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Meeting and greeting

Unit overview In this unit students will: ● learn about and discuss different ways of greeting people ● identify formal and informal situations and the correct language to use in each ● talk about different social customs in different countries.

Students will build communication and literacy skills as they develop an awareness of the difference between formal and informal language. To do this, they will look at different ways of greeting people according to age and degree of familiarity. They will expand their knowledge of cultural differences by looking at social customs in different countries and comparing them with their own. Students practise communication skills by roleplaying dialogues and discussing correct behaviour. They will develop an awareness of intercultural communication by looking at ways of greeting and meeting in their culture and in other cultures. Students will develop their linguistic ability by learning and practising ways of making requests, asking for and giving advice, offering to do something, making requests and asking for permission.

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Language focus

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Students will develop their literacy skills by reading and discussing a text about famous gifts. They will further develop their awareness of cultural differences by listening to a radio programme about the rules of gift-giving in different countries. At the end of the unit, students will apply and personalise what they have learned by writing a guide of social customs for foreign students in their country.

Modals: shall, should, can, could, will, would, may, might Making requests, asking for and giving advice, offering to do something, requests and permission. Vocabulary topics: greetings, polite language

Self-assessment

I can greet people politely. I can use formal and informal greetings. I can speak about social behaviour in my culture. I can compare social behaviours in different countries. I can listen and understand main ideas.

Teaching tips

When doing the Project, explain the importance of the different steps: brainstorming, deciding which ideas to use, assigning roles and, finally, writing the guide. Tell students that it is essential to plan any kind of writing to make sure the final product is well organised, clear, grammatically correct and complete. Review students’ performance in the Writing exercises and the Project to see how well they are remembering the information presented in the Coursebook. Review note-taking skills and encourage them to review their notes before going on to Unit 2.

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1 Meeting and greeting

Lesson 1: How do you say hello? C p. 6–7

W p. XX–XX ●

LESSON OBJECTIVES Reading: How people greet each other around the world.

Speaking: Comparing ways of greeting and meeting people; describing pictures.

Answers

Writing: Writing about meeting and greeting people. Critical thinking: Making hypotheses; understanding the difference between formal and informal language and when to use each; developing awareness of cultural differences. Vocabulary: Collocations: shake hands with someone, put your hands together, bow your head, give someone a kiss on the cheek.

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Coursebook Starter

Greet students. Say: Hello! Encourage them to greet each other. ● Then, ask them how they say Hello and Goodbye in their own language. Do they use a different greeting when they greet adults or strangers? ● Ask students if they know how to say Hello and Goodbye in other languages. Critical thinking: Focus on the photograph at the top of page 6. Encourage students to describe what they see. What do they think these people are saying? Do they know each other? Why do the students think this? ●

Critical thinking: Discuss cultural differences to help students develop awareness of other cultures. This is a useful lead-in for the reading activity.

Reading and listening

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2 Read about how people greet each other and guess which country they come from. Then listen and check. ● Working individually, students read each text and decide which country the speaker comes from. Encourage them to look for reasons to support their choice. ● When they have fi nished, they discuss their decisions as a class. Do not reveal the correct answers yet. ● Students often panic when they fi nd words they don’t know in a text. Explain that they can use the context in which the word appears to guess the meaning. ● Tell students that you are going to listen to the audio and check the answers. ● Play the audio at least twice to give students enough time to check their answers.

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Materials: Coursebook, Workbook, audio device, globe or map of the world.

Friends and family: Hello, Bye, All right?, See you, How’s it going?, Hi, How are you?, How are things? Teachers: Hello, (Bye), Good morning, How are you?, Goodbye, Good afternoon

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Listening: Comparing ways of greeting and meeting people in different countries; checking information.

Speaking 1

Focus on the different forms of greetings. In pairs, students discuss and decide, e.g. Bye is for friends and family but not for teachers, Goodbye is for teachers and for friends and family too. Circulate, checking for correct pronunciation and helping if necessary. You could classify the greetings into two lists and display in a table.

Work with a partner. Which of the following phrases are for friends and family? Which would you use with your teachers? ● Ask students if they use the same language with friends and with adults. Is there any difference in the use of everyday language (not just in meetings and greetings), for example between adults in the family and adults outside the family, teachers, etc? Give a few examples, e.g. asking a parent to give them something and asking a teacher, the use of Sir and Madam. Encourage students to provide their own examples.

Answers 1 Singapore 2 Argentina 3 India 4 Thailand

Audioscript Track 2 Speaker: 1 Girl: I’m from Singapore. When we meet someone for the first time, we usually nod our heads and smile. In formal situations we shake hands. Speaker: 2 Woman: In Argentina, women give one kiss on the cheek when they greet friends and family. In formal situations, people shake hands. Speaker: 3 Man: In India, close friends and family members hug when they meet but they do not kiss. You only kiss babies and very young children.

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1 Meeting and greeting

Vocabulary

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1 head 2 shake 3 hands 4 head 5 kiss

4 Match the words and phrases from the text with their meanings. ● Read the instructions and focus on the example answer. Explain that all the words in the left-hand column are from the texts in Exercise 2. ● Before doing the exercise, ask students to re-read the texts in Exercise 2 again. Then, they find the words and circle them. This exercise will help them to contextualise the words and phrases. ● They work independently and match the words to their meanings. ● Check as a class. Answers 1e 2c 3f 4a 5b 6g 7d

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Answers Students’ own answers.

Writing 6 Use your answers to the questions in Exercise 5 to write a paragraph about meeting and greeting in your culture. ● Tell students to use the information they discussed in Exercise 6 and the notes, if they have made any, to write a paragraph about meeting and greeting in their culture. ● You may wish to model the fi rst sentence and then they follow independently. ● When they have fi nished, you may wish to ask some of them to read their paragraphs to the class. Answers

Students’ own answers.

