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WINTER/SPRING 2013


EaSy & flExIBlE We understand that you have a busy life and things can change. That’s why we make ticketing and parking easy.

No fEES Whether you buy in person, online or by phone, you’ll pay the same low price for your ticket. We don’t add any fees.

TIckET ExchaNGES aNd REfuNdS call us anytime before the performance to exchange or refund your ticket. additional details on page 64. Excludes group sales and some rental events. and if you can, please do us the courtesy of giving us enough time to resell your ticket to someone else.

fREE TIckET REPRINTING can’t find your ticket? We’ll reprint it for you for free. We’ll hold your reprinted ticket at our ticket office for pickup before the show. This applies only to tickets that you received from us. We cannot reprint tickets that you received from an authorized distributor.

fREE PaRkING We offer several parking options, including free parking in lot 1 during the times of most shows: mondays-fridays: after 4Pm; Saturdays & Sundays: all day. additional details on page 65.

BE coNfIdENT aS you Buy TIckETS To ThaT ExTRaoRdINaRy PERfoRmaNcE!

Cover: National Orchestral Institute; this page, top: School of eatre, Dance, and Performance Studies; bottom: UMD Symphony Orchestra. Photographs by Alison Harbaugh

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


WINTER/SPRING 2013 SToRy BooTh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

PERfoRmaNcE lISTINGS our multi-disciplinary season includes classical music, jazz, opera, theatre and dance, as well as work that defies genres. This season we have organized performances by theme, offering audiences a dynamic interplay of ideas across conventional boundaries. mINdS aNd BodIES IN moTIoN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Renowned artists and emerging new talent reach maximum creative velocity. aRT INSPIREd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 For visionary artists, familiar work sparks the next generation of ideas. NEW lIGhTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Renaissance and renewal of the classical tradition. WomEN makING WavES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Exceptional women share their creative visions. claSSIcal, STRaIGhT uP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 e rich traditions of classical music, fully expressed in concert. afRIcaN hEaRT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 African American culture and history take center stage. Jazz WITh a TWIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Unique partnerships lead to intriguing musical adventures. maSTERS RE-ImaGINEd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Contemporary performances provide new perspectives on the masterworks of musical legends. oPENING dooRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Programs with universal appeal. NaTIoNal oRchESTRal INSTITuTE & fESTIval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52

SToRyTEllERS our storytellers recall a performing arts experience that was especially meaningful to them. aNa PaTRIcIa faRfáN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 aNNE BoGaRT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 coNNIE mayER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 caRmEN BalThRoP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 NolaN WIllIamS, JR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 chElSEy GREEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 muRRay hoRWITz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 dR. hoWaRd kaPlaN aNd RomaNa lakS kaPlaN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 RoNIT EISENBach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 SuPPoRT ThE ExTRaoRdINaRy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 2012-2013 SToRyTEllERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 hoW To PuRchaSE TIckETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 vISITING ThE cENTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 chRoNoloGIcal PERfoRmaNcE lISTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center transforms lives through sustained engagement with the arts.

WhaT’S youR SToRy? ThE aRTS chaNGE lIvES. hoW havE ThEy chaNGEd youRS? as an arts lover, what has touched you, made you think, made you angry, given you a new perspective, forged a new connection? Why did you come to the center today? how do you feel about what you saw or heard?

vISIT ouR SToRyBooTh IN ThE loBBy — aNd TEll uS WhaT you ThINk.

oPEN all day, EvERy day

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


mINdS aNd BodIES IN moTIoN

mINdS aNd BodIES IN moTIoN Renowned artists and emerging new talent reach maximum creative velocity. Maryland Dance Ensemble photo by Zachary Z. Handler

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SEvEN uNIquE TalENTS… UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

mfa IN PERfoRmaNcE Festival of New Works In the grand finale of their studies in the mfa in Performance (mfaP) program, the members of the inaugural mfaP class will showcase seven new works. Each mfaP student will perform an individual piece that showcases his or her own writing, research and performance. This small group of talented theatre artists, who came to the program with experiences ranging from regional theatre to Broadway, have prepared hour-long works grounded in their own experiences, personal artistic visions and their

three years of mfa in Performance training. “Independent-thinking theatre students like these have the capacity to change the nature of the field,” said leslie felbain, interim head of the mfa in Performance program. “Their performances will be just a preview of what’s to come as they turn their talent and passion to new careers and even greater artistic accomplishments.” $25/$20 subscribers Purchase all three performances for the discounted price of $60.

caRolINE clay aNd aNu yadav

davId dEmkE: Sacred Soil

Friday, February 1, 2013 . 7PM Saturday, February 2, 2013 . 2PM & 7PM

Sacred Soil poses a question: “Can we be redeemed by violent means?” e play tells the story of a young man struggling to make sense of the violence that is around him and a part of him. In the end, what is revealed to him suggests the truth about hope and love. Demke says,”With this story, I want to show that the landscape of the human heart is also harsh and beautiful, complex and paradoxical, and it is the spiritual path that makes sense of it all.”

caRolINE clay: Let it Flo!

Let it Flo! is a celebration of the courage it takes to truly be free. Can you ever, especially as you age, come to terms with the often-unpopular choices that afford such freedom? When you choose to live fiercely, publicly and out loud, what happens when your legacy of achievement and struggle is erased from history? is is an invitation to find the place in all of us that is willing to forgive. aNu yadav: Meena’s Dream

With one actress and three musicians, Meena’s Dream is a coming-of-age tale about seven-year-old Indian American Meena, as seen through the fantastical landscape of her own imagination. Meena’s only wish is for her mother Aisha to be well, while Hindu God Lord Krishna seeks Meena’s help in his hour of need. In an epic conversation with God, Meena wrestles with life’s unanswerable questions of mortality, suffering and God’s own existence. Her quest is set to a live, original score combining South Indian classical music, contemporary jazz and indie rock.

RoB JaNSEN aNd davId dEmkE Friday, February 8, 2013 . 7PM Saturday, February 9, 2013 . 2PM & 7PM

RoB JaNSEN: e Tramp’s New World

From his office atop the 50th floor of the Chrysler Building, Pulitzer Prize winning author James Agee struggles to complete a screenplay that tells the story of Charlie Chaplin’s “Tramp” character as the lone survivor of a super atomic blast. Using projection, physical comedy, music and silent film technique, e Tramp’s New World adapts a lost screenplay for the stage described as “so dark it was without precedent” and tells the story of a writer’s struggle to find redemption through his art.

NIck hoRaN, claudIa RoSalES aNd TERESa BayER Friday, February 15, 2013 . 7PM Saturday, February 16, 2013 . 2PM & 7PM

NIck hoRaN: e Sound of Smoke

Using projections and shadow play, this theatrical event challenges the audience’s conception of sexuality, truth and identity. Dance movement, song, text and imagery will illuminate a dark period in the world’s history that in many ways mirrors our world today. Horan says, “I want to engender an environment of glorious decay right on the edge of collapse and in doing so allow the audience to walk the tightrope with me as I portray a transvestite who loved too hard and lost it all.” claudIa RoSalES: Café

When Erendira’s brother, Miguel, tracks her down after three years in order to tell her of their beloved Abuela’s death, she begins a journey of forgiving both her brother and herself. In the play, Rosales uses the ritualistic tradition of preparing Cuban coffee as a way to symbolize the struggle of constructing cultural identity for many first-generation Americans as they reconcile familial obligation with individual desire. “rough flashback, dream-like lighting, verse, music, movement and food I want to arouse in people the desire to question their own cultural upbringing.” TERESa aNN vIRGINIa BayER: Coffee and Biscuit

“I think a person has to believe in something, or has to look for something to believe in, otherwise his life is empty, empty.... Just to live and not to know why the cranes fly, why children are born, why there are stars in the sky... Either you know the reason why you’re alive, or nothing makes any difference.” – Anton Chekhov, e ree Sisters

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mINdS aNd BodIES IN moTIoN

Clockwise, from top left: Rob Jansen photo by Teresa Bayer; Claudia Rosales photo by Teresa Bayer; Nick Horan photo by Teresa Bayer; Teresa Bayer photo by Anu Yadav; Anu Yadav photo by Teresa Bayer; David Demke and Caroline Clay photo by Walter Dallas

‌SEvEN aRTISTIc vISIoNS claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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Ana Patricia Farfán mfa IN daNcE, umd School of ThEaTRE, daNcE, aNd PERfoRmaNcE STudIES fulBRIGhT ScholaR

When I was 15 and living in Mexico City, I had the chance to attend a concert given by a marionette company. They “played” Rossini, Schumann, Revueltas, Cage … The precision and grace in the movement that these stick-boned beings showed that night left a deep mark on me. At that time, I might have been surprised by the idea that movement and choreography are not exclusive to dance. At the end a puppet “pianist” played Saint-Saens’ “Dying Swan” and a marionette danced the iconic role. I felt myself mesmerized by her performance; her eyes seemed to me more live than those of my seat neighbors, and so her entire body. Through her movements, the fabric of which she was made emulated flesh so effectively. And if that weren’t enough, when she was about to finish the choreography, the curtains of the little theater started slowly to rise up, revealing about ten, 12, 13 people who were manipulating the marionettes’ strings, like ancient Moiras (Fates). I was looking up, admiring the mastery of these Moiras’ fingers while feeling myself tangled, trying to decipher the exact source of the marionettes’ movement. Seeing how the puppeteers’ movement was transformed into a dancer and a pianist made me feel I was in the heart of an illusion. “So magic is handcrafted!” I thought. And although I was looking at the strings, magic remained.

Photo by Mike Ciesielski

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30Th aNNual choREoGRaPhERS’ ShoWcaSE Saturday, January 26, 2013 . 3PM & 8PM Dance Theatre

Purchase 5 or more performances throughout the season and receive 20% off. See page 64 for details.

e 30th anniversary production of this adjudicated showcase — a joint project of the Center and the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission — celebrates the diverse talents of a new generation. One patron summed up her experience with the showcase this way: “I didn’t know what to expect and was completely overwhelmed by the complexity, diversity and beauty of each and every dance performance.” is year’s program includes four solo works: Corroded (Connor Voss), Ink Spilled in Cursive (Jason Garcia Ignacio), Eclosion (Junichi Fukuda) and Curb (Vanessa Owen). Also on the program: And Frolic (Charli Brissey and Felix Cruz) and Robert J. Priore’s Going nowhere, getting somewhere featuring a group of 13 dancers. Join us for a Talk Back after both shows. $25/$20 subscribers

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

ShaREd GRaduaTE daNcE coNcERT Paul D. Jackson, director Thursday, February 21, 2013 . 8PM Friday, February 22, 2013 . 8PM Dance Theatre

is concert features provocative choreography by first- and second-year Master of Fine Arts students in Dance, focusing on new works in development. As the first opportunity for them to put material onstage and see what develops, it often contains the seeds of movement ideas that will be featured in their MFA esis programs — an unguarded exploration of their talents and interests.

