Page 1

Editors • Denis Brosnan & Rebecca McEwen Smith • Volume 9 • Issue 2

Charity Begins At Home

N ews

C r o m w e l l

C o l l e g e

Within The University of Queensland

SEPTEMBER 2009

Eve York and her Elcho Island family I have recently set-up a charity with a friend, Alice, who studies Aboriginal Law at Charles Darwin University. The charity, Improving Indigenous Health and Education (IIHE), aims to do just that. Alice and I met in 2006, in Townsville, where we both did voluntary work for 6 months at a school, Shalom Christian College. This is a boarding school for Indigenous children from all across Australia broadly covering the Central Desert, Cape York, Kimberley, Arnhem Land, Torres Strait and central Queensland regions. At the school I had an immediate connection with one young girl, Merinda, who was from Elcho Island. It is hard to explain, but from the beginning it was as if I’d always known her. So I would spend the majority of my time hanging out with her. Merinda always called me ‘yapa’. I never really knew what it meant – but went with it. In my second term at the school, one of the new boys called me ‘yapa’. Everyone got really angry at him because he didn’t have the right to – I was pretty confused. That’s when I first found out ‘yapa’ meant sister and Merinda had adopted me as her sister. A few weeks later, her grandparents and immediate family, about twenty people, flew to Townsville to meet me. When I met them I was completely accepted as part of the family, and I was given my adopted name, ‘Merote’. My grandma had made me necklaces that were from shells, shark tooth, and parrot feather, from Elcho Island – these would bring me good luck. Since leaving Shalom I have kept in close contact with Merinda and her family. Over Easter this year, (two and a half years later) I went to Elcho Island to visit my adopted family. In setting up this charity, Alice and I would like our first project to give back to Elcho Island. Elcho Island is a remote Aboriginal community located in the Arafura Sea off the coast of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory. The island has a breathtaking landscape ranging from tropical rainforests and sandy beaches to mangroves, tidal creeks, and large cliffs. Approximately 550km northeast of Darwin, it is home to the YolnguMatha people and their rich and beguiling culture. The island consists of one main town settlement, originally a mission, Galiwinku (the second largest Aboriginal community in terms of concentrated population in the Northern Territory), and approximately ten outstations located throughout.

o Island Typical house on Elch

Continued page 2

A Magazine for Old Collegians, Friends of Cromwell, Current Residents and their Families

What’s I nside

From the Principal

3

Ongoing Maintenance

4

Fuelling Up .....

5

Master Plan

6

Celebrating 60 Years

7-10

Chit Chat Round-up

11-12

It’s a Long Way to Longreach Africa Bound

13 14-15


CROMWELL COLLEGE Walcott Street ST. LUCIA, QLD 4067 Ph: (07) 3377 1300 Fax: (07) 3377 1499 Email: friends@cromwell.uq.edu.au Website: www.cromwell.uq.edu.au Mission Statement To provide a vibrant community for students in a caring Christian environment that enables them to grow in knowledge and character and the desire to serve. Vision Statement Accept diversity Create community Strive for excellence Pursue spiritual, academic, cultural and social maturity Serve Society Care for the environment. Coat Of Arms When the College was able to adopt its arms, it secured permission from the head of the Cromwell family to bear Oliver Cromwell’s personal arms, a lion argent rampant on a field of sable. Motto VBI SPIRITVS IBI LIBERTAS – This motto comes from the Latin version of the Second Letter of St Paul to the Corinthians, Ch 3, Verse 17. “Now the Lord is Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom.” Thanks Thank you to all the staff, students and Alumni who have been contributors to this issue of COCA News. Editors Denis Brosnan, Dean of Students & Rebecca McEwen Smith, Development Manager Graphic Design & Printing Westminster Printing 31 Stevenson Street PADDINGTON, QLD 4064

The current estimated population of Galiwinku is 2,000, with a ten percent non-Indigenous population and an extra 450 people living on the various outstations. Elcho is known world-wide for its many cultural exports. It is home to ARIA award-winning musician Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunipingu, the unique Chooky dancers and hundreds of visual artists who create both traditional and contemporary artworks. Galiwinku is a culturally strong and proud community, with many of its people being leading figures in national Indigenous foundations. IIHE’s first project aims to improve the health and nutrition standards on the island. As is the case with many Aboriginal communities in contemporary Australia, the diets of the people consist primarily of junk food, resulting in health problems, such as heart failure and diabetes. Other associated symptoms include depression or self-destructive behaviour. Research shows that because of the isolation of Elcho Island, up until as recently as 1985, the people in this region lived a traditionallyoriented lifestyle with no risk factors for diabetes or cardiovascular disease. However with the introduction of three takeaway shops in Galiwinku, an easy cheap food source, the health of the people has suffered considerably. The island now has statistics similar to those of most Aboriginal communities. For example, life expectancy for Yolngu men is 57 years, compared with 74.5 years for non-Indigenous Australians, and for the Yolngu women it is 60 years - 20 years less than for other Australian women.

Collating & Distribution Work Solutions (Wesley Mission) P.O. Box 6402 FAIRFIELD GARDENS, QLD 4103

ong S e g e l l o C l l Cromwe st College,

te is the grea of test; Cromwell ind k ry e ev Proved by ighest knowledge, h e r th best. Seeking fo ays for the Aiming alw have the victory, when we efeat, Generous we know d Gracious if ’s firm tradition; mwell This is Cro it, our heartbeat! ir g in Free Sp eedom brings us fr it ir p S n w ss; God’s o o we profe Is the mott inspiration, us stress. It provides in times of r, th g n re st s togethe Gives u e, we stick art; in sh r o il Ha ap ear or far Whether n ue and loyal, tr g, Ever carin ell in our heart. romw C r a e b e W Joy” “Hymn to

usic of g to the m k). song is sun ustralian Hymn Boo e Th C O C A N e w s2 in2th0e A0 9 • P a g e  (9

Some of the kids going on a shellfish

search for

IIHE is currently raising funds to set up a community-run take-away shop that sells nutritious meals. In the long run our aim is to create an alternative nutritious diet, educate locals on the importance of one’s health, assist employment within the community and develop a blossoming economy. For many

Playing footy on the beach Aboriginal people who live in remote areas, the community store is their main source of food. Stores, therefore, have a major role to play in promoting the physical well-being of the community. There are four main parts to the project: 1) Setting up a sustainable fruit and vegetable garden on the island. The garden will provide fresh food for the homemade meals to be sold in a community-run take-away shop. The garden is to be run and managed by the local Yolngu people, using their knowledge of the land and seasons, and further educating them in the way of a ‘western’ horticulturalist’s thinking. 2) Encouraging the employment of local Yolngu men to hunt for fresh produce, such as crayfish, mud crabs, fish and to supplement the meals. 3) The setting-up of a communityrun take-away shop on the island, to sell affordable, nutritious meals. The meals are to be made on the island from the produce of the garden and hunting, by local Yolngu people, educating them in what is needed for a healthy diet and creating employment. 4) A presentation to the community once a month, for four consecutive months, educating the Yolngu people on the importance of one’s diet and the effect junk food has on health and general wellbeing. The project is currently in its early stage. We have applied for charity status from the Commonwealth government and are currently waiting to receive the go-ahead for our venture. We are looking forward to getting it up and running and will keep everyone advised of how we are going. Anyone interested in helping out in any way can contact me on eve.york@uqconnect.edu.au.


