 10 pounds of chocolate in the next 24 hours, you will get sick. Please don’t do that. Limit your intake to no more than a pound. Follow a similar policy with any other pleasurable activity. Feel emboldened to surpass your normal dosage, yes, but avoid ridiculous overindulgence. Now is one of the rare times when visionary artist William Blake’s maxim is applicable: “The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom.” So is his corollary, “You never know what is enough until you know what is more than enough.” But keep in mind that Blake didn’t say, “The road of foolish, reckless exorbitance leads to the palace of wisdom.”

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Gemini

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

LIVING FREE WILL ASTROLOGY LIVING FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

By Rob Brezsny

(May 21-June 20): Have you ever had a rousing insight about an action that would improve your life, but then you failed to summon the willpower to actually take that action? Have you resolved to embark on some new behavior that would be good for you, but then found yourself unable to carry it out? Most of us have experienced these frustrations. The ancient Greeks had a word for it: akrasia. I bring it up, Gemini, because I suspect you may be less susceptible to akrasia in the next four weeks than you have ever been. I bet you will consistently have the courage and command to actually follow through on what your intuition tells you is in your best interests.

Aquarius (Feb. 19-March 20): In her novel The Round House, writer Louise Erdrich reminisces about how hard it was, earlier in her life, to yank out the trees whose roots had grown into the foundation of her family’s house. “How funny, strange, that a thing can grow so powerful even when planted in the wrong place,” she says. Then she adds, “ideas, too.” Your first assignment in the coming weeks, my dear Pisces, is to make sure that nothing gets planted in the wrong place. Your second assignment is to focus all your intelligence and love on locating the right places for new seeds to be planted.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): “There is no such thing as a failed experiment,” said inventor Buckminster Fuller, “only experiments with unexpected outcomes.” That’s an excellent guideline for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks. You’re entering a phase of your astrological cycle when questions are more important than answers, when explorations are more essential than discoveries, and when curiosity is more useful than knowledge. There will be minimal value in formulating a definitive concept of success and then trying to achieve it. You will have more fun and you will learn more by continually redefining success as you wander and ramble.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): During World War II, British code-breakers regularly intercepted and deciphered top-secret radio messages that high-ranking German soldiers sent to each other. Historians have concluded that these heroes shortened the war by at least two years. I bring this to your attention, Leo, in the hope that it will inspire you. I believe your own metaphorical code-breaking skills will be acute in the coming weeks. You’ll be able to decrypt messages that have different meanings from what they appear to mean. You won’t get fooled by deception and misdirection. This knack will enable you to home in on the elusive truths that are circulating—thus saving you from unnecessary and irrelevant turmoil.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In April 1972, three American astronauts climbed into a spacecraft and took a trip to the moon and back. On the second day of the 11-day jaunt, pilot Ken Mattingly removed and misplaced his wedding ring. In the zero-gravity conditions,

it drifted off and disappeared somewhere in the cabin. Nine days later, on the way home, Mattingly and Charlie Duke did a space walk. When they opened the hatch and slipped outside, they found the wedding ring floating in the blackness of space. Duke was able to grab it and bring it in. I suspect that in the coming weeks, you will recover a lost or missing item in an equally unlikely location, Virgo. Or perhaps your retrieval will be of a more metaphorical kind: a dream, a friendship, an opportunity.

spouting their cracked advice. Here’s another curiosity: You are extra attuned to the feelings and thoughts of other people. I’m tempted to speculate that you’re at least temporarily telepathic. There’s a third factor contributing to the riot in your head: People you were close to earlier in your life are showing up to kibitz you in your nightly dreams. In response, I bid you to bark “Enough!” at all these meddlers. You have astrological permission to tell them to pipe down so you can hear yourself think.

Libra

Capricorn

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to British philosopher Alain de Botton, “Maturity begins with the capacity to sense and, in good time and without defensiveness, admit to our own craziness.” He says that our humble willingness to be embarrassed by our confusion and mistakes and doubts is key to understanding ourselves. I believe these meditations will be especially useful for you in the coming weeks, Libra. They could lead you to learn and make use of robust new secrets of self-mastery.