Speaking 7

Answers

When they have finished, talk about their conclusions as a class. Encourage them to support their opinions with examples.

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3 Complete these collocations. They are all in the text. ● Write a jumbled list of collocations on the board. Ask students to pick out the collocations. Then ask what the groups of words are called. If they don’t know then tell them. ● Read the instructions. Focus on the Reading tip and discuss what a collocation is. ● Explain the exercise and ask students to complete the sentences. Tell them to refer back to the reading texts in Exercise 2 for help. ● Check as a class. You may wish to ask students to brainstorm other collocations based on the topic of greeting, e.g. rub your noses.

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Speaker: 4 Boy: In Thailand, we don’t hug or kiss each other when we meet. We greet friends and colleagues with ‘wai’. Wai is a gesture. You put your hands together and bow your head. The tips of your thumbs should touch your chin for a friend and your nose for someone older than you. However, today younger people usually wave and even hug.

Work with a partner. Answer these questions about meeting and greeting in your culture. ● Students read the questions and discuss their answers. You may wish to ask them to write a few notes in preparation for the writing activity.

Look at these pictures of people greeting each other. Describe them and say where you think they were taken. ● After a few minutes of paired discussion, discuss the students’ impressions a class. ● Encourage them to give their opinion and reasons for it. Answers The photos show people greeting each other in Thailand and in New Zealand.

Differentiated instruction Additional support and practice ● Ask students to search the Internet or reference books and find how to say Hello and Goodbye in different languages. You may wish to help them write a list on the board or make a small poster with the name of the corresponding language. ● If there are students who have different mother tongues or speak other languages, invite them to teach their classmates how to say Hello in those languages. Extend and challenge ● Focus on the countries mentioned in the text. Help students to find them on a map or globe. What do they know about these countries? Do any of the students come from one of these locations? Are the students living in one of the countries listed?

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Workbook 1 Complete the conversation using words and phrases from the box. ● Students read the dialogue and choose phrases from the box to complete it. ● When they have fi nished, you may ask them to role play the dialogue in pairs to check the answers.

Lesson 2: What should you say? What should you do? C p. 8–9

LESSON OBJECTIVES Reading: Reading and answering a questionnaire; reading and completing conversations.

Answers 1 Hello 2 Nice to meet you 3 Thank you 4 Bye 5 Good morning

Speaking: Comparing ways of behaving in social situations in different countries; roleplaying a dialogue.

2 Use the words in the two columns to write captions for these pictures. ● Students read the words and combine them to write the captions. ● Check as a class.

Listening: Listening to situations and responding appropriately. Critical thinking: Understanding social convention; developing awareness of cultural differences; doing a multiple-choice quiz and working out the results; inferencing.

Answers 1 nod your head 2 shake hands 3 put your hands together 4 bow your head

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Language focus: Modals: shall, should, can, could, will, would, may, might; asking for and offering advice, asking for permission, offering to do something, making requests.

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3 Read the text about Japan. Then write yes or no beside each of the sentences. ● Students read the text and decide. ● Check as a class. You may wish to ask them to compare Japanese ‘greeting’ culture with their own. Answers

Vocabulary: Congratulations!, Good luck!, Goodnight, Sleep well, Well done!, Happy New Year!, Have a good holiday, Have a good weekend, Nice to meet you, See you later, Welcome to …

1 no 2 yes 3 yes 4 no 5 yes 6 no

4 Complete the crossword with words you have used in this unit. ● Students read the clues and solve the crossword. ● If they have difficulties solving the puzzle, remind them to revise the unit vocabulary. ● Check as a class. Answers

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Materials: Coursebook, Workbook, audio device, a copy of Photocopiable activity 1 for each student.

Coursebook Starter ●

Across 1 kiss 4 colleague 8 wave 9 hug 10 fine 11 hi 12 chin Down 5 shake 3 bye 5 older 6 gesture 7 bow 10 friend

Review with students how to greet people in different contexts. Provide imaginary situations, e.g. they ring the bell at a friend’s house and his / her mother / little sister / father opens the door. Ask individual students what they would say. Establish what ‘social situations’ are. Ask the students about themselves in different scenarios. Are they shy? Are they self-confident? How did they learn how to behave and what to say?

Reading 1

Answer the questions in the quiz. Then compare your answers with a partner. ● Focus on the title of the quiz ‘Are you a good guest?’ and ask students what they think it is going to be about. ● Then focus on the photographs and ask students what they can see. Ask them to predict how the photographs and the title of the quiz are linked.

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1 Meeting and greeting ●

Remind them what the spread topic is and ask them how they think the two questions fit with the exercise. Explain the exercise. Tell students to read the options carefully before choosing. Focus on the title question and the instructions. Explain guest if necessary. When they have finished, tell them to count their score. Explain how to do this.

Answers

Students work independently on the remaining dialogues. When they have finished, ask students to read their dialogues.

Answers Example answers: Can I make you a sandwich? May I use the computer to send an email? You should go to bed. What should I buy?

Students’ own answers.

Differentiated instruction

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3 Read these expressions. What are they in your language? ● Read through the expressions as a class. Focus on pronunciation. ● Discuss the meaning of each expression with the students. ● Ask individual students to tell the class what each expression is in their language. Answers

Students’ own answers.

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Provide additional support and practice ● Prepare some more situations similar to those in Exercise 1 and ask students to provide suitable responses. Extend and challenge ● What other situations might arise? In small groups, students write one more item and three possible answers on slips of paper. They exchange papers with other groups and choose the correct answer.

Listening

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Critical thinking: Discuss the scores as a class. What answers carry the most points? Why do they think this is so? What is the difference between the answers that carry the highest points and the ones that carry the lowest? What would the acceptable behaviour be in the students’ country? Is it similar or different?