From the

Principal

Have you ever heard of the Ulysses club? It is a club for geriatric bikies (junior members over 40, full members over 50) and it takes its name from a poem called ‘Ulysses’ by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. And to quote the web site “it tells how the great Greek hero Ulysses, now middle-aged and securely in charge of his kingdom of Ithaca, is getting bored with things around him and longs to go adventuring again with his shipmates of old.” The motto of the club is to ‘grow old disgracefully’, a motto that, as an ex-bikie (or to be more honest – like A.A, I’m a recovering bikie), I find endlessly amusing. You who are still young will have trouble grasping what I am about to say, but those who are older, whose bits and pieces are falling off or heading south, will understand that the motto resonates with our growing sense of mortality. We who qualify for the club know the desire to somehow keep ourselves alive even as our bodies grow disobedient and uncooperative. We have all met older people whose lives have become sour, bitter or lifeless; but we have also met geriatric ‘Ulysses’ whose aging frames belie their youthful eyes and lively spirit. There is a lady who attends my church who can hardly walk. She shuffles around like one of those walking toys you used to put on sloping ramps that would waddle downhill, stifflimbed, leaning from side to side as gravity pulled one leg after the other. And yet, shuffling septuagenarian though she is, she is bursting with life, abounding in humour, with eyes that flash and sparkle with cheekiness and good fun. She is, in fact, one of the oldest (but most gracious) teenagers I know. Her mind bounds like a puppy even though her body barely stays upright. As I contemplate retirement from the College, I am aware that I am about to embark on an important journey. The next stop in my life is like not previous ones. At every other stop I was simply changing trains, but now, it’s different. I don’t wish to sound maudlin, but the reality is that I am getting closer to

Central Station and like many before me, I have to face these questions: “How do I grow old graciously? How do I use the latter years of my life well? How do I deal with the indignities of an aging body?”. Now don’t get me wrong; I’m not in my dotage yet. I’m still fit and well and walk everywhere. But you can’t face the prospect of this kind of change without asking some hard questions.

Here are some of my random thoughts. First, in one sense we never retire. We must keep serving, doing good things, ‘working’ until we die. As a Christian minister, my calling is for life. I will keep my ministry going – maybe paid, maybe not, maybe full-time, maybe not – but ministry I will do. Secondly, the two great commands to love God and neighbour are liberating in that they can be pursued even when all my wheels have fallen off and I can no longer do great things in the world. Finally, and related to my last point, I believe that the works of real and lasting value are those that reflect the purposes of God, particularly those that spring from love for God and love for neighbour. I am involved in a church home group. Recently we were looking at the famous passage on love, 1 Corinthians 13. What amazes me about that passage (indeed about the whole Christian view of love) is that this love has real ‘grunt’. It’s full of courage – not belligerent, dominating courage, but a self-giving, gentle power that springs from the heart of God. This kind of love is more important and more enduring than anything else. It is difficult to achieve, but it is liberating and lifegiving. To commit to it is to pursue a goal that no one but I can thwart. Listen to what Paul says: “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices in the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” This is radical stuff that leaves the gooey sentimental definitions of love for dead. This love includes emotions but comes down in the end to a decision of the will. I will love others as God in Christ has loved me.

The Principal on his first motorbike, 1968. “For those interested, it was a terrible machine, a heap of garbage.” I may not be able to run anymore. I am well past the zenith of my life. The afternoon shades are growing longer. But I can find great joy and life and excitement and freedom and motivation as I ponder these verses. As my late wife, Helen, revealed, loving like this is something that you can do until all bodily power is taken from you. The Ulysses motto is not quite a match for 1 Corinthians 13. But its zest for life is important. It just seems to me that the zest that springs from love is one stage better than the wind in your hair and a great corner on a hot machine with squealing partner on the back. Mind you, I am tempted sometimes. So if, one day, you see this geriatric ex-principal touring down the highway on his wheels, grinning from ear to ear, striving to re-capture some of the endorphins of his youth, lean out the window and ask: “Do you still know how to love?”

Hugh Begbie Principal

COCA News 2009 • Page 


Ongoing Maintenance New Windows in Hancock

Hancock Refurbishment

Despite being in the youngest of the buildings, the windows in the Hancock building had corroded and were beyond repair. Over the July break G. James Glass replaced all the windows with high quality aluminium windows with 100mm cross section frames and 4mm glass. The stairwells and common rooms had their glass replaced with 6mm tinted and laminated glass resulting in 30% reduction in heat load. The total cost of this work was $186,532. While the contractors were doing the work, it was discovered that the rendering on exposed slab work was failing and had to be replaced. It just never stops!

A company that specialises in refurbishment work (Isis) was selected to do the Hancock refurbishment in December/January. Their planning is well underway and measurements have been taken for each room. They have appointed Wise Designs to do the joinery for the wing. The total cost of this work will be $1.1m.

Other work In the last 6 months the incoming phone lines have been upgraded to ISDN 20 standard (now fully digital); a 5 year rolling plan for the refurbishment of the kitchen was begun with an upgrade to the hot and cold Bain Marie at a cost of $11,200 and two water tanks with a total capacity of 17,500 litres were installed on the northern side of Thatcher to service the new courtyard. The cost of these tanks was $10,711.

Window renovations in Hancock

A number of changes have been put in place to manage costs. Isolators have been placed in the fire panels to enable staff to isolate bathrooms for steam cleaning, reducing the risk of fire alarms being activated. In addition, all air-conditioners in public places have been placed on timer switches and with temperature settings that cannot be manipulated by residents. As many lights as possible have also has timers installed.

Conference Facilities & Visitor Accommodation available @ Cromwell College Looking for the right sort of budget-style accommodation in Brisbane? Then Cromwell College may be just the venue for you. Looking for accommodation for delegates to your next conference, seminar, or workshop? Cromwell College offers a number of facilities suitable for a variety of events and occasions. Available: July & December, January (University recess periods) * Conference Accommodation  * Conference Venue Available: Throughout the year * Short-term or Temporary Accommodation  * Workshop & Seminar Rooms * Venue for Weddings and Funerals

In-house Catering Facilities * Our experienced Dining Hall staff can provide a variety of meals including breakfasts, morning and afternoon teas, lunches and dinners. For further information contact Cromwell College Office on: Ph: (07) 3377 1300; Fax: (07) 3377 1499; Email: stay@cromwell.uq.edu.au

COCA News 2009 • Page 

New water tanks behind Thatcher


Fuelling up for the future at Cromwell The idea of picking the fuel for your car from a tree seems to be far off reality, but research conducted at UQ’s ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research (CILR) aims to make this happen within the next few years. Professor Peter Gresshoff, director of the CILR, was invited to one of the College’s formal dinners in May to talk about his research on the future energy crop Pongamia pinnata which aims to make a significant contribution to resolving the looming energy, specifically fuel, dilemma.

“We have tested growth with high levels of salt and little water and Pongamia proved to be both salt and drought resistant,” Professor Gresshoff said. In addition, through its ability to capture and convert nitrogen from the air, this legume tree enriches soils with low nitrogen levels and lessens the need for environmentally damaging nitrogen fertiliser. The tree also has significant environmental benefits in that it has the ability to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) - one of the major greenhouse gases - from the atmosphere, thereby increasing not only its financial significance, but assisting in preserving our environment as well. “We are currently researching the biotechnology of Pongamia, which will enable highly productive plantations of Pongamia to be grown,” Professor Gresshoff said.

ps a close eye on

Professor Peter Gresshoff kee Pongamia oil

Pongamia is a legume tree that bears nonedible seeds containing a high percentage of oils that are composed of fatty acids ideal for biodiesel production. Because the tree can be grown on low agriculturally productive lands, Pongamia biofuel does not compete with food crops. As such it has application in land preservation and reclamation.

CILR has set up several hectares of pilot plantations in South East Queensland.

