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Coastal Weed Strategy December 2008


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This draft Strategy has been prepared by a Coastal Weeds Working Group, as below: Tim Rudman (Flora Conservation Officer, Department of Primary Industries & Water), Krissy Ward (Regional Planner, North West Region, Parks & Wildlife Service), Anna Wind (Coastal and Marine Facilitator, Cradle Coast NRM), Peter Sims (Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Committee), Phillip Milner (Community), Karen Stewart (Regional Weeds Officer, Department of Primary Industries & Water), Greg Taylor (Regional Weed Strategy Officer, Cradle Coast NRM) and Ian Houshold (Geoconservation, Department of Primary Industries & Water). Front cover layout: Matthew Campbell Ellis Eagle Photo courtesy of: Armin Howold Back cover drawing by: Brayden Robinson, Grade 5, Acton Primary School

PUBLICATION DETAILS This document may be reproduced in whole or in part for the purpose of study or training, subject to the inclusion of an acknowledgement of source and its not being used for commercial purposes or sale. Reproduction for purposes other than those given above requires the prior permission of the Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Committee. ISBN Suggested citation: Coastal Weed Strategy for the Cradle Coast NRM Region (2008), Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Committee (Tasmania). Published by ŠCradle Coast Authority For copies of this publication please contact: Cradle Coast NRM PO Box 338 Burnie Tasmania 7320 Telephone: (03) 6431 6285 Or visit the web page at: www.nrmtas.org

Coastal Weed Strategy December 2008


CONTENTS Summary ...................................................................................................................................... 2 Legislative and Planning Framework .......................................................................................... 4 Target Area .................................................................................................................................. 5 Current Situation .......................................................................................................................... 5 Coastal Weeds ............................................................................................................................ 5 Vision .......................................................................................................................................... 6 Challenges .................................................................................................................................. 6 Stakeholders ............................................................................................................................... 7 Goals, Objectives and Actions ..................................................................................................... 8 Strategy Review .......................................................................................................................... 12 Acronyms .................................................................................................................................... 12 References and Further Reading ................................................................................................. 12 Appendix 1 – Prioritisation matrix ............................................................................................... 13 Appendix 2 - Relevant targets of the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy ……. 14

Coastal Weed Strategy December 2008


SUMMARY This Coastal Weed Strategy aims to establish a strategic and co-ordinated approach to the long term management of weeds in coastal areas of the Cradle Coast region. It provides a framework within which available resources, both human and financial, can be deployed to the greatest effect. This Coastal Weed Strategy is an initiative of the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Committee, and operates within the context of Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy (2005). Beaches and coastal areas of the Cradle Coast region are highly valued for many reasons including: •

Most of the region’s human population live, work and play close to the coast, and have done so for many thousands of years.

Coastal areas are vital to many economic activities, including tourism, industry, agriculture and business.

Coastal and estuarine areas are biodiversity hotspots.

Coastal areas of the region, particularly those in south west and western Tasmania, have significant natural values and are among the last great wild places on the planet.

Although coastal areas of the region are highly valued for these and other reasons, perhaps few of us consider the impacts that weeds may be having in these areas. However the impacts of coastal weeds can be very significant. Weeds can reduce recreational amenity, affect sites of biodiversity and cultural significance, dramatically alter sand dunes, beach and estuary landforms, and displace native vegetation. They may also adversely affect shorebird nesting and feeding sites. Weed infestations can also create fire hazards, and in some coastal areas these can threaten property and life. Management of coastal weeds imposes financial costs on Federal, State and Local Governments, industry and the general community. Some coastal weeds – marram grass, sea spurge, sea wheatgrass, rice grass, and pyp grass – can be spread by ocean currents. Effective management of these weeds requires co-ordination at regional, state and in some cases national levels. Other weeds significantly impacting coastal areas of the Cradle Coast region include boneseed, bridal creeper, mirror bush (coprosma), boxthorn, gorse, cape ivy and blackberry. This Strategy recognises that the total eradication of coastal weeds is not feasible, however they may be managed to reduce their impacts. The principal priority of this Strategy is to protect coastal assets from the threat of weed invasion. Mapping, targeted control actions and incentives to land managers are major components of the Strategy. Awareness raising and education programs are also recommended. The Coastal Weed Strategy will be reviewed internally by the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Committee in 2010, with a full public review in 2013.

