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one of the advantages of being located in sunny South carolina is the beautiful weather. photo by richard esposito

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Charleston southern university

Spring 2017, vol.27 no.1

features

6 18 29 32 36

sCiCu funded two student and faculty research projects school of nursing students receive blueCross blueshield of sC foundation grant on the road in new york City kimber gist’s amazing story of surviving a shooting Class notes, baby bucs and more

on the cover: celine freeland, Jaime locklear and anna Johnson are just some of the nursing students who have benefited from the bluecross blueShield of South carolina foundation’s grant to the cSu School of nursing. photo by richard esposito

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from the president

dear friends, We are having a great year at Charleston Southern, and we are delighted to present you with stories in the pages of this magazine which illustrate the wonderful things happening at CSu. one of the university’s strategic goals is to maximize student learning through high quality academic programs, utilizing traditional and innovative learning systems to prepare graduates to enter the workforce as skillful communicators and effective collaborators. one way we are accomplishing this is by providing quality undergraduate research opportunities. two student/faculty research teams applied for and received funding last year through South Carolina independent Colleges and universities. Planning and research was conducted in summer and fall 2016, and the teams officially presented the results of their research in february. dr. denise dawson and Cassidy richmond sought a connection between matroids and buildings. richmond says even though they have proven for themselves that a fano plane is a building, they still have questions and hope to continue their research into the world of mathematics. dr. Maggie Shields, William hunnell and Connor brown compared the benefits of lEgo® therapy to coloring therapy to see if lEgo® therapy was as good a stress reliever as coloring has proven to be. in their planning, the team could not find any research using lEgo® therapy with adults, so their study is truly groundbreaking. both of these research projects display a universal theme. Mathematics is considered the universal language, and lEgo® is considered a universal toy. the work of the Charleston Southern researchers will have far-reaching implications as what is learned is able to cross cultural and language barriers. also, in the magazine you will learn about new programs such as the expansion of air force rotC from a two-year program to a four-year program, a new cybersecurity major, the beginnings of a master in psychology and hear from some nursing students who are benefiting from the blueCross blueShield of South Carolina foundation grant. Make sure you read the incredible story of Kimber gist, a 2014 criminal justice graduate who is currently working on a master of science in criminal justice. Wounded in the line of duty, she has fought her way back to return to her career as a law enforcement officer. We are proud of all our students and graduates and hope you will update us on what you are doing in the workforce and in your community.

Sincerely,

Jairy C. hunter, Jr. President

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Charleston Southern University

CSU

magazine

a publication of charleston southern university

volume 27 number 1 Spring 2017

contents

Editorial Staff: Jan Joslin ’82, Editor, Director of Publications John Strubel ’11, ’14, Director of Integrated Marketing Jon Merkling, Graphic Designer Richard Esposito, Multimedia Coordinator Warren Peper ’74, Media Relations Coordinator

Contributing Writers:

Learning

4 AFROTC Expanding to 4-year Program 14 De’Jean Dunbar Winner of App Contest 14 First Chinese Exchange Students Visit 15 Cybersecurity Major Added 16 Master in Psychology in Planning Stages 17 SACSCOC Reaffirms Accreditation 17 Best Online Program

CSU Sports Information Dr. William Librizzi Will Powell ’83

Contributing Photographers: Craig Albertson ’18 Clark Carter ’87

Leading

22 24 25 26 28

5 Qs with William Powell ’83 Daniel Walker Competes for Air Liaison Slot Mark Tucker Named Football Coach Groundbreaking for Singleton Baseball Complex Ross Parker Named Dean

Colin McCandless

Serving CSU Magazine is published three times a year by the university relations office for alumni and friends of Charleston Southern University. Address changes should be sent to advancement@csuniv.edu

CSU Magazine on the web: csumagazine.com Email: magazine@csuniv.edu Charlestonsouthern.edu

Design and layout by:

843.324.2004 • www.facebook.com/bobduranddesign

34 Computer Science Impacting Foster Care Youth 35 1,800+ Shoe Boxes Packed School Ties

36 Class Notes 38 Memorials 40 Baby Bucs 42 #17 Most Beautiful Campus 44 Cosby Scholarship Established 44 CSU Family Tree 44 Shopping for Scholars Provides Scholarships 44 New Alumni Board Members 45 Drowota Scholarship Established 45 Do You Know? 46 Homecoming 2016 48 Where Are They Now? Coy Browning

Printed by:

© 2017 Charleston Southern University

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the air ForCe rotC prograM eXpanDs FroM 2- to 4-year prograM

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or almost 40 years, Air Force ROTC Detachment 772 at Charleston Southern has been a two-year program only available to college juniors and seniors. This year, it changed to a four-year program, allowing college students to start their journey toward becoming an Air Force officer as freshmen or sophomores. The switch gives students in the Lowcountry and beyond more options. Previously, the only four-year Air Force ROTC program in the Lowcountry was at The Citadel. Now, students who want a traditional college experience coupled with Air Force training in this part of South Carolina can get it at Charleston Southern. Likewise, students at the College of Charleston, Medical University of South Carolina, The Citadel evening program, and soon Trident Technical College, can be a part of Air Force ROTC at Charleston Southern because of consortium agreements. With this change came growth. Last year there were only nine cadets in the program. This year, the program has exploded to about 40 cadets who are striving to become an Air Force officer. Lieutenant Colonel Alexandria Watson, the Detachment Commander, said, “We are excited about being able to offer this opportunity to students as freshmen and sophomores. Additionally, expanding our program means we’re not only meeting our Air Force mission of developing and growing new officers but also helping the school by providing leadership training and education to students. The skills they gain in our program can be used anywhere.” The growth has not been limited to the cadets. The Detachment also gained an additional faculty member last summer to

help it transition from a two to a four-year program. Major Kimberly Champagne is not only an assistant professor of aerospace studies teaching the first classes the cadets take but also serves as the Detachment’s recruiting officer. The almost quadruple jump in number of cadets can mainly be attributed to her efforts in the latter part of the summer and throughout the fall 2016 term. “It’s in my blood to share my love for the Air Force with others,” said Champagne. “In this

position, I get to show and tell students about the great way of life the Air Force offers and usher them through the process of becoming an officer if they decide to join our program.” Detachment 772 shares the same mission as 144 other Air Force ROTC Detachments across the nation, and that is to develop quality leaders for the Air Force. The faculty and staff in the Detachment do that by offering classes and leadership training designed to educate and prepare cadets for

detachment 772 officers: lt. col. alexandria watson, maj. kimberly champagne and capt. letricia baxley

“we are eXcIted about beIng able to offer thIS opportunIty to StudentS aS freShmen and SophomoreS.” - lt. col. aleXandrIa watSon

photos by richard esposito

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Charleston Southern University

In a year’s time, the program has grown from nine students to 40 students. The program hopes to grow to about 100 students eventually. life on active duty as an Air Force officer. Captain Letricia Baxley is the Detachment’s operations officer in charge of day-to-day leadership training. She said, “We work to develop students into strong leaders throughout their years in the program. It is designed such that more senior cadets manage, supervise, train and lead newer cadets. This gives them practical, handson leadership experience regardless of their chosen career field.”

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You will see cadets marching around campus, wearing the uniform, managing projects and exercising. All of this is a necessary part of their training. Then, upon successful completion of all ROTC requirements, they are commissioned as Second Lieutenants and off they go to serve our nation in the world’s greatest Air Force. The faculty and staff in Detachment 772 are working diligently to grow and strengthen the Air Force ROTC program. Most recently, their

hard work paid off when they won Air Force ROTC Team Excellence Award for the fourth quarter, making them number one of 38 Detachments in their region. So, this year’s expansion is only the beginning. Expect to see more Air Force cadets on our campus. If you would like information about becoming a part of the Air Force ROTC program, that includes getting information on scholarship opportunities, email afrotc@ csuniv.edu or call 843-863-7144.

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LEARNING

Student and faculty reSearch

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Blocks anD coloRing aWaY stRess

ReDUction The Building Blocks and Coloring Away Stress Reduction research project was aimed at determining the validity of LEGO® therapy in stress management and coping skills within college students. Dr. Maggie Shields, assistant professor of health promotion, first became interested in the effect of LEGO® bricks on stress when she noticed the effect it had on her own stress levels. “There was joy in taking time to slow down,” said Shields. She started to wonder about the effect LEGO® therapy would have on college students and found that there was no research involving LEGO® therapy and adults. After further research it was decided to compare LEGO® therapy with coloring – an activity that has been proven to reduce stress in adults. The project was perfect for college students. According to Anxiety and Depression Association of America, anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health problems on college campuses. Shields also wanted to show her students that research doesn’t have to be something in a lab or involve people running on treadmills. Research can be creative. compiled by Jan Joslin

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Why LEGO® Research? bill hunnell, a health promotion major who will graduate in May, was one of the student researchers on the project. “When my university professor asked me if i’d be interested in researching lEgo® therapy, at first i thought she was crazy. however, as i’ve learned through many life lessons: sometimes the craziest ideas are the sanest ideas. “our goal as aspiring public health educators is to be multidimensional, not self-limiting: to explore all avenues of approach rather than traditional, possibly self-limiting approaches. through this study we hope to determine the efficacy of lEgo® therapy as a stress management tool as it is easily accessible to the public at large. “lEgo® therapy has already been proven successful in other venues such as teaching social skills to individuals with developmental disorders such as those found on the autism Spectrum. So, why not see what it can do for stress management? besides, who doesn’t like to play?”

FUn Facts aBoUt lego®

a lEgo® noninferiority research project to compare stress reduction of lEgo® with coloring. the research was grant funded through the South Carolina independent Colleges and universities.”

• According to Stackitevents.com, there are 86 LEGO® bricks per person in the world

Connor brown and annie Price, health promotion majors, were also student researchers on the project. this spring the results of the study are being presented to SCiCu, at a national conference in denver and at CSu’s annual Spring Symposium.

• Name is based on the Danish letters “leg godt” and means to “play well”

evans Smith shows her completed lego kit.

it wasn’t until she was working on her doctorate that Shields began building with lEgo® bricks in earnest. “What was most interesting to me was the fact that while schoolwork and my multiple jobs seemed to be spinning out of control, the step-by-step instruction book had the opposite effect. it was about adding the five bricks that were on step #90 on page #59 that helped me to build a foundation for everything else to come. lEgo® became its own type of therapy similar to the colors and small pieces that coloring may afford others. “Was i the only one that was seeing the benefit of lEgo® therapy? the short answer is that there really isn’t any research on it. there is research on children with autism and education with StEM emphasis but much of the research ends shortly after middle school. So, for the past year, i have been working with a team of students to conduct

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Project Details With the funding of the SCiCu grant, lEgo® bricks and coloring supplies were purchased. CSu students were invited to participate in the study and were divided into three groups: coloring, blocks and control. Each individual took pre- and postsurveys regarding their stress level. over the course of one month, the coloring and building groups met twice a week for one-hour sessions. they were required to unplug their phones. they couldn’t play music, but they could talk to each other.

the project was performed as a noninferiority trial:

Hypothesis 1: Participating in some creative form of stress reduction strategy (i.e., coloring or building blocks) positively affects emotional stress during the academic semester.