Pongamia is an out-crossing species with trees of highly differing growth and cropping abilities. For it to become a feedstock for the Australian biodiesel industry, methods are needed for clonal propagation of superior trees. CILR researchers have successfully developed protocols for the propagation of Pongamia by both multiple bud culture and shoot cuttings. Molecular biology and genetics studies are being conducted to form the basis of further crop domestication. But the research is not limited to laboratory studies. In partnership with a number of commercial partners, the

Pongamia seeds and seed pod

With a trial plantation at UQ’s research farm at Gatton, the researchers are evaluating biomass increase, carbon sequestration and nitrogen gain. All are critical parameters needed to make informed decisions on a future biodiesel industry. The Pongamia research at the CILR has the potential to lead to a productive and efficient biodiesel industry that will impact positively on the environment, agriculture and the economy of Australia. The CILR’s website offers more information on the Pongamia research project: www.cilr.uq.edu.au For more information contact: Charlotte Camerer, (07) 3346 9534 or c.camerer@uq.edu.au Alvin van Niekerk, (07) 3346 8802 or a.vanniekerk1@uq.edu.au

Trial plantation in Central Queensland

Flowering Pongamia tree in Brisbane

COCA News 2009 • Page 


Master Plan It’s like bushwalking really. You have to know where you are going, then you have to plot your route and ensure you have everything necessary for a safe journey; and such journeys can be long and hard. And yet they are also enriching, productive, valuable and immensely satisfying. We know where we are going. As you would have seen in the previous edition of COCA NEWS, the Master Plan has been approved by the Board and the University Senate. We are now plotting the route. Mr George Hammond of Hammond Associates is assisting us with basic costing and feasibility studies. More work is yet to be done, but to give some indication of the exciting (but daunting) challenges ahead here are some basic indications of cost. • The car park, which will cater for 170 cars and serve as the podium for the tennis court, the new hall and the new administration building will cost in the vicinity of $4.35 million. This car park would generate around $120,000 per year in income from the rental of excess car park sites to University staff and visitors. There is still a gap between income and interest paid, but if some equity can be found then the project becomes viable. • The Catered Accommodation Building to replace Steele-Craik Lodge and Cromwell Cottage will cost in the order of $1.25 million. This will enable the College to place all fully-catered residents in accommodation that is of comparable quality, remove twin share from the system and resolve some of the student placement problems we currently have. • The new hall would cost around $2.05 million. It would bring in some additional income, but the amount is unknown. For example, it will be ideal for exams, for conferences that need sporting, exercise or large meeting spaces. It will also provide excellent new services for current residents. Please do not underestimate the value of this building, both in the increased flexibility it gives the College in providing student services, but also in its capacity to add value to conference enquiries. • The new administration building would cost around $1.1 million. The current administration is limited in space, but the new building would also allow for the re-orientation of the ‘front door’ of the College. The current entry is non-descript and confusing. A complete reorientation would enable the College to have an inviting front entry which faces the

COCA News 2009 • Page 

A Walk through the Bush

University which is currently planning a complete new precinct in the area east of the College. • There is the option of a new student facility building in the plan. This is not a priority and its use is as yet undefined but would cost around $900,000. It may even be used for income generation purposes. • The self-catered blocks – the cost of these is still being fine-tuned but would be in the vicinity of $5 million for 64 rooms. This project, however, will be largely self-funding as each new room generates income. However, any equity put towards this end adds flexibility to the project and brings forward the day that net income from this accommodation can assist in the progress of the Master Plan.

both the number of residents and the cash flow of the College. Ideally we should build the fully-catered wing at the same time. This would require the demolition of Cromwell Cottage as well but would allow all fullycatered residents to be housed in similar and fully up-dated accommodation. Given the time taken to construct, it is clear that at some point we may have to temporarily house fully-catered residents in the selfcatered buildings, but this would affect the financial modelling. Clearly, the more equity we can place into the self-catered units, the less debt and the more freedom we have to manage the accommodating of our residents while our building program is in progress. The Car Park is an important part of the plan. It will deal with our parking problems; it will generate cash flow; it will provide the podium for future development, and all this partly on land that is a floodway and partly on land that is fill. The car park can be built as soon as sufficient equity is accumulated to allow the foreshadowed income to service the debt. The Hall and new Administration could be built over time through reserves accumulated through conferences or the receipt of donations or bequests. Once they are done, the front door of the College is effectively reoriented to Hood Street. This whole precinct will be designed to show a welcoming face to the campus and to visitors.

ia Hugh in a gorge in Slovak So, my fellow ‘bushwalkers’, this journey will cost in today’s dollars around $10 million (catered section only). So, if we have any buskers, donors, people willing to include the College in their will, or people with bright ideas – please organise today what has to be organised or pass on to me what you wish to pass on. I am an enthusiastic bushwalker and I want to get started on this adventure as soon as possible. Or, at the very least, I want to bequeath to my successor the capacity to complete the journey. The route to achieve this ambitious plan is yet to be finalised, but the first two blocks of the self-catered section would be first stop on the way. This is currently being investigated and it is my hope to commence this before I retire from College in June 2010. The next stop is yet to be resolved. We cannot build the second two blocks of the self-catered units without demolishing SteeleCraik Lodge. This would reduce our fullycatered room numbers by 11 and impact on

So as you can see, the journey is challenging and much of it will be the task of my successor to complete: but complete it we must and we need all the help we can get. SO FELLOW ‘BUSH’ WALKERS - YOU CAN ASSIST in a number of ways. Resident fees cover general operations. This means that conferences, weddings or other functions held in the College over the University break helps the College move forward, build reserves and accomplish tasks not covered by general operations. You can assist by keeping Cromwell in mind for any functions you might have (e.g. wedding receptions in December or January) or conferences you can refer our way. And of course, you can remember the College through donations and bequests. My friends, the College experience was an important moment in your life – perhaps you are now in a position to assist another generation gain from this unique experience, gain not only for themselves, but grow in those skills and wisdom necessary to make an important contribution to our world. P.S You won’t forget that any and all contributions to this fantastic enterprise are tax deductible.


Celebrating 60 Years - Young At Heart

Cromwell College

A Co-educational Residential College at The University of Queensland

1950 - 2010

Celebrations - 3rd & 4th July, 2010 Saturday 3rd July - Anniversary Dinner Sunday 4th July - Thanksgiving Chapel Service

- Lunch & Tour of the College

We would like to encourage as many Alumni as possible to reconnect with the college to help celebrate this wonderful landmark in the life of Cromwell College. If you are in contact with other Cromwell Alumni and Friends of the College who may not have an up-to-date mailing or email address with the College, please pass this information on to them and ask them to re-connect with us. For further information, contact Mrs. Rebecca McEwen Smith, Development Manager Ph: (07) 3377 1232, Fax: (07) 3377 1499, Email: r.mcewen@cromwell.uq.edu.au or friends@cromwell.uq.edu.au

COCA News 2009 • Page 


Looking for our 1954 1959

1960 1964

1965 1969

Unconnected Alumni

Title Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Prof Mr Mr

Firstname Leith Leith V Keith Russell Tan Soon Hoe Harry Boonlird Terrance Suraman Heng Thong Loo Khee Ng Thin Nau Quen Goh Kin Yew Kiew Siew Fook Lim Boon Kai Siu Song Voon Lee Teng Donald Barry Derangabua Daryl Craig FS Anthony

Lastname ANDREWS ASVARAKSH BAKER BEARDMOORE BENG BOEY BOLTON BOONSUKHA BULL CHAMNANIDIADHA CHAN CHAN CHEE CHEN CHENG CHENG CHEONG CHEOW CHIANG CHIEN CHYE CRAIG CUSTANCE DEMAUNA DOUGLAS DUNCAN DYER FARMER