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Paleontologist Jack Horner says that developmental biologists are halfway toward being able to create a chickenosaurus—a creature that is genetically a blend of a chicken and a dinosaur. This project is conceivable because there’s an evolutionary link between the ancient reptile and the modern bird. Now is a favorable time for you to contemplate metaphorically similar juxtapositions and combinations, Capricorn. For the foreseeable future, you’ll have extra skill and savvy in the art of amalgamation.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): During the next four weeks, there are three activities I suspect you should indulge in at an elevated rate: laughter, dancing and sex. The astrological omens suggest that these pursuits will bring you even more health benefits than usual. They will not only give your body, mind and soul the precise exercise they need most, they will also make you smarter and kinder and wilder. Fortunately, the astrological omens also suggest that laughter, dancing and sex will be even more easily available to you than they normally are.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The little voices in your head may have laryngitis, but they’re still

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Be stubborn about your goals but flexible about your methods.” That’s the message I saw on a woman’s T-shirt today. It’s the best possible advice for you to hear right now. To further drive home the point, I’ll add a quote from productivity consultant David Allen: “Patience is the calm acceptance that things can happen in a different order than the one you have in mind.” Are you willing to be loyal and true to your high standards, Aquarius, even as you improvise to uphold and fulfill them? Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, 1-877-873-4888.

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Experienced Ecological Designers and Landscapers Wanted The Natural Garden, a local habit-restoration, native plant nursery, and ecological landscaping company, is hiring for a variety of positions from experienced landscape architect to field crew members. We offer competitive pay rates, a family-like company culture, and opportunities for career advancement. For more information visit our website at www.thenaturalgarden. net/job-openings.html. Greenhouse Someone with a horticulture degree or equivalent experience to wait on customers, to help with ordering and receiving plants, and to help diagnose plant pest and disease problems. Looking for someone who enjoys helping people. Forty hours a week year round includes a Saturday schedule. Please come in for an application. Ivy Nursery 434-295-1183.

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Greenhouse and Annuals Person to help customers with annuals and greenhouse plants for spring season. Forty hours a week from early March through mid-June includes a Saturday schedule. Looking for someone who enjoys helping people and who may want to come back for other busy seasons. Please come in for an application. Ivy Nursery 434-295-1183.

EMPLOYMENT

Horticulturist Person with a horticulture degree or equivalent experience

with trees and shrubs to help wait on customers and to help diagnose plant pest and disease problems. Looking for someone who enjoys helping people. Forty hours a week year round or seasonal, includes a Saturday schedule. Please come in for an application. Ivy Nursery 434-295-1183. PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www. AdvancedMailing.net (AAN CAN)

REAL ESTATE HOUSES FOR SALE

tures granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, ceramic tile flooring and brand new cabinets. Washer and dryer hookups conveniently located on the first floor. Within walking distance of the Downtown Mall, this home is complete with an off street parking space. Jamie White, Agent, 434-322-4592. Montague Miller & Co. MLS ID# 567748

SERVICES HOME IMPROVEMENTS Home Improvements Gravel Driveway Repair Private, commercial, or subdivision. Drainage correction. Gravel delivery. All excavating needs. Fence building of all types. Water line replacements. (434) 960-8994

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DAY SUPPORT PROGRAM MANAGER Director of Development & Community Relations

(Charlottesville Adult Activity Center)

direct support services.

experience is required.

To learn more about our agency and mission please visit us at http:// To learn more about our agency and mission please visit us at thearcofthepiedmont.org/. Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit https://arcpva.org/ Qualified arePark encouraged to submit a a cover letter and resume to The Arc of thecandidates Piedmont 509 Street cover letterVA. and resume to: Themay Arcalso of the Piedmont 509 Park Street CharCharlottesville, 22902. Materials be faxed to 434-977-7864. VA. 22902. Materials may also be e-mailed to evanderloo@ Thelottesville, Arc is a EEO/D/V employer.

arcpva.org or faxed to 434-977-7864. The Arc is a EEO/D/V employer.

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Compensation for a completed egg donation cycle is $4,500.

Anonymous Egg Donors Needed The Reproductive Medicine & Surgery Center of Virginia is looking for young women interested in helping couples who are unable to conceive using their own eggs. To be an anonymous egg donor, we need applicants who are: • Between 21 years - 31 years old • In good general health • Within normal weight range • Non-smoker For more information and an application, please con-tact Stephanie Barrix, R.N., IVF/Egg Donor Coordinator @ stephanie.barrix@rmscva.com or call 434.654.8537.Also, visit our website www.rmscva.com

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This position requires a Bachelor’s degree in the field of communications, This is non-profit a full-time, salaried, and/or exemptbusiness; level position requires considermarketing, management at least which two years of leadership experience of in developmental non-profit marketing or public relations, development, able knowledge disability service delivery systems. Also donor relations and/or fundraising using diversified fund development, required are strong oral/written skills, the ability to exercise leadership and as well as documented success in securing gifts fromeffectively donors, foundations supervise the work of others, to interact and to establish and andmaintain government sources. This is a full-time, exempt position to A Bachelor’s favorable relations with our clients and reporting the public. the degree ExecutiveinDirector. Compensation to be negotiated, a human services related field and commensurate two years of with directly related qualifications and experience.