Hypothesis 2: building blocks are a noninferior or superior form of stress reduction strategy when compared to coloring.

FUn Facts aBoUt lego® • LEGO® is a Danish company, but LEGO® is known worldwide and is a universal toy

building with lEgo® bricks and coloring are both considered directed creativity – the lEgo® building blocks and the picture to be colored are already present. activities are completed stepby-step and have clear directions yet still provide an opportunity for creativity.

“this generation is stressed out by being overstimulated and overwhelmed. they are overstimulated by the phones they have in their hands,” said Shields. “Culturally, we are creative beings, and we are going to have to address the challenges of technology in relation to stress.” “Stress. Everyone knows something about stress. it’s how stress is handled that makes the biggest difference in health. i could bore you with how stressful situations produce cortisol, and unregulated cortisol can affect your body negatively in the form of reduced metabolism (fat buildup) and such. instead i’ll leave it at this: it’s not good to have excess cortisol production,” said hunnell

Result:

the research determined lEgo® therapy is the same and similar to coloring therapy. the data showed that lEgo® therapy did help to improve stress components and had positive results in lowering stress.

bill hunnell, one of the student researchers, observes emily Sizemore as she builds with lego blocks during a weekly session.

• LEGO® has moved beyond a child’s toy to pop culture status

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FUn Facts aBoUt lego®

Student Response i participated in building a lEgo set. Each of my lEgo® sessions impacted my stress levels and general mood drastically. along with the normal stress from school, i also had a handful of personal/family issues weighing on me too. i seemed to forget all of the stressors going on during each lEgo® session. My stress levels also remained much lower after completing each session. i was even able to focus on my studies much better after lEgo® [therapy]! Each session was like a timeout or reset allowing my brain to catch up and get on track. i will definitely continue using lEgo® [therapy] for stress relief. i have two young children that also love playing with lEgo®, and it seems to calm them down as well. ®

Jeremy a. Parrish senior, psychology major

i participated in building a lEgo modular. Every time i would go into a session, i was usually really stressed out, and i was amazed how much lEgo® [therapy] affected my stress level. i would become much more relaxed, and i could notice the difference in my body. i never even thought about adults building them as a destressor. Since this research project, i have been more involved with lEgo® [therapy], and i enjoy building the more complex ones because they have more instructions and pieces to build. it is a better accomplishment when i see the result of something so detailed. i am so happy dr. Shields shined the light on something i didn’t even know i enjoyed. ®

Sarah Myers sophomore, psychology major

• The LEGO® Learning Institute researches the future of play and is defining the role and value of play in the 21st century

i was in the lEgo® group, and it really affected my stress level and reduced it dramatically. being a part of the lEgo® research project allowed me to set aside two hours a week to relax and unwind. occasionally, i play with my lEgo® bricks, but i mostly use the coloring books that were given to us for relaxation. Elizabeth Evans Smith junior, health promotion major

cameron poyner was a member of the coloring group. the lego and coloring groups met twice weekly for an hour at a time.

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STRESS MANAGEMENT LEARNING TECHNIQUES • Identify the major stressors in your life and learn to practice coping techniques • Establish a network of supportive people in your life • Spend time on your spiritual life • Get the proper amount of exercise – exercise releases endorphins, which can improve mood • Get adequate amount of sleep each night – considered one of the most beneficial ways to deal with stressors • Eat a healthy and balanced diet – overeating and undereating can cause distress in the body • Make time for yourself and learn to manage your time

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Charleston Southern University

Spring 2017, vol.27 no.1 LEGO village from the collection of Dr. Maggie Shields

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LEARNING

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student and faculty research

Making Mathematical o n n e c t i o n s

ath is the universal language. It is the underlying structure for what is occurring in the world and is present in everything from music to computers. Cassidy Richmond, a senior math education major, is passionate about mathematics, so passionate that she wants everyone else to be also. As a future teacher, her goal is to present math in such a way that the student in the back of the class who usually sleeps will instead say, “I learned something today.” In the semester before student teaching Richmond finished up her undergraduate work, juggled her duties as wife and mother of three, and added another job, that of researcher. Richmond plans to continue on with a master’s degree and eventually a PhD. Dr. Denise Dawson, associate professor of mathematics, advised she would need research experience. Richmond and Dawson applied for and received a research grant from South Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities to look for a connection between matroids and buildings. “It’s been exciting, hard, exhausting,” said Richmond. She thinks about the research while driving and has white boards in her home filled with definitions. She flies out of bed in the middle of the night, flipping on lights and throwing pens and papers, much to the dismay of her husband. Richmond explains that math is so much more than formulas. It is a chance to make connections.

Dr. Denise Dawson and Cassidy Richmond discuss their math research project in Dawson’s office. Photo by Richard Esposito

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Richmond and Dawson were looking for a connection between matroids and buildings. Richmond said, “With a Fano plane, we know it has a matroid. We also know it has a building. We overlapped 28 Simplices and 28 maximal independent sets. What is the connection? Between 28 and 28, where is the overlap? One day it finally clicked. We built 28 points and realized those points are a direct connection. That day was such a high.” They have worked on the research separately and together. “The times we meet in Dr. Dawson’s office we make the biggest breakthroughs,” said Richmond. “We are able to ask, what if we approached it this way? How do we make it work?” Richmond and Dawson presented their research findings to SCICU in February on Richmond’s birthday. Even though they have proven for themselves that a Fano plane is a building, they still have questions they want to research further. “In presenting our research, we have to explain complex math concepts to nonmath people,” said Richmond. This ability is preparing Richmond for the classroom and further education. To present these complex concepts, Richmond and Dawson use plenty of visuals. “Visuals matter a lot in trying to explain these concepts,” said Richmond. “The purpose of math research is math,” said Richmond. “Both buildings and matroids have uses. Some may ask why you would want to find a connection. We don’t know if we don’t do the research. It may just be there for someone else to come along and say, that’s what I was looking for,” she said. For example, Number Theory is the basis for computers. It was originally thought to have no application. The world as we know it wouldn’t exist if someone hadn’t made that connection, someone like Richmond, who is passionate about making a complex mathematical world understandable to all.

By Jan Joslin

As a future teacher, RICHMOND’S goal is to present math in such a way that the student in the back of the class who usually sleeps will instead say, “I learned something today.”

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dunbar takes first plaCe in Mobile app CoMpetition

by Jan Joslin

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enior computer science major De’Jean Dunbar recently won a mobile app competition sponsored by the Charleston Defense Contractors Association at their 2016 C5ISR Summit. “De’Jean was awarded first place by the judges and Best in Show, which is selected by the audience, for his mobile app, TagIt!” said Dr. Valerie Sessions, chair of the computer science department. “It is a huge honor, and we are so proud.” Dunbar said his professor, Dr. Yu-Ju Lin, suggested the idea as his senior project. “People will use my app as an information

port,” said Dunbar. “They will be able to scan NFC tags that are near objects, such as pictures, monuments, etc., to get information in the form of text, video or picture.” NFC stands for near field communication and is often used with smart devices. Dunbar is looking forward to a career in software development. “The computer science department at CSU exposes us to many programming languages. Problem solving has been a passion of mine as well, so I believe software development is the way to go.” Eventually he would like to earn a master’s degree in computer science.

de’Jean dunbar won the mobile app competition sponsored by the charleston defense contractors association. photo by richard esposito

First Chinese exchange Students

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he first students from Jiangsu National University in China have completed a semester at CSU. Suting Liu, Xiaojuan Qian and Xiamei Zhang met all the requirements in the University Exchange Program. The program promotes cooperation in teaching, research and consultation and is one of CSU’s global education opportunities for students.

pictured are: dr. Xiangdong bi, associate professor of chemistry; Suting liu, Xiaojuan Qian, dr. aiye liang, associate professor of chemistry; Xiamei Zhang, dr. Jairy c. hunter Jr., president, and Stephanie levan, director of international programs.

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photo by richard esposito

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Charleston Southern University

Cybersecurity Major Meeting Demands in the Workplace

By Warren Peper and Jan Joslin

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he university is offering an exciting new major, a bachelor of science in cybersecurity. Planning for the major has been a team effort between the computer science and criminal justice departments with support from the CSU Industry Advisory Board. Cyber crime and cyber warfare have become widespread issues with tremendous financial consequences. Developing resources to combat these attacks is more important than ever. CSU cybersecurity majors will receive foundational training to enter a career in cybersecurity. Classes are scheduled to begin in the fall. However, currently enrolled CSU students were able to begin taking courses this spring. Support for the major from industry leaders is strong. Todd Lant, vice president of information technology at Blackbaud, said, “I am encouraged to see focus placed on developing industry-prepared, qualified graduates in the area of cybersecurity. As a technology innovator, security is a key differentiator for Blackbaud. Our customers trust us to provide secure solutions for them as well as ourselves. This degree program is an important step in developing critical talent to support the growth of competitive businesses in our region.” The major incorporates core computer science courses, including network security, computer architecture, and operating systems with additional specific coursework in Network Penetration, Ethical Hacking and Cyber Defense. These courses will be complemented by criminal justice and mathematics coursework. A senior project will be required and will focus on cybersecurity with particular emphasis on risk assessment and mitigation. Dr. Valerie Sessions, associate professor of computer science and chair of the department, has seen a positive response from both students and the department’s industry advisory board. “The highly technical nature

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of the coursework will prepare a student to assess and combat cybersecurity threats. In addition the excellent criminal justice coursework will prepare students to establish a chain of evidence as they track a security breach.” Students graduating with a cybersecurity degree, with the added bonus of liberal arts courses that foster communication and teamwork skills, will be prepared to seek government careers as well as jobs in the private sector. A recent Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce survey estimates 243 IT security analyst openings in our region alone over the next 10 years. This same report shows that a mere 16 percent of the job needs are currently filled by local graduates. Nationally the job shortage is even greater. “Cybersecurity is an area of significant focus at PepsiCo – we are committed to keeping our customer, supplier, and internal data safe,” said Jody Davids, senior vice president and chief information officer for PepsiCo. “I applaud this new major at CSU. It is a visionary move, and I know the graduates of this program will be in high demand.” The computer science department currently offers an applied technology minor with an emphasis in cybersecurity and hosts a cybersecurity club which competes in both local and national competitions. Palmetto Roost, the local chapter of the AOC, an international professional association advocating for a strong defense capability, supports the cybersecurity club.