Mr Prof Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr

John Perry Andrew Chye Kim Cheng Theng Aun Manit Graham Robert Bradford Ronald Shu Jen Soo Wing Loh Beow Tan Ke Lee Lim Tek Kamal Umre Jan Chan Goh Chumlong Clyde John Edward Douglas Purna Thiam

Title Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr

Firstname Bed Phillip Barry Michael Gary James R Stafei K Graham Gregory Sui Kai Sui Icai Aik Seong Chee Yan John Clifford Kong Kiong Sum Nam

Lastname ACHARYA AHLSTRAND ALLAN ANDERSEN ARCHER ARGYROS ASHFIELD AZIS BAKER BOND BUCHANAN CHAN CHAN CHEAM CHENG CLIFT ELLIOTT ER FONG

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

James Rodoefo Ian Paul Kee Peter Cuthbert J Raymond Tabua

Title Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

Firstname John Richard Kin Jark D Garth Urfun Preston Louis James John Ralph Joseph Hock Beng Ah Tee Warren

Lastname ALEXANDER ARMISHAW AUNG BAGITA BALLANTYNE BELLINGHAM BOONPRAKOB BOTTGER BRANDS BROWN CAMPBELL CARLISLE CARTER CHAI CHAI CHANT

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

COCA News 2009 • Page 

FOLEY GANAS GILLISON GOH GOH GOH HAKIMI HANSON HARNEY HARVEY HENDRICKSEN HO HO HUAT HUAT HUNG HWA IDRIS JACHJA KARLIK KHEE KHENG KITTEVEJA KNIGHT KNOWLES KNUST LAING LAMSAL LAUW

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

Mel Teng Tan Tiang Boon Tek Beow Mook Harcourt Lat Tengku TU Leo Harry James Donald Phuah Franklyn Henry Basri Thamnoon Thin Soekieno Liang Sien Joseph Choon Meng Yoong Phoo George Peter David

LEE LEE LEONG LIM LIM LOH LOH LOO-NEE LOW MADHAR MAHDHAR MATTI MCDONALD MCGILVRAY MCKENZIE MENG MILLETT MILNER MOHAMED NAWASAWAT NG NJANTOSO OEY PHILLIPS PHUAH PIN PROUD REIMANN ROBERTSON

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mrs Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

Geoffrey Aussie Loh Prahbu Khoo Khoo Foo Oey Fook Cheong Atndsoetirts Edward Beng Ke Huat Jin Keat Tiang Wai Yong Wee Nam Chan Heng Sawasdi Chien Song Ivy Robert Richard Donald Neil Warren Mook Kin Tan Wai Phoo Pin Munzil

ROSCOE RUTHERFORD SENG SHARMA SIANG SIANG SIEN SIEW SRIJANTO TAN TAN TAN TAN TAN TAN TAN THONG VONGSA VOON WACKER WAIMSLEY WALTON WARD WATSON WILSON WOON YONG YOONG ZEN

FOOTE FORTUNADO GORDON GREGORY HAH HARDY HATIBU HIZKE HORNE INABI Pararasasingam JEYARASAH Peter JONES Albert JONES Kevin JUBB Chan KAI Sunardi KARTASASMITA Lim Wee KEAT John KNOWLES Yong LEE Chin LIM

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr

LIM LOW MAH MAREALLE MATTHEWS MCNAUGHTON MERRITT MITCHELL MORRIS NG PALMER PETERSON RICH RILEY ROBINSON SAN SENG SHUN SLADE SMITH

Mr Mr Mr Mr

William Ian Nam Fong K Inabi Lim Chin Do My Lee Hwa Quoc Christopher Nguyen Hamish Lloyd

Mr Mr

Wee Por Shiu Sauri Philip William John John Alan Koon David Ronald Murray Richard William Ong Yeo Hung Anthony Daniel

Saw Yeen Douglas Cheng Chee Lou Por ER

STOCK STOCKS SUM SUNARDI TABUA TEIK THIEN TONG TRAN TRUMBULL TRUONG TURNBULL VALLIS WILLAN WONG WOODALL YAN YEONG YOUNG

See Tiang Hwang Soo Teik Chaun Ronald Ian A Richard Bernardus Norman Tilden Thomas Michael Jon Albert Warwick Roger Leslie

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

Douglas Leigh Richard Richard Mohamed K Kenneth Sow Robert Veravat Soo Chin Thien Hoa Som Arnold Ross Robert Teng

GEORGE GOLD GRAY GRILLS HAJI HARRIES HARRIS HENG HENNING HONGSKUL HWANG IAM ISARABUKHDI JOSEPH KEATING KELLY KHOO

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

Hashim Richard William Lawrence King Simon Boon Joo Tiat Richard Noel Trevor Chee Yun Ke Gregory Kok Kok

KIDWAI KINZBRUNNER KIRBY KIRWAN KUANG LALOR LEE LEE LEE LEVI LILLICRAP LIM LIM LO LOGAN LOW LOW

CHIANG CHIN CHIN COLLIER CRAIG CREAM DANSEY DEN HARTOG DOYLE EDE EDMEADE EDSER ELLIOT ENGEL FORD FRYER FUNCH

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

Philip Gerald Maynar


In light of the upcoming celebrations in 2010 we would like to be able to reconnect with as many of our Alumni as possible. Can you help us to find and reconnect with those Alumni who are on our ‘Returned’ lists? This edition we start with the first few of our five year groups and will continue with the rest in the December issue. If anyone is still in contact with or knows of the whereabouts of any of these Alumni, please ask them to contact the College.

1965 1969 Cont’d

1970 1974

Title Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

Firstname Robert Brian George Van Simon Bruce John Mohammad William John Abu Saleh Bernard Tran Chanakya Robin Ross Graham Hla Desmond Paul Van Daryl

Lastname LOWRY LUCAS LUTHER LY MACHIN MALCOM MANSLEY MANSOR MATH MATH MATIN MCDOUGLAS MINH MISRA MORROW MORTON MURPHY MYINT NEUENDORFF NEWMAN NGUYEN OFFER

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

Chye Whai David U Aye Vincent Ahmed John Bostang Vadlamudi Martin Robert Jason Christian John P Hamish Gerhard Wayne David Abdul Rodney Mohd. Anthony

ONG ONG PAHOFF PAW QUEK QURESHI RADECKI RADJAGUKGUK RAO REIDY RENEW REYNOLDS RICKERT RIGANO ROBERTS ROBERTSON ROTHIG RUBENSTEIN RUSCOE SAHOTA SALZMANN SATTAR SCHEELBEEK

Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Mr Mr

Lee Maurice Em Kiat Mahbubar Lee Kin George Manusan LJ John Gregory Sudjar David Thomas Keith Eric Kukiet Sam Rodney Dai How Kee Hoa Ly Van D

SENG SHEEHAN SIA SIDDIQUE SIEM SILVA SIRASUDHI SMITH SMITH SMITH SOEMARTOPO SOMERTON STEVENS STRINGER SUMMERS SUWANLAK SWAMINATHAN SWARTZ TAINA TEH LAM THIN THOMPSON

Mr Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

THWIN TIAT TILLIEY TOKA TRUSCOTT TSAFRIR UIARI WARDROP WATSON WELLS WESTWOOD WILSON WINTERFLOOD Bambang Kawedar WIRJOSOEMITRO Lloyd WRIGHT Joo Seng YEO Francis Soon Weng YIP Thomas Kae-sang YIP Ian YOUNG See Wah YUEN Bruce ZIMMER