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WELLNESS

February 21-27, 2018, c-ville.com

Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality Arepossible you passionate about applying your skills to ensure of life for your fellow community members in need? If so Thethe Arcgreatest quality of life possible for your fellow community members in need? If so The is hiring for a Director of Development & Community Relations. This person Arc is hiring for a Dayimplementing Support Program Manager. This position oversees is responsible for designing, and leading a comprehensive the operation ofrelations, our Charlottesville Adult Activity Center, which serves and mission-based public fundraising and membership campaign. Responsibilities includewith identifying, cultivating and stewardingResponsibilities contributory supports adults developmental disabilities. include relationships with individuals, foundations, corporations and government facilitating and implementing day-to-day services, community integration sources. Will also work closely with, and provide leadership thepeople we support. initiatives, activities and individualized programs forto,the Development Community Committee to secure funding, conductconsistent Provides and supervision toRelations Direct Support Professionals to ensure major gift campaigns, public awareness of The Arc, andperson-centered implement maintenance andfurther implementation of each person’s Indispecial projects. Serves as primary media contact for the organization and vidualized Service Plan. Also responsible for staff and budgetary oversight, works strategically to devise and implement proactive media outreach efforts team meetings, medical administration and licensure compliance. Will also and marketing strategies to increase awareness of the agency. Responsibilities provide on-call assistance to assure appropriate handling of emergency also include oversight of our web site as well as the leveraging of social situations and will also be required to assist team, as-needed, in providing media.

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CLASSIFIEDS Region Ten Walk-In Interviews 800 Preston Avenue Tuesday, February 27th from 1:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Region Ten seeks energetic people to interview for positions at the Mohr Center and The Women’s Center at Moores Creek. Mohr Center is a treatment program for adult men experiencing co-occurring SA and mental health conditions. Interviewing for: Clinician II/ III Director III, Mohr Center Community Services Associate I, Full Time and PRN Licensed Practical Nurse, Full and Part Time Registered Nurse

www.uvaclinicaltrials.com Advancing Healthcare Through

Clinical Trials Lung Imaging Study Seeking healthy volunteers or those with COPD, cystic fibrosis, or history of smoking or radiation therapy treatments (ages 12-85) for an MRI study of how air moves in the lungs. The study involves inhaled hyperpolarized xenon and/or helium gas, spirometry, 6-minute-walk test, electrocardiogram, physical exam, chest CT and finger stick, depending on your qualifications. Study requires 1-3 visits of 2-3 hours each. All study related tests provided free. Compensation is provided. Principal Investigator: Michael Shim, MD. UVA Radiology Research 434.243.6074 | rrd8w@virginia.edu IRB-HSR #16215

How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.

Are you a postmenopausal

February 21-27, 2018, c-ville.com

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woman concerned about low libido? If so, you could be eligible to participate in a clinical trial to evaluate an investigational medication consisting of a daily intravaginal insert for 28 weeks. You will have to undergo different tests at each visit and complete various questionnaires throughout the study. To be eligible, you must: 1. Be a postmenopausal woman aged between 40 and 80 years; 2. Meet the other criteria of the clinical study. Financial compensation up to $350 may be provided upon completion of the study. For more information or to see if you qualify, please communicate with Eleanor Jones at 434-243-4631. This trial is sponsored by EndoceuticsTM and has been reviewed by an independent Ethics Committee.

The Women’s Center of Moores Creek is our community’s first substance use residential facility for women and their preschool children. Interviewing for: Community Services Associate, Peer Support. Part Time Clinician/ Case Manager Visit the Careers Section of our website for more info! www.regionten.org or call 972-1898 We value diversity in the workplace EOE Bilingual applicants are encouraged to apply.


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VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE Complainant,

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

v.

Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE 8.01-316

Albemarle County

ANGELA W. FITZGERALD, f/k/a ANGELA NICOLE WINSTON,

General District Court Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re

D.B. a male child (d.o.b. July 18, 2007)

The Object of this suit is to: approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residual parental rights of Johnnie L. Bottenfield in the child born to him and Jennifer A. Fitzgerald on July 18, 2007, in Charlottesville, Virginia. It is ORDERED that the defendant Johnnie L. Bottenfield appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interest on or before March 27, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. 1/9/18

David M. Barredo

DATE

JUDGE

Respondents. ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is to effect a judicial sale of certain real property, reportedly containing one-half acre, more or less, and designated as Tax Map Parcel No. 79-36B, and which is being assessed on the tax records of Albemarle County, Virginia in the name of Angela W. Fitzgerald, in order to subject such property to the lien thereon for delinquent real estate taxes. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that the Complainant has used due diligence to ascertain all of the owners of the subject property but has been unable to do so and that there are or may be persons unknown who claim or may claim an interest in the property, namely the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns in and to the title and interest of Angela W. Fitzgerald, f/k/a Angela Nicole Winston. It is therefore ORDERED that the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, if any, of Angela W. Fitzgerald, f/k/a Angela Nicole Winston, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as “Parties Unknown,� appear on or before March 14, 2018 and take such action as they deem appropriate to protect any interests they may have in the above-described property. It is further ORDERED that the foregoing portion of this Order be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the C-Ville Weekly, that a copy hereof be posted on the door of the Courthouse. The Clerk is hereby directed to send this Order to the C-Ville Weekly for that purpose, and to make the aforementioned posting and mailings. And this cause is continued. ENTER: Cheryl V. Higgins DATE:2/8/18 I ASK FOR THIS: JONATHAN T. WREN, VSB #40304 MARTINWREN, P.C. 400 Locust Avenue, Suite 1 Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 (434) 817-3100 (phone) (434) 817-3110 (fax) wren@martinwrenlaw.com (email) Counsel for the County of Albemarle

Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE 8.01-316

Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE 8.01-316

General District Court Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re

and the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, of Angela W. Fitzgerald, f/k/a Angela Nicole Winston, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as PARTIES UNKNOWN,

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Albemarle County

Case No. CL17-1169

The Object of this suit is to: approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residual parental rights of Johnnie L. Bottenfield in the child born to him and Jennifer A. Fitzgerald on February 6, 2009, in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re

T.B. a male child (d.o.b. May 3, 2004)

The Object of this suit is to: approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residual parental rights of Johnnie L. Bottenfield in the child born to him and Jennifer A. Fitzgerald on May 3, 2004, in Charlottesville, Virginia. It is ORDERED that the defendant Johnnie L. Bottenfield appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interest on or before March 27, 2018 at 9:00 a.m.

1/9/18

1/9/18

DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

facebook.com/cville.weekly

It is ORDERED that the defendant Johnnie L. Bottenfield appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interest on or before March 27, 2018 at 9:00 a.m.

February 21-27, 2018, c-ville.com

H.B. a male child (d.o.b. February 6, 2009)

Albemarle County

General District Court


52

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. 6007 W. AUDIO-EXCHANGE.COM BROAD ST. RICHMOND, VA 23230 . (804).282.0438 . VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FOR THE CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA, Complainant,

Complainant, v.

Case No. CL17-1166

JULE COLTRAIN, TRUSTEE of the 421 Silver Slipper Club, believed deceased, CLAUDE COLES, TRUSTEE of the 421 Silver Slipper Club, believed deceased, CHARLES B. BROWN, TRUSTEE of the 421 Silver Slipper Club, believed deceased, 421 SILVER SLIPPER CLUB, existence and address unknown, and the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, if any, of Jule Coltrain, Claude Coles and Charles B. Brown, Trustees of the 421 Silver Slipper Club, and/or of the 421 Silver Slipper Club itself, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as PARTIES UNKNOWN,

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

Case No.CLl 7-664

DELWIN W. WASHINGTON BIANCA N. JOHNSON-WASHINGTON, SARA D. CARTER, TRUSTEE, DAVID C. CARTER, TRUSTEE, PHILLIP EDWARD BROWN, SR., deceased, COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, CARL TON BRIDGE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., FLOOR FASHIONS OF VIRGINIA, INC., JACQUELINE CARNEY DDS PC dba CHILDREN’S DENTISTRY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE, and the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, if any, of Phillip Edward Brown, Sr., as they may appear, proceeded against herein as PARTIES UNKNOWN, Respondents.