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

dEad maN’S cEll PhoNE KJ Sanchez, director Friday, March 1, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, March 2, 2013 . 8PM Sunday, March 3, 2013 . 2PM Wednesday, March 6, 2013 . 7:30PM Thursday, March 7, 2013 . 7:30PM Friday, March 8, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, March 9, 2013 . 2PM & 8PM Kay Theatre

Sarah Ruhl’s 2008 play finds comedy in the most unlikely of circumstances: a romance between a young woman and a dead man carried out via his still-active cell phone. Mousy Jean becomes irate when her solitary lunch is interrupted by the insistent ringing of a nearby diner’s cell phone and in an uncharacteristic fit of boldness, she approaches him only to find that his ringing phone is the only spark of life he has left. When the phone continues to ring, she flips it open and answers it. us begins her oddly intimate relationship with the man, unfolding solely through the people who knew him. In the New York Times review of the play’s premiere, Charles Isherwood noted that the playwright “blends the mundane and the metaphysical, the blunt and the obscure, the patently bizarre and the bizarrely moving” to extraordinary effect. $25/$20 subscribers

$20/$16 subscribers

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mINdS aNd BodIES IN moTIoN

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UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

ShaREd mfa ThESIS coNcERT

maRylaNd daNcE ENSEmBlE

Apple Falling

Springing from Fantasy

Graham Brown, choreographer

Adriane Fang, director Thursday, April 18, 2013 . 8PM Friday, April 19, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, April 20, 2013 . 8PM Sunday, April 21, 2013 . 3PM Dance Theatre

Triumph of Disruption: A Movement to Subvert Kwame Opare, choreographer Thursday, March 14, 2013 . 8PM Friday, March 15, 2013 . 8PM Dance Theatre

In Graham Brown’s Apple Falling, the lives of seven individuals intersect as they each interact with their familial histories, musing over the stories and characters that have, over the generations, helped shape who they are and who they will become. Can we control how far the apple falls from the tree? Kwame Opare uses pop iconic imagery and popular music in Triumph of Disruption: A Movement to Subvert, a funky, hip and engagingly fantastical journey through time and space. e choreographer entertains the concept of disruption as a method to alleviate the problems facing a particular group of young people — an artful attempt to show, through dance, iconic pop imagery and music, an epidemic of failure in America’s methods of educating its youth.

is lively, diverse concert provides a preview of the emerging talent of the next generation of dance artists. e program includes original dances created and/or performed by undergraduate students majoring in Dance as they begin to find their choreographic voice and vision, plus new works developed throughout the year by guest choreographers. $20/$16 subscribers

$20/$16 subscribers

Top, left to right: TDPS Shared MFA esis Concert, Apple Falling, photo by Graham Brown; TDPS Shared MFA esis Concert, Triumph of Disruption: A Movement to Subvert, photo by Kwame Opare

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aRT INSPIREd

aRT INSPIREd For visionary artists, familiar work sparks the next generation of ideas. PostClassical Ensemble photo by Tom Wol

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PoSTclaSSIcal ENSEmBlE ExPloRES dvořák’S “amERIcaN accENT”

Dvořák’s American years (1892-1895) constitute one of the most astounding chapters in the history of Western music. It was during his brief American sojourn that Dvořák composed his best-known symphonic and chamber works — the New World Symphony and the American String Quartet — as well as such undeservedly neglected music as his American Suite, a vivid postcard of American sights and sounds.

All of this music — fixating on plantation song, Native American chant and the vast American prairie — was influential and controversial, holding up a mirror to the American experience, asking and answering the perennial questions: “What is America?” and “Who is an American?”

All three concerts in this unique series will incorporate commentary and discussion by way of exploring Dvořák’s “American accent.” — Joseph Horowitz, Artistic Director, PostClassical Ensemble

amERIcaN RooTS

PoSTclaSSIcal ENSEmBlE

Benjamin Pasternack, piano Tuesday, February 26, 2013 . 8PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Dvořák and America

American pianist Benjamin Pasternack presents piano music inspired by African Americans and Native Americans, including two rarities by Arthur Farwell, who as leader of the “Indianists” movement deserves to be known as the American Bartok. e program includes Dvořák’s Humoresques in F and G-flat and an excerpt from his American Suite; Busoni’s Indian Diary No. 2; Farwell’s Pawnee Horses and Navajo War Dance No. 2; and Bernstein/Pasternack’s On the Town Dances. FREE

lEfT BaNk quaRTET

Angel Gil-Ordóñez, conductor Joseph Horowitz, artistic director Kevin Deas, narrator/baritone Friday, March 1, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

As the culmination of our exploration, this concert includes a visual presentation for Dvořák’s American Suite and the world premiere of Hiawatha Melodrama, a creation of Joseph Horowitz and Dvořák scholar Michael Beckerman, which combines text by Longfellow with excerpts from the New World Symphony and other Dvořák works. Join the artists for a pre-performance discussion and commentary by Benjamin Pasternack at 7Pm in Gildenhorn Recital hall. $35/$28 subscribers

v

Dvorák in Search of America David Salness, producer Evelyn Elsing, cello Katherine Murdock, viola Rita Sloan, piano Wednesday, February 27, 2013 . 8PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Postclassical Ensemble, now in its ninth season, is an experimental musical laboratory testing the limits of orchestral

Produced by UMD faculty artist David Salness in association with PostClassical Ensemble, this concert includes readings from Longfellow’s e Song of Hiawatha and Dvořák’s personal letters from Iowa. Together, these documents illustrate how Dvořák’s Sonatina incorporates a portrait of Hiawatha’s wife Minnehaha and how his American String Quartet is an elegiac evocation of the Iowa prairie. Joseph Horowitz will provide commentary. Dvořák works include Humoresque in G-flat major, arranged for violin and piano; Sonatina for Violin and Piano; selections from Biblical Songs and Gypsy Songs; and American String Quartet. e program also includes the spiritual “A City Called Heaven,” arranged by Hall Johnson, and John Carter’s Prelude and Rondo (“Peter Go Ring Dem Bells”) with Carmen Balthrop, mezzo-soprano.

programming. Their concerts regularly incorporate popular music, folk music, vernacular music and more, combining the music itself with insights into the people and the times that produced it. artistic director Joseph horowitz has done

extensive research into dvořák and his body of work, resulting in a book, an educational project about america in dvořák’s time and this set of programs.

PostClassical Ensemble most recently appeared at the Center in The Gershwin Project (2010-2011).

Joseph horowitz, Patrick Warfield, angel Gil-ordóñez and the performers will participate in a post-concert discussion. FREE

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aRT INSPIREd

BIll T. JoNES/ aRNIE zaNE daNcE comPaNy SITI comPaNy

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

IN TImE of RoSES

A Rite Friday, February 8, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, February 9, 2013 . 8PM Kay Theatre

Choreographer Bill T. Jones and SITI Company’s Anne Bogart have always loved each other’s work, but they had never collaborated until this year, when they brought their formidable creative forces together to create this new piece. In A Rite, these groundbreaking artists have deconstructed the original score of Stravinsky’s e Rite of Spring to create a provocative meditation on the power of singular new works of art to alter the way we think. Join the artists for a Talk Back after the february 8 performance. $50/$40 subscribers

SITI Company most recently appeared at the Center in Café Variations (September 2012). This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Ashley Smith, director Friday, April 26, 2013 . 8PM Sunday, April 28, 2013 . 2PM & 7:30PM Wednesday, May 1, 2013 . 7:30PM Thursday, May 2, 2013 . 7:30PM Friday, May 3, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, May 4, 2013 . 2PM & 8PM Kogod Theatre

In Time of Roses is a sexy, fast-paced, political thriller, based on the true story of Margaret of Anjou, a woman forced to lead an army to save her family. Most of the play’s text was taken directly from William Shakespeare’s Henry VI trilogy and from his sonnets. Playwright Ashley Smith, who also directs the performance, says, “My goal is to distill the story of Margaret of Anjou in chronological sequence, focusing on the love triangle between her, King Henry VI and the Earl of Suffolk. I find that this story thread, which I’ve pulled from Shakespeare’s much larger Wars of the Roses tapestry, makes for a great play all by itself.” $25/$20 subscribers

Anne Bogard and Bill T. Jones

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aRT INSPIREd

Anne Bogart aRTISTIc dIREcToR, SITI comPaNy

When I was a school kid in Providence, Rhode Island, I was brought in on a yellow bus one day to the Trinity United Methodist Church, where the Trinity Repertory Company was performing Macbeth, directed by Adrian Hall. I was 15 years old and that day turned me into a director. I didn’t understand a word of what was being spoken; I had never heard Shakespeare before. And I didn’t understand what was happening — there were witches coming out of the ceilings, the actors were performing all around us — and yet I knew what I was going to do for the rest of my life. Be a director. There were regional theaters all around the country then, built by really great artists who had an appetite for theater and who did exciting work. That was true for a long time but now the artists who created those theaters are gone and the theaters, for the most part, due to economics and fear, have become timid.

I run the graduate directing program at Columbia University and as I look around the country, I see art centers in communities and at universities as the most innovative and exciting places for my graduate directors to do work. The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center is a good example of that. When I want to do a show with my company, I’ll go to people at the Center who are open to new ideas and who will help us find a way to bring those ideas to the stage. Performing arts centers are very open-minded, adventurous, risk-taking organizations led by real entrepreneurial, art-loving men and women who make things happen. And you find in them not only adventurous directors and exciting artists, but also audiences who are more diverse and more adventurous, who come with an appetite for the art. And that’s where I see life right now.

Photo by Mike Ciesielski

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NEW lIGhTS

NEW lIGhTS Renaissance and renewal of the classical tradition. eighth blackbird photo by Fadil Berish

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NEW lIGhTS

UMD School of Music

UMD School of Music

maRylaNd oPERa STudIo

umd WINd oRchESTRa

NEW WoRkS REadING SERIES

e Poetry of Joseph Schwantner

Romeo and Juliet Lee Hoiby, composer Mark Shulgasser, libretto Michael Rossi, conductor Friday, February 15, 2013 . 7:30PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

In this continuing series of new music for opera, first-year students of the Maryland Opera Studio give a reading of Lee Hoiby’s last opera, Romeo and Juliet. Hoiby’s music is known for its lyricism and simplicity and has been recognized by awards and grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Institute of Arts and Letters, the Ford Foundation, the Fulbright Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts. FREE

Michael Votta, conductor Sunday, March 10, 2013 . 3PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

Known for his dramatic and unique style, Joseph Schwantner is one of the most prominent American composers today. Each movement of his trilogy was conceived as an independent piece through three commissions across 29 years. Schwantner says, “While each work is self-contained, I always envisioned the possibility that they could be combined to form a larger and more expansive three-movement formal design.” UMWO fulfills the composer’s vision in honor of his 70th birthday, Purchase 5 or more performing the premiere of all three works together, performances throughout as part of a whole.

the season and receive 20% off.