Use of English: Modals Starter ●

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Remind students of ways in which they ask for permission to do something in class, make requests, etc., e.g. Can I open the window? Can I borrow your pencil? Ask for more examples from students. Look at the categories in the Use of English box and ask students to read the examples. Encourage students to think of more examples to add to each category. Write them on the board. Circle the modals and explain what modal verbs are. Read the explanation with the class. Direct their attention to the note about the use of could and may. Ask them to imagine situations in which they would need to use these two modals. You may ask students to decide what the difference is between formal and informal examples.

2 Complete the conversations using modal verbs. There may be more than one possibility. ● Explain the exercise and focus on the worked example.

4 Listen to the scenarios and respond with an appropriate expression from Exercise 3. ● Check if students know what scenario means. What other word does it look or sound like? (Scene.) ● Tell students that you are going to listen to people speaking in five different situations and they have to choose an appropriate expression to respond. ● Play the audio once for students to familiarise themselves with the content. Play it a second time, pausing after each situation, and ask students to explain the situation briefly, e.g. who is speaking to whom. ● Play it a third time, pausing after each situation to allow time for students to decide and respond. Allow for a range of answers and encourage students to give reasons for their choice. Answers 1 Nice to meet you. 2 Congratulations. 3 Have a good holiday. 4 Goodnight, sleep well.

Audioscript Track 3 Speaker: 1 Man: Hello, I don’t think we’ve met before. You must be Claudia’s friend. I’m Roberto. Speaker: 2 Boy: We had a really difficult Maths problem for homework tonight. But I’ve worked out how to do it and I’ve finished it. Speaker: 3 Girl: See you when I get back. I’ll be away for three weeks. I’ll send you a postcard.

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1 Meeting and greeting Speaker: 4 Boy: I feel really tired. I think I’ll go to bed now. See you in the morning.

Speaking Work in pairs. Make up and roleplay five short dialogues, like the ones you’ve just heard. In each dialogue, include one of the expressions from the box in Exercise 3. ● Play the audio again to remind students of the dialogues. ● Then they write five short dialogues. Allow enough time for them to work. Circulate and offer support, including help with new words. ● When they have fi nished, invite pairs to roleplay their dialogues. Answers

Answers 1 Could I borrow a pen? 2 Can I help you? 3 Would you like some tea? 4 May I have a glass of water? 5 Should I take off my shoes? 6 Where should I put my coat? 7 Where can I buy a present to take home?

4 Read the paragraph. Then write five sentences giving advice about meeting and greeting using you should/shouldn’t or you can. ● Students read the information about South Korea. ● Then, they write the sentences. ● Check as a class. Answers

Students’ own answers.

Differentiated instruction

Workbook

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Provide additional support and practice Complete Photocopiable activity 1. Extend and challenge Brainstorm with students situations similar to Exercise 2. Write them on the board. Ask students to choose one and write a dialogue.

1 You shouldn’t use first names. 2 You should use Mr, Mrs, Miss and the family name of the person. 3 You should bow when you meet someone. 4 You shouldn’t make eye contact. 5 You can shake hands when you meet.

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3 Put the words in these questions in the correct order. ● Students read the words and make the questions. ● They compare their answers with a partner. ● Check as a class.

1 Correct the spelling mistakes. ● Students read the sentences are correct the mistakes. ● Check as a class. Answers

5 Complete the dialogue using should, could, can and may. ● Students read the dialogue and complete it as instructed. ● Check as a class. Answers Example answers 1 should I do 2 Should I use 3 Could I borrow 4 can I use 5 May I go

1 should 2 holiday 3 Hello 4 friend 5 o’clock 6 tomorrow 7 because

2 Complete the conversations with the correct phrases. ● Students read the phrases in the box and use them to complete the conversations. ● When they have fi nished, they can compare their answers with a partner. ● Check as a class. you may consider asking them to role play the conversations. Answers 1 Welcome! 2 Nice to meet you. 3 Goodnight, sleep well. 4 Have a good holiday. 5 Well done! 6 See you later.

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1 Meeting and greeting

Lesson 3: It’s better to give than to receive W p. XX–XX

Answers

LESSON OBJECTIVES Reading: Reading and answering questions; choosing correct sentences to complete a text. Speaking: Discussing gift-giving customs. Listening: Listening to a radio programme and answering questions. Writing: Answering questions; writing a social guide. Project: Designing and writing a social guide for exchange students. Critical thinking: Speculating; making inferences. Language focus: Review of polite language. Vocabulary: Famous historical gifts, giving and receiving gifts, meeting and greeting people.

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Ask the class what gifts they have received that they have been especially excited about. Why were they special? Do they ever buy gifts? How do they choose a gift? ● Focus on the pictures. Ask students what they know about each. Generate interest by asking a variety of questions without revealing the answers to the exercise: Have you ever seen a panda? Where? Have you seen the Statue of Liberty? Where is it? If yes, what did you see there? ● The construction of the statue took ten years, so it was not ready for the actual centenary in 1876. The torch-bearing arm was, however, exhibited in Philadelphia in that year. Critical thinking: Ask students to describe the egg. Encourage them to speculate. Have they ever seen one like that? What would they use it for? ● Tell students they are going to read a text to fi nd out about the pictures. Explain that they do not need to focus on new words, but on the general content. ●

1 1c 2d 3a 4b 2 They were given by one country to another. 3 They also feature animals. 4 The Trojan Horse.

2 Choose the correct sentence to complete each paragraph on page 10. ● Tell students that paragraphs 1–4 are not complete and they have to complete them using the four sentences provided. ● Check as a class and ask students to justify their choices. You may take advantage of this activity to focus on references, i.e. how each sentence relates to the text. ● Ask students about their experience of reading the text. Was it difficult to understand? Did they find too many new words? What did they do to understand the meaning? ● Read the Language tip together. Is this similar to what they did?

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Materials: Coursebook, Workbook, map of the world, project: writing and drawing supplies.

