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C I T Y M A G A Z I N E

founder & publisher fernando de haro production director analee g. paz

NO 15

copy editor

october • november 2012

graciela garcía

C I T Y M A G A Z I N E

interns

mariela álvarez, elyssa canales, anna carolina gonzález

design & production

publisher welcome to cream 15. It is an honor to greet you in this Oct. /Nov. edition. The year is slowly coming to an end; change is in the air, we can feel it in the weather and in the window displays that welcome autumn, one of my favorite seasons of the year. In this issue, a select and interesting group of people livens up our pages. We invited them to share the details that brought them today to call Laredo home. Also in this edition, we explore elaborate hairstyles that became extravagant when mixed with yarn, shapes, and textures. The Cream team excelled during this photo shoot. I hope you enjoy every one of our sections such as “Versus,” “I am Cream,” and “The Profiles” as well as the articles of Rubén Bazán, Bobby Turner, and Michelle Cook Gutiérrez whose writings always deal with interesting themes. I want to thank all who collaborated in the making of this issue—interns, writers, graphic designers, and sales department— and especially our advertisers, a list that keeps growing. Thank you for making Cream #1.

NO°15 TEAM ANALEE G. PAZ MARIELA ÁLVAREZ / ELYSSA CANALES ANNA CAROLINA GONZÁLEZ MARIANA ORTEGA Copyright © 2012 Cream City Magazine is a bi-monthly publication. All rights reserved. Points of view expressed do not necessarily represent those of Cream City Magazine. We reserve the right to refuse any advertisement we believe is incompatible with our mission. We also reserve the right to refuse any advertisement we deem competitive or contrary to the best interests of the magazine. Advertisers are legally responsible for the content, accuracy, and images of their ads. Printed in Mexico.

photographer ferch graphic designer analee g. paz design production assistant mariana ortega

writers rubén bazán, bobby turner, michelle cook gutiérrez special thanks

familia paz + serna, brenda ibarra, celina díaz, diana juárez, rosina de hoyos, the mexican consulate, gabriel castillo, christen manwani, lydia delfin, michael dickerson, and elisa cortés.

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8

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the gallery

v g N T I 101

13

TAKING IT TO THE

The

15

Your life is like the house you live in. Others may see it from afar and may even admire it, but nobody is going to care if your pipes are leaking or if your health is at the mercy of lead-based paint.

You’re on your own.

string quartet

22

31

36

find ng jobs


KALEB CANALES Blazing trails for Laredoans.

GIGI RAMOS The woman behind an admirable cause.

EDGAR PARRA A unique entrepreneur with a novel attitude.


Meet three dynamic achievers who contribute to the development of both Laredos. They are flying high on Cream’s radar.

KALEB CANALES

Assistant Coach, Portland Trail Blazers

Being the first Mexican-American interim head coach in NBA history took faith, humility, energy and hard work, and, above all, education. The one thing my parents always demanded from us was education; they understood how important it was to our future. I have been blessed with this opportunity thanks to my master’s degree. I always loved the game. My first coaching position was at Martin High School. When I realized I wasn’t good enough to play college basketball, I decided to study the game and learn as much as I could. To this day, I am still trying to learn and grow every single day. I was about 18 when, one day, I decided to write down my professional and personal goals. Coaching an NBA team was one of them. Everybody gave me a hard time about it, but God has been so awesome in my life that I’ve been very fortunate so far. I hope my story teaches young people that they can’t be afraid to dream; that whatever they want to accomplish in life, through faith and hard work and determination, they can. To that end, Assist13 is our strong commitment to serving, contributing, and developing youth in Laredo through basketball camps. Sacrifice is part of commitment. I have learned from each step and setback. My work ethic comes from my parents Alicia and Victor Canales. My mother quit working two jobs just a couple of years ago. That kind of dedication was instilled in my sister and me at an early age. I know God put all the people that I’ve encountered in my life for special reasons. GIGI RAMOS

Founder and CEO of Volunteers Serving the Need

Anyone who is willing to serve our country is worthy of praise and admiration. The American heroes who put their lives on the line for the rest of us inspired me to create Volunteers Serving the Need, a nonprofit tax exempt organization that aids on a monthly basis financially-challenged veterans and their surviving spouses with two bags of groceries, frozen meat products, and personal hygiene items at no cost to them. The inexhaustible generosity of Webb county residents supports and maintains alive this undertaking. My volunteer path has given me the opportunity to be thankful everyday for all the blessing provided for my family and me. It started when I resigned from the USPS in 1982 after participating with the food stamp program and witnessing that senior citizens only received $11 in assistance.

In retrospect, I wish I had realized earlier that opportunities are all around just waiting for us to seize them and make dreams happen. You do not have to be highly educated to accomplish a project as long as you are willing to wait and listen. My main advice to anyone wishing to help others would be to surround yourself with people who love God, the poor, orphans, and widows, and your project will succeed in its season. My dream will be complete when there is a center that can offer our veterans more opportunities to blend back into society. I want them to feel as they were before they left to uphold freedom for our country. I want them to feel appreciated. I want them to know we are grateful. EDGAR PARRA Entrepreneur

I used to work for pleasure and to feel useful. But at 19, I had my first successful business experience, and it sparked my desire to become a businessperson with the passion for creating new and different things and interested in providing real professional service.

A thriving company is not only based on profitability. It also includes fostering within the company values like integrity, responsibility, persistence, and proactivity. I truly believe and apply in my daily responsibilities honesty, common sense, and positive thinking. Without these, I couldn’t have a productive day. Prospective entrepreneurs should embark on a professional career one-hundred percent related to what they like and inspires them. It’s not always easy to identify it, but it will become one of the most important decisions of their life. Whatever they decide to do, they must do it with dedication, knowledge, professionalism, and always “do it right the first time.” In today’s world there is no room for errors. The only thing I would change from my life would be my unplanned decisions during my student years and not having the courage to follow what really inspired me at that time. Nowadays, my satisfactions include giving my family a good, stable life; my personal freedom; and feeling good about every realized goal. There are many more things I hope I can accomplish, and I know a few I will achieve soon with God’s will. I want to thank my family for their unlimited support and trust, my dad who gifted me this great energy, and my employees, commercial partners, and customers for believing in me and my projects.