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

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COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE,

Respondents.

v.

February 21-27, 2018, c-ville.com

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE

The object of this suit is to effect a judicial sale of certain real property, known as 814 Ridge Street, and designated as Tax Map Parcel No.250101000, and which is being assessed on the tax records of the City of Charlottesville, Virginia in the name of Delwin W. Washington and Bianca N. Washington, a/k/a Bianca N. Johnson-Washington in order to subject such property to the lien thereon for delinquent real estate taxes. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that the Complainant has used due diligence to ascertain all of the owners of the subject property but has been unable to do so and that there are or may be persons unknown who claim or may claim an interest in the property, namely the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assignors in and to the title and interest of Phillip Edward Brown, Sr. It is therefore ORDERED that the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, if any, of Phillip Edward Brown, Sr., as they may appear, proceeded against herein as “Parties Unknown,” appear on or before March 19, 2018 and take such action as they deem appropriate to protect any interests they may have in the above-described property.

It is further ORDERED that the foregoing portion of this Order be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the C-Ville Weekly, that a copy hereof be posted on the door of the Courthouse and a copy be mailed to the last known address, if any, of the Respondents. The Clerk is hereby directed to send this Order to the C-Ville Weekly and to make the aforementioned posting and mailings.

The object of this suit is to effect a judicial sale of certain real property, reportedly containing 10 acres, more or less, and designated as Tax Map Parcel No. 120-63, and which is being assessed on the tax records of Albemarle County, Virginia in the name of the Jule Coltrain, Claude Coles and Charles B. Brown, Trustees of the 421 Silver Slipper Club, in order to subject such property to the lien thereon for delinquent real estate taxes. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that diligence has been used without effect to ascertain whether the following Respondents are alive, and if so, their whereabouts: Jule Coltrain, Claude Coles and Charles B. Brown, Trustees of the 421 Silver Slipper Club. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that the Complainant has used due diligence to ascertain all of the owners of the subject property but has been unable to do so and that there are or may be persons unknown who claim or may claim an interest in the property, namely the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns in and to the title and interest of Jule Coltrain, Claude Coles and Charles B. Brown, Trustees of the 421 Silver Slipper Club and/or the 421 Silver Slipper Club itself. It is therefore ORDERED that Jule Coltrain, Claude Coles and Charles B. Brown, Trustees of the 421 Silver Slipper Club, and the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, if any, of Jule Coltrain, Claude Coles and Charles B. Brown, Trustees of the 421 Silver Slipper Club, and/or of the 421 Silver Slipper Club itself, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as “Parties Unknown,” appear on or before March 14, 2018 and take such action as they deem appropriate to protect any interests they may have in the above-described property. It is further ORDERED that the foregoing portion of this Order be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the C-ville Weekly, that a copy hereof be posted on the door of the Courthouse and that a copy be mailed to the last known address, if any, of the Respondents. The Clerk is hereby directed to send this Order to the C-ville Weekly and to make the aforementioned postings and mailings. And this cause is continued. ENTER: Cheryl V. Higgins

And this cause is continued.

ENTER: Richard E. Moore Judge DATE: I ASK FOR THIS: JONATHAN T. WREN, VSB #40304 MARTINWREN, P.C. 400 Locust Avenue, Suite 1 Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 (434) 817-3100 (phone) (434) 817-3110 (fax) wren@martinwrenlaw.com (e-mail)

2/12/18

DATE: 2/8/18 I ASK FOR THIS: JONATHAN T. WREN, VSB #40304 MARTINWREN, P.C. 400 Locust Avenue, Suite 1 Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 (434) 817-3100 (phone) (434) 817-3110 (fax) wren@martinwrenlaw.com (e-mail) Counsel for the County of Albemarle


CLASSIFIEDS

53

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE

COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE,

COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE,

Complainant, v.

Complainant,

Case No. CL17-1171

v.