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SUMMARY OF GOALS AND OBJECTIVES GOAL 1: TO MINIMISE ADVERSE IMPACTS OF WEEDS IN COASTAL AREAS Objective 1.1

Identify priority sites for protection

Objective 1.2

Protect priority sites from invasion or adverse impact by weeds

Objective 1.3

Improve management techniques

GOAL 2: TO CONTAIN THE DISTRIBUTION OF MARRAM GRASS, SEA SPURGE, SEA WHEATGRASS, RICE GRASS AND PYP GRASS IN THE CRADLE COAST REGION Objective 2.1

Establish and maintain eradication zones for marram grass, sea spurge, sea wheatgrass, rice grass and pyp grass

Objective 2.2

Establish a monitoring and control program for marram grass, sea spurge, sea wheatgrass, rice grass and pyp grass

GOAL 3:

TO EDUCATE, CO-ORDINATE AND MAINTAIN STAKEHOLDER COMMITMENT

Objective 3.1

Raise public awareness of coastal weeds and their impacts

Objective 3.2

Involve and support stakeholders in coastal weed management

Objective 3.3

Co-ordinate coastal weed management in the Cradle Coast region

GOAL 4: TO ENSURE AVAILABILITY OF FINANCIAL RESOURCES FOR COASTAL WEED MANAGEMENT Objective 4.1

Resource on ground control programs for priority coastal weeds

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LEGISLATIVE AND PLANNING FRAMEWORK This Coastal Weed Strategy functions within, and is consistent with, the following National, State and Regional legislative and planning frameworks. NATIONAL The Australian Weeds Strategy (2007) provides a national framework for weed management and identifies three goals: 1. Prevent new weed problems 2. Reduce the impact of existing priority weed problems 3. Enhance Australia’s capacity and commitment to solve weed problems The National Cooperative Approach to Integrated Coastal Zone Management has two relevant objectives: ‘Strengthen knowledge and understanding of pest species, and of effective tools to conserve and protect coastal biodiversity from the impacts of pest species; and increase capability of NRM regional bodies and coastal managers to identify, manage and/or eradicate pests’ and ‘Review and amend, as necessary, the list of Weeds of National Significance and alert list weeds, to better recognise the impacts of weeds on our coastal resources and biodiversity’. The Weeds of National Significance (WoNS) program has provided strategic direction and funding opportunities for WoNS in the Cradle Coast region, (including boneseed, bridal creeper, gorse and blackberry present in coastal areas of the region). STATE The Weed Management Act (1999) provides overarching legislative structure to guide weed management in Tasmania. The State Coastal Policy is currently being reviewed, and outcomes of the review process should guide this Coastal Weed Strategy. The Tasmanian Beach Weed Strategy (Rudman 2003) focuses on marram grass, sea spurge, sea wheatgrass, and pyp grass and identifies eradication and containment zones for each particular species. These eradication and containment zones have been updated in this Strategy. The Strategy for the Management of Rice Grass (DPIWE 2002) outlines a statewide approach to the management of rice grass in Tasmania. REGIONAL The establishment of the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002, and the subsequent development of three regional NRM Strategies for Tasmania in 2005 set the context for overall co-ordinated and long term planning for the management of Tasmania’s natural resources. The Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy was completed in 2005, and it operates within the framework of the broader Cradle Coast NRM Strategy.

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TARGET AREA This Strategy is a subset of the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy, and is focused on weed management on both public and private land in the area between high tide mark, and one hundred metres inland. This area has been chosen because it is manageable, and coincides with the area to be studied by a Coastal Values project, shortly to be undertaken within the Cradle Coast region. However, it is clearly recognised that coastal areas may be impacted by weeds outside this narrow area, and to be effective, coastal weed management must be informed by a cognisance of this bigger picture.

CURRENT SITUATION The Cradle Coast NRM region has a coastline of 2,640 km (oceanic and estuarine), and approximately 650 km of oceanic sandy beaches. A significant proportion of this coastline has undergone major environmental change as a result of weed invasion, urbanisation and other disturbances, and the few remaining unmodified areas are at great risk of weed invasion. Also at direct risk from coastal weeds are various cultural and environmental assets of significance, including landforms. All these assets may be further at risk because of weed induced changes in sand movements around the coast. Management of coastal weeds at present is, in some instances, achieving significant positive results at the local level. However many coastal areas do not benefit from any active management, and there is a need to increase co-ordination at the state and regional levels. Cradle Coast NRM incentive programs provide financial support and management advice to land managers to assist with weed control, and are currently available for gorse, boneseed, bridal creeper and asparagus fern. It is expected that weed control incentive programs will continue to be available into the future. At present the impact of weeds on our coastal areas is not widely appreciated, however there is evidence of growing community concern, and that concern has in part prompted development of this Strategy.