“CSU’s integration of cyber security and criminal justice programs is an insightful and exciting response for future needs of our commercial industry, government and our military,” said Rich Nelson, president of Palmetto Roost Chapter. As more large companies and small-tomedium businesses make Charleston their home, there will be an increased need for information security specialists. For more information on CSU’s bachelor of science in cybersecurity, contact Dr. Sessions at 843-863-7529 or email her at vsessions@ csuniv.edu.

Above: Jody Davids, senior vice president and chief information officer for PepsiCo, recently visited campus and spoke to computer science students. Photo by Richard Esposito

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Master of science in Counseling psychology in planning stage

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ccording to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, master level mental health jobs are projected to increase by 19 percent between the years 2014-2024. This rise represents a greater than normal growth rate with an anticipation of over 31,000 jobs available during that same period. These findings were further confirmed during a recent feasibility study done with CSU undergraduate students in the behavioral science department. Those included in this study were students majoring in either psychology or sociology with an emphasis in human services. The outcome of this feasibility study indicated an exceptionally strong support for a graduate program. Of 191 majors polled, 177 (93 percent) expressed interest in a master’s in psychology from CSU, with 137 (72 percent) indicating interest in a clinical counseling psychology program. CSU is in the planning stages of a master of science in counseling psychology. This program will consist of both didactic and clinical academic work, will require 60 graduate credits for completion and will take three years to complete. The program will offer clinical focus areas in addiction treatment, marriage and family counseling

the mISSIon of thIS program IS to prepare StudentS that are both clInIcally competent and bIblIcally Sound.

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dr. william librizzi

and a Christian counseling emphasis. Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for counselors (National Board of Certified Counselors), and upon completion of this degree, passing the boards, and completing supervisory training, will be able to obtain a license as a Licensed Professional Counselor in South Carolina. William J. Librizzi, PsyD, LPC, ACS, director of the program, comes to CSU with over 20 years of clinical experience. In addition to his clinical work, he has been employed for nearly a decade in various capacities in graduate level counseling education. Librizzi said, “The mission of this program is to prepare students that are both clinically competent and biblically sound.” Each course is designed specifically to train future counselors to offer exceptional clinical expertise in a compassionate manner with a

focus on the biblical worldview, integrating faith in learning and leading and reinforcing the very mission of Charleston Southern. Librizzi believes the program must maintain both clinical excellence and biblical soundness in the training process. It is this distinction that makes our work at Charleston Southern unique. “In fact,” he said, “This unique faith distinction in clinical training seems to be consistent with recent program growth research. Data indicates that although master’s degree completions in South Carolina are declining, counseling completions at faith-based institutions are growing (Bob Jones and Columbia International University 21.9 and 10.7 percent, respectively). To be clinically competent and biblically sound is key,” said Librizzi. The anticipated start date for the program is fall 2018. Currently, Librizzi is working on all the details necessary to add a new program to the CSU catalog. These responsibilities include submitting to the university’s accreditation agency, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, the program proposal for approval and acceptance into the university’s offerings. In addition, he and his colleagues have been developing curricula, creating syllabi, finalizing the course sequence of this 60 credit program and looking to expand their undergraduate internship sites to incorporate graduate internship sites in the future. The program is designed for the individual who has completed an undergraduate program and would like to obtain his/ her credential as a Licensed Professional Counselor and seeks to work one-on-one with individuals who need mental health support and counseling. As a Licensed Professional Counselor, one can work in private practice, university counseling centers, hospitals, and state and federal agencies.

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Charleston southern university

saCsCoC reaffirMs Csu aCCreditation

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he Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges reaffirmed the accreditation of Charleston Southern University with no recommendations in December. The reaffirmation of accreditation is a rigorous process each accredited college or university must undergo every 10 years. “I am especially proud of the faculty and staff who work so diligently to provide academic excellence in every area every day at CSU,” said Dr. Jackie Fish, vice president for academic affairs. “Thousands of hours were invested in development and compilation of the Reaffirmation documentation. Our internal Accreditation Committee did

a superb job of addressing all areas of responsibility for research and enhancement of CSU programs. Reaffirmation submissions usually average 17 ‘findings’ which must be sufficiently addressed to achieve continuing accreditation. The Accreditation Committee at CSU was commended by the SACSCOC site visitation team for receiving zero findings on the 2016 submission. We are certainly blessed to have professional educators and staff who strive for and achieve excellence at CSU on a daily basis.” Under the leadership of Dr. Scott Yarbrough, chair of the English department and assistant to the vice president for academic affairs, CSU submitted a self-study consisting of 400

pages, with 1,758 supporting documents, and a plan outlining the Experiential Learning Initiative (ELI) as the Quality Enhancement Plan, to the SACSCOC visiting committee. In the self-study criteria book, the reaccreditation visiting committee submitted a report that CSU’s self-study was impeccable. “Our team has done an excellent job,” said President Jairy C. Hunter Jr. He noted the excellent leadership and work of Yarbrough, Fish and Nathan Martin, associate professor of history and Quality Enhancement Plan director.

CSU Makes Best Online Program List again

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or the fourth straight year, Charleston Southern University has been named to U.S. News and World Report’s Best Online Program’s list. Charleston Southern Online offers a flexible, affordable, relevant degree option for adult students pursuing a degree in business, education, nursing, computer science, technology, criminal justice or Christian studies. According to research published by Ruffalo Noel Levitz, enrollment of adult learners is projected to grow by 20 percent through

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2022. To address the needs of adult learners, CSU’s online program offers flexible pacing, convenience and an accelerated schedule to help busy professionals juggling jobs and families. Charleston Southern Online’s applied learning style enables our students to learn something today and apply it in the workplace tomorrow. CSU’s 16 online degree programs and three online certificate programs are designed for adults looking for career advancement, professional growth or a career change.

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nURses Making a DiFFeRence in the coMMUnitY by warren peper

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lueCross blueShield of South Carolina foundation awarded more than $1 million in scholarship money to Charleston Southern nursing students in 2015. there is one caveat to receiving the money. the nurse, upon graduation, must work in community or home-based settings for a designated time. the scholarship was created to address the shortage of nurses in community and home

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photos by richard esposito

health care organizations in South Carolina. Some of the first students to seize this opportunity are now in the workforce. CSU Magazine offers a profile of three industrious students who used this generous donation to further their ability to care for the sick and injured. one student is in her final year of school and will graduate in december. the other two graduated in May 2016 and are putting

their skills and education on display in areas of medicine not initially on their radar. We hope you enjoy meeting each of these unique and dedicated nurses. they all possess different interests and circumstances but share one common trait – without the blueCross blueShield of South Carolina foundation’s generosity, their dream of becoming a nurse never would have happened.

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Charleston southern university

Mother of Five Preparing to graduate

anna Johnson senior, graduating in December 2016

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here are no nurses or doctors in Johnson’s family. it was her experience in dealing with a dying sister that confirmed her understanding that a career in nursing was her calling. “god gave me the grace to deal with my dying sister,” said Johnson. that experience also revealed that she could do this kind of work while incorporating her training and her faith in helping people face their troubles. the biggest concern for the mother of five children was how to pay for the education. it was during a church service that the minister stated he felt somebody was worried about paying for school. days after being assured that god would provide a way, Johnson learned of CSu’s partnership with blueCross blueShield of South Carolina foundation. if Johnson was willing to commit to three years of working in community or homebased settings after graduation, the final two years of her schooling would be financially covered. She’s never looked back. in her final year, Johnson is working in various clinical settings. She’s already spent time in an emergency room where quick decisions are required. Johnson has also witnessed the duties of a hall nurse at the Va hospital, MuSC and roper St. francis. She said she learned a nurse has to often “go with the flow” during her practicum as a technician in iCu at trident Medical Center. Johnson remains excited about what lies ahead. She’s still unsure where she’ll land but feels her training and faith integration learned at CSu prepares her for any and every opportunity that comes her way. as a wife, mother and soon-to-be nursing graduate, her desire to help others would have never been possible without the scholarship offered by the foundation. Johnson is convinced, “My experiences have validated what i feel i’m called to do.”

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celine FReelanD graduated in May 2016 with a bachelor of science in nursing

Freeland Finds Calling with DheC Job

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s freeland was preparing to graduate last spring, she was so concerned that all her other nursing friends were getting jobs in a hospital, and she wasn’t. her foundation scholarship required that since her final year of schooling was paid, she would need to work for two years in a community or home-based setting. She still wasn’t sure what that might look like. all freeland ever wanted to do with her nursing degree was work with maternal child health or pediatrics. it was during her final year of school that she was made aware of a possible position with the department of health and Environmental Control. the job required a nurse to visit first-time, low income mothers in the tri-county area of the lowcountry. Suddenly, freeland was exactly in a job she wanted. freeland started her new job in September. a typical day requires that she visit three or four clients in their homes. “We deal with a new mother’s anxieties and possible depression. it’s a very personal experience.” Part of the job is connecting that new mother with community resources that are also available to help her through the pregnancy. a real hurdle to this personal approach to her clients is managing to keep it professional, as well. “We don’t attend baby showers nor are we allowed to be friends on facebook,” said freeland. but she is certain she’s on the exact path she should be because it allows her to impact these new moms on their journey. as a government employee, there are certain lines that can’t be crossed as it relates to integrating faith. her approach is to let her actions speak louder than any words and to show love along the way. that component was also part of her training at CSu. “there’s so much more to being a nurse than working in a hospital. because of the blueCross blueShield of South Carolina

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foundation scholarship, i now have a job that i would have never considered pursuing.” freeland is quick to add that she looks forward to telling others how this

experience has opened her eyes to the different opportunities and experiences the partnership with CSu has provided.

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Charleston southern university

Locklear hopes to never Leave Cancer Center

JaiMe lockleaR graduated in May 2016 with a bachelor of science in nursing

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note: the bluecross blueShield of South carolina foundation is an independent licensee of the bluecross and blueShield association. Its mission is to promote and support healthier South carolinians, particularly the economically vulnerable, by supporting solutions to address gaps in health care and serving as an agent of change to support innovation and value-added public-private partnerships.