Title Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Ms Ms Mr Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Ms Mr Ms Mr Dr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Prof

Firstname Julius Howard James Peter Ian Eugene John Ian Christopher Edward Frank John Rafael Patrick Edvardo Sharon Kathryn Chee Simon Sumui David Tran Ngoc Choo Liang Russell Geoffrey Richard Zenaida Bruce Walter Debra Bruce Tran Denise John Annette Simon Peter Peter Peter Clinton Kevin Gregory Ahmed Kay Peter Martin

Lastname AKINOLA ALEXANDER ALEXANDER ALLEN ANDERSON ANDRIETTE ARGUS BAKER BELL BRANOLI BUCKHAM CADDICK CAMACHO CANTWELL CARDOSA CARMICHAEL CAVE CHAN CHAN CHEA CHI CHUA COBB COMPTON CROFT CRUZ CURTIS DAVIES DAVIS DRAYDON DUC DUNN DUNNING EDWARDS EVANS FARROW FEENY FORD FOSTER FROST GIBBON GIBRIEL GILES GRAY GREEN

Mr Mr Mr Ms Ms Mr Dr Ms Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mrs Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Ms Ms Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mrs Mr

David James Cherinet Jennifer Kathleen Mark Jeffrey Suzanne Glen Peter Druce Howard James Antonia Sosefo Mohammed Anthony Peter Richard David Surendra Peng Cheong John Temple Simon James Bin Jae-hong Richard Denise Susan Therin Chalempol Stephen David Trevor Kam Kai Rogan Alan Philip Michael Mark Robert Ethlyn James

GREGOR GREIG HAILU HAINSORTH HARNETTY HASEMAN HASSALL HENNISSEY HENZEL HODGKINSON HORTON HOULISTON HOUSTON HURLOCK INOKE IQBAL IRELAND JEFFREYS JONES KANARELY KAWATRA KEE KEEGAN KEHOE KELLY KESTEVEN KHALID KIM KING KIRBY KLEINSCHMIDT KYAW LAIRUNGREANG LAM LAU LAU LAU LEE LEE LEE LEE LENNON LESLIE LITTLER LONG MACPHERSON

Dr Ms Mr Dr Mr Ms Ms Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Ms Mrs Mr Mr

John Carolyn Benni Steven Gregory Jane Vicki Paul Stephen Nicholas Steven Victor Sawing Thai Hoan Minh Archibald Carmel Linda Suresh Albert Kevin & Jann Brian Salvatore Helena Ross John Julian Kathleen Ronald Anthony Syed Deborah Peter John Yvonne Don Navaratne Violet Gregory Mohammed Peter Peter Ann Geoffrey Thomas

MAGUIRE MANN MATRAM MATTHEW MCADAM MCGRATH MCKAIN MCMAHON MEEKIN MERSIADES MOON MORALES NATTRIBHOP NG NGUYEN NGUYEN NORTEYE O’BRIEN O’CONNOR ODHAVJI OFF OFFER OLE PAPPALARDO PARKINGTON PAUL PAXTON PEARCE PETERS POULSEN PRINEAS RAHMAN RASMUSSEN REID ROLLO ROSS SAMARAWEERA SAMARSINGHE SAMPRA SCALLY SHAMSUZZHOA SHIELDS SHIPMAN SMITH SMITH SOLLY

Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Ms Dr Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Mr Dr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr Mr

Norman Rodney Alan Maxwell P Russell Ian Chia Chun Beverley Jeffrey Tsenueneri Tran Tee Guan Christine Hiow Hoong Donald Htay Gujjarappa Peter Michelangelo Malcolm Gary Ross Graham Timothy Don Linda

Mr & Mrs

Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr Mr Mr Ms Mr Mr

Swe Lim Tin Ian Michael Paul Nethanel Kipling Eric Stephen Clayton Alan William Andrew Graham

STANLEY STEGEMAN STEPHEN STOKER STONIER STORY SUN SUTTON SWIFT TAJIRI TAN TANG TAYLOR TEO THAMS THAN THIMMAIAH TREWIN VECCHIO WADE WALKER WALKER WALTER WALTON WANASINGHE WARREN Wirna Mihardja WASKITO Bruce WEBBER Imajan WIDJI Gordon WILSON Peter WILSON Robert WINTEN Eric WONG Roger WONG Hwa Fung WONG Russell WOOD Ian WOODS Gerard WRIGHT William WRIGHT Mohamadan ZACKARIA Kazik ZAKRZEWSKI Jose ZORILLA-RIOS Elliot ZWANGOBANI Roger LEWIS

COCA News 2009 • Page 


Can you help fill in the missing names and years ATPs/Seniors Year

Corridor

Name

Bottom North Top North Bottom Thatcher Top Thatcher Bottom Dowling Mid Dowling Top Dowling Bottom Han Mid Han Top Han Bottom Cock Mid Cock Top Cock Lockley

Student Association Executive Position

Year

Name

President Vice-president Secretary Treasurer Social Convenor/s Media Representative Female Sports Convenor Male Sports Convenor Cultural Convenor ICC Representative

Non - Executive Shop Board of Governors Representative International Student Officer ‘O’ Week Coordinator/s ‘O’ Week Action Committee

Other – (please fill in where necessary)

Please return the information to: Rebecca McEwen Smith, Development Manager, Cromwell College, Walcott St, St Lucia, Brisbane, Qld 4067, Fax (07) 3377 1499, Email: r.mcewen@cromwell.uq.edu.au COCA News 2009 • Page 10

?


CHIT CHAT

Round Up is a top company

One of Cromwell’s keen entrepreneurs, Nathan Ahearn (Crommie 2000– 2001) and his company Reddog Technology, has made it onto one of this country’s prominent lists of top young entrepreneurs for 2009. Leading Australian business website SmartCompany announced its second annual Hot 30 Under 30 list in May. Nathan who founded Reddog in 2006 with fellow Crommie, Jason Rudolph (Crommie 1998 – 2001), says, “To be included among such an innovative group of people is a real honour. I have lived and breathed Reddog Technology for the past three years so it’s really exciting for it to be acknowledged in this way. I look forward to seeing what we can achieve in the next decade.” Aherne’s other business interests include the following; • Reddog Infrastructure (short lifespan assets)

Tania launches new venture in Australia and New Zealand. TANIA PIETZKER (Cromwell 1988-1989) who has her own PR Company in Europe will soon be launching a new organisation in Australia, New Zealand and Germany. The official launch of the Australian New Zealand Chamber of Commerce and Culture Deutsch (ANZChamDeutsch) in Australia, New Zealand and Germany will happen in 2010. According to Tania, ANZChamDeutsch aims to create a meeting place, forum and lobby group to represent its interests along important private sector principles, namely the free flow of information, objective, independent analysis of economic perspectives and the useful exchange of contacts and mutually beneficial networks. The Chamber will consist of members, stakeholders, friends and sponsors who will have the opportunity to partake in online mini thinktanks, sponsorship events, and monthly e-newsletters. Tania and her colleagues are currently in the process of building their membership base and enticing sponsors. Membership is free during the commencement phase, and sponsors can also receive advertising discounts at this time. More information about ANZChamDeutsch is available at http://www.anzchamdeutsch.com or by contacting Cara Spence (07) 3278 6140. Alternatively, if any Crommie Alumni or Friends of the College would like to speak to Tania directly, she can be contacted in Berlin at the cost of a local call to Sydney using the Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phone number:- +61 (0)2 8005 08 07. Congratulations and best wishes for your new venture, Tania.