cream oct / nov 2012

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FABULOUS OR FATTENING? crystals, beads, formaldehyde, McDonald’s burger (meat patty, lettuce, buns, and fries), plastic tray, cups, straw, and fries container

the gallery featured artist // yamel “monti” araiza


activity challenge:

activity challenge:

i’ve always been interested in art-fashion as well as creating unique jewelry and handbags. Crystals are my specialty. Whether I make an object or buy it, I always find myself covering it in crystals; they are my medium of choice. I bedazzled an entire McDonald’s meal, containers included. I used crystals and glitter to make an otherwise just-tempting meal irresistible to the eye. I took an ordinary fast food meal and sealed it with polyurethane and proceeded to embellish it with beads and jewel-like stones. I want to prove a point about fast food and society’s addiction to it; we know it’s bad, so why do we continue to eat it? When you look at my piece, I want you to ask yourself, “Is it worth it?” Although this meal looks shiny and new, it’s what is underneath that counts. All the ingredients we can’t see are the ones causing obesity. Obesity in America has skyrocketed in recent years—the leading cause: fast-food consumption. — Yamel “Monti” Araiza


v g T N

THE

IND

EX

v

I 101 g T N

I 101

The number twelve is a fascinating number. It follows us everywhere: eggs in dozen, months in a year, tribes in Israel, days of Christmas, inches in a foot, steps to recovery in Alcoholics Anonymous (not that I would know). Without knowing it, the number twelve haunts us in ways that discreetly pass us by. It is also the number of years that go by between what I like to call The Bi-National Governmental Makeover.

I

t is not a bad thing. It is just something that happens due only to benefit their own selfish interests. I have also learned that, to the laws that surround us. Citizens of the UnitedYour States halfhouse of the country doesn’t care about my life, maybe I should life is likeifthe and Mexico elect (and I use this term loosely) a new taking an interest in it. Your life is like the house you youpresident live in. Others be maythe seeone it from every four and six years, respectively. This means that every twelve live in. Others may see it from afar and may even admire it, but afar and may even admire it, but nobody years, both countries go through a simultaneous governmental nobody is going to care if your pipes are leaking or if your health is is going to care are leaking makeover. This also means that as border inhabitants, we if youratpipes the mercy of lead-based paint. You’re on your own. Why? Sadly, if your health ishumans at the mercy are drenched in political opinions, commentaries, or and angry are too busy and worried about their own lives that they of lead-based paint. Facebook status updates in two different languages. It is really couldn’t care less if your refrigerator is broken or if you a trashy, six-month-long political soap opera that, are paying too many taxes. Unfortunately, the people unfortunately, we must tune in to. Then again, dislike fighting the battles of those they don’t it is where we live, and novelas like these know, and caring about the entire citizenry’s usually come with subtitles. problems is a great idea in theory only given that it is extremely difficult trying Your life is like the house The marketplace of ideas has to get 300 million inhabitants (and an expanded due to the advent of the additional 112 million in Mexico) to you live in. Others may see it from Internet, particularly social media. think the same way. The last time I afar and may even admire it, but nobody Being informed (or at the very saw somebody convince individuals is going to care if your pipes are leaking least, the desire to be informed) to think a certain way was Henry or if your health is at the mercy went from being an elite privilege Fonda’s character in the movie 12 of lead-based paint. to an easily acquired skill. Polling Angry Men. Oh look, there’s that stations today are being flooded number twelve, again. more and more by the electorate who yearns to exercise this crucial Whether or not you decide to vote this right. Voter turnout has increased in year is entirely up to you. Voting for the the last elections, which means that the lesser of two evils is a common practice, public is very informed, very motivated, or so make a thorough evaluation of your very angry. It could be all three. In retrospect, wants and needs. Disregard the “Democrats are this is probably the case. Whatever it is, it seems Communists” and the “Republicans are the Devil” to be working, and this is great. I believe in democracy Facebook groups and be sure to vote for the candidate and the idea of a head of government being chosen by the people. that is going to benefit you. I challenge you to take this smart Philosopher Joseph de Maistre once said that every nation has approach and no matter who you vote for, never feel the need to the government it deserves. Given the accessibility of information explain yourself to anybody. If you get at the moment, it has never rung truer than now. questioned as to why you voted a certain way, a simple “Because that candidate/ I get asked very often whom I am going to vote for. Having party benefits me” will be enough for worked on Capitol Hill, I have learned how to create an opinion them to change the subject. Most when it comes to this issue. I also learned that, in order to be importantly, don’t let anybody convince a happier person, it is best to not mix your political opinions you that caring for and looking after with anybody. This includes your best friend and your girlfriend. yourself and your loved ones is a selfish Believe me. act. It is, in fact, the complete opposite.

You’re on your own.

You’re on your own.

The electoral process is an excellent school. Throughout the years, I have discovered that, when it comes to social and political issues, people do not care about you or your loved ones. They try to convince (ahem, brainwash) their peers to vote a certain way

See you at the polling station! BY RUBÉN BAZÁN III THERUBENINDEX@GMAIL.COM

cream oct / nov 2012

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Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins

Honey Apple Cider Vinaigrette ingredients

⅔ cup canola oil ⅓ cup apple cider vinegar 4 tablespoons applesauce 5 teaspoons honey ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon ⅛ teaspoon ground allspice 1 teaspoon water instructions

Combine all ingredients, except for the canola oil, in a food processor. Blend until ingredients are incorporated. Stop; add canola oil and blend for a few seconds. Pour into a jar or container. Good for about one week in the refrigerator. Top on your favorite greens.

ingredients

Pumpkin Hummus ingredients

1 can (1lb.13oz.) chickpeas 1 can (15oz.) pumpkin puree ½ cup lemon juice ⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil ½ cup tahini 2 garlic cloves 1 teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon nutmeg ½ teaspoon ground allspice 1 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons brown sugar instructions

Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend on high for a few minutes until creamy. Stop and use a spatula to scrape down the sides between blends. Once done, transfer to a container and refrigerate from 30 minutes to an hour. Serve with apple slices or pita chips. Good for 7 days in the refrigerator.

7.5 ounces pumpkin puree 2 eggs ¾ cup granulated sugar ¾ cup unsalted butter, melted 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon 1 cup chocolate chips instructions

Preheat oven to 350°. In a large mixing bowl combine all ingredients, mixing well. Using an ice cream scoop, scoop batter (⅔ full) into cupcake pan with your favorite cupcake liners. Bake in middle oven rack for 9 minutes then rotate, for an even bake, 9 more minutes. Let them cool for about 15 minutes before serving. Modify and make your own creation— with banana chunks or walnuts. You can even glaze them with chocolate or spread with cream cheese icing. Yummy in so many ways!