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ocklear came to nursing somewhat unconventionally. already in possession of an art degree from another school, she still felt a desire to work with the elderly. her grandmother became a nurse in her 40s and worked in nursing homes. locklear is convinced that played a subconscious part in her decisions. the foundation scholarship forced locklear to look at other opportunities to work as a nurse. She found work as a chemotherapy nurse at the Charleston Cancer Center across university boulevard from CSu. “it’s a blessing. i’ve got a job i don’t think i’ll ever leave!” that’s how locklear feels after learning from some terrific nurses who taught her how to treat and interact with people dealing with constant pain. in nursing school, oncology is not heavily discussed. but here she is, often in a room with 18 chairs where mostly older people receive their regular doses of chemo and hope. often, it’s a nurse who delivers both. locklear never once thought about community nursing being her calling. it’s while the bag of chemo is administered that she may provide her most valuable medicine. “i know personal things; their children’s names, when they take trips, i become part of their family.” CSu taught locklear to recognize a vibe from a patient that might also want to pray. if a patient makes such an indication, she’s willing to accommodate. Many days, those moments of reflection and understanding are just what she needs to make it, along with the comfort the patient might receive. “i love old people, and i love their stories,” said locklear. though not necessarily on her original road map, locklear has landed in the perfect spot with these cancer patients. and it’s all because of the generosity of the blueCross blueShield of South Carolina foundation.

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QUestions With: Will Powell ‘83 Will Powell is a fitness coach, a leader of wellness retreats, a professional bodybuilder, and passionate about the role food and nutrition play in our health. In 2014, Powell was the Reebok Crossfit Champion in the 50-54 age range. His commitment to a fit lifestyle extends to a wellness blog he writes, and he also shares healthy recipes on his website at willpowellfitness.com. Powell and his wife, Terry Ellis Powell ’83, live in Greensboro, N.C., and own the Fitness Zone Personal Training Studio.

compiled by Jan Joslin

How did you become interested in the fitness field?

What role do you think food and nutrition play in getting healthy?

I became interested in the fitness field as a natural progression from sports activity since childhood. After many years of fitness activities to support athletics I began training for physique sports and as a result got the attention of people interested in looking and performing as I do. This led me to personal training as a part-time occupation which progressed quickly to full-time. I quickly saw a need for a place where established personal trainers could go as independent contractors and run their business.

The foundation of healthy living is nutrition based on whole foods that contain not only fuel for our bodies to perform physically but also to repair itself and ward off disease. This begins with education about food content as more and more unnatural ingredients are being added to our food supply leading to poor physical performance and disease.

How long have you run Fitness Zone and what services do you offer?

Some simple steps can be taken to improve overall fitness:

In December 2010 we opened the doors at Fitness Zone Personal Training Studio. We provide space and equipment for independent trainers to run their own business. We do not have members or staff. All training sessions are by appointment. Our services include one-on-one personal training, group fitness training, strength and conditioning classes, yoga and massage.

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What resources do you make available on your website that CSu Magazine readers might find helpful? My website willpowellfitness.com has resources that readers might find helpful: • Healthy Recipes • Workout Videos • Blog • Links to seminars and events

What are some simple differences people can make in their life that will improve their overall fitness?

• Move your body! This is what the human body was designed to do. Start by setting a goal of 10,000 steps per day. Sedentary bodies will deteriorate faster. • Eliminate processed food, especially the ones that have high sugar content. • Cook your food at home; make restaurant and convenience foods the exception, not the norm.

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Charleston Southern University

Assigning Values to the Foods We Eat

By Will Powell

Greek Quinoa Salad Recipe Ingredients: 2 cups water 1 cup quinoa Pinch of salt 1 cup grape tomatoes, halved 1 cup chopped cucumber 1/3 cup pitted Kalamata olives, halved 1/4 cup diced red onion 1/3 cup feta cheese Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste To make the dressing: 1/4 cup olive oil 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon dried oregano Cooking Instructions: Using a strainer, rinse the quinoa under cold water. Add quinoa, water, and salt to a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Boil for 5 minutes. Turn the heat to low and simmer for about 15 minutes, or until water is absorbed. Remove from heat and fluff with a fork. Let quinoa cool to room temperature. In a large bowl, combine quinoa, tomatoes, cucumber, Kalamata olives, red onion, and feta cheese. To make the dressing, whisk together olive oil, red wine vinegar, and oregano in a small bowl. Pour dressing over the salad and stir. Yield: Serves 6 Reprinted with permission willpowellfitness.com

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hen deciding on food choices in this day and time, there is a need to place values on the foods we eat. There was a time long ago when most foods had a similar value in that they were mostly good for us to consume. Not anymore. As food makers become more clever at influencing our food choices, it becomes downright burdensome to place value on individual foods. This is what I believe is one of the main problems we face as a society of people attempting to maintain good health throughout life as it pertains to nutrition. The big problem is that many people have assigned value on these foods using the wrong criteria. For example, someone might place a high value on a particular food because it tastes extremely good, or because others in their social network like to consume it. Others might consider the low cost of a food to be a perceived value. If we really are concerned about health and long-term wellness, including fat loss, we must assign value to our food based on sound nutritional principles. With the exception of occasional treat foods, we should use three simple criteria to place value on our foods: • Nutritional content • Ability to fuel daily activities and brain function • Ability to fight disease Foods that meet these needs should have the highest value and be consumed the most, as this will lead to long-term health and personal productivity. So each time you consume any food, ask yourself, “what is this food’s real value to me given the goals I have for health and wellness?” Reprinted with permission willpowellfitness.com Photos provided

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rotC Cadet seeks special Forces

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e’ve all no doubt heard of Navy Seals, Army Rangers and Delta Force. Did you know the Air Force has a Special Operations Unit that works sideby-side with these other highly trained tactical squads? One of CSU’s own ROTC students is attempting to become an Air Liaison Officer,

by warren peper

also known as ALO. Daniel Walker, 27, has served over six years active duty in the Air Force. He’s now a fulltime student, a junior majoring in history. He found CSU online last year while stationed at an air base in Germany. He was intrigued by the school’s 2-year program. After making one call, he was told he could enroll

and showed up in Charleston in July with just a suitcase and started classes the next month. Walker wasted no time. Taking 19 hours apparently didn’t keep him busy enough, so he started researching the ALO program. Meanwhile, ROTC commander, Lt. Col. Alexandria Watson, took notice. “Cadet Walker is an excellent candidate for this program because he is committed and enthusiastic about the opportunity,” Watson said. Walker spent a week in Camp Bulls, Texas, in early January undergoing ALO Aptitude Assessment. He joined 40 other candidates; nine were selected. The Air Force puts the candidates through intense physical, mental and technical training. Although Walker wasn’t selected in this round, he has been invited back to participate again. The week-long training was highly competitive and stressful, but Walker remains undaunted. “Right now, I’m the best I’ll ever be,” says Walker. If he’s selected, he’ll not advance to the next stage until he graduates. The other candidates are from other ROTC programs, the Air Force Academy and the enlisted ranks. Is he concerned his age works against him? Just the opposite. “I think my wisdom helps after more than six years of active duty and now a college education.” If he’s not selected? No worries, says Walker, “I’ll humbly accept whatever the Air Force asks of me.” Meanwhile, Watson is happy Walker is part of CSU’s program. Watson said, “He’s demonstrated leadership and followership abilities, academic success and intense physical fitness.” From a distance, Walker looks like any other student walking around the Reflection Pond on his way to class. Every time a jet or a C-17 flies over campus, though, from nearby Joint Base Charleston, this one-day officer smiles and looks forward to the moment he can further serve his country. daniel walker photo by richard esposito

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Charleston Southern University

Tucker named head football coach

By CSU Sports Information

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ark Tucker, 54, has been named the fourth head football coach in CSU history. He replaces Jamey Chadwell, who accepted the associate head coach/offensive coordinator position at Coastal Carolina. Tucker spent the last four seasons as CSU’s quarterbacks coach and takes over a program that has won back-to-back Big South Conference championships and FCS playoff berths. “It was obvious to all of us around the program from the start that one of Jamey’s gifts was to hire people, to recognize outstanding teachers, coaches, people that have great relationships with their players,” said Hank Small, athletic director. “It was because of that we first looked inside the staff to see if we had our next head coach. It wasn’t hard to find an obvious answer to that question.” Tucker has been influential over the past four seasons as the Buccaneers’ offense developed into one of the top rushing attacks in the nation. During his tenure, he developed consistent quarterback play with Shane Bucenell, Austin Brown, Kyle Copeland, Malcolm Dixon and Danny Croghan all making significant impacts. Tucker’s impact was showcased with the rapid development of Bucenell in 2016 as the Buccaneers again sat among national leaders in time of possession and rushing. Bucenell, twice named the Big South Freshman of the Week, shined when the Bucs needed him most with a season-high four touchdown passes in CSU’s double overtime win over Coastal Carolina. He added three touchdowns apiece in wins over Bucknell and Liberty in guiding the Bucs to a Big South championship and a berth in the FCS Playoffs. Tucker’s experience proved valuable for CSU in 2013, as the Bucs set a school record with 10 victories to earn a No. 22 final national ranking. Under Tucker, Dixon played the best football of his career to pace CSU to a 4-0 start. When Dixon went down with an injury during the fourth quarter of the Appalachian State game, Tucker was then able to mentor a pair of freshmen in Croghan and Copeland. The Bucs continued to win even without

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their veteran signal-caller, as Croghan ran up a 5-1 record as a starter to earn Big South Offensive Freshman of the Year honors. Copeland too showed flashes of his potential, starting twice and rushing for 230 yards and three touchdowns. Tucker said, “The gentlemen I’ve had the opportunity to coach with and work with over the last four years have been incredible. Good friends, good family, good men. There’s a reason the young men in our charge have done the things they have done. It’s about direction, leadership and focus. Jamey’s approach every day was to find a different way to communicate purpose and discipline and the mission at hand. Those things I’m going to take with me. I’d like to think he learned a lot from me over the past 19 years, as I learned a great deal from him.” CSU’s 35 wins over the last four seasons are the most over a four-year stretch in program history. The Bucs were ranked for 22 consecutive weeks and finished the 2016 season ranked No. 14 in the FCS Coaches Poll and No. 15 in the STATS FCS Top 25 after appearing in the national rankings just once in the program’s first 22 seasons. This past season, the Bucs had 12 players earn All-Big South honors. Leading that group were Defensive Player of the Year Anthony Ellis and Special Teams Player of the Year Darius Hammond. CSU was first in the Big South total defense at 294.1 yards per game (7th nationally), as well as first in yards per rush (6.0), punt returns (15.2 – 13th) and kickoff returns (25.4 – 2nd). The Bucs also ranked among the nation’s best in rushing offense (266.5 – 6th), passing yards allowed (158.8 – 3rd), sacks (2.6 – 18th) and scoring offense (33.0 –20th).