CORA W. LEAHR, deceased, WILLIAM J. LEAHR, believed deceased, CORA L. HILLMAN, MICHAEL L. LEAHR, DAVID W. LEAHR, JENNIFER L. JONES, f/k/a JENNIFER LEAHR, DANIEL J. LEAHR, and any unnamed heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, if any, of Cora W. Leahr, William J. Leahr, Cora L. Hillman, Michael L. Leahr, David W. Leahr, Jennifer Leahr, and Daniel J. Leahr, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as PARTIES UNKNOWN, Respondents. ORDER OF PUBLICATION

MARGARET GORDON ROBERTS, deceased, ELLA MAE ROBERTS, DAVID ROBERTS, HENRY ROBERTS, MARY ROBERTS, SHEILA F. ROBINSON, ELLA MAE HARRIS, JACK HARRIS, THE RECTOR AND VISITORS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, A CORP., t/a UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA MEDICAL CENTER, AN AGENCY OF THE COMMONWEALTH, F & S FINANCIAL MARKETING, INC., and the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, if any, of Margaret Gordon Roberts and Ella Mae Roberts, including but not limited to David Roberts, Henry Roberts, Mary Roberts, Sheila F. Robinson, Ella Mae Harris, and Jack Harris, and their heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as PARTIES UNKNOWN, Respondents. ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is to effect a judicial sale of certain real property, reportedly containing 3.58 acres, more or less, and designated as Tax Map Parcel No. 54-9D, and which is being assessed on the tax records of Albemarle County, Virginia in the name of M. G. Roberts and children, et al., c/o Anthony Swingler, in order to subject such property to the lien thereon for delinquent real estate taxes. It also appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that diligence has been used without effect to ascertain the status and whereabouts of Margaret Gordon Roberts, Ella Mae Roberts, David Roberts, Henry Roberts, Mary Roberts, Sheila F. Robinson, Ella Mae Harris and Jack Harris, It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that the Complainant has used due diligence to ascertain all of the owners of the subject property but has been unable to do so and that there are or may be persons unknown who claim or may claim an interest in the property, namely the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns in and to the title and interest of Margaret Gordon Roberts and Ella Mae Roberts, including but not limited to David Roberts, Henry Roberts, Mary Roberts, Sheila F. Robinson, Ella Mae Harris, and Jack Harris, and their heirs, devisees, personal representatives,successors, or assigns, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as PARTIES UNKNOWN. It is therefore ORDERED that Margaret Gordon Roberts, Ella Mae Roberts, David Roberts, Henry Roberts, Mary Roberts, Sheila F. Robinson, Ella Mae Harris, and Jack Harris, and the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, if any, of Margaret Gordon Roberts and Ella Mae Roberts, including but not limited to David Roberts, Henry Roberts, Mary Roberts, Sheila F. Robinson, Ella Mae Harris, and Jack Harris, and their heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as “Parties Unknown,” appear on or before March 14, 2018 and take such action as they deem appropriate to protect any interests they may have in the above-described property. It is further ORDERED that the foregoing portion of this Order be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the C-Ville Weekly, that a copy hereof be posted on the door of the Courthouse. The Clerk is hereby directed to send this Order to the C-Ville Weekly and to make the aforementioned posting and mailings. And this cause is continued.

I ASK FOR THIS: JONATHAN T. WREN, VSB #40304 MARTINWREN, P.C. 400 Locust Avenue, Suite 1 Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 (434) 817-3100 (phone) (434) 817-3110 (fax) wren@martinwren.com (email) Counsel for the County of Albemarle

DATE: 2/8/18 I ASK FOR THIS: JONATHAN T. WREN, VSB #40304 MARTINWREN, P.C. 400 Locust Avenue, Suite 1 Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 (434) 817-3100 (phone) (434) 817-3110 (fax) wren@martinwrenlaw.com (e-mail) Counsel for the City of Charlottesville, Virginia

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ENTER: Cheryl V. Higgins Judge