• 3B Unit Trust (investments in sustainable resources such as forestry) • RA Unit Trust (intellectual property investment involving trademarks and patents) • PG (Nathan is an Executive Manager for this company that distributes Polygiene in the Asia-Pacific region) • Quest Research and Development (blue sky research) • Xerovis (commercialises the R & D that is developed by Quest Research and Development) Established in 2006, Reddog Technology is the leading full service IT provider in Australia. Reddog prides itself on the fact that their average response time to any problem, large or small, is 26 minutes. Furthermore, Reddog’s hardware and systems undergo rigorous testing to ensure that they are the most efficient in the marketplace. Further information about Nathan and Jason’s company, please visit www.reddog.com.au

Bade Family Christening Dr. Stu Bade (Crommie 1993 – 1998) and wife Natasha chose the lovely Cromwell Chapel for the christening of their third child, Nicholas, in May. The family and friends celebrated with a morning tea following the christening which was performed by Rev. Dr. Hugh Begbie. Nicholas has a sister Danielle and brother, Andrew, who were also christened in the Cromwell Chapel.

Back row: David Bade, David Jesser, Hugh Begbie, Peter Heywood, Scott Hooper & Phil Manning Front Row: Danielle Jesser (nee Rutherford), Stu Bade with Nicholas, Emily McAuliffe, Cindy Bacalakis (nee Rinehart) with Theodore and Alice Rinehart

Hello From:

***Wanted Table Captains *** Wanted Table Please Raise Your Hands. Captains Howey Wong, (Cromwell 1999), is presently back living

Are you in contact with many Crommies from your era?

Would you like to Your be a Table Captain and organise a Please Raise Hands.

of your Crommie friends to be at your tableinforSingapore after having been in Eastern Europe and 60 Anniversary Dinner? Are you in contact with many Norway. Howey is juggling several different business We need a number of Crommies who would like to nominate as Table and organise a groupinterests of Crommies from Captains your era? and spreads his working days between Crommie friends to celebrate with them. Singapore and Malaysia. He is keen to hear from anyone Were you one of the Table Captains at the 50 Anniversary Reunion? Did you enjoy organising table of Crommies from Captain your era at Would ayou like to be a Table andCromwell? organiseWould a you like to dowho was at College during his time here and can be the same again? group of your Crommie friends to be at your table for the contacted on the following email wsyhowey@gmail. Please contact Rebecca McEwen Smith, Development Manager, Cromwell College, th Anniversary and let her know of your to act as a Table Captain. 2010 60willingness Dinner? com . We need a number of Crommies who would like to Katherine Fuller, (Cromwell 2006-2007, QUT student) nominate as Table Captains and organise a group of “I gained a lot from my time at Crommie and while there Crommie friends to celebrate with them. I studied Law. However, after working for the duration of last year, this year I have switched to study seafaring Were you one of the Table Captains at the 50th at the Australian Maritime College in Tasmania. I am Anniversary Reunion? Did you enjoy organising a table of thoroughly enjoying my course here and it will allow Crommies from your era at Cromwell? Would you like to me to become a deck officer on merchant ships such as do the same again? container carriers, tankers, cruise ships and others. I will Please contact Rebecca McEwen Smith, Development soon be finishing the first study phase and am currently in Manager, Cromwell College, and let her know of your the process of applying to shipping companies to gain sea willingness to act as a Table Captain. time with one of them.” group the 2010

th

th

To Email or Not to Email – What is your preference? • Would you prefer to receive any correspondence from us only via email? If so, let us know so that we can change your database entry accordingly. • Email is a great and cost-effective means of communicating with you, our Alumni. But, for it to be effective, it, like your snail mail address, needs to be updated with us if it changes. So if you change your email address, please let the College know as soon as possible. r.mcewen@cromwell.uq.edu.au or • Send your updated details to: friends@cromwell.uq.edu.au so we can keep in touch with you easily and efficiently.

COCA News 2009 • Page 11


Vale Ian John Turton 18.09.1944 – 29.03.2009 (Crommie 1963)

Cromwell College 1993 describes Ian as “A happy soul with the equipment to chew carrots… a real culture-vulture; a history buff (an article “A look at History” appeared in the same magazine) and a gas at English essays.” After completing his Teachers Certificate (1965) Ian was sent off to Alpha Secondary School, Queensland, from which he has regaled us with many funny incidents of school inspections and the like. Over the next seven years Ian moved to Sarina, Mareeba, Yeronga and Salisbury Secondary High Schools and then resigned from the Education Department. In 1968 Ian married. There were two children, but unfortunately this marriage ended in divorce in 1986. In the meantime Ian joined the Australian Navy’s Instructor Branch (19721988), as an officer. During his time in the Navy, Ian was seconded to the Royal Australian Air Force, Fairbairn ACT. On leaving the Navy Ian was Deputy Director of Naval Training. His expertise saw him and his family moving to Tallahassee, Florida (1984-1985), where he completed a Master of Science (Instructional Systems). He already had completed Bachelor of Arts (UQ 1972); Bachelor of Letters (Australian Literature) (University of New England 1980) and Occupational Analyst’s Course Certificate (Department of Defence, ACT 1979).

He was head-hunted from the Navy and became a Consultant Manager with Andersen Consulting, ACT from 1989-1991. Over the next five years Ian was a private consultant in education and training in a range of public and private sector organisations, for example Australian Taxation Office, DEET and Cocos/ Keeling Islands Health Services. He also put himself back into the private/public secondary school systems for short periods to keep his teaching skills current. In 1994 Ian moved to Fitzroy Crossing, Kimberley, Western Australia as Aboriginal Educational and Economic Development Officer Program Trainer. It was here that he met Judy, a Community Health Staff Development Nurse, based in Derby. They married in June 1994. A year later they moved across to Cairns, Queensland and once again Ian returned to teaching. Due to a family death they moved to Rockhampton in 1996 and stayed there for a couple of years. On their return to Derby Ian became Flight Commander, 22 Flight WA AIRTC, Derby, WA. Ian and Judy with others, all in their spare time, set up 22 Flight, the remotest Flight in Australia and it included a large number of Aboriginal cadets. Ian again taught at the local High School and at one time worked, for six weeks, as a kitchen hand at the local nursing home. He also enjoyed the task of overseeing the Anglican Church, Derby as it was without a minister. Ian had given his life to the Lord after a major accident in 1990. In 2001 Ian and Judy moved to Maningrida, where Ian was the Campus Manager of the Job, Employment and Training Centre owned by the Community. In 2002 they went to England and Ian taught at one of the Secondary Schools in Stevenage, Hertfordshire – a lot of East Enders were moved there after the war. Their time there was cut short as Judy had an accident (dislocated left hip and hairline fracture of her femur), but not before they had visited Malta, Jerusalem and Paris. One of Ian’s dreams was to sit outside a Paris café and watch the world go by.

What a Country - Turkey In April I spent almost 3 weeks travelling around Turkey. It is an extraordinary country to visit. It has marvelous scenery including that in the unique region of Cappadocia. This area in central Turkey is covered in volcanic tuff (ash) which is soft until exposed to air. Consequently, it has been used for homes or hideaways for thousands of years. Thoroughout the region there are hotels, homes, ancient churches and monasteries carved into the mountains. There is even an underground city for 10,000 people designed to be used during times of war. It is 10 stories deep and it is a marvelous thing to wander (with a guide) through the labyrinth of tunnels and caves.