CAFFE DOLCE 1708 Victoria Street Laredo, Texas

956 . 568 . 4707

TAKING IT TO THE with Caffe Dolce

PUMPKIN

&

APPLES SPICE &

HONEY APPLE CIDER VINAIGRETTE

Oh My!

caffe dolce was established in September 2010. Owners Rosario, Erick, and Valeria Vega, and Chris Contreras felt that downtown Laredo needed something new and fresh. Chris and Val moved to Austin in 2004 so Val could pursue her dreams of learning all about cupcakes and pastries at the Texas Culinary Academy. At the same time, Chris, who worked at Chipotle Mexican Grill, found a passion for creating good quality food. After culinary school, Chef Val worked at Whole Foods, Little Big City Catering, and Hey Cupcake! Although Austin was an amazing adventure, they all knew that Caffe Dolce would be their next adventurous experience. Having never owned a café before, they combined ideas to make way for their new enterprise. “In our business we are constantly trying to educate ourselves on how to create healthy ‘green-conscious’ foods. Caffe Dolce has the most amazing customers who continue to support us and are always willing to try new ventures like our pumpkin hummus. Thank you, Laredo!”


This fall, be creative and soar like a crescendo in a symphony. Forget understated. Style can also be audacious. Cream dares you to orchestrate an exaggerated look and be free from conventionalism. Defy the trite and experiment with bold color, unique textiles, and magnificent hair. This season we’ve retired the old ensemble and composed for a special string quartet of our own. BY ELYSSA CANALES

PHOTOGRAPHY FERCH H A I R M A R T Y R O D R Í G U E Z M A K E U P B A R B A R A FA L C Ó N M O D E L S G R E T C H E N L O T H E S S C H U S T E R + A L E J A N D R A G A R C Í A AV I T I A SARAH DE LA GARZA-GONZÁLEZ + AMANDA TORRES H A I R E X T E N S I O N S M AY O B E A U T Y S U P P L I E S


WANT THE “CREAM DREAM” TO VISIT WITH YOUR ORGANIZATION? CONTACT US AT INFO@CREAMCITYMAGAZINE.COM!


KILL THEM WITH

YOU SHOULD START EACH DAY

DON’T FORGET

I AM CREAM FERCHPHOTOGRAPHY


want to feature your event? contact us for more info at info@creamcitymagazine.com


REPORTED BY ELYSSA CANALES EDITED BY GRACIELA GARCÍA PHOTOGRAPHY FERCH

Cream is proud to bring you six winners who came from abroad with their hearts full of hope to realize their dreams. Discover how they define and live success.

TAIWAN

dr. yu-mei huang is the assistant professor of upper strings at tamiu and has lived in the country for twenty years. Her life has always revolved around music—she came to complete her bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees. Moreover, she plays with the Laredo Philharmonic Orchestra and is happily married to a musician, also an instructor at TAMIU. They are the proud parents of a four-year-old girl. Taiwan was formed

WHEN IT COMES TO EDUCATION." DR. YU-MEI HUANG

cream oct / nov 2012

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Don’t let your

youth be reduced "I CAN SEE SOME CLOSE

to a brief

moment in life. NACASIUS U. UJAH, NIGERIA

Instead, make it a permanent mark of character. ANNA OCHOA, CUBA

“THIS LAND IS THE REFUGE SOUGHT BY MILLIONS, THE LEADER OF THE WORLD, AND ONE COUNTRY THAT

.

I AM GRATEFUL TO THIS GENEROUS COUNTRY THAT ACCEPTED A LARGE GROUP OF DISPLACED CUBANS WHO HAD NOWHERE TO GO. WE WERE BLESSED.”


through the processes of imperialism and colonization.Taiwanese customs and traditions reflect an amalgamation of Confucianism, dating back to the Han Chinese dynasty, and European, Japanese, American, global, and regional customs. Nowadays, Taiwan blends modernity with traditionalism. According to Dr. Huang, American culture is based on individualisms, equality, and freedom, while the Chinese are more focused on family and collectivism. Dr. Huang tries to find balance between the two, especially on the education issue. With her young daughter she follows traditional ways; however, she also emphasizes creative thinking, which is a western influence. Since Laredo does not have a large Chinese population, and most of her family is still in Taiwan, Yu-Mei visits them every year. “We miss out on a lot of activities during our special holidays or festivals. For example: We have a celebration called ‘Moon Festival’, which is similar to Thanksgiving. The family gathers to celebrate, and we eat mooncakes. These customary cakes are made in the shape of a circle to symbolize that everything will be perfect.” When the interview veers to gastronomy, she says, “Only in Taiwan is it possible to enjoy fine authentic food from all the different regions of China; it is a veritable paradise for gourmands. Taiwan's own native cuisine has also become known around the world, and if you try it just once you will remember it forever. My favorite dishes are roasted duck and Chinese meatballs.” To Dr. Huang, success is the result of hard work and persistence with some variable factors such as time and the involvement of others included in the process.

NIGERIA

currently enrolled at tamiu as a ph.d. student in the field of international business and finance, nacasius ujah came from nigeria at the age of 21 to pursue his studies. He also lived in Arkansas before coming to the gateway city. He has enjoyed meeting new people, but at first had to put up with stereotypical misconceptions from those who would ask if people live on trees or if animals roam freely in Africa. Nigeria is a beautiful country home to the Zuma Rock and the Yankari and Gashaka/Gumti Game Reserves. It also has a lot of outdoor markets. Nacasius has adapted well to Laredo and can see similarities between his compatriots and Mexican-Americans. Mostly, he misses the food and traditional dishes like okoho, ogbono and equsi soup. He grew up learning British English and has had to adjust his writing to suit the American style. Ujah also speaks two Nigerian languages fluently and understands four other Nigerian languages. “Most Nigerians regard their cultural heritage as their roots. Nigeria is made up of about 250 tribes, which explains the country’s complexity in its citizens’ heritage. Three of the 250 spoken languages are considered the major ones based on the population that speaks the language; the rest are known as the minor tribes. My native language (Idoma) is one of the minor tribes.” Ujah believes it is important to work hard and not give up until the work is complete. However, he feels that, “Overall, Americans don’t rest much as many have to work more than one job to pay their bills.” Nacasius considers himself a work in progress. His family— extended and nuclear—and his educational accomplishments are his biggest source of pride.