Coursebook Starter

Ask comprehension questions. What do they know now about the pictures they didn’t know before? Is there anything surprising about the information they have read?

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C p. 10–11

Reading 1 Answer the questions. ● Students read ‘Famous gifts in history’. Focus on the questions. Students match the paragraphs to the correct picture and decide what the items have in common, e.g. some are gifts between countries.

Answers

1d 2a 3b 4c

Listening

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3 Listen to two people talking on a radio programme. What are they talking about? Which country do they mention? ● Tell students they are going to listen to an Indian radio magazine programme. Do they ever listen to the radio? What kinds of programmes do they listen to? What do they prefer, the TV or the radio? Brainstorm words for different kinds of radio programmes. ● Tell students to focus on the questions and listen to find the answers. Play the audio at least twice. Answers They’re talking about giving gifts. They mention India.

Audioscript Track 4 Interviewer: Do you take a gift when you go to someone’s house? Man: Well, I think it’s always a good idea to take a box of sweets or dried fruits when you visit friends and family. Woman: Yes, I agree. Sweets and dried fruits are good things to take for most occasions. You can also take flowers of course. Man: But you should never give white flowers. Interviewer: That’s interesting. Why is that? Why shouldn’t you give white flowers?

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Speaking 5

Work with a partner. Ask and answer the questions in Exercise 4 with reference to giftgiving in your country. ● In pairs, students discuss the questions in Exercise 4. They may roleplay each situation or take turns asking and answering. ● After they have discussed all of them, you may wish to have an open-class discussion. If you have an international class, you can ask students to compare gift-giving traditions of the countries or regions represented in the class. Answers Students’ own answers.

Project: A guide to social customs Design and write a guide to social customs for an exchange student visiting your school. ● Divide the class into groups. Read the instructions with the class. Focus on the fi rst question and ask students to reflect on each aspect at a time. Elicit ideas from them, e.g. gestures, common greetings. ● Students prepare the project and write the fi nal version. They may decorate it with suitable pictures or drawings. ● Make a class display of the guides and invite groups to present their project to the class.

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Man: Because white can have a negative meaning, connected with dying. After a woman’s husband dies, for example, she wears a white dress. Interviewer: Oh, I see. What about wrapping gifts? Are there any special rules to follow? Woman: Yes, you should wrap your gifts in red, blue, green or yellow paper. That’s because these are colours that bring happiness and money. Interviewer: Oh, right. And do people ever give money? Woman: Yes, gifts of money are very common when people get married, when they move into a new house or when they have a new baby. Man: But, remember that money should be given in quantities of, say, eleven, or fifty-one, or a hundred and one, and so on. This is because eleven is ten plus one, fifty-one is fifty plus one, a hundred and one is a hundred plus one. In other words, you are giving ten, fifty or a hundred with something extra. It shows that you want to give more than is necessary. Woman: And when you visit close friends and family you may want to give special gifts, like toys, clothes or books. Interviewer: How much money should you spend on a gift? Man: The value of a gift is not as important as the feelings attached to it. In other words, the best gifts aren’t always the most expensive gifts. Interviewer: When do you open gifts? Do you open them as soon as you get them, or do you wait? Woman: We don’t usually open gifts in front of everyone. We keep them and only open them after all the guests have gone home. Man: There’s also a tradition of exchanging gifts. So at a wedding in India, for example, you don’t only give something, you receive something in return. Interviewer: That’s a nice tradition. I like that!

4 Listen again and answer the questions. ● Focus on the questions. Tell students to listen again very carefully to find the answers to these questions. Tell them that they can make notes to remember the answers. ● Play the audio a few times. Discuss the answers with the class. Answers

1 A box of sweets or dried fruits. You can also take flowers. 2 You should never give white flowers because white can have a negative meaning, connected with dying. 3 You should wrap your gifts in red, blue, green or yellow paper. 4 When people get married, when they move into a new house or when they have a new baby. 5 You should give money in quantities of 11, 51, 101, and so on. This shows you are giving something extra. 6 Special gifts like toys, clothes or books. 7 You open your gifts after all the guests have gone home. 8 You exchange gifts at a wedding, for example.

Differentiated instruction Provide additional support and practice ● Ask students to try to write a similar guide to social customs for a different country. They may have to research in books and online. They should present their guide to the class. Extend and challenge ● Help students fi nd on a map or globe the countries or cities mentioned in the reading texts: Greece, Troy, New York, Paris, China. Ask them to search the Internet and fi nd out more about these places. In groups, they choose one place and prepare a dossier.

Workbook 1 Read the text. Look up any words you don’t know in a dictionary. ● Students read the text. Ask them to underline or circle the words they don’t know. ● Before looking them up in the dictionary, encourage them to guess their meaning from the context. Then they check with the dictionary. ● Check as a class. 2 Write the meaning of the following words and phrases.

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1 Meeting and greeting ●

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Students read the words and look for them in the text to contextualize them. Then they look them up in the dictionary and write the meaning. Help with dictionary skills if necessary. Check as a class.

Answers 1 a gift 2 an object such as a box or a bottle that is used for holding something 3 where everyone can see you 4 people who live very near you 5 in, to, or from another country 6 a journey in which you visit a place for a short time and come back again 7 to say you will not do or accept something 8 things you say or write that show what you think about something

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1 clothes 2 toys 3 a basket of dried fruits 4 money 5 a bunch of flowers 6 books 7 a box of sweets

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3 Label the gifts with words from the box. ● Students label the pictures using the words in the box. ● Check as a class. Consider asking them to add more gifts.

Answers

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4 Complete the word puzzle with verbs that can all be used before the word ‘gifts’. ● Students look at Activity 3 and at the unit and look for suitable words to solve the puzzle. ● Check as a class. Across wrap exchange give Down receive open

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2

Personal identity

Unit overview In this unit students will: ●

discuss the differences between primary and secondary school

speak about and describe their families

learn and speak about family history

read about DNA and immigration

read about Australia and Aborigines.