$25/$20 subscribers

eighth blackbird Shifted During Flight Tim Munro, flutes Michael J. Maccaferri, clarinets Yvonne Lam, violin & viola Nicholas Photinos, cello Matthew Duvall, percussion Lisa Kaplan, piano Friday, March 8, 2013 . 8PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

e Chicago-based sextet eighth blackbird combines the finesse of a string quartet with the energy of a rock band and the boldness of a storefront theatre company. In their concert at the Center, this audacious band of musicians will perform Steve Reich’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Double Sextet, with students from the UMD School of Music forming a second sextet.

UMD School of Music

NEW muSIc aT maRylaNd

See page 64 for details.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013 . 8PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

New works, as well as breathing new life into music, give young instrumentalists and singers the opportunity to learn from living composers, collaborate with them and gain insight into the compositional process. is concert features original works by UMD student composers, including solo, chamber and electroacoustic performances. FREE

$30/$24 subscribers

eighth blackbird most recently appeared at the Center with Rinde Eckert and Steve Mackey in Slide (2009-2010). WAMU 88.5 is the official media sponsor of this performance. This tour of eighth blackbird is made possible by a grant from Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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oRPhEuS chamBER oRchESTRa WITh GaBRIEl kahaNE Saturday, April 20, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

UMD School of Music

American composer and singer-songwriter Gabriel Kahane, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra’s first composer-in-residence, combines his classical music training with modern folk-pop influences. Often compared to Suan Stevens and Rufus Wainwright, Kahane has collaborated with both of these artists. He will perform with Orpheus in a program that includes his new song cycle, Hugo Wolf ’s Italian Serenade and Arnold Schoenberg’s Transfigured Night.

umd WINd oRchESTRa mEmBERS of oRPhEuS chamBER oRchESTRa … of a rare and special type … Michael Votta, conductor Sunday, May 5, 2013 . 5PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

kRoNoS quaRTET

Two sound worlds collide in a program that pairs Mozart’s Serenade in B-flat (“Gran Partita”) K. 361 and Varese’s Octandre, Intégrales, Deserts, Hyperprism and Density 21.5. During Orpheus’s 2011-2012 residency in the UMD School of Music, Orpheus members engaged in coaching sessions, rehearsals and masterclasses, providing students the opportunity to experience the Orpheus conductor-less ensemble performance process. Orpheus members will join the student performers in bringing these very different works before the audience.

Student Composition Reading

$25/$20 subscribers

Thursday, April 25, 2013 . 8PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

This performance is made possible in part by support from The MARPAT Foundation.

$35/$28 subscribers

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra served as artists-in-residence with the UMD School of Music in 2011-2012 and performed several times during the season. This performance is made possible in part by support from The MARPAT Foundation.

Kronos Quartet’s ongoing residency at the Center includes working closely with composition students in the UMD School of Music. Each season Kronos works with selected young student composers in creating new works, refining the pieces for maximum musical impact and presenting initial readings of the works in a public event. is year, second-year DMA Composition students Alexandra (“Lexi”) Bryant, Jonathan Graybill and Joel Pierson traveled to San Francisco to work with Kronos on their compositions, shaping and refining their work for Kronos’s public performance at the Center. FREE This residency with Kronos Quartet is made possible by a grant from Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts. This project is also supported in part by an Art Works award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

UMD School of Music

umd PERcuSSIoN ENSEmBlE Xenakis Lee Hinkle, director Monday, May 6, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

Usually positioned at the back of the orchestra, the percussion section moves center stage to reveal the colorful, melodic potential of their instruments in this striking concert of contemporary music by Greek composer, architect-engineer and music theorist, Iannis Xenakis. FREE

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


NEW lIGhTS

Maryland Opera Studio’s production of La Bohème photo by Cory Weaver

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

21


Connie Mayer hEad, mIchEllE SmITh PERfoRmING aRTS lIBRaRy

One performance that moved me? How to begin? Music, theatre and dance have always played a major role in my life. When I was growing up, I sang, danced, acted in plays and played a variety of musical instruments, often choosing those activities over completing my math homework. In spite of the dire predictions of my math teacher, I’ve been fortunate to have a happy life working in the performing arts as a music teacher, scholar and performing arts librarian. As head of the Michelle Smith Performing Arts Library, I have the privilege of leading a group of talented, creative and energetic librarians and curators who are committed to providing the best possible library resources and services to our diverse clientele — faculty, students and patrons of the performing arts in the state of Maryland. We reside within the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center and are an integral part of the lives of our young artist/students. We also have the opportunity to attend a wide variety of performances in this beautiful facility. So, which performance moved me? The last one I attended. Or perhaps the next one…..

Photo by Mike Ciesielski

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WomEN makING WavES

WomEN makING WavES Exceptional women share their creative visions. Laurie Anderson and Kronos Quartet

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WomEN makING WavES

lauRIE aNdERSoN aNd kRoNoS quaRTET Friday, February 1, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, February 2, 2013 . 8PM Kay Theatre

In addition to her groundbreaking solo work, Laurie Anderson has undertaken collaborative projects with artists of all kinds, including William S. Burroughs, Lou Reed, Marisa Monte and Colin Stetson. Kronos Quartet, musical mavericks who shatter conventional wisdom about string quartets, has partnered with Eiko & Koma, Philip Glass, Alim Qasimov, Astor Piazzolla and many more. For the first time, these artists join their distinct personalities and musical styles in a new work composed by Laurie Anderson and commissioned by the Clarice Smith Center. Kronos joins Anderson in this world-premiere performance. Join the artists for a Talk Back following the february 1 performance. $50/$40 subscribers

Laurie Anderson most recently appeared at the Center in her solo work Delusion (2010-2011). Kronos Quartet has performed and served as resident artists at the Center since the 2007-2008 season. This tour of Kronos Quartet is made possible by a grant from Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts. This project is also supported in part by an Art Works award from the National Endowment for the Arts. This work is commissioned by Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center; Adelaide Festival, Australia; The Barbican Centre, London; The Office of Arts and Cultural Programming, Montclair State University, NJ; Perth International Arts Festival, Australia; Stanford Live, Stanford University; and the University of Texas Performing Arts Center, Austin.

Purchase 5 or more performances throughout the season and receive 20% off. See page 64 for details.

Wu maN, Solo PIPa Thursday, March 28, 2013 . 8PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Recognized as the world’s premier pipa virtuoso and as a leading ambassador of Chinese music, Chinese-born musician Wu Man creates and fosters projects that give this ancient instrument a new role in today’s musical world. She has introduced the pipa — the traditional, four-stringed Chinese lute — to new audiences around the world and has commissioned and premiered more than a hundred new works. rough projects she has instigated, the pipa has found a place in new solo and quartet works, concertos, opera, chamber, electronic and jazz music, as well as in theatre productions, film, dance and collaborations with visual artists. Her adventurous musical spirit has also made her a respected expert on the history and preservation of Chinese musical traditions, reflected in her recorded and live performances and multi-cultural collaborations. $35/$28 subscribers

Wu Man most recently appeared at the Center in A Chinese Home with Kronos Quartet (2009-2010).

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


WomEN makING WavES

Creative Dialogue

NoRa chIPaumIRE

a coNvERSaTIoN aBouT WomEN aNd RESISTaNcE

Miriam Eric Ting, director Omar Sosa, composer Olivier Clausse, lighting design Okwui Okpokwasili, performer Thursday, April 4, 2013 . 8PM Friday, April 5, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, April 6, 2013 . 8PM Kogod Theatre

Nora Chipaumire, choreographer and dancer Sheri Parks, UMD Professor of American Studies Sarah Browning, DC Poets Against the War and Split This Rock Sheema Kalbasi, poet and human rights advocate Kojo Nnamdi, moderator Monday, April 1, 2013 . 7:30PM Dance Theatre

Nora Chipaumire’s Miriam is a deeply personal dance-theatre performance that looks closely at the tensions women face between public expectations and private desires; between selflessness and ambition; and between the perfection and sacrifice of the feminine ideal. Join Chipaumire along with Sheri Parks, UMD American Studies professor; Sheema Kalbasi, an Iranian writer who has lived most of her life in exile from her home country; and Sarah Browning, director of DC Poets Against the War and Split is Rock. ey will discuss these and other complexities experienced by women who choose and/or are destined to lead a life of protest and resistance. FREE

With Miriam, the renowned choreographer and dancer Nora Chipaumire creates her first character-driven work — a deeply personal dance-theatre performance that looks closely at the tensions women face between public expectations and private desires; between selflessness and ambition; and between the perfection and sacrifice of the feminine ideal. e inspiration for Miriam springs from the cultural and political milieu of Chipaumire’s southern African girlhood, her self-exile to the U.S. and her self-discovery as an artist. But Miriam also reverberates with other literary and legendary influences: the writings of Joseph Conrad and Chenjerai Hove; the life of South African singer and activist Miriam Makeba; and the Christian iconography of Mary. e staged work features an interplay of light and shadow that infers the presence of others, real and imagined, within a suggestive environment that calls to mind the site of a crime, a mysterious land or a sacred place of ritual and retreat. Join the artists for a Talk Back following the april 5 performance. $35/$28 subscribers

Nora Chipaumire most recently appeared at the Center in lions will roar, swans will fly, angels will wrestle heaven, rains will break: gukurahundi (2010-2011). This tour of Nora Chipaumire is made possible by a grant from Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts. The presentation of Miriam is also made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and additional funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Nora Chipaumire photo by Olivier Clausse

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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Creative Dialogue

coNSIdERING ThE humaN coNdITIoN: oN BEhalf of NaTuRE Meredith Monk, composer, singer, director, choreographer and filmmaker Suheil Bushrui, George and Lisa Zakhem Kahlil Gibran Chair for Values and Peace Alexander Ochs, Worldwatch Institute Sacoby Wilson, Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health Kojo Nnamdi, moderator Monday, April 29, 2013 . 7:30PM Dance Theatre

Purchase 5 or more performances throughout the season and receive 20% off.