CUBA

a successful real estate agent, ana was 17 when she came to live in the u.s., and resided in Miami and Dallas before coming to Laredo in late 1961 after Fidel Castro’s takeover. Spanish is her native language, and she speaks a little French besides English, which she learned to speak, not fluently, at school, as it was a required course. “I did not become proficient until I lived here. I remember how hard I used to practice to ask for a grilled cheese sandwich. For some reason, those three, very differently pronounced words, tripped my tongue.” An adoring mother and grandmother whose children and grandchildren also speak Spanish, she was pleasantly surprised when her 17-yearold granddaughter who lives in Houston went to Madrid on a summer exchange program because she wanted to learn more about her cultural background. “My culture is loud, energetic, filled with dancing music and the smell of roasting chicken flavored with garlic and onions.” Proud of her rich heritage, Ochoa has fond memories of Cuba. She recalls the vibrant atmosphere enveloped by the beat of rhythmic drums when she visited the cathedral during a trip to the island’s Oriente province and the beautiful cante guajiro from the green valleys of Pinar del Río. “But watching a mariachi band enter a birthday party in Laredo is just as exhilarating. We can adapt and enjoy any changes if we have the right attitude. My family celebrates Christmas Eve with Mexican tamales, black beans and white rice and Christmas Day with tenderloin, shoepeg corn, and pecan pie.” Ana still remembers how hard it was to leave so much behind. “My entire life until then became a shadow I never caught up with. Most Cubans thought we would all go back someday soon, but that never happened.” When asked to make comparisons about America and Cuba, Ana answers, “What is so remarkable about Cuba is its people. I have spoken with a lot of visitors who tell me the country is fifty years behind in its development, food is scarce, crumbling buildings are everywhere, but the people are resilient, funny, and friendly.” Then adds, “This land is the refuge sought by millions, the leader of the world, and one country that epitomizes the right to live your life the way you want it. I am grateful to this generous country that accepted a large group of displaced Cubans who had nowhere to go. We were blessed.” On being successful she says, “Effort often generates success, but material success often comes without the accompanying satisfaction that doing the job well brings. Ultimately, being successful is being at peace with myself.”

ITALY

nicola lanese, beloved retired high-school teacher, grew up in post-war italy. His father died before he was born and a very young Nicola and his brothers learned from his mother, a seamstress, to be hard-workers. Daily, he had to walk to nearby towns to go to work. Nicola first came to Laredo in 1966 to visit his brother Father Pasquale Lanese who was assigned to San Agustín Church. Here he met his wife Carmen Dávila Lanese whom he married in 1967 and decided to stay. The fast-pace of American life along with modern-day conveniences such as cream oct / nov 2012

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being able to go to one store for all his groceries changed his way of living. At the time, Lanese was not fluent in either English or Spanish, yet he was able to complete college and two master’s degrees. He found great satisfaction in achieving the American dream. He recalls that when he got here there were many possibilities, and still thinks it is true today. However, he feels America was much more welcoming of immigrants back then. Fortunately for him, Italian and Mexican cultural values have similitudes—family and faith are very important in both. “I think that I would have experienced more obstacles in instilling my values if I had raised my family in another part of the U.S.” In discussing the differences between the two cultures, Mr. Lanesse points out, “Americans work a lot and take very little time off. They are also very preoccupied with status and wealth—lots of cars, big houses, lots of name-brand clothing. Life in my hometown is much more relaxed and carefree. Holidays and vacations are well-appreciated, and jobs are always left at the office. While Italians enjoy the finer things in life, they don’t define us.” Also, “In spite of Italians’ fascination with American pop-culture, they will always believe that their country, its products, and their way of life, is superior to any other.” The retired teacher hosts an Italian traditional lunch for his children and grandchildren every Sunday and they are there not because it is expected but because they want to. He was in Italy this summer with his daughter, Claudia, and her two children, Massimo and Sofia. Two of his siblings still live there plus a large extended family. Lanesse will never forget his years as an Italian language instructor at Martin High School. “It was a great experience to share my native language and background with students who were so eager to learn about a different world. I hope it encouraged them to seek out new experiences outside of Laredo.” As for success, “A person is successful if he has derived joy and satisfaction in his career, in his family life, and in his interpersonal relationships. I am blessed to say that my life has been filled with joy and satisfaction in every aspect.”

INDIA

in 1994, at age 19, anju rupani, owner of marble slab creamery at mall del norte moved to laredo directly from mumbai, india after getting married to an indian american. Anju is proof that hard work and honesty lead to success in business especially in this “land of opportunity,” as she calls it. Coming from an environment that is very familyoriented, she did not encounter difficulties in adjusting to our area, except for the language barrier which she proudly overcame within two years of her arrival. The entrepreneur acknowledges that both societies differ—from the style of dressing, to the music, the cuisine, the five-day-long wedding ceremonies, to the custom of bowing before their elders and touching their feet to show respect and receive their blessing. Mrs. Rupani has made every effort to inculcate her traditions to her pride and joy, her 7-yearold daughter, Krisha, who already speaks Hindi fluently. “India is the world’s oldest civilization. There is ethnic diversity, religious harmony, endless natural beauty, exotic architecture, and a wide variety of foods.” Anju tries to go every three to four years to see her extended family, another big part of Indian lifestyle. “I still follow our traditions as close as possible. For example, we celebrate Diwali which is the Indian New Year and falls in the months of October or November though we also celebrate New Year’s Eve on December 31st. And maybe our ethnic attire of saris and salwar kurtas has changed into pants, jeans, and dresses. At 26

cream oct / nov 2012

the end of the day, I enjoy cheese enchiladas as much as a good spicy vegetable curry,” says the strict vegetarian. I didn’t move here with fixed views but I did realize that we are all a part of the same artwork; everyone has the same needs and wants but how we go about getting them is what differs.” At 15, Anju had her own small business making and selling glass jewelry boxes. From her parents she learned that no job is too small. They said, “Give it your best with sincerity and honesty and leave the rest to God. That has been the backbone of my work mentality. Success is not just financial because the best things in life cannot be purchased. Being able to live each day of my life humbly, with my head up, and to be able to make even a small positive difference for someone is what success is to me.”

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

after 14 years in laredo, jaime alejandro sued, interventional pain management specialist and anesthesiologist, is very proud of his family, his professional success, and being able to provide relief and a better quality of life to many suffering people. Every year in February, he goes for a week on a medical mission to help kids born with deformities. Dr. Sued first arrived in the U.S. in 1990 and came to Laredo via Queens, N.Y.; Grand Rapids, Michigan; and Chicago, Illinois. The pursuit of a better education and training in his field of medicine, still not available in the Dominican Republic, brought him here. “My biggest struggle has been being on my own. All of my family is in the island, including my four children. I try to go at least twice a year. I was used to the American way of life since I always traveled in the summers to the United States. My mother is Mexican, so I had an idea of the Mexican culture. Now, I speak Spanglish and like cowboy boots!” The esteemed physician thinks that our country has many remarkable advantages such as incredible highways, buildings, different types of terrains, and “you can find anything you can dream of.” Though a very adaptable individual, he comments, “I still have not gotten used to holidays like Thanksgiving and the Christmas celebration is very different. But the concept of discipline has helped me in many aspects such as being punctual to meetings.” On the unavoidable subject of American influence on cultural values, Dr. Sued answers, “I have three girls and a boy. It has been difficult to instill them our customs, starting with the Spanish language. But it is a matter of persistence. I want them to know the good and the bad of both worlds.” “Dominicans are very happy and helpful—warm like the climate. Loud music everywhere, beautiful, picturesque scenery and people of many colors, a mixture of typical Latin American culture mixed with African culture. There is little organization, traffic is horrible, and there are a lot of power outages. But again, people are laughing and joking all the time—they do not seem to mind. Food is very seasoned and colorful.” His favorites: Rice and beans, plantains, and seafood dishes, local beer, and coffee after every meal. “Being able to achieve goals makes you a success, but goals do not have to be complicated. Coming from an underdeveloped country with so many poor people and few resources makes me try to give the best of me in simple ways.”