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Students will build communication and literacy skills as they discuss and give opinions about school experiences. They will further expand their knowledge of the world around them by reading and discussing a text about immigration and DNA. Students practise communication skills by finding out and discussing their family history, discussing issues and supporting their opinions. Students will further develop their literacy skills by writing about a family member. At the end of the unit, students will apply and personalise what they have learned by doing a project on impressions of school life.

Teaching tips

Present perfect for situations continuing up to now Apostrophes: ’s and s’ Vocabulary fields: life at school, describing a family member, family history

Group work is an important opportunity for developing critical thinking skills. Students cooperate, have roles and share responsibilities. They also support each other to achieve a common objective and respect each other’s points of view. Review students’ performance in the Writing exercises and the Project to see how well they are remembering the information presented in the Coursebook. Review note-taking skills and encourage them to review their notes before going on to Unit 3.

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Self-assessment

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Language focus

I can speak about my past and present school experiences. I can speak about my family’s history and my ancestors. I can read and understand a text about immigration and DNA. I can write a profi le of a family member.

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2 Personal identity

Lesson 1: So far, so good C p.12–13

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LESSON OBJECTIVES Reading: Reading about people’s experiences at school Speaking: Describing school experiences Listening: Listening to people speaking about their first days at a new school Writing: Writing about own experiences at school Critical thinking: Listening for main ideas; understanding attitude in a text; taking notes Language focus: Present perfect for situations continuing up to now Vocabulary: School subjects, sports, feelings

Ask students what memories they have of their early years at school. Did they attend the same school during all the years of primary? What memories do they have of teachers and schoolmates? Do students come from the same primary school? If not, how do their primary schools compare? Focus on the title of this lesson: So far, so good. Invite students to discuss the meaning. Focus on the photograph on top of the page. Ask students to predict what its relationship is with the content of the lesson. Ask them if they had schoolmates of different nationalities. If yes, where were they from? Ask about their experiences in secondary school. Focus on the questions and have an open-class discussion.

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Reading 1 A teacher has asked new students to describe their first few weeks at secondary school. Read what two of them said. Are they mostly positive or negative about their new school? ● Students read ‘First impressions’. ● Explain the exercise and encourage students to look for reasons to support their decision. Remind students to use context to understand the meaning of new words. ● When they have fi nished, discuss as a class. Answers

1 A few weeks. 2 Shamira kept getting lost and one teacher told her off. Sunil was a bit nervous on his first day. 3 Shamira has made loads of new friends and she’s also met up with some old friends. Sunil has enjoyed making new friends. 4 She thinks they’ll get more homework after half-term. 5 She means everything has been all right up to this point. 6 He plays the drums.

Listening

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Coursebook Starter

Answers

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Materials: Coursebook, Workbook, audio device

Critical thinking: Tell students to focus on the question and look for that information only. Tell them to look for and circle words or phrases that show the attitude of the students. 2 Answer the questions. ● Tell students to read the questions and re-read the text, this time paying attention to detail to find the answers. ● When they have fi nished, discuss the answers as a class.

3 Before you listen, read the questions in the survey. Who do you think wrote the survey? Who is going to answer it? ● Students go through the survey questions in pairs or small groups and predict who wrote them and who will answer. Then they share their impressions with the class. Listening strategy: Take advantage of this activity to predict the vocabulary they will hear in the audio and some of the content. This will make it easier for students to understand what they hear. Answers Teachers at the school have probably written the survey. New students are going to answer it.

4 Listen to Shamira and Sunil doing the survey. Have they done well at school this term? ● Play the audio at least twice for students to familiarise themselves with the content and find the answers to the question. ● They check if their predictions were correct. Ask what helped them decide, e.g. some key vocabulary. Critical thinking: Students generally try to understand everything they hear and are sometimes frustrated when they can’t. Ask them to focus only on finding the answer to the question. Answers Yes, they’ve done well at school this term.

They’re mostly positive.

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2 Personal identity Audioscript Track 5

Answers Sunil Shamira Science English History Geography The body (the skeleton and how your joints work) The Ancient Greeks She got an A for His marks have been English. OK. He got an A for Science. 6 He’s joined the school No orchestra 7 Football Volleyball 8 Yes. He kicked a football Yes. She was 10 minutes late for a through the staffroom lesson. window. 9 Yes. She spoke to him Yes. She said ‘Good about the window. morning, Shamira’. 10 Yes Yes

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1 2 3 4 5

Use of English: Present perfect simple

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Shamira: We’ve got to do this class survey. OK, so this term … Number 1: Which subjects have you enjoyed most? Sunil: Well, I’ve enjoyed Science. I like doing experiments in the lab. What about you? Shamira: I’ve enjoyed English because we’ve read some funny stories and we’ve done some creative writing. Number 2: Which subjects have you enjoyed least? Sunil: Ugh … History. There’s too much to remember. Shamira: I like History, but I don’t like Geography. All those facts and figures. It’s boring. OK, Number 3: What have you done in Science? Sunil: Well, we’ve done the body. I liked all that stuff about the skeleton and how your joints work. Shamira: Yes, that was good. So, Number 4: What have you done in History? Sunil: I can’t remember. Shamira: We’ve done the Ancient Greeks. Don’t you remember the story about The Trojan horse? Sunil: Oh, yes. That was OK. Shamira: Number 5: Have you had good marks in all subjects? Sunil: Well, my marks have been OK. I got an A for Science. Shamira: Did you? That’s good. I got an A for English. So, Number 6: Have you done any after-school activities? Sunil: Yes, I have. I’ve joined the school orchestra. I’m learning to play the drums. What about you? Shamira: No, I haven’t yet. I haven’t had time. Now, Number 7: Which sports have you played? Sunil: I’ve played football. Shamira: I’ve played volleyball. Number 8: Here’s one for you, Sunil. Have you been in trouble? And what for? Sunil: You know what I did. I kicked a football and it went through the staffroom window. But it was an accident. What about you? Shamira: Yes. I got into trouble for being ten minutes late for a lesson. Number 9: Has the headteacher spoken to you? Sunil: Yes, it was about the window. Shamira: Oh, yes. Sunil: Has the headteacher spoken to you? Shamira: Yes, she knows my name. She said, ‘Good morning, Shamira’. Sunil: She knows my name too, unfortunately! Shamira: Number 10: Have you enjoyed this term so far? Sunil: Yes, I have actually. I’ve made quite a lot of new friends and I’ve enjoyed it. Shamira: Yes, so have I.