A hotel in Goreme

COCA News 2009 • Page 12

Turkey is a montage of culture, history, geography, great food, flowers, agriculture (with sheep everywhere) and welcoming

On return to Cairns, Queensland, Ian again went back into teaching, including being Deputy Principal at an all-Aboriginal College and in 2004 Ian and Judy moved to Malanda (Tablelands outside of Cairns). In 2005 Ian took himself out of the workforce to assist in the building of their new home, whilst they lived in an 80 year old house on the property. He did do some relief teaching in the Torres Strait during that time. They survived the cyclone of 2006 and at the end of that year moved into their new home. Ian worked for the Australian Agriculture College Campus (AACC), Mareeba as an instructor in numeracy and literacy in the local prison for two years and then he was invited to apply for the Manager of Education and Training at the AACC. Ian was well known amongst readers of the local papers as his letters were a source of interest in relation to current political events both at a Federal and State level. Ian and Judy went to Perth to celebrate Christmas 2008 with Judy’s family, including her 93 year old Mum. Ian had attended his daughter’s 40th birthday in Brisbane in January 2009 and was able to see his three grandchildren as well as his son and daughter-in-law. The following month Ian was diagnosed with an aggressive brain tumour that ironically affected his ability to express himself verbally and in writing. The illness lasted seven weeks and Judy nursed him at home until the last six days. It was a time of spiritual healing for Ian. He remained cheerful, recognising his many visitors and always having a positive word for each of them. Ian’s funeral, which over 200 attended, including school students from Cairns and Mareeba, was a tribute to his wide range of friends and how they saw him - a man with an outgoing personality, intelligent, a quick wit, a ready sense of humour and prepared to go out of his way for anyone. Ian is now at rest with his Lord.

Judy Turton 22.06.09

people. Its history spans eons with Hittite ruins visible, as well as Troy, extraordinary Roman and Christian locations of many types and later the Seljuks and Ottomans. Among the ruins is Ephesus – the best preserved ancient city in Turkey. There is even an advertisement for a brothel still visible in the roadway as well as a very Making friends intimate public toilet. at the

.

public loo During my stay in Turkey I visited Istanbul (including the Palace of Topkopi), Cappadocia, The Bosporus, Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, the Turkish Dead Sea and Gallipoli. It was a wonderful place to visit and, as a Christian, both a reminder of the historic importance of Christianity and a humbling reminder of the possibility that it can be over-run. If you plan to travel, put Turkey on your list.

Hugh Begbie


It’s a long way to

Longreach…

… …

It’s a long way to Longreach ……

Time for a team photo before the race. In an absolutely amazing effort, two Crommie residents, brothers Monty and Tighe Summers and twelve friends raised $80,000, by running 1,200 km from Brisbane to Longreach during the recent Uni holidays.

The team comprised nine runners and four support people including other family members. He has high praise for his family and friends who had no hesitation in continuing to support the cause.

The ‘City to Longreach’ run was organised by Monty as a fundraiser for the Leukaemia Foundation and AEIOU – For Children with Autism, charities of which Monty has had first hand experience.

“These are the people who have really stood by my side. They made sure I didn’t lose a smile and gave me a smack when I started to complain too much,” he said. The trek, which finished on 26th July, took

Monty Summers was diagnosed with lymphoblastic leukaemia in Grade 12, but although he wasn’t aware then of how far the fight with the disease would take him, he wasn’t about to let it get the better of him. Since then, his determination has seen him succeed in getting past the major hurdles associated with the disease, including continuing with his studies.

over 13 days with each runner pounding out 10km per day.

The road stretches on forever.

Monty hopes he can make this trek an annual event, especially as he likes running so much.

Monty give instructions on how to warm up before a ‘big’ race.

Monty, who is studying a dual degree in Arts (Psychology) and Human Movement Studies at The University of Queensland, is now frustrated that the stress fractures resulting from running the distance has meant that he has been unable to keep on training as he would like, for the time being. Of the race, Monty says that the team was over-whelmed by the generosity of people along the way. “There were two small towns which would have had a combined population of 1,000 people and they gave us $2,000 altogether, which was amazing,” he said.

Monty makes a new friend along the way.

Follow the right directions.

COCA News 2009 • Page 13


Africa Bound During the Uni holidays at the end of 2008, a group of 23 College kids (mostly Crommie, with a few ring-ins) travelled to the heart of one of the most amazing and beautiful continents – Africa. On a trip spanning 4 weeks, covering 3 countries, we were given a remarkable insight into the lifestyle that is Africa. The trip was organised by an old-Crommie boy ‘Tenna’ (a Zimbabwean himself ) and the group consisted of guys/girls, Australians/ Africans/Others, 2 guides and a driver. Those that went on the trip were; Michael Stone, Jenna Thompson, Nathan Riedy, Jane Fisher, Stephanie Courtice, Stewart Glynn, Michael Ford, Gareth Mitchell, Duncan Wilkie, Johannes Inoke, Nicholas Bull, Zenan Franks, Simon Campbell, James Barton, Sofia Robleda, Rebecca Smith, Emma Crook, Colleen Ferries, Beatrice Ramella, Braedan Beggs, Daniel O’Donnell, Iain More and Angela Day. We originally flew into Harare, the Zimbabwean capital, and spent the first few nights split up amongst several families in the town that Tenna’s family knew. After a few days in Harare we boarded ‘Big Blue’ – our ‘Overlander’ which carried us, our food and all luggage around for the entire trip. This ‘Overlander’ was like a truck but with a bus-like thing stuck on the back, where we could sit/lie/stand and watch the passing landscape while playing cards/ listening to music/chilling out. Our first stop in the trip was to Lake Kariba, a massive inland expanse of water bordering ‘Zim’ and Zambia. This lake originates from the Zambezi River in Zambia and continues out to sea in Mozambique. We boarded a house boat for the week, and travelled up and down the lake with the help of several boat-hands, a captain and a cook. This week was so relaxing – literally doing nothing all day but fishing from the little ‘tinnies’ which we took everywhere attached to the main boat, watching elephants, monkeys etc. chill on the side of the lake – while also navigating our little boats to avoid the hippos! We got to see some amazing sunsets/sunrises and witnessed the heart of the African landscape in all its beauty.

COCA News 2009 • Page 14

After our week on Kariba, we jumped on the ‘Overlander’ again, crossed the border into Zambia and spent the day driving through Zambia, to reach our next destination – Victoria Falls – one of the seven natural wonders of the world. We originally stayed a night on the Zambian side of the ‘Falls’ in a town called Livingstone, and the next day crossed the border back into ‘Zim’ to reach our accommodation. We stayed at a place called Lokothula Lodges owned by Tenna’s Dad which was a welcomed indulgence after being eaten alive by mozzies at night in Kariba. The actual ‘Falls’ left us all speechless. The sheer size and power behind them is almost impossible to fathom. Unfortunately for some of us, the dreaded traveller’s bug that circulated the group hit a few of us there. A few of us can now safely say we have not only visited, but been sick on one of the seven wonders of the world! Victoria Falls is also renowned for its adventure sports. Activities offered included gorge swing, bungee-jumping, flying fox, high wire and white water rafting. Rafting was one of the most amazing experiences and as our confidence

grew in our guides, we decided to turn things up a notch. Despite many obscenities being thrown around the boat in an effort to change our mind, flipping the raft on purpose on one of the biggest rapids in the world was our aim. After capsizing, we then were able to let the current of the mighty Zambezi take us down the rapids on our own. Boma night was also one of the highlights of the trip. Boma is the restaurant at the hotel we stayed at which serves traditional African cuisine - Warthog, Crocodile, Guinea fowl, Eland Steak, Kudu and various other African game – most of which, surprise, surprise, tasted kinda like chicken. It wasn’t only the food though; this place was an absolute experience in itself. At the door we were dressed in African sarongs and our faces were painted. Halfway through the meal we were taught African drumming and got up to bust our moves with the tribal men. There was also a witchdoctor who told our fortunes and a lady braiding hair. I think it’s safe to say that Boma was the best 20 dollars I’ve ever spent! During our stay at the ‘Falls’ we also made trips to the local markets to hustle with locals for different African trinkets etc.

