__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek Wesley Vale Primary School Tasmania 2010

Fig.1 Andrew Creek School Reserve and education centre

Bushways

Environmental Services –Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Author “Bushways Environmental Services – Tasmania” 175 Glenford Farm Rd, Underwood TAS 7268. Email: bushways@intas.net.au Mobile: 0429 197 671 © Bushways Environmental Services – Tasmania 31 October 2010

Prepared for: Cradle Coast NRM PO Box 338 Burnie Tasmania 7320

Acknowledgements Bushways wishes to thank all those who assisted with the progress of this report including: Volunteers and school staff involved with the rehabilitation project: Portia Andrew, Julia Butler-Ross, Kim O’Brien, Simon Payton, Rodney Thomas, Peter Tonelli, Steve Connelly; Iona Mitchell, DPIPWE Land for Wildlife Coordinator; Jim Nelson, Deloraine Field Naturalist. Funding acknowledgement This project is supported by Cradle Coast NRM, through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country.

2 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 4 2. Background ................................................................................................................................ 4 3. Site Description ......................................................................................................................... 5 4. Methodology .............................................................................................................................. 6 5. Assessment of native vegetation and weeds ......................................................................... 7 5.1 Native Vegetation ............................................................................................................ 7 5.2 Habitat for threatened and non threatened fauna ........................................................... 8 5.3 Weeds............................................................................................................................ 10 5.4 Natural values and weeds management map ............................................................... 11 6. Threats and Management Recommendations ...................................................................... 12 6.1 Threats to habitat ........................................................................................................... 12 6.2 Weeds and recommendations for control ...................................................................... 13 6.2.1 Blackberry ............................................................................................................... 13 6.2.2 Blue Periwinkle ....................................................................................................... 13 6.2.3 Elms ........................................................................................................................ 13 6.2.4 Other woody weeds ................................................................................................ 14 6.2.5 Grassy weeds ......................................................................................................... 14 6.2.6 New weed invasions ............................................................................................... 14 6.3 Protect habitat while controlling weeds ......................................................................... 14 6.4 Protect threatened species habitat ................................................................................ 15 6.5 Restoring habitat ........................................................................................................... 16 6.5.1 Revegetation........................................................................................................... 16 6.5.2 Plants for revegetation ............................................................................................ 17 6.6 Liaison with contractors and volunteers ........................................................................ 19 6.7 Management zone table ................................................................................................ 20 7. Strategic Priorities ................................................................................................................... 23 9. References ............................................................................................................................... 24 10. Appendices ............................................................................................................................ 25 Appendix 1. Plant Species List ............................................................................................ 25 Appendix 2. Weed control table........................................................................................... 26 Appendix 3. General Weed Control Advice ......................................................................... 29 Appendix 4. Dont kill natives! .............................................................................................. 30 Appendix 6. Useful contacts ................................................................................................ 31

3 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

1. Introduction Cradle Coast NRM engaged Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania to provide a Vegetation Management Plan for Andrew Creek at the Wesley Vale Primary School, Wesley Vale. The Vegetation Management Plan has four primary objectives: • To improve the management of the riparian reserve, increase the area of native habitat and vegetation, reduce critical threats to biodiversity and enhance the condition, connectivity and resilience of habitat. • To reduce the impacts of Weeds of National Significance in the reserve. • To increase the involvement of volunteers and build existing education projects in managing the reserve. • To assist the Wesley Vale Primary School to better manage the reserve.

2. Background Wesley Vale Primary School and dedicated volunteers have been caring for this site on Andrew Creek for many years. Figure 2 Signage on the bushland education centre is a reminder of some of the programs that have supported the rehabilitation at Andrew Creek.

The vegetation at the stream headwaters has been protected since 1930 (Portia Andrew pers. com. 25/08/10) but downstream of this, on the school reserve, the land on both sides of the creek was used for agriculture, predominantly cattle grazing, for many years. As a result, the area became highly eroded and most of the native vegetation was lost. Recognition of the degradation caused by livestock led to projects for fencing and revegetation from 1996-1999 to improve the riparian and aquatic habitat. A management plan was developed to guide the rehabilitation work (Kim O’Brien pers. com 1/9/10). Once the cattle were excluded with fencing, rehabilitation of the riparian area was initiated with plantings. As part of this effort Tasmanian Blue Gums were planted for the migratory Swift Parrot’s foraging habitat. The natural regeneration of blackwoods, ferns and shrubs was excellent, and over time, planting became less necessary for habitat recovery. The protected upstream vegetation was beneficial as a seed source for the rehabilitation. Under the National Landcare Program and Natural Heritage Trust the school participated in many environmental programs including Leapfrog, to protect habitat for Tasmania’s endemic and threatened frogs including the Green and Gold Frog, Adopt a Patch, Adopt a Farm and Junior Landcare. These projects led to a range of activities for the students such as involvement with the nearby dairy farm, developing a school nursery and vegetable garden, basket weaving, making plant based dyes for embroidery and basketry, and releasing dung beetles (Julia Butler-Ross 24/08/10). Educational activities involved the students in collecting data for frog, bird and weed identification and monitoring. The school students collected a herbarium for the school resources and grew native plants for revegetation on the creek. Volunteers and students ran a business enterprise from the shade house project, growing plants for the school fair which netted over $1500.00 and another big sale for mother's day which raised further funds (Julia Butler-Ross 15/10/10). Weeds were kept under control by the groundsman, teachers and students who worked together regularly once a week to maintain the area. The groundsman slashed the weeds and 4 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