You may ask students to take notes of the answers to discuss later. When they have finished, they may compare Shamira and Sunil’s experiences.

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6 Complete the sentences using the present perfect of the verb in brackets. ● Review the use of the present perfect and the simple past. ● Focus on the Use of English box and discuss the differences between both tenses. ● Students complete the sentences using the correct form of the verbs.

5 How did Shamira and Sunil answer each question? Listen again. ● Students can discuss how Shamira and Sunil answer each question before listening again. ● Play the audio, pausing after the answers to each question.

Answers 1 I’ve made 2 We’ve had 3 I’ve enjoyed 4 We haven’t played 5 My friend has been 6 Have you seen

Speaking 7

With a partner, ask and answer the questions in the class survey. ● Ask students to record their answers to the survey in note form. Critical thinking: Note-taking is a useful skill to develop as students have to make judgements about what information is really necessary to record and concentrate only on key ideas. ● When they have fi nished, ask them to report back to the class. They may collect results and see how many have given similar answers, which school subjects or sports are the most popular, etc. ● Circulate, checking for correct pronunciation and helping if necessary.

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2 Personal identity 3 Write three sentences which are true of you. Use the words from Exercises 1 and 2. ● Students write the sentences. Then, they compare them with a partner. ● Elicit some answers from the class.

Students’ own answers.

Additional writing task ●

Students can write about their own experiences of the fi rst few weeks at school this term. Tell them to use the phrases to organise their text. You may wish to model the fi rst sentence before they work independently. Remind them of the importance of planning their writing. Tell them to fi rst make notes of everything they would like to include and then choose what they like best. When they have finished, ask some of them to read their paragraphs to the class.

Differentiated instruction

Students’ own answers.

4 This is a shortened version of the conversation between Shamira and Sunil in Exercise 4 on page 13 of the Coursebook. Complete it with the correct form of the verbs in the present perfect. You can look at ‘Grammar: Unit 2’ on page 113 of this book to help you. ● Students read and complete the conversation using the present perfect. ● Check as a class. Ask students to act out the conversation in pairs. Answers 1 have you enjoyed 2 I’ve enjoyed 3 we’ve read 4 we’ve done 5 Have you done 6 I’ve joined 7 I haven’t had 8 have you played 9 I’ve played 10 Has the head teacher spoken 11 Have you enjoyed 12 I’ve made 13 I’ve enjoyed

Workbook

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Provide additional support and practice ● Divide the class into small groups. One student will be a journalist. This student interviews the other members of the group for the school magazine and asks them questions about their school experiences. Extend and challenge ● Students ask their parents about their school memories and experiences. They take notes and prepare a short text. If possible and suitable, they may accompany it with a photograph. Make a class poster with all the contributions.

Answers

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Answers

Lesson 2: You and your family C p. 14–15

LESSON OBJECTIVES Reading: Reading and answering questions

1 Complete the words for school subjects and match them to the symbols. ● Students look at the icons and complete the words. ● Then, they match them to the correct symbol. ● Check as a class.

Speaking: Describing your family; speaking about your family’s history Writing: Writing a description of your family Critical thinking: Predicting; making connections; making inferences

Answers

Language focus: Apostrophe: ’s and s’

History 3 Art 6 Music 7 Maths 1 English 5 Science 2 Geography 1

2 Match these words to three of the school subjects in Exercise 1. ● Students read the list of words and classify them. ● Check as a class. You may consider asking them to write words they can associate with the other subjects. Answers 1 Science: skeleton, lab, experiment 2 Music: concert, drums, orchestra 3 English: vocabulary, grammar, spelling

W p. XX–XX

Vocabulary: Family relationships, date of birth, full name, were / was born, emigrate, identical twin, remarkable, analysis, ancestor, amazed, connected with Materials: Coursebook, Workbook, family photos if appropriate, globe or map of the world

Coursebook Starter ●

Show a photo of your family and speak briefly about it. Ask students to show their photos and talk about their families. Have they always lived in the same town or city?

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2 Personal identity Discuss the questions with students. Tell them about your grandparents and, if possible, your great-grandparents. Encourage them to do likewise. Do they know any interesting stories about their grandparents?

Vocabulary 1 Look at the questions in the quiz on page 14. Find the words. ● Students read the quiz ‘How much do you know about your family?’. ● Ask students to read the questions and circle all the family words. This will help them contextualise the words. ● Then, they match them to the defi nitions provided in Exercise 1. Check as a class. ● Tell students to look at the quiz questions again and think of the answers. Ask them to make a few notes in preparation for the speaking activity. ● Elicit the meaning of potentially difficult or new vocabulary and provide examples: date of birth, full name, were / was born, emigrate, identical twin. 1 parents 2 grandparents 3 aunt 4 cousins 5 relatives 6 twins

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Writing 4 Read this description of a family. Then answer the questions. ● Ask students to read the text. ● Ask personalisation questions to prepare for the writing. Does anyone in your family live abroad? How many aunts and uncles do you have? Use this opportunity to revise family words such as cousin. Answers 1 Alicia 2 Eight 3 They’re Alicia’s cousins.