For her newest work, On Behalf of Nature, Meredith Monk offers a poetic meditation on the environment, inspired in part by the Buddhist notion of conjoining heaven and earth through human beings. Responding to the precarious state of our global ecology, Monk creates a space at the threshold where human, natural and spiritual elements are woven into a delicate whole, illuminating the interconnection and interdependency of us all. Join this cross-disciplinary panel of artists and activists to discuss how science, art and spirituality can influence the way we are living on the planet. FREE

See page 64 for details.

mEREdITh moNk On Behalf of Nature Saturday, May 4, 2013 . 8PM Kay Theatre

Meredith Monk is a composer, singer, director/choreographer and creator of new opera, music theatre works, films and installations. A pioneer in what is now called “extended vocal technique” and “interdisciplinary performance,” Monk creates works at the intersection of music and movement, image and object, light and sound in an effort to discover and weave together new modes of perception. On Behalf of Nature, a new music theatre work inspired by the writings of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, essayist and environmental activist Gary Snyder, will portray the human realm as just one layer in a multitude of realms within the natural world. is poetic meditation on the environment will focus on what the global community is in danger of losing, to challenge all who experience it to be more conscious of preserving and advocating on behalf of our shared natural world. Join the artists for a Talk Back following the performance. $35/$28 subscribers

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


WomEN makING WavES

Wu Man photo by Steven Kahn

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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claSSIcal, STRaIGhT uP

claSSIcal, STRaIGhT uP The rich traditions of classical music, fully expressed in concert. UMD Symphony Orchestra photo by Alison Harbaugh


claSSIcal, STRaIGhT uP

UMD School of Music

umd REPERToIRE oRchESTRa e ree E’s John Devlin and Jason Ethridge, music directors Michael Votta, guest conductor Tuesday, February 26, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

e UMD Repertoire Orchestra performs Brahms’s Fourth Symphony in E Minor; Evening Prayer and Pantomime from Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel; and Beethoven’s Egmont Overture. FREE

UMD School of Music

maRylaNd oPERa STudIo umd SymPhoNy oRchESTRa ere’s a good reason that the Maryland Opera Studio has won a devoted following among our patrons. See what these talented second-year MM Voice students have in store for you as they perform two great operatic works.

Idomeneo Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, composer Giambattista Varesco, libretto Pat Diamond, director Joseph Gascho, conductor Allan Laino, chorus master Friday, April 12, 2013 . 7:30PM Sunday, April 14, 2013 . 3PM Thursday, April 18, 2013 . 7:30PM Saturday, April 20, 2013 . 7:30PM Kay Theatre

Revenge, jealousy, love, betrayal and forgiveness — it’s the very stuff of opera. Mozart’s brilliance weaves them into a stunning musical and dramatic event. Buffeted by the gods, survivors of the Trojan War move from the agony of loving your enemy to the joy of finding your love. Idomeneo premiered in Munich on January 29, 1781, conducted by the 25-year-old composer himself.

La Bohème Giacomo Puccini, composer Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica, libretto Giovanni Reggioli, conductor Andrea Dorf McGray, director Allan Laino, chorus master Saturday, April 13, 2013 . 7:30PM Wednesday, April 17, 2013 . 7:30PM Friday, April 19, 2013 . 7:30PM Sunday, April 21, 2013 . 3PM Kay Theatre

Before RENT, there was La Bohème, perhaps the world’s most beloved opera. In the tempestuous demimonde of Parisian artists, poets and philosophers, Mimi and Rodolfo pursue their ill-fated love. La Bohème was a huge hit when Puccini premiered it in 1896 and its popularity has not waned. $35/$28 subscribers

UMD School of Music

RoBERT dIluTIS, claRINET Mayron Tsong, piano Sunday, April 14, 2013 . 3PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Robert DiLutis, one of the School of Music’s newest faculty members, makes his solo debut at the Clarice Smith Center with a program featuring works by Brahms, Schumann and more. DiLutis has performed as a featured soloist with ensembles such as the San Antonio Symphony, Laredo Symphony, Baton Rouge Symphony and the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. He recently toured with the New York Philharmonic on its historic trip to Pyongyang, North Korea. FREE UMD School of Music

chamBER muSIc ShoWcaSE Part I: Monday, April 15, 2013 . 5:30PM Part II: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 . 7PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Small chamber groups of students perform repertoire for strings, woodwinds, brass and piano. e culmination of rehearsal and coaching during the fall semester, this concert is an integral part of coursework for UMD School of Music students and a glimpse into the training they receive for performing in major ensembles. FREE

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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Carmen Balthrop SoPRaNo . PRofESSoR of voIcE, umd School of muSIc

The most moving experience I’ve ever had actually didn’t happen on stage. The story starts when I was eight years old. My father had a radio and television shop in the basement of our home where he would just tinker around with things, lots of machines that had lights, knobs and dials. One Saturday, I heard the sounds of someone singing in the operatic classical style, coming from a radio in his shop. And it drew me like a magnet to the top of the steps. I called out, “Dad, who is that? What is that?” He said, “Well, that’s opera and that singer is Leontyne Price.” I was mesmerized. I was supposed to be cleaning the house and I remember distinctly that I went back upstairs, turned on the vacuum cleaner and started trying to imitate the sounds I had heard. I think what happened in that instant was that I was awakened to the idea that singing — singing in that style — was something I could do. Years later, Leontyne Price would come to Washington DC to do live recitals. I went to every one, and every time I went backstage

and got her autograph. After a while she started to recognize me and I just considered that we were friends from that point. But what I’m getting to is this: I was in San Francisco, where I had been hired by Maestro Kurt Adler to sing on stage with Marilyn Horne in Tancredo. In that same season Leontyne Price was singing in La Forza del Destino there. I was coming out of a stage rehearsal, walking down a hallway in the old War Memorial Opera House, and at the other end of the hallway I saw Leontyne Price, walking toward me. I looked at her and she looked at me and she said, “I just came from your rehearsal. You were stunning.” And we embraced. There was no one in the hall. I was standing there with the voice that inspired me to sing. Every time I think about it I just well up, because I don’t think people get to meet their idols very often let alone hear from them their response to their work. That, to me, was one of the most moving moments ever in my life.

Photo by Mike Ciesielski

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UMD School of Music: Music in Mind

GRaduaTE fElloWShIP chamBER ENSEmBlES French Impressions Sunday, April 28, 2013 . 3PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

UMD School of Music

umd mEN’S choRuS aNd umd WomEN’S choRuS Around the World in 80 Minutes Kenneth Elpus, conductor, UMD Women’s Chorus Joseph Shortall, conductor, UMD Men’s Chorus Friday, April 19, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

e UMD Women’s Chorus and UMD Men’s Chorus traverse the world through song. is rousing concert features music from Asia, Africa, Europe, South America and North America, all transcribed or arranged for choirs by some of the art form’s most celebrated composers.

e School of Music’s premier chamber ensembles, Aeolus String Quartet and SIREN Woodwind Quintet, have swiftly gained renown for their artistry. ey share the stage for an afternoon of shimmering French repertoire, including Ravel’s String Quartet and Poulenc’s Sextuor featuring faculty artist Bradford Gowen at the piano. Proceeds from music in mind concerts benefit the School of music’s undergraduate scholarship fund. $25/$20 subscribers

UMD School of Music

maRylaNd oPERa STudIo

FREE

Opera Scene Study Performances UMD School of Music

umd REPERToIRE oRchESTRa French First and Fortuna John Devlin and Jason Ethridge, music directors Andrew McLaughlin, baritone Wednesday, April 24, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

e UMD Repertoire Orchestra gives the world premiere of La Saulaie: Poeme pour baryton et orchestra, a piece by Claude Debussy that was recently discovered and completed by French music scholar Dr. Robert Orledge. Orff’s mammoth Carmina Burana will follow. FREE

After a year of taking apart their craft and sculpting it from the ground up, the final class project for our first-year students pairs them in operatic scenes from a wide variety of repertory and featuring all aspects of their training. Accompanied only by piano and minimal props, these performances give our young artists a chance to shine in the purest of forms. FREE

UMD School of Music

umd coNcERT choIR umd SymPhoNy oRchESTRa

UMD School of Music

maRylaNd oPERa STudIo Opera al Fresco Thursday, April 25, 2013 . 12:30PM Grand Pavilion

A casual preview of the Maryland Opera Studio’s Scene Study Performances in the Clarice Smith Center’s expansive Grand Pavilion. FREE

Thursday, May 2, 2013 . 7:30PM Friday, May 3, 2013 . 7:30PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Firebird Edward Maclary, conductor, UMD Concert Choir James Ross, conductor, UMD Symphony Orchestra with members of the UMD Graduate Conducting Program Friday, May 3, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

e UMD Concert Choir and the UMD Symphony Orchestra perform a concert of music anchored by Verdi and Stravinsky, including Te Deum (Verdi) and e Firebird Suite (1945) (Stravinsky). Also included in the program will be Ives’s ree Places in New England and General Booth Enters Heaven, as well as John Adams’s Son of Chamber Symphony. $25/$20 subscribers

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


afRIcaN hEaRT

afRIcaN hEaRT African American culture and history take center stage. Branford Marsalis photo by Eric Ryan Anderson

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Nolan Williams, Jr. muSIcoloGIST, ThEoloGIaN, SoNGWRITER, PRoducER cEo, NEWoRkS PRoducTIoNS

In 2007 I took 33 singers to Italy for the Amalfi Coast Music and Arts Festival. One of our four performances was in a town called Maiori. There are two towns next to each other, Maiori and Minori — Major and Minor. The priest of the cathedral where we were performing had somehow forgotten about the concert and had gone out of town. He was the only person in town with the keys so at the eleventh hour the concert ended up being canceled. We were all dressed up with nowhere to perform. I said to my singers, “You know what? Change your clothes, put on something comfortable. Let’s just go down to the boardwalk.” So we marched down to the boardwalk overlooking the Mediterranean Sea and just started singing and within about ten minutes it seemed like every townsperson from both Maiori and Minori had gathered around us — hundreds and hundreds of people.

It ended up probably being one of our biggest concerts, an outdoor concert, very impromptu. Performance for me is grounded in connecting with my faith and in communicating the sacred in meaningful ways, so at the end of most concerts we like to come together for a prayer of thanksgiving for the experience. And so we gathered that day in Italy for prayer in a circle and sometime in the middle of the prayer we realized that the townspeople had circled themselves around us and were praying in Italian as we were praying in English. We felt a sense of understanding that superseded the language barrier. By the end of the prayer we were in tears, the people were in tears; we embraced and it was just the most amazing experience of intercultural and spiritual exchange. The power of music, the power of the spirit — it’s in all of us when we tap into it.

Photo by Mike Ciesielski

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afRIcaN hEaRT

Pre-performance Discussion

BRaNfoRd maRSalIS davId c. dRISkEll Friday, February 15, 2013 . 6:30PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

Purchase 5 or more performances throughout the season and receive 20% off. See page 64 for details.

Two artists with abiding connections to African American visual art will discuss the influence of jazz on the artists who create this work. David C. Driskell has taken a leading role in bringing African American art into the mainstream of American society through his own artwork and writing. Since 1977, as a professor of art at the University of Maryland, he has focused attention on black artists as they fight for survival and search for identity in the United States. Saxophonist Branford Marsalis has a particular interest in the works of renowned artist Romare Bearden and in 2003 produced a jazz album paying tribute to him. Marsalis continues to pursue that interest here, in a performance in conjunction and collaboration with the opening of the David C. Driskell Center’s exhibition, Convergence: e Intersection of Visual and Performance Art in Jazz. FREE

aN EvENING WITh BRaNfoRd maRSalIS Friday, February 15, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

Branford Marsalis and his quartet will perform an evening of music in conjunction with the opening of a new exhibit at the David C. Driskell Center, highlighting African American artists inspired by jazz. A man of numerous musical interests — including jazz, blues, funk and modern classical works — Marsalis first gained acclaim through his work with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers and his brother Wynton’s quintet before forming his own ensemble. e three-time Grammy winner continues to expand his skills as an instrumentalist and composer. As head of Marsalis Music, the label he founded in 2002, he produces both his own projects and those of the jazz world’s most promising new and established artists. $35/$28 subscribers Funded in part by a generous gift from Barbara and Charles Reiher. Additional sponsoring partnership with the American Jazz Museum in Kansas City.