Mark Tucker, photo by Richard Esposito

Tucker is a former assistant at two Southern Conference schools. He spent four seasons at ETSU, where he coached the offensive line for one season and running backs and tight ends for two years. In his six seasons as an assistant at The Citadel, Tucker was part of record-setting offenses for the Bulldogs. He served as offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach during his final season in 1996. Prior to being named the offensive coordinator, he coached offensive skill players over a three-year stretch during some of the Bulldogs’ best seasons in school history. In 1994, The Citadel set the national rushing record with 382.6 yards per game, which led all divisions. He was also part of the Bulldogs squad that reached the I-AA Quarterfinals and won the Southern Conference championship in 1992. That team was ranked No. 1 in the national poll during the season. He was also an assistant at The Citadel for one season in 1988 when the Bulldogs reached the I-AA Playoffs and were ranked 14th nationally. Tucker played at ETSU from 1982-1986 and was a three-year letterman at quarterback.

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Csu breaks ground on singleton Complex

by John Strubel/photos by richard esposito

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he night after his mother and eight others were shot and killed at Emanuel AME church, Chris Singleton, surrounded by family, friends and Charleston Southern University teammates, stood in front of television cameras and spoke about love. Love was the greatest gift Sharonda Coleman-Singleton gave to her son, and that night -- that moment -- Chris’s response inspired a community and a country. “Love is always stronger than hate,” Chris Singleton said. “If we just love the way my

Mom would, the hate won’t be anywhere close to what love is.” This past fall, Singleton was back in front of cameras talking about his mom, as Charleston Southern broke ground on the Singleton Baseball Complex. The 3,500-square-foot facility is being built to honor the life and legacy of Sharonda Coleman-Singleton. He thanked the CSU staff and his teammates saying, “You are there for me every day.” Singleton then recognized his family saying, “My brother is 13, and my sister is 16;

they are 10 times as strong as I am.” CSU head baseball coach Stuart Lake ’94 added, “I’ve never been prouder than what Chris said that night … It changed our state and country.” The $1.5 million project will feature a baseball locker room, training room and the Singleton Enrichment Center, and will include a “Love is Stronger” memorial courtyard and plaza at the entryway to CSU Ballpark. CSU president Dr. Jairy C. Hunter explained, “Our sincere desire is that future generations will see the Singleton Baseball Complex as more than a building, but as a symbol of love and hope.” Rev. Eric Manning from Emanuel AME added, “With all the accolades that have gone out this day to honor Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, let us pause and reflect on the phrase ‘love is stronger than hate.’ Contemplate what it took for a young man in the face of adversity, when he could have said anything else to incite a riot. To face a world that would always have us be divided, those words brought us together, they are a constant reminder that hate will never win.” Charleston Southern alum Kevin Futrell ’89 spoke on behalf of former CSU baseball players and parents of current players. He thanked the project architect and construction teams for their tireless efforts to ensure the facility would be completed. “I believe unfortunate incidents are a chance for us to demonstrate our faith in God,” said Futrell. While the complex is expected to be complete during the 2017 season, CSU continues its fundraising efforts to offset the cost of the facility. For information on giving opportunities, visit: charlestonsouthern.edu/singleton. You can watch the entire ceremony online at CSUMagazine.com.

local media interviews chris Singleton after the groundbreaking ceremony.

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Charleston southern university

kevin futrell ‘89 spoke on behalf of baseball alumni and parents of current players. his son, parker, is a freshman.

ConstruCtion update • Dining hall renovation completed • New communication IT building scheduled to be completed March 2017 • Singleton Baseball Complex, under construction, scheduled to be completed December 2017 • Health Science building, under construction, scheduled to be completed December 2017 • Athletic Performance Center, under construction, scheduled to be completed December 2017 • Women’s North renovation scheduled to be completed summer 2017 • Hired McMillian Pazdan Smith Architect to design a 500 bed residence hall complex

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parker naMed dean of Christian studies Dr. ross Parker, assistant professor of Christian studies, has been named the dean of the School of Christian Studies, as of January 1.

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r. Ross Parker’s academic training and experience will bring new ideas and momentum to our programs,” said Dr. Jackie Fish, vice president for academic affairs. “Dr. Parker will be collaborating with many faith-based community organizations to develop internships for CSU students as well as grow our graduate program in Christian Studies.”

Parker is the content editor for the School of Christian Studies’ ChurchandGospel.com website. He also serves as an external fellow for the L. Russ Bush Center for Faith and Culture at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. His areas of specialization include philosophy of religion, ethics and Christian apologetics. “As the mission statement for the School of Christian Studies says, our aim is to ‘prepare Christian disciples who faithfully serve Christ and his church,’” said Parker. “In my time as professor here at CSU, I’ve seen this commitment lived out firsthand in the ministries of Christian Studies faculty inside and outside of the classroom. I look forward to leading the School of Christian Studies to continue to accomplish this mission with all

the students who have been entrusted to our teaching and care.” Parker holds a PhD and an MA in philosophy from Baylor University; an MDiv in Christian ministry from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary and a BA in history from Union University. He was associate pastor of Poplar Spring Baptist Church in Zebulon, N.C. from 2007 to 2009. The School of Christian Studies offers majors in Christian Missions and Church Planting, Christian Studies, Christian Studies with an emphasis in Biblical Languages, and Student Ministry. Minors in Christian Leadership, Christian Missions and Church Planting, Christian Studies, Christian Worldview and Apologetics, and Women’s Ministry are available.

“aS the mISSIon Statement for the School of chrIStIan StudIeS SayS, our aIm IS to ‘prepare chrIStIan dIScIpleS who faIthfully Serve chrISt and hIS church.” -dr. roSS parker

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Charleston southern university

On the Road neW YoRk citY

Meet some of Charleston Southern’s alumni who are living and working in New York City. CSU Magazine asked several alumni to tell us their favorite places to visit and eat in New York City and some favorite things about their neighborhoods. Read on to learn more about CSU alums living in the Big Apple and discover some things to do if you take a trip to NYC. The next city we are visiting on our road trip will be Seattle. If you are a BCC/CSU alumnus living and working in the Seattle area, let us know at magazine@csuniv.edu.

katie’s nYc FaVoRites Favorite Museum: The NY Transit museum. It’s easy to pass over this, but it is incredible to see the evolution of the subway and mass transit!

Katie Crona ’07 For the last eight years, I have worked in the field of corporate recruiting which started out at Blackbaud in Charleston, S.C., and has taken me to Washington D.C., and, now, New York City. For me, HR and recruiting seemed like a solid fit for my interests and skills set when I was taking business management electives at CSU and enrolled in Human Resources and Organizational Behavior. I loved reading company case studies and how different companies attracted, developed and retained employees. I have been living in New York City for the last four years and for the last year have been working at Facebook as a University Recruiter. One day never really looks like another, but at a 10,000 foot level, I am responsible for managing Facebook’s relationships with a handful of the top computer science programs at various universities in the U.S. I attend career fairs and hackathons, host technical interview workshops, and organize other events focused on hiring the best new grad and intern software engineers for Facebook! I feel extremely blessed every single day that I walk into work and am grateful to have the opportunity to work for such an amazing company.

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Best Place for a Meal: Being in NYC spoils you because there are so many amazing restaurants hailing from all over the world. I am dying to go back to Hearth to try their tasting menu. Their entire dining experience there is incredible! Best Place for Dessert: Momofuku Milk Bar’s birthday cake or Magnolia Bakery banana pudding. Both must haves if you’re visiting!!

Favorite Thing about Your Neighborhood: I live in the East Village and love the diversity of the neighborhood. There are amazing restaurants and cafes, parks, and I have easy access to the East River path which offers amazing views of Manhattan, Brooklyn and Long Island City. Favorite NYC Landmark/Tourist Attraction: Broadway/ off Broadway show. I have seen so many amazing marquee shows as well as rolled the dice and seen shows I have never heard of and have never been disappointed!

Favorite Free Activity: Running in Central Park –the outer loop is about 10K, but there are so many trails and other areas to explore that no two runs ever have to be the same! Also, there is something magical about walking over the Brooklyn Bridge for the first time (starting from the Brooklyn side), cresting the top and seeing the entire financial district in front of you.

photos provided above: katie crona connected with her former coach, eric terrill, at the athletic hall of fame dinner in 2015. right:katie crona reacts when she spots her dad and boyfriend around mile 18 in the 2016 nyc marathon.

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On the Road neW YoRk citY

chantal’s nYc FaVoRites Favorite Museum: The Studio Museum in Harlem. It’s dedicated to promoting the work of artists of African descent. Best Place for a Meal: Burger and Lobster located on 19th Street. They only have three things on the menu, burger meal, lobster meal or lobster roll meal. That’s all you need. They have the best lobster I’ve ever had, and each meal is ONLY $20!

Favorite NYC Landmark/Tourist Attraction: The Apollo Favorite Free Activity: Afropolitan. Afropolitan fuses networking, cultural showcase, business spotlight, food, music and dance into a unique 5-hour cultural, inspirational and entertaining experience. It’s one of the most diverse and inclusive experiences with representations from most African and Caribbean nationalities.

Best Place for Dessert: Make My Cake on 116th Street

Chantal Maurice ’11 I’m an actress currently living in Harlem. I majored in communication and theatre at CSU. I was lucky enough to train with Professor Keating. He was one of the best things that happened to me while at CSU, aside from pledging Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. I’ve been on several television shows: “Blue Bloods,” “Mr. Robot,” “Quantico,” “Younger,” “Born Again Virgin,” “Limitless,” and I’ll make a brief appearance on a new Netflix show that I can’t talk about yet. I recently wrote and produced my own short film biopic called “Edge of Harmony” which follows the life of a jazz singer in the 1930s named Harmony Bessler. Check out www.HarmonyBessler.com for more information.

Favorite Thing about Your Neighborhood: The Street Vendors on 125th Street. You can purchase anything from custom made clothing, to handcrafted sculptures.

photos provided above: chantal maurice right: chantal maurice as harmony bessler in “edge of harmony.”