COASTAL WEEDS Weeds can dramatically alter coastal landforms, displace native vegetation, affect sites of cultural significance, biodiversity and landscapes, and reduce recreational amenity. Changes to beach landform and vegetation may also adversely affect shorebird nesting and feeding sites. Weeds can dominate the coastal environment. Some weeds are spread by ocean currents, and management of these weeds requires effective co-ordination at state and sometimes national levels. Other weeds that are not spread by ocean currents may be effectively managed at the state, regional or local level. Implementation of this Strategy is supported by actions of the Weed Hygiene Action Plan, which identifies actions to help prevent the introduction of new weeds, and the spread of existing weed populations. Marram grass, sea spurge and sea wheatgrass are spread by ocean currents. Pyp grass has the potential to become widespread, and may possibly be spread by ocean currents, but it is currently restricted in distribution. Typically, ocean currents carry these invaders south from the mainland and rapidly across the north coastline and down the western coastline of Tasmania. The east and southern coastlines of Tasmania are less rapidly invaded due to the influence of southerly currents for some of the year on those coasts. Sea spurge, demonstrates this. It has infested around half the sandy coastline of Tasmania in just four decades, and in the absence of intervention it is reasonable to expect that ultimately all beaches will be invaded.

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Rice grass is spread by tides and wind and has particular impacts in estuarine areas. Management of rice grass in Tasmania is guided by the Strategy for the Management of Rice Grass (DPIWE 2002). Other weeds significantly impact coastal areas, but their principal means of dispersal is not by ocean currents but by other means including ‘escapes’ from residential gardens, and inappropriate dumping of green waste. Mirror bush (coprosma), boxthorn, boneseed, cape ivy, gorse, cape wattle, blackberry and broom are some of the weeds currently impacting coastal areas in the Cradle Coast region. Boneseed, blackberry, boxthorn, gorse and broom are declared under the Weed Management Act 1999. Generally this strategy recommends that management of these weeds be subject to site specific weed management plans, however management should also be consistent with National, State and Regional priorities. On-ground weed control needs to be carefully planned, with due regard to all relevant social, environmental and economic factors. Planning needs to be informed by accurate identification of plant species, and include consideration of revegetation subsequent to on-ground control. In many cases revegetation is essential to re-establishing a healthy and sustainable site, and planning, including financial budgets, should reflect this reality. With passing time, new weed threats will emerge. Ongoing vigilance is required, together with appropriate reporting mechanisms and continuing implementation of the Region’s Weed Alert program, found at www.nrmtas.org Many coastal weeds and means of control are usefully described in the booklet ‘Coastal Weeds of the Cradle Coast region’.

VISION The vision of this Coastal Weed Strategy is: All levels of Government working in partnership with the community to contain the spread of coastal weeds and minimise their impact on environmental, economic and social values.

CHALLENGES PUBLIC AWARENESS Despite the widespread affection held by the general community for our coastline, the presence and impact of weeds in these areas is not widely recognised. Raising community awareness and maintaining ongoing interest and motivation to participate in management partnerships is both a challenge and an opportunity. Social conflicts have occurred within coastal communities in relation to management of coastal vegetation. These conflicts can be deeply divisive, and undermine community goodwill and motivation. Careful planning, community consultation, and ongoing public education programs will help to minimise these conflicts. CO-ORDINATION Preparation of a Coastal Weed Strategy will be a critical step towards achieving co-ordination at the state, regional and local level. Successful implementation of this Strategy is dependant on the active participation of key stakeholders. In the absence of this, the current situation can be expected to significantly deteriorate. Co-ordinated mapping of coastal weeds, and the availability of an accessible, up to date mapping database showing weed distribution, will greatly assist management. Cradle Coast NRM has developed a Regional Mapping Database, and discussions are underway regarding the development of a fully functional statewide mapping database that will include regional datasets.