Branford Marsalis most recently appeared at the Center in the 2005-2006 season.

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


Jazz WITh a TWIST

Jazz WITh a TWIST Unique partnerships lead to intriguing musical adventures. Stefon Harris, Ninety Miles, photo by Jimmy Katz

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UMD School of Music

UMD School of Music

SPRING BIG BaNd ShoWcaSE

umd chamBER Jazz

Chris Vadala, music director, Jazz Studies Program Director

Part I: Wednesday, April 10, 2013. 7:30PM Part II: Thursday, April 11, 2013. 7:30PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

umd Jazz laB BaNd, uNIvERSITy Jazz BaNd Tuesday, March 12, 2013 . 7:30PM

umd Jazz ENSEmBlE, umd alumNI Jazz BaNd Wednesday, March 13, 2013 . 7:30PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

Join Chris Vadala and UMD jazz ensembles for a lively concert that features jazz standards and premieres of pieces by UMD alumni and current jazz students.

Swing with UMD jazz combos as they play beloved standards and new tunes arranged by UMD jazz students. $30/$24 subscribers

FREE

Brad Mehldau photo by Michael Wilson; Chris î Žile photo by Danny Clinch

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


Jazz WITh a TWIST

BRad mEhldau, PIaNo chRIS ThIlE, maNdolIN Friday, April 12, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

Pianist Brad Mehldau is first and foremost an improviser who cherishes the surprise and wonder that can occur from a spontaneous musical idea expressed directly, in real time. But he also has a deep fascination for the formal architecture of music. Chris ile is best known as the mandolinist and a singer for the progressive alt-bluegrass trio Nickel Creek, and for his work with Punch Brothers, but he has also collaborated with artists like Béla Fleck, Mark O’Connor, Aoife O’Donovan, Edgar Meyer and Yo-Yo Ma. Together, these two artists take music in unexpected directions. John Fordham of e Guardian (UK) remarked of one of their recent performances, “… their musicality and sympathy for each other’s emerging ideas made [this concert] an unexpected tour de force.” $35/$28 subscribers This performance is made possible, in part, by the Patricia C. Solomon Fund for Piano.

NINETy mIlES Stefon Harris, vibraphone Nicholas Payton, trumpet David Sánchez, saxophone Friday, April 26, 2013 . 8PM Kay Theatre

e distance between the coastal United States and Cuba is a short 90 miles but politics and history have sometimes made the distance seem insurmountable. e Ninety Miles Project brought leading Cuban and American jazz musicians together in Cuba over the span of a week to record music that both highlights and synthesizes their different cultures. e program at the Center features three American-based artists — vibist Stefon Harris, trumpeter Nicholas Payton and saxophonist David Sánchez — who, along with three additional players, will perform the distinctly unique collection of songs inspired by this Cuban-American collaboration.

UMD School of Music

umd Jazz ENSEmBlE umd Jazz laB BaNd uNIvERSITy Jazz BaNd Big Band Finale Chris Vadala, music director, Jazz Studies Program Director Wednesday, May 1, 2013 . 5:30PM Theatre Courtyard (Rain Location: Dekelboum Concert Hall)

Featuring all three UMD Jazz Ensembles, the Big Band Finale drives you along with infectious energy and flair. FREE

$35/$28 subscribers This tour engagement of Stefon Harris is funded through the Mid Atlantic Tours Program of Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Maryland State Arts Council.

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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maSTERS RE-ImaGINEd Contemporary performances provide new perspectives on the masterworks of musical legends. Les Illuminations sketches courtesy of Doug Fitch


maSTERS RE-ImaGINEd

NEW yoRk fESTIval of SoNG Jacques Brel and Charles Trenet Revisited Thursday, February 21, 2013 . 8PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

New York Festival of Song is renowned for its intimate, original ensemble song programs consisting almost exclusively of rarely heard songs of all kinds. is program celebrates two of the 20th century’s greatest balladeers, the Belgian-born Jacques Brel and Frenchman Charles Trenet. Brel’s literate, thoughtful and theatrical songs generated a large, devoted following, initially in France and later throughout the world. Trenet, whose best-known song is “La mer,” wrote nearly a thousand songs in his lifetime and, in an era in which it was exceptional for a singer to write his or her own material, he declined to record any but his own songs. e program will include some of the most famous pieces by these two artists: Brel’s “Ne me quitte pas” and “Madeleine” and Trenet’s “Que reste-t-il de nos amours” and “La mer,” along with many of their lesser-known treasures. $45/$36 subscribers

The New York Festival of Song most recently appeared at the Center in Manning the Canon (2011-2012).

UMD School of Music: Music in Mind

WINdScaPE quINTET

umd SymPhoNy oRchESTRa

Tara Helen O’Connor, flute Randall Ellis, oboe Alan R. Kay, clarinet Frank Morelli, bassoon David Jolley, horn Thursday, April 4, 2013 . 8PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Les Illuminations James Ross, conductor Doug Fitch, designer/director Tim McLoraine, projections Gran Wilson, tenor Saturday, March 9, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

UMSO performs Britten’s Les Illuminations, with lighting and stage design by Doug Fitch. Renowned for his multimedia spectacles in symphonic and opera productions — including work with the New York Philharmonic, Santa Fe Opera and Tanglewood — Fitch previously collaborated with UMSO conductor James Ross on UMSO’s 2008 presentation of Petrushka. e Britten also features new School of Music voice faculty, tenor Gran Wilson. Mahler’s towering Symphony No. 7 fills the second half. Proceeds from music in mind concerts benefit the School of music’s undergraduate scholarship fund.

An ever-evolving group of musical individualists, Windscape is an “unquintet” whose innovative programs and presentations take listeners on a musical and historical world tour. ey will perform Bach/Kay Fantasia and Fugue in G Minor; Ginastera/Kay Danzas argentinas; and Dvořák/Jolley Quintet in E-flat Major, op. 51. e UMD School of Music graduate wind quintet SIREN will join Windscape in performing Émile Bernard’s Divertissement for Double Wind Quintet. $30/$24 subscribers

$25/$20 subscribers

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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Chelsey Green dma IN PERfoRmaNcE - vIola, umd School of muSIc

At four years old, I began taking private lessons from a violinist in the Houston Ballet Orchestra. At four, a child is in awe of almost everything, so of course, to me this woman was no ordinary violinist. She was, and definitely still is, a world-class musician who studied at Juilliard and traveled the world performing but made Houston her home. I thought, “That’s where I’m from, Houston!” The connection was nearly instantaneous. A couple years later, she invited me to sit in the pit with her for one of the Ballet’s performances of The Nutcracker. The whole experience completely blew my mind. To watch this magical and fantastical story come to life on stage while experiencing the magic between all of the artists involved inspired me so much to see how everyone was an integral part of the production. I saw how the musicians were speaking with the dancers through their music and how the dancers were speaking with the audience through choreographed movement and how the production team helped facilitate the show. Those moments impressed upon me that making music like this is something special, something that is not only moving for patrons but also for those who are part of the production. It was at that moment that I knew it was something I had to be a part of one day.

Photo by Mike Ciesielski

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oPENING dooRS Programs with universal appeal. UMD Gamelan Saraswati photo by Ian Saunders


oPENING dooRS UMD School of Music

cEllo maSTERclaSS WITh RalPh kIRShBaum Saturday, March 9, 2013 . 1PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Members of the UMD cello studio refine their repertoire in a masterclass with internationally renowned cellist Ralph Kirshbaum. 2012-2013 WORLDWISE Arts & Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series

chImamaNda adIchIE Tuesday, February 19, 2013 . 5:30PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

MacArthur Foundation Fellowship recipient and award-winning Nigerian author Chimamanda Adichie will join us for a powerful talk and conversation. In all her work Adichie, who was named by e New Yorker as one of the 20 most important fiction writers under 40 years old, speaks to the cross-generational significance of storytelling and its enduring impact on the cultural history of our lives. Her newest novel, Americanah, will be published by Knopf in May 2013. FREE, BUT TICKETED. CALL 301.405.ARTS (2787) FOR TICKETS. Tickets do not guarantee admission. We are issuing more tickets than available seats. Arrive early to claim your seat.

Considered to be in “… the highest echelon of today’s cellists” by the Los Angeles Times, Kirshbaum has appeared with many of the world’s leading orchestras, including the Dallas, Pittsburgh, Boston and Chicago symphony orchestras; the San Francisco and Houston symphonies; the Cleveland Orchestra; and Los Angeles Philharmonic. He has also appeared with the BBC and London symphony orchestras; the London, Royal Stockholm, Helsinki and Israel philharmonic orchestras; the Tonhalle Orchestra Zurich; and the Orchestre de Paris. He is also a member of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. FREE This masterclass is funded by the Barbara K. Steppel Memorial Faculty Fellowship in Cello.

International Piano Archives at Maryland This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Literary and Comparative Studies and The Institute for International Programs.

UMD School of Music

umd WINd ENSEmBlE uNITEd STaTES aIR foRcE BaNd We’re Bringing in the “Air” Force(s)! L. Richmond Sparks, conductor, UMD Wind Ensemble Colonel Larry H. Lang, conductor, U.S. Air Force Band Monday, March 4, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

e U.S. Air Force Band honors those who have served, inspires American citizens to heightened patriotism and service, and positively impacts the global community on behalf of the U.S. Air Force and the United States of America.

REflEcTIoNS fRom ThE kEyBoaRd Sunday, March 10, 2013 . 2PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Donald Manildi, Curator of the International Piano Archives at Maryland, explores the world of pianos and piano music in a program to be announced. FREE, BUT TICKETED. CALL 301.405.ARTS (2787) FOR TICKETS.

2013 PRINcE GEoRGE’S couNTy aNNual SPEllING BEE Friday, March 15, 2013 . 7PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

e county’s best middle school spellers vie for top honors and the opportunity to advance to the national bee. FREE

On this night everyone in attendance will be inspired as Colonel Larry H. Lang, commander and conductor of e United States Air Force Band, shares the stage with the University of Maryland Wind Ensemble. Both bands will attempt to inspire through the works of Paul Creston, Gordon Jacob, Percy Grainger and John Philip Sousa; but the real inspiration begins as Colonel Lang invites our young musicians to sit beside the professionals to perform a robust and spectacular finale to the program.

Presented in collaboration with The Gazette & The Star.

FREE

e University Band and Community Band share an evening of traditional and contemporary wind band music. Conducted by Director of Bands Emeritus, Professor John Wakefield, and UMD Assistant Director of Bands, Eli R. Osterloh, this concert will be an exciting evening for the whole family! Children and adults who are thinking of starting to play an instrument are sure to be inspired.