5 Use the description in Exercise 4 to write a similar description of your own family. ● Students write a profi le of their own family using the model to help them. Answers

Students’ own answers.

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Speaking

1 My cousin’s name is Su-Wei. 2 My grandmother’s name is Aisha. 3 When I lived very near my grandparents’ house. 4 The twins’ is not the same colour as their father’s hair. 5 My father’s brothers live in Jakarta. 6 I enjoy finding out other people’s family histories.

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Answers

Answers

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With a partner, ask and answer the questions in the quiz. Which ones are hard to answer? Is there any way you can fi nd out the missing information? ● Ask students to take notes of their partner’s answers. Circulate, helping with vocabulary and checking for correct pronunciation. ● When they have fi nished, ask pairs to report back to the class. Answers Students’ own answers.

Use of English: Apostrophes: ’s and s’

3 Put the apostrophes in the right position in these sentences. ● Read through the Use of English box with the class. Personalisation: You may wish to compare with the students’ mother tongue. Are apostrophes used in their L1? How are they used? ● Discuss the questions with students and provide more examples. Elicit examples from students. ● Students complete Exercise 3. Check by asking individual students to come to the board and write a sentence with the apostrophes in the correct place.

Differentiated instruction Provide additional support and practice ● Ask students to work in groups and to read each other’s descriptions aloud to the rest of the class. Students have to guess who the description belongs to. Extend and challenge ● Give each student the name of a famous person. Ask them to write a description of that person’s family (real or made up). They can show their descriptions to the whole class.

Workbook 1 Write the family members under the correct headings. ● Students read the words and classify them. ● Check as a class. Answers male son brother father grandfather husband uncle female daughter aunt grandmother mother sister wife

2 Use words from each column to complete the sentences. ● Students read the words and combine them suitably to complete the sentences.

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2 Personal identity ●

Check as a class.

Answers 1 family history 2 identical twins 3 great-grandparents 4 full name 5 date of birth

Lesson 3: Family history C p. 16–17

W p. XX–XX

LESSON OBJECTIVES Reading: Reading about DNA

3 Solve these logic puzzles. ● Ask the class to work in pairs. They read the puzzles and solve them. ● Check and discuss the answers as a class.

Speaking: Speaking about family history Writing: Writing a profile of a family member; answering questions; report for a school magazine

Answers 1 Mary 2 David 3 Grandfather, father and son go to see the film. (The father is both a father and a son.)

Project: School magazine Critical thinking: Inference skills

4 One word is missing in each sentence. Rewrite the sentences correctly. ● Students read the sentences and correct the, ● Check as a class.

Language focus: Apostrophe: ’s and s’ Vocabulary: Family members, dates Materials: Coursebook, Workbook, map of the world, project: writing and drawing supplies, a copy of Photocopiable activity 2 for each student

Coursebook Starter

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1 I’ve met most of my cousins. 2 How many cousins have you got? 3 Two of my cousins live in Germany. 4 We have a lot of fun when we see each other. 5 We are about the same age. 6 Where were you born?

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Answers

Answers

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5 What are the missing verbs in each of these phrases? Write them in. ● Students read the phrases and decide what verbs are missing. Tell them to re-read the unit and look for the phrases for help. ● When they have fi nished, ask them to fi nd two phrases that mean the same. ● Check as a class. 1 get 2 be 3 get 4 meet 5 make To get together with friends and to meet up with friends mean the same thing.

6 Correct this email, putting in the apostrophe (‘s or s’) where necessary. ● Students read the email and put in the apostrophes. ● Tell them to re-read the Use of English section in the Course book if necessary. ● Check as a class. Answers friend’s parents’ mother’s father’s grandparents’ cousins’

How do people find out about their family history? What do students know about their family history and how did they find out? Elicit ideas about how information is passed through families, such as diaries, letters, word of mouth. Ask whether stories change when they are passed down.

Before you read ●

Write DNA on the board and ask students if they know what it stands for. Collect some answers for future reference.

Reading and speaking 1 Look at the map and read the article to fi nd out about a scientific approach to family history. What does the map show? ● Students read the article ‘A remarkable journey’ to find out about a scientific approach to researching family history. ● Read the Did you know? box together. Was their understanding of DNA correct? ● Focus on the map. Encourage students to describe it and explain what it shows. Answers 1 The map shows where Luiza’s and Raju’s ancestors came from.

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2 Personal identity 2 Find these words in the text. Choose the correct meaning. ● Students fi nd words in the text ‘A remarkable journey’ and choose the correct meaning, a or b. ● Tell students to fi nd the words in the text fi rst to help them decide. ● Check as a class and ask students to explain their choices. Answers 1b 2b 3b 4b

Writing 6 Write a profile of the oldest person in your family. Use Cecilia’s profile to help you. Check what you’ve written. Make sure you have used the apostrophes correctly. ● Students write a text about their great-grandparents or grandparents using the text as a model. Provide help with additional vocabulary or grammar as necessary. Answers

Answer the questions. ● Ask students to reflect on the questions and discuss the answers in pairs. Then ask them to share their answers as a class. Encourage them to give reasons for their answers. Critical thinking skills: This is a useful opportunity for developing inferencing and interpretation. Answers

Project: A report for your school magazine or website 7 Write a report for your school magazine or website about your impressions of school so far this term. Use the plan below to help you. Illustrate your report with photos and drawings. ● Ask students to work individually. ● The reports can be displayed in class when fi nished.

Differentiated instruction

4 ●

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1 to be completed when map is in place 2 Yes, they have. Her great-grandparents are Polish. 3 He’s Indian. 4 It surprised them that their ancestors came from so far away. 5 Your DNA can tell you where your ancestors came from.

Students’ own answers.

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Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions. Circulate, helping with vocabulary and pronunciation.

Answers

Students’ own answers.