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RESOURCES Coastal weed management has drawn heavily on the human resources of Coastcare and other community groups, and individuals. Their ongoing involvement will be important for the success of this Strategy. Given the general affection of our community for our coastal areas, there is significant potential for wider community involvement in the management of coastal weeds, especially if the impacts of these weeds are more widely understood. Government supported management of coastal weeds has occurred in recent years, through the Australian Government’s Natural Heritage Trust and some Local Government programs, and the actions of the Parks and Wildlife Service. Industry has also made valuable contributions. The impacts of coastal weeds are so widespread that effective management is beyond the voluntary resources of the community. Significant financial resources are required from all levels of Government and other coastal managers, otherwise the degradation of coastal assets will continue. Solutions to most current problems will involve long term management, and a corresponding commitment to financial resources.

INTEGRATED CONTROL Integration between National, State and Regional bodies is required to address some coastal weed issues. More effective long-term solutions need to be developed for the management of infested sites to reduce impacts, spread rates and improve native coastal vegetation rehabilitation techniques. There is an urgent need to develop controls to reduce the vigour and reproductive capacity of sea spurge, and other weeds spread by ocean currents.

RISING SEA LEVELS In its 2001 report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicts the sea level will rise between 9cm and 88cm by 2100. Storm surges are also predicted to have increased impacts. The actual degree of sea level rise and its impacts are currently the subject of much debate, and those responsible for the ongoing management of our coastal environment need to be informed by the growing scientific knowledge of rising sea levels.

STAKEHOLDERS The Parks and Wildlife Service has land management responsibility for the majority of coastal areas around the State while Councils are commonly responsible for coastal urban areas, particularly those on the northern coastline of the Cradle Coast region. Freehold title extends to the high tide mark in some areas with individuals or organisations such as the Aboriginal Land Corporation of Tasmania responsible for weed management. Though the key responsibility lies with the land manager, the widespread use of coastal areas by the community results in a very broad spectrum of stakeholders including volunteer groups with a specific management orientation such as Coastcare, Birds Tasmania and Fishcare groups. Many community groups are currently actively involved in coastal weed management. Typically these groups focus their attention and efforts on coastal weeds in their local area according to local priorities. While this Strategy is focused on CCNRM regional priorities, it recognises and aims to support the very valuable contributions made by local community groups. The public has a particular role to play in monitoring and assisting weed control in partnership with the land manager. To facilitate this, stakeholders at state, regional, municipal or local levels can engender public awareness and commitment to the Strategy. Scientists have a key role in introducing new control techniques such as biological control and assisting with the identification of priority sites for management. The Australian Government has limited land management responsibilities within coastal areas of the Cradle Coast region, but provides financial assistance for management through its Natural Heritage Trust.

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GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND ACTIONS Four goals are identified for the management of coastal weeds, and under each a series of objectives and actions are presented. Groups with a key responsibility for implementing actions, and partner groups are identified. Acronyms are elaborated at the end of the section. Timelines for implementation of actions are to be consistent with, and determined by, short, medium and long term targets of the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy. A list of relevant targets can be found in appendix 2 of this document.

GOAL 1: TO MINIMISE ADVERSE IMPACTS OF COASTAL WEEDS Objective 1.1

Identify priority sites for protection

Action Number 1.1.1

Actions

Key responsibility

Partners

Identify native coastal vegetation and plant communities that have very few priority weeds

DPIW, CCNRM

PWS

1.1.2

Identify sites with geoconservation significance

DPIW

PWS

1.1.3

Identify sites with threatened flora species and/or communities, and other significant biodiversity values

DPIW

PWS, Coastcare groups

1.1.4

Identify sites with threatened fauna species and communities of significant biodiversity value, including feeding grounds of the Orange Bellied Parrot

DPIW

PWS, Coastcare groups, Birds Tasmania, Environmental groups

1.1.5

Identify sites of cultural significance

ALCT, PWS, TALSC

CCNRM, Community

1.1.6

Identify sites of social and recreational amenity

PWS, Councils

Community

1.1.7

Continue to develop and apply a matrix for determining Coastal Weed Priorities

CCNRM, PWS, DPIW

Performance Indicators • Values recorded on central database • Priority sites for monitoring and control identified and recorded in weed control programs