ENTER: Cheryl V. Higgins Judge DATE: 2/8/18

February 21-27, 2018, c-ville.com

The object of this suit is to effect a judicial sale of certain real property, reportedly containing 16 ¼ acres, more or less, and designated as Tax Map Parcel No. 106-8, and which is being assessed on the tax records of Albemarle County, Virginia in the name of Cora L. Hillman, Michael L. Leahr, David W. Leahr, Jennifer L. Jones, f/k/a Jennifer Leahr, and Daniel J. Leahr, in order to subject such property to the lien thereon for delinquent real estate taxes. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that Cora L. Hillman is not a resident of the Commonwealth of Virginia and that her last known address is 8053 Debonair Court, Cincinnati, Ohio 45237. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that Michael L. Leahr is not a resident of the Commonwealth of Virginia and that his last known address is 2043 Southstead Court, Cincinnati, Ohio 45220. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that David W. Leahr is not a resident of the Commonwealth of Virginia and that his last known address is 1111 Ehrman Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45220. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that Jennifer L. Jones, f/k/a Jennifer Leahr is not a resident of the Commonwealth of Virginia and that her last known address is 3433 Alexander Place, SW, Smyra, Georgia 30082. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that Daniel J. Leahr is not a resident of the Commonwealth of Virginia and that his last known address is 4007 Rocky Creek Trail, Loganville, Georgia 30052. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that the Complainant has used due diligence to ascertain all of the owners of the subject property but has been unable to do so and that there are or may be persons unknown who claim or may claim an interest in the property, namely the heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns in and to the title and interest of Cora W. Leahr, William J. Leahr, Cora L. Hillman, Michael L. Leahr, David W. Leahr, Jennifer L. Jones, f/k/a Jennifer Leahr, and Daniel J. Leahr, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as PARTIES UNKNOWN. That it is also appearing that diligence has been used without effect to ascertain whether the following individuals are alive, and if alive, their location: Cora W. Leahr and William J. Leahr. It is therefore ORDERED that Cora W. Leahr, William J. Leahr, Cora L. Hillman, Michael L. Leahr, David W. Leahr, Jennifer L. Jones, f/k/a Jennifer Leahr, and Daniel J. Leahr, and any unnamed heirs, devisees, personal representatives, successors, or assigns, if any, of Cora W. Leahr, William J. Leahr, Cora L. Hillman, Michael L. Leahr, David W. Leahr, Jennifer L. Jones, f/k/a/ Jennifer Leahr, and Daniel J. Leahr, as they may appear, proceeded against herein as ‘Parties Unknown,” appear on or before March 14, 2018 and take such action as they deem appropriate to protect any interests they may have in the above-described property. It is further ORDERED that the foregoing portion of this Order be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the C-Ville Weekly, that a copy hereof be posted on the door of the Courthouse and that a copy be mailed to the last known address, if any, of the Respondents. The Clerk is hereby directed to send this Order to the C-Ville Weekly and to make the aforementioned posting and mailings. And this cause is continued.

Case No. CLI 7-1177


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Q&A What would you tell your teenage self knowing what you know now? Weed is not a (bad) drug. @JASONMDUBYA/TWITTER

In the long game of life, not being invited to prom is not a big deal. @JALANE_SCHMIDT/TWITTER

I would probably tell my teenage self to take more chances or do more outof-the-box things instead of staying in my lane. CLAIRE JAFFE

Speaking up about injustice can have some painful consequences, but don’t ever stop doing it.

Student debt is hell. Go to trade school instead. KAITY VANCE/EMAIL

LESLIE DURR/FACEBOOK

ANDREW KINBACK/FACEBOOK

You know nothing, Jer Sharp.

That much eyeliner isn’t cool and looks horrible! Harry Potter isn’t real so stop yelling at the mail lady every day your letter doesn’t come! Eat more pizza because one day you’ll actually have to buy it for yourself and you’re poor!

JEREMY SHARP/FACEBOOK

I would tell her to hold her head high...it will be alright in the long run. Look toward your real friends, not the ones you think are friends. They are all around you!!!

February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

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@MJL68275190/TWITTER

In the words of the late, great Bill Hicks: “It’s just a ride.”

Don’t go to college for your Mrs. degree!

Start a journal. Try harder in school so you get better scholarships. Start investing early, especially in Google.

@CAMEOKATH/INSTAGRAM

ALLAN REY

@ALLYPONN/TWITTER

Next week’s question: Do you think stricter gun control is the answer to preventing school shootings? Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cvillenews_desk (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.


55

GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT IN IN CHARLOTTESVILLE CHARLOTTESVILLE NN TTIIOO TTAA

P PU UB BLLIIC C IIN NVV II

OUR OUR GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT TODAY TODAY

OUR OUR GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT TOMORROW? TOMORROW?

EDUCATIONAL SERIES SPONSORED BY

THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS CHARLOTTESVILLE TOMORROW JEFFERSON SCHOOL AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE CENTER SESSION February 11, 2018 SESSION II Sunday Sunday February 11, 2018

Government Government in in Charlottesville Charlottesville Today Today

FACILITATORS: FACILITATORS: · Andrea Douglas, Executive Director, ·

· ·

Andrea Douglas, Executive Director, Jefferson School African American

Jefferson School African American Heritage Center Heritage Center Brian Wheeler, Executive Director, Brian Wheeler, Executive Director, Charlottesville Tomorrow Charlottesville Tomorrow

This session will focus on alternative forms of city This sessioninwill focus on alternative forms city government Virginia, elected Mayors, wardofversus government in Virginia, elected Mayors, ward versus at-large council elections, procedures and at-large counciltoelections, and models,etc. requirements enact newprocedures city governance requirements to enact new city governance models,etc.