"WHILE ITALIANS ENJOY THE FINER THINGS IN LIFE,

NICOLA LANESE, ITALY

DR. JAIME SUED, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

"MAYBE OUR ETHNIC ATTIRE OF SARIS AND SALWAR KURTAS HAS CHANGED INTO PANTS, JEANS, AND DRESSES. AT THE END OF THE DAY

"MY MOTHER IS MEXICAN, SO I HAD AN IDEA OF THE MEXICAN CULTURE

ANJU RUPANI, INDIA

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HISTORICAL DOWNTOWN SAN AGUSTIN CATHEDRAL García on some of his sources of inspiration: "keeping up with global tendencies in every aspect of design and creativity— fashion, music, art, gardening, architecture, and social media."

RENAISSANCE BY ELYSSA CANALES

Man Upon entering Victor Hugo García’s space, my mind went into a creative frenzy—Romanticism meets Japanese Garden, to say the least. If this was the initial prelude into the mind of a wedding planner guru, amongst other wonderful things I had so commonly heard, it would come as no surprise that this jackof-all-trades would credit his home the centre of his inspiration. This modern day Renaissance man is generously inventive and equipped to bring any woman’s ultimate dream day into a reality. cream aug / sept 2012

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Marveled by the organic splendor found in nature, his work is reflective of his education in the Japanese art of Ikebana. His weddings

stand alone for his exceptional elegance drips from floor to ceiling. More than simply

placing flowers in a vase, he has elevated the standard, stereotypical set of blooms

to highlight its alluring curves, lines, and form. As I got to know Victor Hugo, his

romantic spirit became more transparent

as I noticed quotes of Shakespeare subtly displayed throughout his walls. He credits his finesse to time spent in San Miguel

de Allende, his love for writing, and his inherent ability to create and experiment with different mediums. Through the success

of Victor Hugo’s inimitable style, Laredo is

allowed to pop its collar a little more. The boy who spent his summers conceiving murals on his mother’s backyard fence now finds his greatest accomplishments in the scene of

event planning and dreaming up beauty in the world.

I’m a bit impatient and somewhat distracted. Never boring—I can certainly throw a good party. I have been told I am a “connector,” an avid romantic, and an idealist. I can change my mind pretty easily. I’m a people person; love every opportunity to meet new people. I'm drawn to creative and intellectually stimulating individuals. I am an art collector. WHERE DID YOU STUDY? My bachelor degree is in art history from Lon Morris College, but then I went on to study with master artists in San Miguel de Allende and at Instituto Bellas Artes El Nigromante. WERE YOU ALWAYS VERY CREATIVE? I was always more creatively inclined in my childhood years, and I was lucky to have very supporting parents who not only gave me freedom to choose and experiment but actively promoted my exposure to art in many ways. I was constantly trying to recreate different environments, and I was a collector of artsy things from a very early age. The collector in me truly began from a very early age. WHAT INSPIRES YOU? Keeping in touch with all the surrounding elements, keeping an open mind and a keen eye wherever I go, and keeping up with global tendencies in every aspect of design and creativity—fashion, music, art, gardening, architecture, and DESCRIBE YOUR PERSONALITY.

social media. IS COMMUNICATING WITH YOUR CLIENTS IMPORTANT? Communication is the essence of a successful, collaborative project. YOUR BODY OF WORK INCLUDES SUPERB CREATIONS. WHICH ASSIGNMENT HAS BEEN THE MOST MEMORABLE? Having the opportunity and responsibility to coordinate President Bill Clinton's private visit to one of my client's home here in Laredo. Having to be accountable to such highly-regarded entities as Homeland Security, Secret Service, and Mr. Clinton's personal assistants during the entire week of preparations for his visit and all that the short visit and Mr. Clinton's demands required was an intense but unforgettable experience.WHAT DISTINGUISHES YOU FROM OTHERS IN YOUR LINE OF WORK? Perhaps what has influenced my personal style the most is the fact that my artistic formation took place in an environment (San Miguel de Allende) so eclectic and sophisticated, inhabited by some of the most renowned artists of our time. I think, as also for everyone else, we have our own particular sources of inspiration, which consequently make us unique in what we imprint in every project. As for me, an old-world feeling, a sense of history combined with a twist of modernity is what defines my work. HOW DO YOU MANAGE TO MAKE EVERY EVENT SO UNIQUE? With attention to detail, interpreting the client’s needs and own ideals. But, most importantly, going with my initial instincts while opening up to understanding that most projects are not all about me but for a certain purpose and someone else in mind, typically. And reinventing myself as often as possible. HOW DO YOU STAY ON THE CUTTING EDGE? By keeping up with my inner self, most importantly, and to have good use of my time and talent. Finding a balance between providing for a project but still having time for myself and what motivates and inspires me. Reading as much as I can historical and current issues and trends. Traveling is always refreshing, but getting lost off the path is always more inspiring. Wherever I am, I find time to stop and pay attention to details, even in the most unusual places and in the most minor aspects. IS DISCIPLINE IMPORTANT? I have learned to understand that in my profession, there is no such thing as irrelevant factors in design, and that each factor requires a decision. So to be in control, it's a 100% commitment. YOU HAVE CREATED SOME STUNNING ARRANGEMENTS WITH FLOWERS, HATS AND A MYRIAD OF OBJECTS


"I love nature in general. It's the most wonderful thing to learn to appreciate our own resources, respect them, and draw inspiration and

responsible use from them." Victor Hugo García

BEAUTIFULLY COMBINED. HOW DO YOU DO IT? You

can often hear me say that I can get bored pretty easily; that's why I have to be creating something new and different all the time. So once I’m done with a craft, I want to move on and learn a different one, and put it to practice. I also have learned that there is no limit to what we set ourselves to do creatively speaking. An artist is an artist in any medium, and I believe diversity is more fun. YOU USE MANY