UMD School of Music

uNIvERSITy BaNd aNd commuNITy BaNd Spring Concert Eli Osterloh, conductor, University Band John Wakefield, conductor, Community Band Wednesday, April 3, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

FREE

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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UMD School of Music

umd JaPaNESE koTo ENSEmBlE aNd WaShINGToN Toho koTo SocIETy Springtime in Japan Kyoko Okamoto, director Sunday, April 28, 2013 . 2PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

2012-2013 WORLDWISE Arts & Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series

caThy davIdSoN Thursday, April 18, 2013 . 5:30PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

Dr. Davidson, the author of Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn, will explore how the modern digital age will globally shape future innovations in learning. Named a “Top Ten Science Book” of the year by Publisher’s Weekly, Now You See It has helped spark a spirited conversation about how the principles of the Internet will shape our schools and workplaces going forward. In 2011, President Obama appointed Davidson to a six-year term on the National Council on the Humanities. FREE, BUT TICKETED. CALL 301.405.ARTS (2787) FOR TICKETS. Tickets do not guarantee admission. We are issuing more tickets than available seats. Arrive early to claim your seat.

Experience a journey of spring music depicting the young growing season of springtime in Japan with cherry blossoms blooming and birds chirping to welcome the warmth of spring. e music expresses the quiet beauty and rustic simplicity of the 13-string, six-foot-long koto, accompanied on some occasions by the shakuhachi (end-blown bamboo flute) and shamisen (three-string, banjo-like instrument). In the first part, it is as if you are admiring the cherry blossoms on a calm spring day. In the second part, there are musical representations of the flute and drum in a Japanese festival celebrating spring. FREE

UMD School of Music

umd WINd ENSEmBlE uNIvERSITy BaNd commuNITy BaNd

This event is co-sponsored by the ADVANCE Program.

Annual Pops Concert

UMD School of Music

L. Richmond Sparks, music director Saturday, May 4, 2013 . 8PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

umd koREaN PERcuSSIoN ENSEmBlE Sebastian Wang, director Friday, April 26, 2013 . 7:30PM Dekelboum Concert Hall

Experience the sights, sounds and rhythms of Korean percussion — Samulnori! Samulnori is an ensemble of four percussion instruments: an hourglass drum, a barrel drum, a small gong and a large gong. is exhilarating contemporary form of Korean music will be performed by the UMD Korean Percussion Ensemble. In addition, director Sebastian Wang will be accompanied by trained professionals and will perform some of the great repertoire of Samulnori. FREE

maRylaNd day

$25/$20 subscribers

UMD School of Music

hoNoRS chamBER muSIc REcITal Sunday, May 5, 2013 . 3PM Gildenhorn Recital Hall

is concert showcases exceptional ensembles of the UMD School of Music’s chamber music program, selected by faculty. FREE

Saturday, April 27, 2013 . 10AM-4PM

is community open house has something for the entire family with more than 40 different events throughout the Center — on stage, in the studios and behind the scenes. FREE

For 37 years and running, the Annual Pops Concert has been a big hit with audiences. We guarantee you will walk out humming more than one tune from this lighter fare of great classic music.

UMD School of Music

umd GamElaN SaRaSWaTI Nyoman Suadin, director Wednesday, May 8, 2013 . 8PM Kay Theatre

An evening of Balinese music is performed by UMD Gamelan Saraswati on a colorful array of gamelan instruments including bronze gongs, xylophones and other percussive instruments. Dance accompanies the music with expressive and coordinated gestures, nuances and rhythmic dynamics. FREE

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


oPENING dooRS

Clockwise, from top left: UMD Gamelan Saraswati photo by Ian Saunders; Maryland Day photos by Kelly Pollins, John Consoli and Lizzet Alvarez

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)


Murray Horwitz PlayWRIGhT, dIREcToR, lyRIcIST

Sometime in my sophomore year at Kenyon College, 1967-68, the James Cotton Blues Band came to campus. Kenyon in those days was a men’s school and it was a dance weekend so there were women there but it was still mostly guys and I didn’t have a date. So I was unhappily unencumbered. I’ve always been good at getting near the stage at rock and pop music concerts, and I actually got up on the stage for that one. I can still tell you some 45 years later who the personnel were that night: James Cotton, of course — harmonica and vocals. Bob Anderson was the bassist and Francis Clay was the drummer. Luther Tucker played guitar, and the pianist was a man named Alberto Gianquinto, who went on to become a big inspiration to Carlos Santana and the band Santana. I spent the concert kind of laid out on my back underneath Alberto Gianquinto’s piano, and it was a good piano, maybe a Steinway, and I was right underneath it, listening to what you could do with the blues. I was hearing and feeling how the blues is just endless in its possibilities — harmonic and melodic and rhythmic — and watching James Cotton’s feet doing a two-step to every number. I’m lying on the floor underneath the piano with the music all around me and looking over at James Cotton dancing that little two-step … and it was just really transforming. I had been familiar with the blues, and could tell you what it was musically, but in that moment, I knew the blues. Understood the blues. I knew that this was a life-changer.

Photo by Mike Ciesielski

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JUNE 8–29, 2013 JA M E S U N D E RC O F L E R aRTISTIc dIREcToR

Now celebrating its 26th season, the National orchestral Institute and festival has helped nurture an entire generation of american orchestral musicians. Each year, a national audition tour selects outstanding performers for this month-long event, a laboratory for shaping the future of chamber and orchestral performance. Performances by the National festival chamber orchestra and National festival orchestra take place every Saturday night between June 8 and June 29, 2013; additional free events are open to the public. Join the exploration!

Photos by Stan Barouh and Alison Harbaugh


NaTIoNal oRchESTRal INSTITuTE

SaTuRday, JuNE 8, 2013 . 8Pm

SaTuRday, JuNE 15, 2013 . 8Pm

SaTuRday, JuNE 22, 2013 . 8Pm

NaTIoNal fESTIval chamBER oRchESTRa

RoSSEN mIlaNov coNducToR

aShER fISch PIaNIST & coNducToR

Richard Strauss: Don Juan, op. 20 Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Allegro moderato from Violin Concerto in D Major, op. 35* Richard Strauss: Ein Heldenleben, op. 40 (“A Hero’s Life”)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 17 in G Major, K. 453 Gustav Mahler: Symphony No. 6 in A Minor (“Tragic”)

Alberto Ginastera: Variaciones concertantes Richard Wagner: Siegfried Idyll Igor Stravinsky: Suite from Pulcinella

In this concert, the musicians lead each other, performing challenging chamber orchestra repertoire without a conductor. $30/$24 subscribers

is program features the winner of the National Orchestral Institute’s first-ever concerto competition performing the first movement of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto.

Asher Fisch leads the National Festival Orchestra as both conductor and soloist in Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 17 in G Major, K. 453. He conducts Mahler’s Symphony No. 6 in A Minor, “Tragic” on the second half of the program.

* The soloist for the Tchaikovsky concerto will be selected from among the NOI participants

$30/$24 subscribers

$30/$24 subscribers

Photo by Chris Gonz

Photo by Amanda Stevenson

SuNday, JuNE 23, 2013 . 3Pm & 5Pm

SaTuRday, JuNE 29, 2013 . 8Pm

NaTIoNal fESTIval oRchESTRa

alaN PIERSoN coNducToR

Peter and the Wolf

Arnold Schoenberg: Five Pieces for Orchestra, op. 16 John Adams: Harmonielehre

In this family-friendly performance, members of the National Orchestral Institute play Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf and give their own imaginative musical interpretations of beloved children’s books. FREE

Purchase 5 or more performances throughout the season and receive 20% off. See page 64 for details.

Known for his dynamic interpretations of modern music, Alan Pierson leads the National Festival Orchestra in John Adams’s groundbreaking work, Harmonielehre. $30/$24 subscribers

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SuPPoRT ThE ExTRaoRdINaRy The performing arts have extraordinary power.

They give us new ways of seeing ourselves. They inspire us to connect with others. They change us — and through us, the world.

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center has set the standard

for university performing arts centers by integrating a vibrant visiting artist program with resident academic programs and community engagement, thus deepening the artistic and educational experience for everyone.

Your contribution ensures that the Center has the resources to provide opportunities for learning, exploration and growth and to foster innovation at the highest level.

These opportunities reflect the excellence that our community has come to expect. We invite you to embark upon this extraordinary journey with us!

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


SuPPoRT ThE ExTRaoRdINaRy

youR coNTRIBuTIoNS chaNGE lIvES audIENcE ENGaGEmENT

commISSIoNS aNd PREmIERES

NoRa chIPaumIRE

lauRIE aNdERSoN aNd kRoNoS quaRTET

Miriam African-born choreographer and dancer Nora Chipaumire will present her new work Miriam and will engage in a year-long residency involving the Prince George’s African American Museum & Cultural Center, the Maryland Women’s Heritage Center and the new National Museum of Women’s History.

ese boundary-breaking artists return in the 2012-2013 season to collaborate on the world-premiere performance of an original piece by Anderson, commissioned by the Center. In the last ten years, the Center has commissioned more than 40 new works and debuted many of them with the creative input of both students and faculty.

vISITING aRTISTS PRoGRam

mEREdITh moNk

ScholaRShIPS

Meredith Monk will be in residence this spring, serving as a Creative Dialogue panelist and presenting a masterclass in advance of her May 4 performance, On Behalf of Nature. Students from select classes in the School of Music and the School of eatre, Dance, and Performance Studies will attend the Creative Dialogue as a group, and others from both schools will jointly participate in a cross-disciplinary masterclass titled Dancing Voice, Singing Body.

coNNoR voSS Undergraduate in Dance School of eatre, Dance, and Performance Studies “Scholarships have allowed me to supplement the strong training I am receiving at Maryland with workshops, intensives, study-abroad opportunities and professional projects. Recognition from the UMD School of eatre, Dance, and Performance Studies validates the work I am doing and encourages me to take even larger risks with my artistry.”

all GIfTS, REGaRdlESS of SIzE, havE ThE PoWER To makE a dIffERENcE. call 301.405.5550 To makE youR GIfT Today. Gifts in support of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center are managed by the University of Maryland College Park Foundation, Inc., an affiliated 501(c)(3) organization authorized by the Board of Regents. Contributions to the University of Maryland are tax deductible as allowed by law. Please see your tax advisor for details.

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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SuPPoRT ThE ExTRaoRdINaRy

Dr. Howard Kaplan and Romana Laks Kaplan doNoRS

The Center’s presentation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream this season brings back memories of my first date with Romana. We go back to 1954 for that one. I was a young man in the army, stationed at Walter Reed, and I read whereby the Old Vic Company and the Saddlers Wells Ballet had put together a joint performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. Being in the military, I ran right down to the USO and got a pair of tickets, which I found out later were scarcer than hen’s teeth.

My friend found somebody who wanted to go and she told me, “You’ll like her. Her parents go to the Museum of Modern Art.” A pedigree!