Objective 1.2 Action Number 1.2.1

Protect priority sites from invasion or adverse impact by coastal weeds

Actions

Key responsibility

Partners

Produce a map of priority control sites

CCNRM, PWS

DPIW

1.2.2

Implement a planning process which sets out to eradicate or reduce weed impacts at priority sites, but takes into account significant values and ensures the long term maintenance, rehabilitation and management of those sites

PWS, land managers, Council Industry

DPIW, CCRWMC, Community

1.2.3

Implement monitoring programs for sites with priority values

CCRWMC

PWS, Community

1.2.4

Report annually on works to date, and recommendations for future management

PWS, CCRWMC

DPIW, Councils, land managers

Performance Indicators • Number of significant coastal areas with monitoring partnerships in place • Number of significant coastal areas with weed infestations that are under control programs • Production of annual report to quantify outcomes

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Objective 1.3

Improve management techniques

Action Number 1.3.1

Actions

Key responsibility

Partners

Actively support the development of biological control agents for sea spurge

CCRWMC, DPIW

Aust Gov, NRM Regions, PWS

1.3.2

Monitor, review and improve on-ground weed management techniques

DPIW, PWS, CCRWMC

All stakeholders

1.3.3

Establish and provide training for partner groups and agencies

CCRWMC

All stakeholders

Performance Indicator • Application for registering sea spurge as a biocontrol target is submitted within two years

GOAL 2: TO CONTAIN THE DISTRIBUTION OF MARRAM GRASS, SEA SPURGE, SEA WHEATGRASS, RICE GRASS AND PYP GRASS IN THE CRADLE COAST REGION Objective 2.1

Establish and maintain eradication zones for marram grass, sea spurge, sea wheatgrass, rice grass and pyp grass in the Cradle Coast region

Action Number 2.1.1

Actions

Key Responsibility PWS and other land managers

Partners

2.1.2

No further planting of marram grass

PWS and other land managers

CCNRM, Coastcare groups

2.1.3

Eradicate sea spurge from south of Birthday Bay and control between Stanley and Devonport and elsewhere at priority sites

PWS and other land managers

BT, CCRWMC, Coastcare groups, Councils, DPIW

2.1.4

Eradicate sea wheatgrass on the West Coast, from south of Sandy Cape

PWS and other land managers

BT, CCRWMC, Coastcare groups, DPIW

2.1.5

Eradicate pyp grass from mainland Tasmania and contain distribution to planted areas on King Island

PWS and other land managers

CCRWMC, Coastcare groups, DPIW

2.1.6

No further planting of pyp grass

Land managers

CCNRM, Coastcare groups

2.1.7

Encourage implementation of Tasmania’s Strategy for the Management of Rice Grass

CCNRM

DPIW

Eradicate marram grass from south of Birthday Bay

Coastcare groups, CCRWMC, DPIW, BT

Performance indicators • Eradication programs under way for known populations of each weed occurring in an eradication zone by 2008 or within one year of reporting new infestations - progress reported • No further plantings of pyp grass or marram grass

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Objective 2.2

Establish a monitoring and control program

Action Number 2.2.1

Actions

Partners

Contribute to the central weed database, updating distribution information for each coastal weed

Key Responsibility PWS, DPIW, CCRWMC

2.2.2

Implement and promote a cooperative monitoring and reporting program

CCNRM, PWS, DPIW

Community, Industry

2.2.3

Provide management advice

DPIW

CCNRM, PWS

2.2.4

Within the eradication zone, initiate control within 1 year of new coastal weed reports

PWS, Councils and other land managers

CCRWMC, Community, Industry

Community, Industry

Performance Indicators • Weed database updated within two months of new reports • Reporting and response protocols in place • Parks and Wildlife Service and land managers have monitoring programs in place • Control program in place for each infestation with an eradication zone

GOAL 3: MAINTAIN STAKEHOLDER COMMITMENT AND INCREASE PUBLIC AWARENESS Objective 3.1

Raise public awareness of coastal weeds and their impacts.

Action Number 3.1.1

Actions Develop media releases

Key Responsibility CCNRM

Partners

3.1.2

Develop and promote education resources

CCNRM

All stakeholders Education Dept.

3.1.3

Coastal weed information to be incorporated into NRM education and communications programs

CCNRM

NRM North, NRM South

3.1.4

Continue implementation of a Weed Alert program for new and emerging weeds

CCNRM

DPIW

PWS, DPIW

Performance Indicators • Coastal Weed pamphlets available and promoted • Inclusion of all priority coastal weeds in coastal weed guides • Inclusion of coastal weed management in coastal management courses • Number of media events • Four coastal weeds workshops or field days held annually • Weed brochures distributed and promoted to Nursery Association and commercial nurseries.