Standing in front of those magnificent falls - Beatrice Ramella, Emma Crook, Colleen Ferries, Rebecca Smith, Sofia Robleda, Jenna Thompson, James Barton and Braedan Beggs


really got to witness the true colours of African wildlife.

seafood cook-ups by the locals, and many bargain-hunting trips to the markets. We behaved like true tourists; the girls loading their arms with carved bangles while the boys bartered off old clothes in exchange for oil paintings and other various souvenirs.

The next stop of our journey was a safari park – Antelope Park. This stunning park was home to many of Africa’s Undoubtedly the biggest highlight, incredible wildlife – lions, however, came in a visit to a child care elephants, antelope, program set up by volunteers for the local giraffe, impala – the list children. is endless. We camped on The College had raised funds to donate the side of a little lake and to the facility before we left (about $350) were fed buffet-style in a t Glynn, ar and we were all excited to be able to see ew St a, ed bl Ro those lions – Sofia an Franks, dining room with all of en Z e, on first hand where the money was going. St k ic Keeping track of M , Jenna Thompson is the guide the other guests who were (The money for the program was raised hr C d an s ie rr Beatrice Ramella, Fe there. Antelope Park was gela Day, Colleen by having a “biggest supper” event in the Emma Crook, An where we got to interact more and get JCR. Everyone turned up in their PJ’s up close and personal with the animals. After we packed up our stuff and boarded and the kitchen donated food and people We got to walk with some lions (an gave donations of as much money as they the ever reliable ‘big blue’, the next step of could...it was a good night!). We spent our journey brought us to a beautiful place unbelievably amazing and special experience!), watch the full grown males the day meeting the kids, and had a ball by the name of Hwange National Park. and female lions get fed, and some of us singing songs and playing with them. After unpacking our tents and rolling out It was a very confronting and moving our sleeping bag, our guide informed us to opted to pay a bit extra and take part in a make sure we stayed in our tents the whole night-kill. This is where the lion caretakers experience but also a positive one and, take some lions out at night to help them for many of us, the most memorable and evening as wild animals tend to wonder establish their hunting skills. We got to rewarding part of the whole trip. After around the campsite during the night. see the lions in their natural environment, Mozambique, we spent several long days in Sure enough, whether it was the distant stalking and flanking and chasing prey, the Overlander travelling back to Harare, roar of a pack of lions, or the soft panting to begin our long plane ride home. of a sneaky hyena, we were woken multiple witnessed from the back of an opentop jeep with special spotlights. While times to the sound of the beautiful African This trip will forever stay in the hearts and we didn’t witness a kill (unfortunately!) wildlife. minds of all those involved, and it was the experience was once-in-a-lifetime definitely a once-in-a-lifetime experience. The most rewarding part of Hwange – especially when we saw a lion attempting While witnessing the African culture we National Park was the day trip to one of to chase down a full-grown giraffe!! felt safe the entire time and gained an the local villages. Arriving with gifts, food utter appreciation for such an amazing At Antelope Park we also rode elephants and toys in our hands, we spent the day and beautiful culture and landscape. (which included them walking you into playing games and spending time with Thanks must go to Tenna and his family a lake and dunking you while you hold some of the local children. It really was for organising the trip and I’m sure if the on!!), experienced a horse-back safari an amazing experience and one which opportunity arises again, we will all jump (which enables you to get extremely close everyone will remember forever. to a lot of animals as they just see the horse at the chance to go back! The days were spent by relaxing by the and aren’t bothered by you) while learning local pool and going on amazing safari about the breeding programs in place on drives. Whilst sitting in the back of site for the lions. Antelope Park was an the open top jeeps, we witnessed some unforgettable experience which gave us remarkable sights such as families of such an appreciation for the incredible giraffes grazing on trees, herds of buffalo African native wildlife. and hippos by the watering hole and some Our final destination was Vilanculos, of the most incredible birds ever seen. At in Mozambique. Here, we spent a week the end of one of the days, we were blessed at a beachside campsite, moving at a with the most mind-blowing sunset slower and more relaxing pace, which anyone could ever imagine and finished it was welcome after the many actionoff with a traditional campfire dinner. packed days we’d had. The beachfront was picturesque and the weather was beautiful Hwange National Park was definitely a so our days were spent lazing in the sun great experience as we got to see so many whilst reading or playing games and were animals, we saw an actual lion-kill, we highlighted by various activities including Sampling the glorious lifest were lucky to see a performance by a yle of Vilanculos, in Mozambique a dhow boat trip out to some islands, big local African tribal group and overall we

Michael Stone, Jenna Thompson, Stephanie Courtice and Jane Fisher.

COCA News 2009 • Page 15


e m o v 9 c 0 0 l 2 e W Wel com e 9 0 m 0 2 o 2 c l e 0 0 W009 2009 9

2009

Cro Week 2009 and other great moments

Some of the St. O liver’s Day reveler s – (back row – Michelle C osnett, Shannon Landmark; front row – Belin da Upton, Lucy Cooper, Jenna Thompson, Kirsty Glynn and Josh Gaffel)

ready for the 2009 The ‘Top Cock’ girls – Jessie l Bunker - (back row Medieval & Mythica third gden and Kate Weber; ory McDonald, Anne Ri all M Larrissa Hursthouse, row – Nicola Ward, trina Ka – Milne; second row ont English and Rochelle Fr ; ay Sh d Kate-Lyn Ah Knox, Jessica Foster an ry) ne an Fl k and Victoria Row – Estelle Leacoc

ight Week’s Karaoke N All ready for Cro rke, Joanne la C a uart, Fion St l Jil – t lef om – (fr aitlin Holding) r Hopkins and C eu Fl k, ar m nd La

We are on top of the world

2

The Students’ Association Ex ecutive girls all dressed up for Boat Cruise in April – (from left), Belinda Upton, Jenna Thom pson, Jane Fisher, Bridget McNee and Stepha nie Courtice

C Debating – John The Cromwell Team for IC n Holding and itli Ca Flett, Mitch Harwood, e third!!! cam ll we Clare Griffin – Crom

Cro Week (O’ Week for 2nd semester) T-shirt 2009

The Extended Cromwell Community Uniting in Friendship for the College Future

4 Yes! I am pleased to send my gift to Cromwell College Foundation (ABN: 26 282 868 309) to help support young people now and for generations to come.

Please send your gift to Cromwell College Foundation, Walcott Street, St Lucia Qld 4067. Phone 3377 1300 Fax 3377 1499 Email friends@cromwell.uq.edu.au Web www.cromwell.uq.edu.au

My gift is enclosed for:

$50

$75

$100

$250

Other $ __________________

I enclose my cheque or money order made payable to Cromwell College Foundation (crossed Not Negotiable) OR credit card

Mastercard

Visa Card

I would prefer to donate On-Line

Signature on card: ___________________________

IRI

SP

Today’s Date: ____________________

Holder’s Name: ______________________________

Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms/Dr____________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________ Postcode __________ Phone (W) _________________________ Phone (H) ___________________________ Facsimile ___________________ Email _____________________________

Request Anonymity

Please send me information on Leaving a bequest to Cromwell College Assisting with Alumni events and programs (If your details have changed recently please indicate in area above). Please note that all gifts are tax deductible - Your receipt will be sent to you.

ER

/

VBI

Expiry date

TA S

Card number TVS IBI LIB

COCA News September 2009  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you