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Charleston southern university

Elias Hightower ’11 I have been living in New York for a little over five years and am professionally (9-5) working within the strategic HR field. For a little over the past four years I have been working at Spotify to build the presence of HR, supporting the Americas. This has been a great opportunity to travel all over the US/globe and really dig deep into what truly makes companies successful from an organizational, operational and strategic standpoint. It has definitely grown to be a passion in life. Also, as most people who live in NY find themselves working in several projects, I also have a fashion/lifestyle (which has always been something that I’ve been interested in) blog (themiseducationoffashion@) in connection with a line of men’s grooming products and accessories that I am in the process of launching. I found my start in the field of HR through my time in the U.S. Army National Guard and then shifting back into this field after moving to New York and completing my MS in HR management. This is truly a city of connections and networking. I would not have been afforded any of the opportunities that I have been blessed to obtain thus far without faith and a firm initiative to meet people who share similar interests as I do.

elias’s nYc FaVoRites Favorite Museum: American Museum of Natural History Best Place for a Meal: Lido or Cecil (located in Harlem) Best Place for Dessert: Levain Bakery Favorite Free Activity: Going to any park in the city on a beautiful day. There is always something to do (free concert series and activities throughout the year).

Favorite Thing about Your Neighborhood: The huge amount of culture and history here is beyond words. Harlem is truly a melting pot with people of many different backgrounds from all over and interesting views on life and the meaning of it. Favorite NYC Landmark/Tourist Attraction: The Apollo - as it still holds a lot of great events at the venue (concerts, charity events, community events, plays) - you never know who you will see just strolling by.

photos provided above: elias hightower shows off his fashion sense. right: elias hightower, on left, at work at Spotify.

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learnIng

leadIng

SERVING

kiMBeR gist: FighteR, sURViVoR by John Strubel/photos by richard esposito

Berkeley County Sheriff Corporal Kimber Gist limped to the podium. Her ankle, wrapped tightly and securely inside a medical boot, was the result of another surgery; her fi fth since surviving an on duty shooting that nearly took her life. Despite the days, and weeks, and months that had passed since Gist was shot multiple times while on patrol, the memory remains clear.

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Charleston southern university

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n the night of the shooting, Gist said she remembers spotting a suspicious-looking vehicle parked in an empty parking lot in Goose Creek. Curious, she parked her patrol car and approached the vehicle. Gist observed a man and woman in the front seat; both appeared extremely nervous. Gist separated the suspects, placing the man in the back of the patrol car. She then asked the woman to step out of the vehicle and put her hands on the hood. The next thing she remembers is hearing a loud popping noise followed by a bright flash. That was the first gunshot. The shot whizzed by her ear. Gist smelled the gunpowder and felt a burning sensation. Fear set in, not for her safety, but the media scrutiny that she assumed was sure to follow. Pop. Pop. Pop. Successive gunshots grazed her lip, hip, abdomen, her ankle, and the radio connected to her belt. Gist fired back, trying to stop the shooter – and save her life. The suspects fled the scene. The entire shootout lasted less than two minutes, but Gist remembers it felt like hours. “Everything was in slow motion,” she said. Spitting out blood, Gist grabbed her radio and shouted, “Shots fired.” “I refused to lie down in the middle of the road and die,” she continued. Gist waved down a car and told the driver to call 911. Still unfazed by her noticeable injuries, Gist said she couldn’t understand why

the driver looked at her with shock and tears. The shooting left Gist with multiple bullet wounds and one deaf ear. Gist, a self-proclaimed fighter and smalltown country girl from Woodruff, South Carolina, was hailed as a hero. “I don’t feel like a hero, because this is something I chose to do,” she said. “I went into this job knowing that something like this could happen – I didn’t think it would be me – but I knew it could happen.” As she slowly began to recover in the hospital, Gist, a student in CSU’s master of science in criminal justice program, stunned everyone when she continued to submit her classwork. “Within a couple days of her surgery, she was sending in classwork,” said criminal justice professor Gary Metts. “I’m saying, ‘How’s this classwork coming in?’ We went to the hospital and told her she didn’t have to worry about this. But she was still turning in the homework.” She shuffled around behind the podium before finally pulling up a chair to ease the pain from standing on her surgically repaired ankle. Gist looked into the crowd and made a promise. “I’ll be back; it’s just a matter of time,” she said. She kept her promise. In January, the Berkeley County Sheriff’s office published a post on Facebook that read: “Welcome back to full duty to Corporal Kimber Gist! We are so glad that she is back!”

www.facebook.com/berkcoSheriff/ the sheriff’s facebook account blew up with words of support and encouragement from across the country. Tom Kelley corporal gist...nothing I could write in words could reflect how I feel about your return … I say thank you and all law enforcement and public Safety officers for not only performing a job, but such service. welcome back! Scott D. White beautiful. brave. warrior. proud of her, the Sheriff’s office, and the people of berkeley county for their support of this hero. Rosa H. Law welcome back god bless you and you and all officers are in my prayers for safety as you perform your duties making us safer. Hope Trahan McKiernan welcome back corporal gist! thank you for your courage. Mike Lawson thank you for your service and sacrifice corporal gist! you are my hero. Stay safe

dr. gary metts, interim chair criminal justice department; kimber gist, deloise gist, kimber’s mother; and duane lewis, berkeley county Sheriff.

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learnIng

leadIng

SERVING

Collaborating to iMpaCt kiDs by Jan Joslin

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ombine professional women in the tech industry, local college professors and students and underserved inner-city children and teens and you have a growing program that is seeking to change lives. Dr. Valerie Sessions, chair of the CSU computer science department, and students Matthew Goforth, De’Jean Dunbar, Lauren Willard and Justin Weathersby helped launch CodeON, coding classes, at the Carolina Youth Development Center for youth in foster care. CodeON stands for Coding in Our Neighborhoods and is a project of Charleston Women in Tech, of which Sessions is a member. The CodeOn classes were launched in Charleston, and CNN Money featured the classes in a September 2016 article. Laura Erickson, Leadership for Life program director for Carolina Youth Development Center, said, “The CodeON program is a perfect fit for our Bakker Career Center because we are always looking for ways to broaden the horizons of our children and expose them to different experiences that can teach them a new skill and enrich their lives.” Sessions and several CSU students have volunteered, and CSU has donated equipment to the classes. Senior computer science major, De’Jean Dunbar, said, “I volunteered because when Dr. Sessions mentioned to me how she wanted to expose the youth to computer science, I wanted to be a part of that great experience. The thing I liked best is watching the kids excelling in the computer scienceoriented games.” Sessions said the idea behind CodeON is to bring computing and the tech industry into underserved communities to kids who don’t have ready access to Wi-Fi or coding classes. There are several clubs in the area, one at the East Side Community Center, a pop-up on Beaufain Street, one at Rosemont and the one CSU students help with at CYDC.

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“Computer science is just one more way to engage children and ultimately make a difference in their lives,” said Sessions. “In the computer science department, we are serious about integrating faith in our classroom and beyond. We want to have students using their new computer science skills to make an impact for Christ in the community.

“Also, it’s no secret that there is a shortage of tech workers in our area. I want those jobs to be filled by our local talent, by the kids that are in school now. Importing all of our tech talent cannot continue and is not good for our community. By fostering a love for tech early we are hopeful to grow this talent in our region. This won’t happen overnight, but if we get computing into their hands at this early age we will reap the benefits in terms of lower unemployment and greater tech talent in the community,” said Sessions. According to Charleston Women in Tech, they are a collaborative effort of Charleston’s women leaders, educators and tech professionals to connect, support and prepare women of all ages for careers in the technology industry. CodeON was the idea of Carolyn Finch, executive director, and Nina Magnesson, a catalyst with BoomTown!. Magnesson said, “The CSU students have done amazing. We are so grateful they are sharing their skill sets with these kids, opening up a whole new world to them.” She said the CSU students are effective as mentors because they aren’t much older than the high school students they are working with. The CodeON curriculum consists of Code. org, Google CS First and other online coding programs. Basic computer skills are offered to adults in the community centers as needed. Charleston companies and organizations providing supplies and volunteers for the CodeON program include: Launchpeer, Benefitfocus, Blue Acorn, BoomTown!, SPARC/Booz Allen, SnagAJob, Iron Yard Charleston, Charleston Digital Corridor CodeCamp, Charleston Open Source, Charleston Southern University Computer Science department, and computer science teachers from Voyager Charter Elementary and St. John’s High School.

cSu students and professors work with youth at charleston youth development center. photos provided by colin mccandless

to read the cnn money article, log on to money.cnn.com/2016/09/27/ technology/codeon-laundromat-tech-class. note: the program has since moved out of the laundromat because it got too large for the space.

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Charleston Southern University

Students pack record number OF SHOE BOXES FOR CHILDREN

By Jan Joslin

Organizations packing boxes: • Campus Activities Board • Enactus • Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated • Spanish Club • Sigma Gamma Rho • Psychology Club • Student Nursing Association • Prepharmacy • Premedicine • Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated • Women’s basketball • Football team Operation Christmas Child is a ministry of Samaritan’s Purse and makes Christmas gifts possible for millions of children around the world each year. For many of these children, it is the first gift they have ever received.

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tudents packed 1,823 shoe boxes for Operation Christmas Child at CSU’s 6th annual packing party. At the packing party, students weave in and out of the aisles of the Chapel, selecting toys, school supplies and necessities such as soap and toothpaste, hand packing each box one by one. Prior to 2011, several clubs and organizations were packing boxes on their own. When Dean of Students Clark Carter was campus minister, he felt like the entire campus should get involved, and the packing party was born. “We have had incredible support from the very beginning from the OCC volunteer staff here in Charleston, especially Jennifer Roberts and Linda Rhyne from Hibben United Methodist Church,” said Carter.

Carter believes the event is popular with students for two reasons. He said, “First, who doesn’t love Christmas? Most students are excited about the holidays approaching, and this is a way to take their minds off of exams and papers for a few hours and think about Christmas. Second, who doesn’t want to help a child? We were all kids once, and we know how important it is to have a gift at Christmas and to know that someone cares about us and loves us.” Kevin Coriolan, director of student activities, said 10 organizations participated in OCC, packing a total of 240 boxes. Also, the CSU football team packed and dropped off 54 boxes, and the women’s basketball team packed eight boxes.

top: Students packing shoe boxes for Operation Christmas Child. Photo by Craig Albertson

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above: Students select items for each box packed for Operation Christmas Child. Photo by Clark Carter

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SCHOOL TIES

Class notes 1970

1975

Sarah T. Moody and her husband, Randy Moody ’69 have published a book, Randy’s Writings, a compilation of the writings of their late son, Randall, which is available on Amazon. They are currently working on their second book, Healing Grief through Prose, Poetry and Prayers. The Moodys are retired and live in Charleston. Tommy R. Sellers is the owner of Chesterfield Driving School in Chesterfield. A former teacher, he is a certified driving instructor for the state of South Carolina.

1971

Frank Shivers has published a new book, called Marriage & Parenting Boosters. In the book, he endeavors to reinforce strong families, stabilize shaky families and bolster new families. The book is available at frankshivers. com.