Objective 3.2

Involve and support stakeholders in coastal weed management.

Action Number 3.2.1

Actions

Key Responsibility CCNRM

Partners

3.2.2

Encourage and support state and local government participation

CCNRM

DPIW, LGAT, Local Councils

3.2.3

Provide incentives to encourage land manager participation

CCRWMC

Land managers

3.2.4

Develop opportunities for partnerships

All

All stakeholders

Encourage and support Coastcare and other community group participation

DPIW, PWS, CCRWMC

Performance Indicators • Number of stakeholders involved in coastal weed management • Number of coastal weed projects undertaken • Number of volunteer hours contributed

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Objective 3.3 Co-ordinate coastal weed management in the Cradle Coast region Action Number 3.3.1

Actions

Key Responsibility CCRWMC

Partners

3.3.2

Integrate this Strategy with PWS, local government and other weed management programs

PWS, CCNRM, DPIW

LGAT, Local Councils

3.3.2

Integrate with other NRM regions

CCNRM

NRM North, NRM South

Implementation of this Strategy to be co-ordinated by the CCRWMC

All stakeholders

Performance Indicators • Strategy priorities adopted by NRM program • Strategy priorities adopted within PWS and local government weed control programs

GOAL 4: ENSURE AVAILABILITY OF FINANCIAL RESOURCES FOR COASTAL WEED MANAGEMENT Objective 4.1

Resource on ground control programs for priority coastal weeds

Action Number 4.1.1

Actions

4.1.2

Allocate funds to deliver on ground incentive programs for Coastal Weeds

CCRWMC

4.1.3

Managers of land in coastal areas allocate and deliver funding and other resources for on ground weed management

State and local gov, private land managers, ALCT, TALSC

Actively seek opportunities for funding on ground Coastal Weed control programs to include mapping, monitoring and revegetation components, and an ongoing commitment to maintenance

Key Responsibility CCRWMC

Partners All stakeholders

Performance Indicators • New funding programs in place for management of coastal weeds • CCNRM coastal weeds on ground incentive program in place • Number of managers of coastal lands that allocate funds to management of weeds on their land

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STRATEGY REVIEW The Coastal Weed Strategy will be reviewed internally by the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Committee in 2010, with a full public review in 2013.

ACRONYMS ALCT BT CC CCNRM CCRWMC DPIW LGAT NRM PWS RWMS TALSC

Aboriginal Lands Council of Tasmania Birds Tasmania Cradle Coast Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Committee Nature Conservation Branch, Department of Primary Industries and Water Local Government Association of Tasmania Natural Resource Management Parks and Wildlife Service, Department of Tourism, Arts and the Environment Regional Weed Management Strategy Tasmanian Aboriginal Land and Sea Council

REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING Australian Weeds Committee, The Australian www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/weeds/

Weeds

Strategy

2007,

found

at

Conod, N, 2005, Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy, found at www.nrmtas.org Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Committee, August 2005, Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Strategy Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management web page www.nrmtas.org Creeping Back Yards – Protecting coastal and estuarine public reserves DPIWE 2002, Strategy for the Management of Rice Grass Marker P & Wind A, 2003 (revised Sep 2007), Guidelines for Works in Areas of Little Penguin Habitat Natural Resource Management Ministerial Council 2006, Integrated Coastal Zone Management

National Cooperative Approach to

Rudman, T, 2003, Tasmanian Beach Weed Strategy for Marram Grass, Sea Spurge, Sea Wheatgrass, Pyp Grass and Beach Daisy, DPIWE, Hobart

Various 2004, Coastal Weeds of the Cradle Coast Region

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APPENDIX 1 SITE PRIORITISATION MATRIX - WORKING VERSION This matrix will be used to assist in the determination of Coastal Weed Priorities – a higher score will equate to a higher priority. The matrix will be reviewed after further on ground testing, with updated versions posted on the NRM Weeds website. SITE .............................................................

LAND MANAGER .................................................

LOCATION ....................................................

TOTAL SCORE ....................................................