NATURAL AND ORGANIC MATERIALS IN YOUR CREATIONS. WHAT ARE YOUR VIEWS ON CONSERVING AND PROTECTING THE

ENVIRONMENT? I love nature in general. It's the most wonderful thing to learn to appreciate our own resources, respect them, and draw inspiration and responsible use from them. When society truly develops a sense of respect for nature, we'll then be able to say we have really advanced intellectually. HOW DO YOU FIND BALANCE IN YOUR LIFE? Spiritually speaking, I'm constantly finding myself drawn to a more Christ-centered life. Breathing meditation brings me back to focus when I get a bit anxious or stressed. I love Nia, Pilates and hot yoga. Finding the right amount of time for the things I love to do privately, such as reading, my own personal artistic projects, enjoying switching constantly my environment into fresh, new creative spaces. There is never a room in my place that doesn't have fresh flowers or nature incorporated since I can remember—it keeps spaces alive and invigorating, and that brings me comfort and relaxation. WHEN WORKING, DO YOU PREFER A PARTICULAR STYLE OR TECHNIQUE? I love the NeoClassical period as much as I like the practicality of modern design. In regards to projects, I think it’s best to combine the “likes” and the “needs” of the situation. If you imprint a space a certain personality influenced by any particular period or style, yet you update it and make it practical, you have a better chance of achieving great results. I have never been a purist of any particular style, but I can honestly say my taste range can expand over quite a few eras and styles in history. WHAT IS THE MOST FULFILLING PART OF YOUR JOB? Achieving something aesthetically pleasing for my clients is very rewarding. And knowing for a fact that a lot of hours, thinking process, and inspiration go into each project. But more importantly, the fact that from every project, a true bond with every client develops, and some of my most cherished and fond memories are from the encounter of great people, some

of whom have become very dear to me. HAS YOUR WORK EVOLVED Of course! Practice makes excellency, and one never stops learning something new every day—from every working experience and from every person in our path. I love the fact that I can influence others, as much as I have been influenced personally and professionally by others. I don't know if I'm too different from my early beginnings to today, but certainly the opportunities presented to me have given me a more well-rounded capacity to provide a better service. AT THE END OF THE DAY, WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO AT HOME? A balanced diet, controlled indulgences, as well as a healthy lifestyle. No network programming TV for me; I think it's unnecessary to disturb and distract the mind with so much negativity being portrayed. The bedroom is the most important space for me, so I spare no limits on comfort and the things I like in it such as art. Simply enjoying a moment of relaxation and constantly being grateful for all the blessings in my life. WHOM DO YOU ADMIRE? Jesus of Nazareth. I would have liked to have met him and all that surrounded him, historically speaking—the people, the places, the culture and customs. A fascinating person and time to have experienced firsthand. WHAT IS YOUR VISION OF YOURSELF WITHIN OUR COMMUNITY? HOW DO YOU FIT INTO IT? I want to leave a positive mark well beyond the material aspect. I hope my social activism through different organizations (such as Greenpeace, Keep Laredo Beautiful, Rio Grande International Study Center, and The Big River Foundation) could motivate others to get involved in giving back to not only our fellow beings but to really start paying our respects to nature, to live it and enjoy it. Giving of my time, my love of nature, and my love for people is truly a gift to me when I serve in my community. There is no monetary or material reward that can surpass the feeling of doing everything you can to leave a better world for the future generations. I also have a saying I use often: “You can choose to be happy or unhappy wherever you choose to live. One can be happy or unhappy here or in N.Y. I choose to be happy right where I am right now." WHAT ARE YOUR FUTURE PLANS? YOUR DREAMS? YOUR CONCERNS? Continue to seek what's emotionally rewarding for me. Seek creative expression in different mediums and a continuing growth in every aspect of my life. Give back to my community in every way possible. WITH TIME?


Small businesses are plagued with initial hardships. To avoid them, businessmen must arm themselves with the best defense. In service for 30 years, the Bienvenidos committee with The Laredo Chamber of Commerce serves as a safeguard against a hurting economy. BY ELYSSA CANALES

w

The chamber represents, in many ways, the face of the business community for the city. Bienvenidos is its official ambassador group. WHAT INNOVATIONS ARE TAKING PLACE? Currently, the committee is exploring ways to make maximum use of social media. It has opened a Facebook page, which keeps the membership informed, offers a site as a photo gallery, and is constantly growing its number of fans. In addition, the group has produced a couple of videos that it has placed on YouTube and is prepping for more. The idea is to promote the services and the work that the chamber does. WHAT IS YOUR HAT IS ITS PURPOSE?

BEST ADVICE TO NEW COMMITTEE

VANESSA GARCÍA JONATHAN RUIZ SARA DE LOS SANTOS

“We are active almost every week of the year. The Laredo Chamber is constantly welcoming new affiliates into its rolls providing ribbon cutting ceremonies, ground-breaking events, power breakfasts or businessafter-hours mixers. Members and prospective members are encouraged to attend all events. To find out about upcoming events simply visit www.laredochamber.com and click on “calendar” or become a friend of Laredo Chamber on Facebook.”

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cream oct / nov 2012

MEMBERS?

Take advantage of what the chamber has to offer. Serving in the committee gives you exposure, which, naturally, helps your company. But always act professionally, because Bienvenidos is continually on the spotlight. HOW CAN SOMEONE ENROLL? Any member of the Laredo Chamber of Commerce (or an employee of a member company) can apply. Applicants are screened just to ensure the level of commitment. There is an annual $80 fee, which serves to cover expense of meals served at meetings and other incidentals. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE ELEMENTS BIENVENIDOS FOCUSES

ON? Professionalism and volunteerism. We are a business organization; as such, its members represent a professional organization. Yet, we understand that we depend on members to give of their time and resources. Bienvenidos is a perfect example of that combination— volunteers at work always delivering a professional message. WHAT CAN YOU OFFER NEW FIRMS? Every member is also a representative for their company.

Whether it is advice on use of media, insurance, banking, or a number of other fields, new business owners are almost sure to find someone within the committee who can offer advice. In addition, with the full support of the chamber behind them, Bienvenidos can guide them to the full menu of discounts and services available through the chamber. IS BUSINESS EXPOSURE LIMITED TO THE

CITY? By no means. Membership includes

representation from regional and national companies. Very often, the Bienvenidos Committee is called on to represent the chamber as businesses open their doors with executives from throughout the country present for official ceremonies. The impression that our committee makes is carried back to those companies’ headquarters. As someone once said, “You only have one chance to make a first impression.” The chamber counts on us to make a good first impression. HOW

HAS BIENVENIDOS IMPROVED THE WAY

SMALL ENTERPRISES CONDUCT BUSINESS?