I wasn’t going out with anybody at the time, I just had a pair of tickets, so I called a friend of mine up in New York (where I’m from) and said, “Look I’ve got two tickets to this performance, do me a favor — get me a special date.” (I was trolling with my tickets.)

So A Midsummer Night’s Dream brought me my wife and the life we live together. I’d do it again. I think she would, too.

And that’s how I met Romana. She later told me that she would have gone with anybody to see that performance; she didn’t care if he was a green Martian. But we hit it off and, with one thing leading to another, here we are. We were married in ‘56 and have been going to theater and dance and music ever since. We feel that, over the years, we’ve seen just about everybody that’s been around.

Photo by Mike Ciesielski

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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WE aRE GRaTEful To ThESE INSTITuTIoNal SPoNSoRS foR ThEIR GENERouS INvESTmENT IN ouR SEaSoN The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center is supported by a grant from the MARYLAND STATE ARTS COUNCIL, an agency dedicated to cultivating a vibrant cultural community where the arts thrive. Funding for the Maryland State Arts Council is also provided by the NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS, a federal agency.

This season is supported in part by an award from the NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS.

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


SuPPoRT ThE ExTRaoRdINaRy

Virginia Freeman

Meriam Rosen

ThE fouNdERS SocIETy

Given the opportunity, most of us would like to leave a legacy to organizations we valued in our lifetime. Planned giving is a constructive way to consider gifts that exceed outright gifts of cash or appreciated securities.

The Founders Society at the University of Maryland honors all benefactors, living and deceased, whose gifts through bequests, trusts or other planned gifts — such as charitable gift annuities, charitable remainder trusts, charitable lead trusts, life insurance, etc. — help to ensure the excellence of the University and its programs. For the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, a planned gift gives us the opportunity to partner with donors who wish to ensure that future audiences have transformational performing arts experiences at Maryland. Every donor can make an impact through a planned gift!

foR moRE INfoRmaTIoN, PlEaSE coNTacT EdWaRd lEWIS aT 301.405.8178.

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

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Ronit Eisenbach aSSocIaTE PRofESSoR of aRchITEcTuRE, umd School of aRchITEcTuRE, PlaNNING aNd PRESERvaTIoN

When I was a young college student at the Rhode Island School of Design, there was a lecture by John Cage. I didn’t know who he was and I had no idea what to expect. I just remember him sitting at a table at the bottom of this great auditorium, which was completely filled with people, and he told us that because we were students who might become makers ourselves someday, he wanted to explain something he was going to do. He was going to read a 45-minute poem, something he called a renga. I learned that day that a renga is a Japanese poem, like a haiku, that would normally be produced by a group of poets. But Cage informed us that although this was generally a collaborative effort he chose to make a renga on his own. He created seven renga poems and proceeded to cut them up line by line, making a bag of first lines, a bag of second lines, a bag of third lines and so on. He picked from each bag in order, randomly finding lines, and put them together to make a single poem. Because this poem was randomly constructed, most of it did not make sense. As we listened

we each heard a phrase or two that had individual significance but had no larger context to give it meaning. As Cage read this construct for what felt like a very long time, I was zoning in and out, sometimes frustrated, sometimes bored. But every once in a while, a phrase made sense and stimulated my own thoughts. One phrase I still remember today was “two Davids walking.” I heard that phrase as words with meaning while the rest of the poem I no longer heard as words. I heard it as sounds. Cage had created a machine that separated the sounds of the words of my mother tongue from their meaning, as if it was a foreign language. This was a revelation. The work framed a particular aspect of the world that I did not notice before. When I think back upon the goals of my own work, it’s often to try to reframe something that already exists so that an idea I’m aware of — or that I may not even be aware of — becomes visible to myself and others. For this reason this experience has stayed with me and remains an incredibly, incredibly powerful memory.

Photo by Mike Ciesielski

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


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2012-2013 SToRyTEllERS

Photography by Alison Harbaugh and Mike Ciesielski

Scott AuCoin

Carmen Balthrop

Anne Bogart

Faedra Carpenter

Bm caNdIdaTE IN comPoSITIoN aNd BmE IN muSIc EducaTIoN umd School of muSIc

SoPRaNo umd PRofESSoR of voIcE umd School of muSIc

aRTISTIc dIREcToR SITI comPaNy

dRamaTuRG umd aSSISTaNT PRofESSoR, School of ThEaTRE, daNcE, aNd PERfoRmaNcE STudIES

Hasan Elahi

Kenneth Elpus

Ana Patricia Farfรกn

Robert Garner

mEdIa aRTIST umd PRofESSoR of dIGITal mEdIa

aSSISTaNT PRofESSoR of muSIc EducaTIoN umd School of muSIc

mfa IN daNcE, umd School of ThEaTRE, daNcE, aNd PERfoRmaNcE STudIES fulBRIGhT ScholaR

doNoR

Murray Horwitz

Helen Huang

Dr. Howard Kaplan

John Layman

PlayWRIGhT, dIREcToR, lyRIcIST

coSTumE aNd SET dESIGNER umd PRofESSoR, School of ThEaTRE, daNcE, aNd PERfoRmaNcE STudIES

Romana Laks Kaplan

umd PRofESSoR EmERITuS, PhySIcS aNd ScIENcE EducaTIoN

doNoRS

Laree Ashley Lentz

Liz Lerman

Sharon Mansur

Connie Mayer

mfa coSTumE dESIGN 2012 umd School of ThEaTRE, daNcE, aNd PERfoRmaNcE STudIES

choREoGRaPhER

daNcE aRTIST umd aSSISTaNT PRofESSoR, School of ThEaTRE, daNcE, aNd PERfoRmaNcE STudIES

hEad, mIchEllE SmITh PERfoRmING aRTS lIBRaRy


David Dickey

Bill Dorland

David C. Driskell

Ronit Eisenbach

Bm IN oBoE PERfoRmaNcE aNd Ba IN vocal PERfoRmaNcE umd School of muSIc

umd PRofESSoR of PhySIcS hoNoRS collEGE dIREcToR

aRTIST aNd aRT hISToRIaN umd PRofESSoR EmERITuS, dEPaRTmENT of aRT

umd aSSocIaTE PRofESSoR of aRchITEcTuRE School of aRchITEcTuRE, PlaNNING aNd PRESERvaTIoN

Angel Gil-Ordóñez

Cary Gillett

Chelsey Green

Gerchel E. Holbert

muSIc dIREcToR, PoSTclaSSIcal ENSEmBlE

PRoducTIoN maNaGER umd School of ThEaTRE, daNcE, aNd PERfoRmaNcE STudIES

dma IN PERfoRmaNcE – vIola umd School of muSIc

maRkET audIToR

Throughout the year, people have shared memories of performing arts experiences that transformed their lives.

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu/storytellers find all of our stories online:

Sheri Parks

Victor Vargas

Ruth Watkins

Nolan Williams, Jr.

umd PRofESSoR of amERIcaN STudIES

NETWoRk aRchITEcT

ThEaTRE maJoR, umd School of ThEaTRE, daNcE, aNd PERfoRmaNcE STudIES maRkETING maJoR, umd RoBERT h. SmITh School of BuSINESS

muSIcoloGIST, ThEoloGIaN, SoNGWRITER, PRoducER cEo, NEWoRkS PRoducTIoNS

Debby Vargas aSSISTaNT dIREcToR of INSTITuTIoNal GIvING, claRIcE SmITh PERfoRmING aRTS cENTER

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hoW To PuRchaSE TIckETS RETuRNS aNd ExchaNGES

WhERE To Buy

Unless otherwise noted, we accept exchanges and refunds anytime before the event.

oNlINE:

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu

By PhoNE:

301.405.ARTS (301.405.2787)

IN PERSoN:

The ticket office is located in the lobby of the Center. During the season, we’re open seven days a week from 11AM to 9PM. On non-performance days and breaks in the academic year, we reduce our hours; please check our website.

NOTE: If you paid with cash or check, you must provide your name, address and tax ID number to receive a refund. Alternatively, we’re happy to issue you a gift certificate.

Patron Services 3800 Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742-1625

We are committed to making events and facilities accessible to all patrons:

By maIl:

accESSIBIlITy aNd accommodaTIoNS:

• Assistive listening devices • Sign language interpretation (3 weeks’ notice, please) • Wheelchair accessible seating and parking

PaymENT oPTIoNS cREdIT caRd: Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express chEck:

Payable to University of Maryland

caSh:

Do not send in the mail. In person only.

For additional services, check our website, email access.claricesmith.umd.edu or call our ticket office: 301.405.ARTS (2787).

TERRaPIN ExPRESS

*

dIScouNTS SuBScRIBER:

SENIoR 62+:

umd STudENTS:

GRouPS:

Buy five or more performances and save 20% off the regular ticket price

Save $5 off the regular ticket price

Receive two student tickets per event with your UID:

dEEP dIScouNTS

umd alumNI aSSocIaTIoN:

$10: Flat rate for students!

Already a subscriber? Save 20% when you buy additional tickets

Save $5 off the regular ticket price

umd faculTy/STaff:

STudENTS/youTh:

Save 20% off the regular price with your UID

Purchase one ticket for $10 per event with your student ID

fREE: Available in-person on the Monday before the event, even for an otherwise sold-out event! Limited quantities. One per event.

Save 20% on 10 or more non-student tickets PRIoRITy SEaTING aNd PERSoNal aTTENTIoN

You’ll get the best seats available as well as detailed seating maps, dining advice, directions and parking for buses flExIBlE PaymENT PlaN

Pay a 50% deposit at reservation and 50% one month before the performance

* Note: Discounts cannot be combined. E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


vISITING ThE cENTER dIREcTIoNS We are located on the University of Maryland campus at the intersection of Stadium Drive and University Boulevard. Visit our website for detailed driving and public transportation directions.

uSING a GPS? Campus buildings do not have street addresses, but most Global Positioning Systems can locate the Clarice Smith Center with the following data: • e intersection of Stadium Drive and Route 193, College Park, MD 20742 Ludwig Field & Kehoe Track

• Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center (for systems using Google Maps) • Latitude & Longitude: (38.990777, -76.950611)

PaRkING We offer free and paid parking. Visit our website for full details.

fREE PaRkING IN loT 1 WhEN:

After 4PM Mondays-Fridays. All day Saturdays and Sundays. Some exceptions.

WhERE: Lot 1, sometimes labeled Lot 1B.

Free!

coST:

SEaSoN PaRkING IN STadIum dRIvE GaRaGE WhEN:

After 4PM Mondays-Fridays. All day Saturdays and Sundays. Some exceptions.

WhERE: Stadium Drive Garage

$30 per season

coST:

More details available online or at our ticket office

Pay PER vISIT IN STadIum dRIvE GaRaGE WhEN:

Anytime. Some exceptions.

WhERE: Stadium Drive Garage

Mondays-Fridays: 7AM-2AM, $3 per hour, $15 a day

coST:

Arrive early if using pay stations, adding 20 minutes to your travel time. Pay with credit card or cash. Pay stations DO NOT provide change.