Minus 3 SOCIAL Seed spread to neighbours is Cultural heritage site within Weeds are fire hazard with threat to property Significant weed control evident within (New owner scores 2) ENVIRONMENTAL Threatened species present

No control evident

More than minimal control required until after Previous funding

WEED CONTROL Proposed works would link to or enhance other works in adjacent areas Site Area Site Access Site weed density Workers available to perform weed control Worker safety

REGIONAL AND MUNICIPAL PRIORITY Weeds on site are (rate according to highest priority weed) Municipal Priority (rate according to highest priority weed)

3

Possible 2 km Possible

Probable 100m Probable

Certain On site Certain

Last three years

Last two years

Last twelve months

One species Pasture or cropping

Nearly intact remnant

Probable Possible

Possible but unlikely Probable

20 years

Over $3,000 Income loss greater than $1k pa Five years

Over $1,000 Income loss greater than $3k pa Three years

Under $1,000 Income loss greater than $10kpa Two years

Obligations ignored

Obligations partially met

No previous funding

Obligations completely met

No linkages

Linkages to other regional works 10 – 30 ha

Linkages to other works within 20km 1 – 10 ha

Linkages to immediately adjacent works Less than 1 ha

Significant access issues Between 20 and 50% Unidentified, though possible Degree of unavoidable risk identified

Minor access issues Between 5 and 20% Identified

Easy access

Site specific hazards identified and managed

No specific issues

WORS or Declared

WONS

Subject to current active program

Zone B

Zone A

Municipal Priority Weed

Certain

Seed transport via corridor ECONOMIC Cost of year one works Weed leading to loss of income on economically productive land

2

More than one species Threatened vegetation community No real possibility Certain

Vegetation

Off target damage

1

Over $10,000

Greater than 30 ha Remote or very difficult Over 50% of area Unlikely

Dangerous

Neither WONS, WORS, or Declared Not listed

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SCORE

Less than 5% Readily available

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APPENDIX 2 RELEVANT TARGETS OF THE CRADLE COAST REGIONAL WEED MANAGEMENT STRATEGY AIMS • • • • • •

(LONG TERM DESIRED OUTCOME OVER 50+ YEAR TIMEFRAME) To prevent new weed infestations To control weed incursions at an early stage, before they become problematic To significantly reduce the impact of existing weeds To establish an enthusiastic, well informed and wide network of people involved in weed management in the Cradle Coast region To manage regional weed issues in a cooperative, co-ordinated manner, through working partnerships to ensure cost effective weed management To ensure the Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy is relevant, achievable, and reflects the current weed management issues in the region

MEDIUM TERM GOALS • • • • • •

(DESIRED OUTPUT OVER 10 – 20 YEAR TIMEFRAME)

All priority new and establishing weed infestations are under active management within six months of reporting by 2011 The area infested by declared weeds (including WONS) and WORS in 2010, reduced by at least 50% by 2025 Rice grass eradicated from Circular Head municipality by 2020 All stakeholders recognise and address weed management as part of their core business by 2015 Regional and all municipal weed committees actively participating in the on-gong implementation of weed management strategies by 2011 The Cradle Coast Regional Weed Management Strategy reviewed and updated every five years

SHORT TERM TARGETS • • • • • •

• •

(DESIRED OUTPUT OVER 1- 5 YEAR TIMEFRAME)

Effective and efficient systems in place to detect, report, map and respond to the introduction of new weed species, outbreaks of existing weeds and sleeper weeds by 2007 Mechanisms applied by all land managers for responding to new weed incursions reported on their land by 2007 Programs to provide incentives to land managers on best practice and cooperative control of weeds by 2005, with ongoing availability to 2025 Regional weed mapping program in place by 2007 The distribution and density of declared weeds (including WONS) and WORS in the region mapped, prioritised and benchmarks set for their control by 2010 In accordance with Tas Together Benchmarks, priority sites determined and eradication of the following target species from these sites, commenced by 2010 – serrated tussock, gorse, boneseed, marram grass and willows Cradle Coast weeds booklet reviewed and updated by 2008 A monitoring and evaluation process in place by 2005 to measure performance against the outlined goals and targets, with the process implemented annually thereafter

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Profile for Cradle Coast Authority

Coastal Weed Strategy  

Coastal Weed Strategy for the Cradle Coast NRM Region

Coastal Weed Strategy  

Coastal Weed Strategy for the Cradle Coast NRM Region