When a company opens its doors, it often turns to the chamber for its ribbon cutting ceremony. Small company owners may be experts in their fields of work—e.g., mechanics, cosmetologists, insurance agents, etc.—but they probably don’t have much experience in planning events. This is where Bienvenidos steps in. Guiding a small business owner through a short but well-planned and executed ceremony often leaves an impression of what good planning can do. These are lessons that will benefit the small business manyfold.

ANY

LOCAL

ESTABLISHMENTS

THAT

HAVE FOUND SUCCESS THROUGH YOUR COMMITTEE? There are plenty of examples. To name a few (each one of these credits many of its clients to contacts made through the Bienvenidos Committee): Staff Connection, SpringHill Suites Hotel, Ortiz Portraits, Liquid Studio Group, FalconSure Insurance. WOULD

YOU CONSIDER BIENVENIDOS A GUIDE

GROWTH AND EXPANSION? Yes. The chamber is like a barometer for the business community. If the economy is healthy, the membership rolls expand; if the economy slows down, membership recruitment slows down. A very active schedule for the Bienvenidos Committee reflects healthy business development and expansion.

FOR


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find ng jobs BY FERNANDO DE HARO

“Sometimes, your only choice is to be strong!” I had just heard those words during a benefit fashion show for the fight against cancer. I never could have imagined that a few minutes later the phrase would resonate so strongly within me because on that day, October 5th, 2011, Steve Jobs, the person whom I had most admired, my biggest source of inspiration in life, had lost his long battle to cancer.

M

y first contact with computers many years ago were never pleasant. I really detested them to the point that I preferred mathematics to those machines. All they did was elicit in me a desire to never have to use them. Time passed, and my hatred for them had not diminished until the time when I was visiting what would become my school in Houston (It’s amazing how I still remember that moment as if it were yesterday!). My eyes sparkled with amazement and wonder as it happens when discovering something marvelous for the first time. It was on top of a desk, it had a multicolored fruit and, the name next to it…Apple! To a great extent, I believe my life changed that day because a computer awoke my imagination, and for the first time in my existence, I had the desire to create. As time went by, I learned much more about computers and graphics programs like Photoshop 3 and something that was just

beginning back then called “information superhighway.” Wow, how times have changed! I still remember my first Mac, with a speed of 75 MHz and 1GB hard drive to store all my work. In the meantime, I was falling in love with computers, and, as I learned about them, the name Steve Jobs was constantly popping up. I kept wondering about him since his name was synonymous with Apple. Back then, Apple was not the mammoth corporation that it is today—many industry pundits thought the company was practically dead, and to buy a Mac was considered a huge risk. Nevertheless, I began to feel more interested in this individual who in the ‘70s, along with his friend, Steve Wozniak, had started Apple from his garage in Los Altos, California. As I was growing up and was learning further about technology, my admiration grew as Apple, guided by Steve, started to shine again. After years of being dismissed, it brightened up just like the


iMacs, those innovative brightly colored, oval-shaped computers that seemed to be made of translucent candy and caused such a stir because they were so different. That day in 1998, computers stopped being beige to make way for a new era that would have the name Apple imprinted on it. I was already a fan of Apple and from that day on, my admiration for Steve Jobs increased. That’s what incited me to learn all I could about his life, to see his keynote presentations, and to figure out what made him so special. The years passed, and the iPod arrived to revolutionize the music world. Then came the iPhone, which also transformed the mobile phone industry. Even the iPad has become a product coveted by the masses. To think that many thought such success was impossible! I was always captivated with every launching,

To a great extent, I believe my life changed that day because a computer awoke my imagination, and for the first time in my existence, I had the desire to create. FERNANDO DE HARO

“Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me…going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful… that’s what matters to me.” STEVE JOBS

spending hours glued to Internet sites that were overflowing with rumors surrounding what was expected to be another hit. I have always marveled at the fact that: How could a company that had never had a cell phone make history with the iPhone on their first try! Undoubtedly, the success belongs to the vision and leadership of Steve Jobs, who gave life to products that were “insanely great.” I really admire the foresight, energy, and attention to detail that he brought to his devices. But what astonishes me even more is how a man who was miles away was able to influence me and a whole generation. He motivated me to be better, to think differently, and to be daring. His decease left me with mixed feelings—sad to know he was gone forever, yet happy to know he had accomplished his mission in the world. Today as I see the new iPhone 5, I feel like the first time I saw a Mac, full of excitement and surprise (as if I had never seen anything like it). In my opinion, Steve Jobs left an invaluable legacy; his vision is now scattered forever among the millions whose lives he touched, including me. Thanks, Steve!

cream oct / nov 2012

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D

espite struggling economies, despite ticket prices that seem to rise every time I find myself at the box office window, despite outrageous concession prices and the ample availability of pirated material on the wonderful wide world of the internet (not that I engage in such nefarious activity), Hollywood continues to make and break records with each successive, threedimensional blockbuster release. So far this year Hollywood has made over $7 billion. If the current trend continues, the motion picture industry will be well on track to earn over $10 billion for the fourth consecutive year. If the expectations of this year’s coming releases are any indication, 2012 will mark the highest-grossing year in history.

However if in 1939 tickets to Gone with the Wind were sold at almost $10 a pop, it would be the highest- grossing movie of all time. So how, in the midst of economic woe does Hollywood manage to keep setting records? What makes us spend what is left of our hard-earned money at the overbudgeted spectacles that have become the standard of the mega-blockbuster franchises? Is the value of entertainment truly priceless? Is the solace of the theater one of the few places we can go to escape our world, if only for a few hours? Something tells me that the answer is more practical than that. From 3-D re-releases and adaptations of every teenage fiction craze that promises to turn a buck, to butchering classic remakes with modern moviemaking methods, and squeezing arbitrary sequels (as well as the soul) out of every “production” that generates the most return on investment, it seems that mainstream Hollywood has become very adept at recycling formulaic success and sucking any originality from every corner of the business. And yet we pay to see more. Yes, this is a rant. When I consider my favorite films, which line the coveted top shelf of my movie library, I see not the box office revenues, megastar cast, opinions of critics or awards season accolades. Instead, I think of the moments that almost resemble fond memories; characters that seem like old friends and enemies rather than figments of an imagination. I like to think that my favorite movies enhanced