Saturdays and Sundays: 12AM-12AM, $3 per hour, $5 a day Anytime: Register for 15 minutes of free parking at the pay station PRE-Pay WhEN you PaRk. INSTRucTIoNS:

We also offer season parking in the Stadium Drive Garage for only $30.

1. Park. 2. Take note of your space number.

Lost or stolen parking passes cannot be replaced. New and replacement passes may be purchased for $30.

3. Pre-pay or register. Use pay station or phone: 888.580.PARK (7275)

Parking passes may not be sold or transferred.

(paid parking only).

Parking is managed by UMD Department of Transportation.

4. Add additional time later. (Optional)

All information is subject to change without notice.

Skip the pay station and use your phone! Register an account now: 888-580-PARK (7275)

full dETaIlS oN PaRkING caN BE fouNd aT claRIcESmIThcENTER.umd.Edu/PaRkING-dIREcTIoNS oR By callING ouR TIckET offIcE aT 301.405.aRTS (2787).

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

65


WINTER/SPRING 2013 JaNuaRy

lEfT BaNk quaRTET Dvořák in Search of America page 14

aPRIl

30Th aNNual choREoGRaPhERS’ ShoWcaSE page 10

Wednesday, February 27, 2013 . 8PM

Creative Dialogue page 27

A Conversation about Women and Resistance

Saturday, January 26, 2013 . 3PM & 8PM

maRch

fEBRuaRy

PoSTclaSSIcal ENSEmBlE page 14

lauRIE aNdERSoN aNd kRoNoS quaRTET page 25

Friday, March 1, 2013 . 8PM

Dvořák and America

Friday, February 1, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, February 2, 2013 . 8PM

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

dEad maN’S cEll PhoNE page 10 Friday, March 1 — Saturday, March 9, 2013

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

mfa IN PERfoRmaNcE page 6

UMD School of Music

umd WINd ENSEmBlE page 47 uNITEd STaTES aIR foRcE BaNd

Festival of New Works Friday, February 1 — Saturday, February 16, 2013

We’re Bringing in the “Air” Force(s)! Monday, March 4, 2013 . 8PM

BIll T. JoNES/aRNIE zaNE daNcE comPaNy SITI comPaNy page 15 A Rite Friday, February 8, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, February 9, 2013 . 8PM

maRylaNd oPERa STudIo page 19 NEW WoRkS REadING SERIES Romeo and Juliet Friday, February 15, 2013 . 7:30PM

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 . 8PM

WINdScaPE quINTET page 43 Thursday, April 4, 2013 . 8PM

NoRa chIPaumIRE page 27 Miriam Thursday, April 4, 2013 . 8PM Friday, April 5, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, April 6, 2013 . 8PM

umd chamBER Jazz page 40

Friday, March 8, 2013 . 8PM

Part I: Wednesday, April 10, 2013 . 7:30PM Part II: Thursday, April 11, 2013 . 7:30PM

cEllo maSTERclaSS WITh RalPh kIRShBaum page 47

BRad mEhldau, PIaNo chRIS ThIlE, maNdolIN page 41

Saturday, March 9, 2013 . 1PM

Friday, April 12, 2013 . 8PM

UMD School of Music: Music in Mind

UMD School of Music

umd SymPhoNy oRchESTRa page 43

maRylaNd oPERa STudIo umd SymPhoNy oRchESTRa page 31

International Piano Archives at Maryland

REflEcTIoNS fRom ThE kEyBoaRd page 47 Sunday, March 10, 2012 . 2PM

aN EvENING WITh BRaNfoRd maRSalIS page 38

Spring Concert

UMD School of Music

Saturday, March 9, 2013 . 8PM

Branford Marsalis David C. Driskell Friday, February 15, 2013 . 6:30PM

uNIvERSITy BaNd aNd commuNITy BaNd page 47

Shifted During Flight

Les Illuminations

PRE-PERfoRmaNcE dIScuSSIoN page 38

UMD School of Music

eighth blackbird page 19

UMD School of Music

UMD School of Music

Monday, April 1, 2013 . 7:30PM

UMD School of Music

Idomeneo Friday, April 12, 2013 . 7:30PM Sunday, April 14, 2013 . 3PM Thursday, April 18, 2013 . 7:30PM Saturday, April 20, 2013 . 7:30PM

La Bohème

Friday, February 15, 2013 . 8PM

umd WINd oRchESTRa page 19

ARHU Dean’s Lecture

Sunday, March 10, 2013 . 3PM

Saturday, April 13, 2013 . 7:30PM Wednesday, April 17, 2013 . 7:30PM Friday, April 19, 2013 . 7:30PM Sunday, April 21, 2013 . 3PM

UMD School of Music

UMD School of Music

SPRING BIG BaNd ShoWcaSE page 40

RoBERT dIluTIS, claRINET page 31

Tuesday, March 12, 2013 . 7:30PM Wednesday, March 13, 2013 . 7:30PM

Sunday, April 14, 2013 . 3PM

e Poetry of Joseph Schwantner

chImamaNda adIchIE page 47 Tuesday, February 19, 2013 . 5:30PM

NEW yoRk fESTIval of SoNG page 43 Jacques Brel and Charles Trenet Revisited

UMD School of Music

Thursday, February 21, 2013 . 8PM

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

ShaREd mfa ThESIS coNcERT page 12

ShaREd GRaduaTE daNcE coNcERT page 10

Apple Falling Graham Brown, choreographer

Thursday, February 21, 2013 . 8PM Friday, February 22, 2013 . 8PM

Triumph of Disruption: A Movement to Subvert Kwame Opare, choreographer Thursday, March 14, 2013 . 8PM Friday, March 15, 2013 . 8PM

American Roots page 14 Tuesday, February 26, 2013 . 8PM

chamBER muSIc ShoWcaSE page 31 Part I: Monday, April 15, 2013 . 5:30PM Part II: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 . 7PM UMD School of Music

NEW muSIc aT maRylaNd page 19 Wednesday, April 17, 2013 . 8PM UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

maRylaNd daNcE ENSEmBlE page 12 Springing from Fantasy

UMD School of Music

umd REPERToIRE oRchESTRa page 31 e ree E’s

2013 PRINcE GEoRGE’S couNTy aNNual SPEllING page 47 Friday, March 15, 2013 . 7PM

Tuesday, February 26, 2013 . 8PM

Wu maN, Solo PIPa page 25 Thursday, March 28, 2013 . 8PM

Thursday, April 18, 2013 . 8PM Friday, April 19, 2013 . 8PM Saturday, April 20, 2013 . 8PM Sunday, April 21, 2013 . 3PM ARHU Dean’s Lecture

caThy davIdSoN page 48 Thursday, April 18, 2013 . 5:30PM

E x T R ao R d I N a Ry m I N d S . E x T R ao R d I N a Ry S T o R I E S


Meredith Monk, On Behalf of Nature

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra

UMD School of eatre, Dance, and Performance Studies: Dead Man’s Cell Phone

UMD School of Music

UMD School of Music: Music in Mind

UMD School of Music

umd mEN’S choRuS aNd umd WomEN’S choRuS page 34

GRaduaTE fElloWShIP chamBER ENSEmBlES page 34

umd WINd oRchESTRa

Around the World in 80 Minutes

French Impressions

oRPhEuS chamBER oRchESTRa

Friday, April 19, 2013 . 8PM

Sunday, April 28, 2013 . 3PM

oRPhEuS chamBER oRchESTRa WITh GaBRIEl kahaNE page 20 Saturday, April 20, 2013 . 8PM

mEmBERS of page 20

… of a rare and special type … Creative Dialogue page 28

Sunday, May 5, 2013 . 5PM

Considering the Human Condition: On Behalf of Nature

UMD School of Music

Monday, April 29, 2013 . 7:30PM

hoNoRS chamBER muSIc REcITal page 48

may

Sunday, May 5, 2013 . 3PM

UMD School of Music

umd REPERToIRE oRchESTRa page 34 French First and Fortuna Wednesday, April 24, 2013 . 8PM

Opera al Fresco

umd Jazz ENSEmBlE page 41 umd Jazz laB BaNd uNIvERSITy Jazz BaNd

Thursday, April 25, 2013 . 12:30PM

Big Band Finale

UMD School of Music

maRylaNd oPERa STudIo page 34

UMD School of Music

UMD School of Music

umd PERcuSSIoN ENSEmBlE page 20 Xenakis Monday, May 6, 2013 . 8PM UMD School of Music

Wednesday, May 1, 2013 . 5:30PM

kRoNoS quaRTET page 20 Student Composition Reading

UMD School of Music

Thursday, April 25, 2013 . 8PM

Opera Scene Study Performances

UMD School of Music

umd koREaN PERcuSSIoN ENSEmBlE page 48 Friday, April 26, 2013 . 7:30PM

NINETy mIlES page 41 Friday, April 26, 2013 . 8PM

umd coNcERT choIR umd SymPhoNy oRchESTRa page 34 Firebird

Saturday, June 8, 2013 . 8PM

mIlaNov coNducTS STRauSS page 53 Saturday, June 15, 2013 . 8PM

mEREdITh moNk page 288 On Behalf of Nature

maRylaNd day page 48 Saturday, April 27, 2013 . 10AM–4PM

UMD School of Music

UMD School of Music

umd WINd ENSEmBlE uNIvERSITy BaNd commuNITy BaNd page 48

Springtime in Japan

NaTIoNal fESTIval chamBER oRchESTRa page 53

UMD School of Music

Saturday, May 4, 2013 . 8PM

umd JaPaNESE koTo ENSEmBlE WaShINGToN Toho koTo SocIETy page 48

JuNE

Thursday, May 2, 2013 . 7:30PM Friday, May 3, 2013 . 7:30PM

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

Friday, April 26 — Saturday, May 4, 2013

Wednesday, May 8, 2013 . 8PM

maRylaNd oPERa STudIo page 34

Friday, May 3, 2013 . 8PM

IN TImE of RoSES page 15

umd GamElaN SaRaSWaTI page 48

Annual Pops Concert Saturday, May 4, 2013 . 8PM

fISch coNducTS mahlER page 53 Saturday, June 22, 2013 . 8PM

NaTIoNal fESTIval oRchESTRa page 53 Peter and the Wolf Sunday, June 23, 2013 . 3PM & 5PM

PIERSoN coNducTS adamS page 53 Saturday, June 29, 2013 . 8PM

Sunday, April 28, 2013 . 2PM

claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

67


3800 ClARICE SMITh PERFoRMING ARTS CENTER University of Maryland College Park, Maryland 20742-1625

NamE

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

PAID

Purchase 5 or more performances throughout the season and receive 20% off.

Already a subscriber? Continue to save 20%. See page 64 for details.

WINTER/SPRING 2013

ThE ExTRaoRdINaRy claricesmithcenter.umd.edu | 301.405.aRTS (2787)

College Park, MD Permit No. 10

Season Guide 2012-2013 (Spring Edition): Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center  

Updated in January 2013, this season guide includes ticketed and free performances for the 2012-2013 season.

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