5 Read Cecilia’s profile of her great-grandmother. Look at the second sentence: She’s my father’s grandmother. What does the first apostrophe show? What does the second apostrophe show? ● Ask students to read the text. Place Italy and Argentina on a map or globe. Personalisation: Ask questions to prepare for the writing. Are there similar stories of immigrants in their families? Where did their ancestors come from? Do they know why they migrated? Do they still have family in those countries? Are they in touch? ● Discuss the use of apostrophes and revisit the Use of English box on page 15 as necessary.

Provide additional support and practice ● Complete Photocopiable activity 2. Extend and challenge ● Ask students to search the Internet and look for information about the countries their ancestors came from. If there are no immigrants in their families, they may look for information about the countries mentioned in this lesson. In group, they prepare a presentation for the class.

The manuscript asked to place the Partrick O’Connell WB activity here, but the markup placed it after the Fiction section. We have placed it as the markup, but if this is wrong, please advise. Design

Answers The first apostrophe shows a missing letter (she is). The second apostrophe show possession (the grandmother of my father).

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2 Personal identity

Fiction W p. XX–XX

LESSON OBJECTIVES Reading: Reading and answering questions Speaking: Discussing behaviour; discussing style in a piece of fiction Writing: Answering questions

3 Match the words and phrases to their defi nitions. ● Focus on the words and phrases and the defi nitions. Allow enough time for students to reflect on the words and think carefully about meaning. Tell them to re-read the text carefully to help them find the answers. ● Discuss the answers as a class.

Critical thinking: Speculating; making inferences; discussing opinions Language focus: Style – use of direct and indirect speech; descriptions Materials: Coursebook

Coursebook Starter

Answers 1c 2f 3j 4d 5a 6i 7b 8e 9g 10h

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Students’ own answers.

Before you read

Focus on the title of the book. Does it give students a clue about what the book is about? Where are guavas grown? Encourage students to predict what text is going to be about and where the book is set. ● Tell them to read the short introductory text about the story. Were their predictions right? What do they know now about the book that they didn’t know before? Is there anything surprising about the information they have read? 2 Read the introduction and the extract. Do you think Hullabaloo in the Guava Orchard by Kiran Desai is a humorous book or a serious book? ● Tell students to read the text and fi nd the answers to the questions. Encourage them to give reasons for their answers. ● Discuss the text with students, trying to personalise the experience. How important is getting married and having a job? Why? What do they think about the metaphors? ●

Answers Students’ own answers.

4 Answer the questions. ● Go through the questions as a class and invite students to give their opinion. Encourage them to make notes of the answers.

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1 Do you like humorous books or do you prefer serious ones? Give some examples of books you’ve enjoyed. ● Discuss books with the class. Do the students prefer to read funny or more serious books? Encourage them to talk about books they have read, and provide them with details of books you have read. Answers

After you read

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C p. 18–19

Reading tip: Ask students about their experience of reading the text. Was it difficult to understand? Did they find too many new words? What did they do to understand the meaning? Remind students to use context to guess the meaning of unknown words. Also, direct their attention to the glossary for more difficult words.

Answers

1 Because he’s still sitting at the breakfast table. He isn’t getting ready for work. 2 To work. 3 Because he wants to escape from the world around him. 4 He’s impatient with Sampath. 5 She’s sympathetic and understanding. 6 He isn’t like his father. He’s not interested in work. He wants to live a more relaxed life. 7 Example 1: Amaji says that the world is round so even if Sampath appears to be going down hill, he will come out the other side, on top of the world. Example 2: Mr Chawla says that if it wasn’t for him, Sampath would be sitting in a special museum for people who are a cross between potatoes and human beings.

Discussion 5 Work in groups. Discuss these questions. Do you know anyone like Mr Chawla, Sampath or Ammaji? How are they similar? How are they different? ● Encourage the class to work in groups and discuss the questions. Give guidance if needed. ● Discuss the questions with the class. Encourage students to give their own opinions and give reasons for them. Answers Students’ own answers.

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2 Personal identity

Differentiated instruction Additional support and practice ● Students make a list of books they like. How many of them have read the same books? Search the Internet and choose extracts from two popular books. Students can compare the extracts. What are the similarities and differences? Which do they like more? Ask them to explain why. Extend and challenge ● Search the Internet for other books set in India (which are suitable for the class). ● Read selected extracts and discuss the topics. How important are these topics in their daily lives? Are there more similarities or differences with their home life?

3 Solve the crossword. ● Students read the clues and solve the crossword. ● You may ask them to work in pairs or small groups. ● Check as a class. Answers Across 3 emigrate 5 amazed 6 accent 9 DNA 11 ancestors 12 full Down 1 grandparents 2 identical 4 remarkable 6 always 7 twins 8 relative 10 uncle

Answers

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First name: Patrick Family name: O’Connell Nationality: Canadian Place of birth: Ottawa Date of birth: 27th July 2002 Father’s name: Liam Mother’s name: Catherine Parents’ nationality: Canadian Parents’ place of birth: Ottawa Father’s ancestors; from Ireland Mother’s ancestors; from Scotland

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1 Read about Patrick O’Connell. ● Students read the text and look at the map. ● Then, they fi ll the form using the information in the text. ● Check as a class. You may consider asking the class to find out additional information about Irish immigration to the north of America.

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Workbook

2 Complete the form with details of your own family history. ● Students complete the form. They may need to ask parents for help. ● Ask the class to share their information. Answers Students’ own answers.

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Cambridge Global English Stage 7 Teacher's Resource CD-ROM  

Preview Cambridge Global English Stage 7 Teacher's Resource CD-ROM, Annie Altamirano, Cambridge University Press. Available May 2014.

Cambridge Global English Stage 7 Teacher's Resource CD-ROM  

Preview Cambridge Global English Stage 7 Teacher's Resource CD-ROM, Annie Altamirano, Cambridge University Press. Available May 2014.