FACILITATORS: FACILITATORS:

· ·

· ·

Andrea Douglas, Executive Director, Andrea Douglas, Executive Director, Jefferson School African American Heritage Center Jefferson School African American Heritage Center Bob Gibson, Senior Researcher, Bob Gibson, Senior Researcher, Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service

PANELISTS: PANELISTS: · Bill Pantele, Richmond City Council, 2001-09 ·· Bill Pantele, Richmond City Council, 2001-09 George Gilliam, Charlottesville City Council, · George Gilliam, Charlottesville City Council, 1972-76 · 1972-76 Rich Schragger, UVA Law School professor ·· Rich Law member, School professor Joan Schragger, MacCallum,UVA former · Joan MacCallum, former member, Lynchburg City Council Lynchburg City Council

RELOCATED TO NEW LARGER MEETING SPACE FROM 2pm-4pm at RELOCATED TO NEW LARGER MEETING SPACE FROM 2pm-4pm at Jefferson School African American Heritage Center - 233 4th St. NW th Jefferson School African American Heritage Center - 233 4 St. NW

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PANELISTS: PANELISTS: · Bitsy Waters, Charlottesville Mayor, 1988-90 ·· Bitsy Waters, Charlottesville Mayor, 1988-90 Charles Barbour, Charlottesville’s first · Charles Barbour, Charlottesville’s first African-American Mayor, 1974-76 Mayor, · African-American Rich Schragger, UVA Law1974-76 School professor ·· Rich Schragger, UVA School professor Tom Walls, Executive Law Director, · Tom Walls, Executive Director, Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership

Options Options for for Governance Governance in in the the Future Future February 21 – 27, 2018 c-ville.com

Panelists will discuss the current Panelists willofdiscuss the current organization Charlottesville City Council organization of Charlottesville elections, rotating mayorships City and Council the elections, rotating mayorships and the City Manager form of government. City Manager form of government.

SESSION February 25, 2018 SESSION II II Sunday Sunday February 25, 2018


Summer 2018 Theater Camps

Mini Camps

Production Camps

123 E. Water St. Charlottesville

Specialty Camps

PreK - Rising 2nd grade

Rising 2nd grade and up

Rising 3rd grade and up

Imagination and creativity rule the day. Our energetic teachers will lead wee theater artists through wacky theater games fostering creativity, self-expression, and teamwork. Each camp culminates in a public performance for family and friends.

Join the Live Arts Youth Theater Company in an annual Summer Camp Production. You’ll perform in a full Live Arts show, make new friends, and collaborate with professional theater artists.

Focus on the funny, the creating your own play or just the music! Live Arts Specialty Camps are immersions into specific aspects of theater - lead by subject specialists. Each Specialty Camp culminates in a world-premiere showcase.

Fantasy Camp

The Tempest

Comedy Camp

Much Ado about Nothing

Comedy Camp

Wizard of OZ

Playwrights & Playmakers

June 11 – 15

Pirates & Mermaids June 18 – 22

Amazing Animals July 9 – 13

Fantasy Camp July 16 – 20

You - just like a pro!

3rd – 6th graders June 18 – 30 7th – 12th graders June 18 – 30

3rd – 9th graders July 16 – August 4

3rd-6th graders June 11 – 15

7th-12th graders June 11 – 15

5th-8th graders July 2 – 13

Disney’s Jungle Book Musical - KIDS

July 23 – 27

3rd – 9th graders August 6 – 18

Musical Theater Camp

Amazing Animals

Plus the Live Arts Summer Musical

Musical Theater Camp

Pirates & Mermaids

3rd-6th graders July 2 – 13

7th-12th graders July 2 – 13

August 6 – 10

SummerAtLiveAr ts.org 434-977-4177

February 21: The Youth Issue  

School, friends, family, work and finding their voice: A peek at what local teens are thinking about right now

February 21: The Youth Issue  

School, friends, family, work and finding their voice: A peek at what local teens are thinking about right now

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