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1990

1999

Jeff Peacock has been named to the board of directors for East Cooper Habitat for Humanity. He is the Southeast director for enterprise sales for Benefitfocus.

Dr. James Spencer MEd has been named the first principal of Philip Simmons High School in Charleston. The new high school is scheduled to open this fall. Spencer previously served as principal at Marrington Middle School of the Arts.

1991 FNB Corporation and its banking subsidiary First National Bank of South Carolina announced the addition of John L. Wiggins, III of Holly Hill to the Board of Directors during the annual meeting of stockholders. He is vice president and cashier of First National Bank of South Carolina where he has been employed for 32 years. He is a member of the CSU Board of Visitors, PresidentElect of the Independent Banks of South Carolina and a member of Target United Methodist Church where he serves as chairman of the Finance Committee. He is married to Beverly Cook Wiggins and has two children, Joanna and Jack, both of Columbia.

1977 After 30 years as an educator, Jeannie Carolyn James Smith has retired from Georgia’s Houston County School System. During her career, she won numerous awards, including Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers and Georgia Master Teachers. She lives in Warner Robins, Ga.

Rodney Van Horn is a digital forensics examiner with Liberty Business Associates. A retired police officer, he received the 2015 Knights of Columbus Officer of the Year award for his contributions to police investigations that involved digital forensics.

1994 Chris Roberts has been named arts and media pastor at Freedom Fellowship in Taylors.

2001 Christi Brinson teaches sixth grade math at Rollings Middle School of the Arts in Summerville. She is also the head of the math department.

2002 Crissy Dillahey was 2016 Teacher of the Year at Chicora School of Communications in Charleston County. She teaches fourth grade.

1995 Lt. Col. Harry J. Bird has retired from the United States Army after 30 years of service. During his career, he received numerous awards including The Bronze Star Medal with “V” Device; the Bronze Star Medal (10LC), the Meritorious Service Medal (POLC), the Army Commendation Medal (one SOLC and two OLC) Lili Gresham Hiser is the new and more. Life and Faith columnist for Azalea Magazine. She also writes an editorial periodically for the Summerville Journal Scene.

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Charleston southern university

compIled by Jan JoSlIn ’82

2004

2006

Cesurian “Cez” Champagne has been picking up some media attention as the new head coach of the baptist hill high School men’s basketball team. Champagne is believed to be the first female to coach a men’s team in South Carolina. She was on the CSu women’s basketball team from 1999 to 2001 and is employed by the Charleston County School district.

Kerry Daugherty MEd was a berkeley County School district Principal of the Year for 2016. he has been principal of timberland high School for seven years. Kristen Fraylick Patrick and David Patrick announce the adoption of a daughter, Emma dale Patrick. She was born July 25, 2016. Kristen writes, “We brought her home on July 27th and are so in love with her.”

stay ConneCted! Send news about family additions, job changes and memories of your time at CSU. To include a photo, email a high resolution jpg. (If you send a professional photograph, please include permission to print from the photographer.) Class Notes: Email your news to magazine@csuniv.edu Address change: Email advancement@csuniv.edu Name change: Email register@csuniv.edu

2007 Antonio Gantt announces the birth of a daughter, Emmalyn olivia gantt, born July 14, 2015.

Roger Simpson is featured in the current issue of School Band and Orchestra magazine in Sbo’s 19th annual 50 directors Who Make a difference. directors from band and orchestra programs from each state are nominated, and Simpson was chosen from South Carolina. he teaches at irmo high School and has 125 students in the music program. in the article, Simpson said, “Every year, i encourage my students to work to their fullest potential so that there is no room left for regret. this is a concept that i hope they apply to all areas of their lives, not just music. “

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Virginia Reijners MEd has been named the guidance director for the new Philip Simmons high School in Charleston, which is scheduled to open this fall.

Follow the Alumni Association on Social Media: alumni_csu

alumni_csu

Mary Kathleen Ruddy was the featured harpist for a performance for the Summerville Music Club last fall. She works with special needs students in the berkeley County School district and plays at Mepkin abbey. also, she is composing new liturgical works.

2009

Dr. Jermaine Whirl MBA is vice president of economic development and corporate Melissa Gore Gibbs and her training for greenville technical husband announce the birth of a College. he has 10 years of higher daughter, Paisley gibbs, born nov. education work experience and 21, 2014. has worked at gwinnett technical College and georgia Southern university.

2010

Rachel Potts Simpson ’14 MBA and her husband, Courtney Simpson, announce the birth of a son, Channing ryan Simpson, born Sept. 24, 2016. they live in Charleston.

2008

Holly Wooldridge is director of human resources for James doran Company. She oversees the humanities foundation, JdC Management llC and St. Jude farms.

Katrin Rumpf Reising and her husband announce the birth of their second daughter, Penelope Marie reising. they live in germany.

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SCHOOL TIES

2011

2014

Elizabeth Miller MBA announces the birth of a son, Weston William Miller, born March 15, 2016. The Millers live in Winston Salem, N.C.

2012 Sean Austin Leonard and his wife, Kelci Paige Leonard, announce the birth of a son, Luke Declann Leonard, born Oct. 30, 2015. He Novelist Rachelle Rea Cobb was welcomed home by big sister, released her first nonfiction title Paige Austin Leonard. They live in on March 4, 2017. Write Well is Lancaster. available from Amazon. Shonté Young announces the birth of a daughter, Sydney Grace Young, born Dec. 1, 2015, in Savannah, Ga.

2013 Sara Davis and Matthew Davis ’11 announce the birth of a daughter, Riley Davis, born Aug. 5, 2016. The Davis family lives in Columbia. Bradley Gruber MBA announces the birth of a daughter, Kathryn Mattie Gruber, born Nov. 9, 2016, weighing 9 pounds, 6 ounces and 21 inches long. The Grubers live in Zebulon, N.C.

Nadiia Fadda is a bookkeeper for JDC Management LLC. Julian E. Simmons is an exercise physiologist at Palmetto Health USC Medical Group in Columbia. He is a second generation Buccaneer. His mom is Julia Marsh-Burnes ’83.

Memorials Karen Benjamin ’08, age 31, died Jan. 5 in a vehicle accident in Anchorage, Alaska. She was a nurse at Providence Alaska Medical Center and Hope Community Resources. Letitia F. Fox ’82, age 72, died Dec. 14, 2016, in Mount Pleasant. She was a registered nurse and spent much of her career at Patrick B. Harris Hospital in Anderson. Rev. Francis “Frank” C. Keels ’73, age 65, died Nov. 5, 2016, in Greer. He was a retired minister, serving churches in South Carolina, North Carolina and Florida. He also was an international missionary and founded the Frank Keels Evangelistic Association.

Roy W. Kennerly ’71, age 68, died Sept. 26, 2016, in St. Simon’s Island, Ga. He owned Competitive Edge and was in the import business. Glenn Louis Meetze ’70, age 68, died Dec. 21, 2016, in Lexington. He was a financial consultant with Merrill Lynch and Wells Fargo. Wendell Walter Mohr ’71, age 76, died Nov. 16, 2016, in Irmo. He was retired from the industrial sales field.

2015 Brion Packett MEd has been named assistant principal for athletics at Philip Simmons High School in Charleston. The school plans to open in the fall. Previously, he was at Stratford High School. Chelsey Nicole Shaw and Timothy Allan Nichols were married Dec. 3 in Conway. She works for Charleston County Parks and Recreation and the Charleston Kettle Bell Club. He attended CSU and works for Fresenius Kidney Care. They live in Georgetown.

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Charleston southern university

BuCCANEER PRIDE LIVES oN Charleston Southern’s Brick Program provides alumni, friends, faculty and staff the opportunity to leave their mark on CSU as well as support the future of CSU students. Help build the tradition today, visit charlestonsouthern.edu/ buyabrick.

LEGACY GRADuATES mom and daughter, Lynne Watkins Douglas ’80 and Bethany Douglas ’15, photo provided

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SCHOOL TIES

Baby Bucs 2

1

3

4

5 6

7

8

9

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Wesley Emerson Butler, son of Kara Butler ’13 and Matt Butler ’10, ’13 MBA and grandson of Jodie Butler ’81 and Woody Butler ’83 Easton Davis, son of Ashley Grady Davis ’10 and Calan Davis Riley Davis, daughter of Sara Davis ’13 and Matt Davis ’11 Emmalyn Olivia Gantt, daughter of Antonio Gantt ’07 Paisley Gibbs, daughter of Melissa Gore Gibbs ’08

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6. 7. 8. 9.

Kathryn Mattie Gruber, daughter of Bradley Gruber ’13 MBA Hampton Hightower, son of Tamaran Benjamin Hightower ’04 and Derrick Hightower Tenley Ann Johnston, daughter of Maggie Murphy Johnston ’14 and Zac Johnston ’14 Luke Declann Leonard, son of Sean Austin Leonard ’12 and Kelci Paige Leonard

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Charleston Southern University

to submit your baby bucs photo: Email a picture of your Baby Buc wearing the shirt to alumni@csuniv.edu. Pictures should be 1 MB in size or larger, in jpg format.

10

11

to order a shirt CSU graduates, if you have a child under the age of 2, let us know at alumni@csuniv.edu, and we will send a CSU onesie for your Baby Buc. The shirt is free. All we ask in return is a photo of your Baby Buc for the magazine.

12

13

16 14 18 15

17

10. Weston William Miller, son of Elizabeth Miller ’11 MBA 11. Jadon Philip Muckenfuss, son of Arona Muckenfuss ’02 12. Emma Dale Patrick, daughter of Kristen Fraylick Patrick ’06 and David Patrick ’06 13. Penelope Marie Reising, daughter of Katrin Rumpf Reising ’10 14. Jetlan Rogenmoser, son of Stefan Rogenmoser ’07 and Courtney Wright

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15. Mason Wyant, son of Courtney Wyant ’11 and Chris Wyant ’11 16. Channing Ryan Simpson, son of Rachel Potts Simpson ’07, ’14 MBA and Courtney Simpson 17. Sydney Grace Young, daughter of Shonté Young ’12 18. Ashtyn Rylee Smalls, daughter of Shontay Smalls ’16 and Jonathan Smalls

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SCHOOL TIES

Csu ranked 17th on 50 Most beautiful Christian Colleges and universities list

i

f you haven’t been on campus in the last few years, you may be in for a surprise. The transformation and growth of the campus itself has captured the attention of students, alumni and the public. Charleston Southern was recently ranked number 17 on the 50 Most Beautiful Christian Colleges

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and Universities list, which is produced by Christian Universities Online. Over the last several years, the area around the Reflection Pond has been transformed with the opening of the Science Building, the Whitfield Center for Christian Leadership, Chick-fil-A Express and Java City, the

expansion of the Dining Hall and renovations to the original classroom buildings, residence halls and the library. The programs of the Whitfield Center for Christian Leadership bring visitors to the campus through workshops, conferences and partnership programs such as the Cradle to Career

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Charleston southern university

Collaborative, the South Carolina Christian Chamber of Commerce, the Association of Christians in the Mathematical Sciences, God in the Workplace, 1Charleston and more. The university also conducts annual programs and conferences such as The Lens, Endure and the Student Leadership Academy.