my life in some way; each having influenced a realization of some small truth, in some small way, sometime between the opening scene and the closing credits. But the eternal flowing stream of trendy Hollywood films has turned my top shelf collection into a graveyard of cinematic past; classic movies from an era that do not seem to have a place in this present time. Films that have earned their place in Hollywood history, Citizen Kane, 8 ½, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, would not stand a chance against the likes of sparkling vampires and comic book heroes. Asking today’s mainstream audience to purchase a theater ticket, without any superhuman characters, without 3-D, in black and white and in a foreign language!? The projections do not seem very profitable to say the least. It is in this three-dimensional Hollywood of today that I question the scope of the generational gap that finally seems to be encroaching upon my aging estimations. Let’s face it, the amusements and distractions of previous generations no longer suffice to meet the needs of the present day masses. It then stands to reason that entertainment standards of today will not be enough to satisfy those of the future. How deep or perhaps how shallow will the culture of superficial satisfactions go? Does this reflect our evolving views and values as a society? Or are we simply, as dictated by our nature, rebelling against the mainstream and creating our own paths? The gears of Hollywood have always worked towards one common goal: The amassment of as much money as possible through the entertainment of the people. The creativity of most production companies stretches only as far as the majority demands. Previous generations have always failed to understand the demands and the alien culture of succeeding youth. And at some point we get left behind. And the very moment that the closing sentences of the preceding paragraph formed in my head, a spine-chilling fact of life dawned upon me. It is not the film industry or the culture of youth that are changing (on the contrary, some things will always stay the same)—it is me. It is inevitable. The world has spun, and I have become the bitter old man, waving his walking stick in defiance of and muttering incessantly about children on my grass. Unable to understand the music, for it is too loud and obnoxious. Are we now living in a world that is so fast-paced that thirty is the new sixty? Or is it just me? Scary. BY BOBBY TURNER

cream oct / nov 2012

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Cream met with an impressive bunch of kids on their way to becoming exceptional citizens. According to their website, “THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA is one of the nation’s largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship, and develops personal fitness. For over a century, the BSA has helped build the future leaders of this country by combining educational activities and lifelong values with fun. The Boy Scouts of America believes — and, through over a century of experience, knows — that helping youth is a key to building a more conscientious, responsible, and productive society.”

S’MORES VS PEANUT BUTTER PRETZELS BEEF JERKY VS TRAIL MIX

MICHAEL CER “A S’MORE IS A MORE POPULAR TREAT, AND SOME PEOPLE MAY BE ALLERGIC TO PEANUTS.”

DIEGO MÉNDEZ

“BEEF JERKY TASTES BETTER AND DOESN’T MELT OR GO BAD AS QUICKLY.”

PINE TREES VS OAK TREES BO KILBURN “OAK TREES ARE EASIER TO CLIMB.”

TRAIL RIDES VS HIKING JACK PAUL “I REALLY LIKE BOTH. I LIKE TRAIL RIDES BECAUSE YOU NEVER KNOW WHERE YOU’RE GOING, AND HIKING BECAUSE YOU ALWAYS FIND INTERESTING THINGS. BUT IF I HAD TO, I WOULD CHOOSE HIKING.”

VERSUS:

“STAYING IN A CABIN IS NICE, PARTICULARLY IN THE COLD, BUT THERE’S NOTHING LIKE SLEEPING UNDER THE STARS, IMMERSED IN THE WILD OUTDOORS ESPECIALLY WITH THE KIND OF TENT YOU CAN TAKE IN A BACKPACK TO SETTLE WHEREVER YOU LIKE, WHEREVER THE WIND TAKES YOU.”

“IT IS MUCH EASIER TO START A FIRE WITH MATCHES.”

MOSQUITOS VS POISON IVY

CABIN VS TENT RICKY CASTILLÓN

MATCHES VS BRANCHES JOEY VILLARREAL

HUNTING VS FISHING

ARMANDO SOTO III

ANDREW ROMERO

“MOSQUITOS CAN ALWAYS BE AVOIDED BY USING REPELLENT. THAT’S ONE OF THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF SCOUTING.”

“HUNTING MAINLY BECAUSE IT IS A MORE REWARDING EXPERIENCE WHEN YOU ACTUALLY GET A KILL.”

DO YOU HAVE A CLUB OR ORGANIZATION THAT WOULD LIKE TO PARTICIPATE IN CREAM’S “VERSUS?” CONTACT US AT INFO@CREAMCITYMAGAZINE.COM

PINE TREES VS OAK TREES ALEX CERDA “PINE TREES. THEY MAKE THE EXPERIENCE OF CAMPING SEEM GRANDER IN COMPARISON TO OAK TREES.”

TRAIL RIDES VS HIKING PATRICK DICKERSON “HIKING BECAUSE IT IS EXERCISE AND MORE FUN.”

BOY SCOUT POPCORN VS GIRL SCOUT COOKIES MARCO VILLARREAL “POPCORN. WE HAVE A WIDER VARIETY AND YOU GET SO MUCH MORE FOR YOUR MONEY.” cream oct / nov 2012

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ramon diez barrozo


STYLED

H

ere comes that time again when girls up north are toasty in their latest pea coats while we are left with no choice but to wear our overly-rotated summer clothes in the awkward stage between seasons I like to call “late” transition into fall. To be honest, even though we’ve said our farewell to summer, who knows when it will be gone for good. So in the mean time, we find ourselves under Mother Nature’s bipolar weather, leading us to become precisely that—bipolar. Because we can rarely rely on high-fashion magazines to inspire our daily attire and salvage us from this unpredictable situation, here are:

Make this the best of both worlds. Incorporate summer wear into your autumn wardrobe, like combining a favorite neutral jumpsuit with a tweed coat. Add fresh air to fall looks and discover the perfect balance between baring some leg and staying warm. Do keep those denim cut-offs that your mother hates. As long as they’re paired with opaque or textured tights, they’ll take you a long way. Inspired here by one of my favorite trends, denim on denim helps to keep your appearance updated and put together. (I have turned this into my uniform.) When in doubt, layer. It is an easy strategy as well as an all-year trend. Start with a basic piece, like I did here with a form fitted striped dress, follow with a couple of lightweight tops, then finish with a coat or chunky sweater. You’ll find endless outfit options when layering.

Enduring the highest of temperatures while at the same time staying chic does make us a different breed. We definitely acquire some skills along the way. So when the leaves start changing around you, keep those summer staples handy. Remember we kicked summer fashionably to the curb and most likely will do the same now. BY MICHELLE COOK GUTIÉRREZ

Michelle is a street fashion blogger living in Laredo, Texas. Follow her blog at nicethingsandstuff.blogspot.com want to feature your event? contact us for more info at info@creamcitymagazine.com


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CREAM NO.15