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Current projects on campus include construction of the Singleton Baseball Complex, the Health Sciences building, the Athletic Performance Center and the communications technology building. It may be time for you to visit campus to see the transformation for yourself.

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SCHOOL TIES

Shopping for Scholars Benefits Students

What does your CSU Family Tree look like?

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C

he CSU Women’s Council held their annual Shopping for Scholars auction in November. More than $44,000 was raised. “The auction has become the largest fundraiser we have on our Women’s Council,” said Susan Johnson, chair of the council. All

money raised funds student scholarships. Kaye Wren and Janice Messex were co-chairs of the event this year. “We just really rely on the generosity of so many supportive people in the community and even the council,” said Wren. Members of the Women’s Council solicit donations of items throughout the year. This year 200 items were offered in the silent auction, and 100 were offered in the live auction. Kaye Wren and Janice Messex served as co-chairs for Shopping for Scholars and organized the silent and live auctions. Photo by Warren Peper

lass of 1968 graduate Jennie C. Goodman of Charleston has a son-in-law and a granddaughter who also graduated from CSU.

Jennie C. Goodman ’68

James L. Downs ’75 of Chester, Virginia

Mayna Cosby Endowed Scholarship

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rs. Mary E. “Mayna” Cosby of Charleston has established the Mayna Cosby Endowed Scholarship for a full-time female student who is a professing Christian and has demonstrated financial need. Cosby is a retired educator and a member of the Board of Visitors and the Legacy Society.

Brooke K. Spivey ’11 of Charleston

We want to recognize our BCC/CSU legacy families. Email a list of your family members who have graduated from BCC/CSU – parents, siblings, kids, aunts, uncles, cousins, etc., to alumni@csuniv.edu. Include a photo if possible. Tell us their name, relation to you and year of graduation. Dr. Jairy C. Hunter Jr., president, and Mary E. “Mayna” Cosby. Photo by Richard Esposito

Alumni Board Members Elected at Annual Meeting

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lumni elected to the Alumni Association Board at the annual meeting are: Esther Wilkins ’91, Shannon Phillips ’95, Amanda Davis ’97, Daniel Cross ’90 and Mahaliah Campbell ’82. Photo by Richard Esposito.

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Alumni Board Officers: Lecius Moorer ’00, President David Weiss ’03, Vice President Ronald Jaicks ’93, Secretary Andre Dukes ’01, ’06, Treasurer Rex Divine ’85, Past President Continuing Board Members: Denise Deveaux ’96 Jordan Pace ’11 Lauren Young ’11

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Charleston southern university

DroWota FunDs sCholarship to honor her parents

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r. Carol Jean Drowota, professor emerita of English, has established an endowed scholarship in honor of her parents, Walter Charles Cecil and Christine Steinberg Drowota. Drowota said neither of her parents had a college education, but they valued education and wanted her to be well-rounded in the liberal arts. “I am indebted to my parents not only for my education but also for inspiring me to live a life of always seeking to learn,” said Drowota. She has supplied a funded scholarship at CSU for years, but wanted to do more, so she has funded an endowed scholarship and joined the Legacy Society, which will supply funding through a deferred pledge from her estate. “I wanted to honor my parents with the scholarship especially when I started giving the funded scholarship. I figured most of what I had had come from them,” said Drowota. Drowota has had a long career in education. “I went into teaching because I wanted to continue to learn,” she said. “The students had as much to teach me as I did them.” After receiving her bachelor’s degree from the College of Charleston, she taught French

bill ward, executive director of development, dr. carol drowota and dr. Jairy c. hunter Jr., president. photo by richard esposito

and English at the High School of Charleston and at Stall High School. She received her master’s degree from Duke and taught at Longwood College prior to returning to South Carolina to work on her PhD at the University of South Carolina. While working on her doctorate, she taught at both USC and Columbia College. Drowota’s career at Charleston Southern

University began in 1976. She retired from full-time teaching and as chair of the English department in 2009. She continued to teach on a part-time basis until recently. First priority for the scholarship will be a freshman who is one of the top three students in the high school graduating class from any high school in Charleston, Berkeley or Dorchester counties.

Alumni – do you know the group and the academic year in the photo at left?

do you knoW?

One alumnus, randomly selected from all alumni submitting correct answers, will receive some CSU gear. Submit your answer to magazine@csuniv.edu.

congratulations to Jamie parler ’92, for correctly identifying new vision in 1989 as the group in the fall issue of cSu magazine. cutlass file photo

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SCHOOL TIES

Weekend by the nuMbers 31 classes represented Class of 2016 had the most attendees Classes of 1981 and 1982 tied for 2nd most attendees alumni attended from 7 states South Carolina had the most attendees Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia tied for 2nd most attendees

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Charleston Southern University

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SCHOOL TIES

Coy Browning ’93

Where are they now? Coy Browning is the founder of Browning Law Firm in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., and has been president of the Okaloosa-Walton Bar Association and All-Sports Association. He earned a law degree from Cumberland School of Law at Samford University. Browning is a member of the CSU Athletics Hall of Fame and was a preseason All-American linebacker for the Bucs football team. One of his favorite memories is of meeting Coach Bobby Bowden at the awards banquet at the Palmetto Touchdown Club when he was named MVP of the football team. What drew you into the field of criminal justice? Ever since I was a teenager, I knew I wanted to work in law enforcement and ultimately become an FBI or Secret Service Agent. I was drawn by the excitement, prestige and challenge of being a federal agent. I wanted to serve my country, kick down doors and put bad guys in jail. I could not think of a better career.

Why do you give back to your community through professional organizations and sports associations? I spend most of my charitable time and resources on supporting youth sports because I feel that sports are so very important for the development of our young men and women. Not only do athletics teach hard work, discipline, humility and team work, they help keep kids on track, in school, and encourage academic success.

What prompted you to go to law school? What was it like meeting Bobby Bowden? After serving Florida for five years as a State Trooper with the Florida Highway Patrol, a law degree would give me a competitive edge in competing for the highly sought after federal law enforcement jobs and better allow for upward mobility. By that point, I had decided I wanted to work for the United States Secret Service as a Special Agent and planned on pursuing that goal upon graduation from law school. However, during law school, I fell in love with the practice of law and decided to open my own law firm upon graduation. It has been one of the best decisions of my life, and I have happily been in private law practice for about 14 years now.

Very cool – it’s Bobby Bowden! And, since first meeting Coach Bowden with Dr. Hunter many years ago, I have been fortunate over the years to be around Coach Bowden and hear him speak many times. One thing I have learned is that he is not only a great coach, he is a great family man and a great Christian. As a side note, Coach Bowden’s only daughter is a fellow attorney in my town, and we have become good friends. When my son was born, she surprised me with a Florida State University helmet personalized to my son by Coach Bowden.

In an email to President Jairy Hunter, you said “…your supportive words are appreciated and may last a lifetime.” How has that encouragement impacted you, and how do you in turn hope to impact others? Since I first stepped on campus, I have always had the utmost respect for Dr. Hunter. When a person you respect encourages and supports you through their words, these words can have a positive ripple effect on your life that last a lifetime. I pray that I have become and continue to be like Dr. Hunter and the other positive role models that have come and gone in my life, and provide support and encouragement through my words and actions that will have a positive ripple effect on their lives for many years.

photos provided: president Jairy hunter, coach bobby bowden, coy browning

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transform Campaign The Transform Campaign is designed to provide for new facilities, scholarships and resources devoted to academic program expansion, improvement and enrichment, and athletics.

The first phase of the campaign’s $40 million goal has been surpassed with more than $42 million committed thus far. The campaign is now in its second phase with a goal of raising $60 million.

Meet several donors who shared why they give to CSU: CJ Hirschman ’07 supports athletics and the Athletic Performance Center through the Buc Club Board of Directors program I was blessed to be able to have the opportunity to give back to the school that gave so much to me. I want to afford all those opportunities I had to future Bucs, create same lifelong memories and friendships. To be able to leave a lasting mark, put my name on the Athletic Performance Center, to have friends and families see I was a part of that, that new building is really a pretty easy decision. Personally for me, CSU really just changed my life through friendships, starting my business and career, my son, creating lifelong memories and friendships; it impacted my life all together.

Gary ’70 and Stephanie ’71 Swanger support student scholarships through the Board of Visitors program Stephanie and I give because we see the progress that CSU has made in the past 46 years. It is a dream that Dr. Hamrick and others fostered and through the excellent leadership of Dr. Hunter has come the reality. The school is a lighthouse for those seeking a quality education with a Christ-centered environment of learning. We want to support what is important for the future of education and that is the direction we see CSU headed. It is our way of thanking CSU for what it means and has meant to us as graduates that were given a superior education with the right values.

Dr. Carol Drowota, professor emerita of English, supports students through the Legacy Society I feel blessed and very grateful to be able to provide a scholarship at CSU. My parents highly valued a liberal arts education and knew of CSU as an institution of compassionate and caring individuals. After years of providing a funded scholarship which would provide immediate assistance to students, I think it is logical now to establish an endowed scholarship in their names and join the Legacy Society. I hope to continue to uphold the values my parents instilled in my sister and me.

Q u e s t i o n s a b o u t t h e Tr a n s f o r m a t i o n C a m p a i g n – c a l l A d v a n c e m e n t a t 8 4 3 . 8 6 3 . 7 5 1 3

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Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage

PAID

Charleston SC Permit #1202

Charleston Southern university 9200 university blvd. P.o. box 118087 Charleston, SC 29423-8087

intEgrating faith in lEarning, lEading and SErVing

baptist College & Charleston southern Connection At Homecoming 2016, Wanda Johnson ’83 and her daughter Emily Stokes ’16 sported the t-shirts that Emily created as her senior graphic design project. The Alumni Association sold a limited edition of the shirts, and $2,552 was donated to the CSU Annual Fund to be used for scholarships.

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Profile for csumagazine

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SCICU funded two student and faculty research projects. School of nursing students receive BlueCross BlueShield of SC Foundation grant. On t...

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