the teachers and students would follow up with sawing off stems and digging out root crowns (Kim O’Brien pers. com 1/9/10). During this time a large resource kit was collected for the school consisting of books and reference material, tools and equipment suitable for the student to use for on ground works, audio recorders, microscopes and a lot of data recorded and stored on CD (Kim O’Brien pers. com 1/9/10). These projects were successful and recognised with awards. The school was the national and state winners of the Weedbusters Award, and won the Readers Digest Local Hero Award. The school gained the Tasmanian Landcare Educational Award in 2001 and was runner up for the National Landcare Educational Award in 2002. As a result of this effort the Andrew Creek bush was rehabilitated from a very degraded stream to the healthy riparian bushland providing habitat for threatened species that it is today. A walking circuit with interpretation signs has been constructed through the regenerated bushland with wooden bridges crossing the stream at both ends and a small outdoor education centre is situated on the edge of the bush giving students a delightful area for learning activities in natural surroundings. Shelters have been constructed as additional habitat for the threatened Eastern Barred Bandicoot (known to be on site) and to give the students a monitoring opportunity with this nocturnal animal (Peter Tonelli pers. com. 24/08/10). Sandbags have been strategically placed in the stream to create pools for more diverse aquatic habitat and sand trays placed in the bush for monitoring animal tracks. Recently, weed control has been carried out with some removal and slashing of blackberries in the riparian area and some further tree planting has been done near the education centre. The bushland on Andrew Creek was registered with Land for Wildlife in November 2009. There are other Land for Wildlife properties in the vicinity and as a network of reserved bushland they contribute to the overall ecological health of the area and are important havens for biodiversity in the agricultural landscape.

3. Site Description Andrew Creek and Wesley Vale Primary School is located at Wesley Vale, on the Devonport 1:25,000 mapsheet 4444, at approximately E: 454793, N: 5440196. The site is within the Northern Slopes bioregion. The area addressed within this plan is 2ha of mostly native riparian vegetation with a blackberry infestation on Andrew Creek. The study site adjoins the school property and is called a “school reserve”. Wesley Vale Primary School has an education centre in the bush near the creek and an interpretation trail through the bush. Agricultural land adjoins the study site immediately downstream and approximately 2ha of native vegetation on private land adjoins the site upstream. Cattle graze the adjacent land but are excluded from the creek and native bush. Wesley Vale Primary School is situated on land classed as school reserve, which is crown land managed under the Crown Lands Act 1998. “Crown land is “public land” owned and managed on behalf of all Tasmanians by the State Government. It includes public reserves, school and hospital sites and the verges of most roads in Tasmania.

5 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010 Crown land that is not reserved under the National Parks and Reserves Management Act 2002 or is not State Forest is managed under the Crown Lands Act 1976 and the Crown Lands Regulations 2001. In a broad sense, this legislation is a set of rules on what can and can’t be done on Crown land and how Crown land is sold, leased or made available for use under licence. The general public does not automatically have a right to enter on Crown land. In general, the public may freely enter on beaches and public reserves but not school and hospital sites, reserved roads and other areas where access may be restricted by signs.�

Figure 2 Location of Andrew Creek at Wesley Vale School

4. Methodology A Natural Values Report was conducted (August 2010) for all threatened flora and fauna records within 5000 metres of the site. Habitat for threatened flora and fauna likely to be found here was recorded during this assessment. The field survey was conducted on the 2 nd August by Helen Morgan, accompanied by Simon Payton, Rodney Thomas and Steve Connelly from the school staff. Significant locations were recorded with a hand held GPS using datum WGS84 (equivalent to GDA94). The assessment included a vegetation survey of the Andrew Creek school reserve, documenting predominant species, and including weed species. Management issues for the vegetation and sites for rehabilitation were identified. Control methods likely to be appropriate and practical were discussed and noted during the survey. Volunteers and school staff who had been involved with the projects in the past were interviewed by telephone.

6 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

5. Assessment of native vegetation and weeds 5.1 Native Vegetation The native vegetation on site is regenerating Acacia melanoxylon (Blackwood) swamp forest (TASVEG code NAF). Blackwood dominates the riparian vegetation at Andrew Creek, with a few emergent eucalypts, forming a dense canopy over an understorey of shrubs and ferns. Most of this forest has regenerated over the past 10-12 years and is still immature, reaching a height of approximately 8-12 metres. Tall shrubs, Coast Paperbark and Swamp Honeymyrtle, are found at the downstream end of the site with Musk, Daisy Bush and Stinkwood more evident in the understorey at the upstream end. Woolly Tea Tree, Daisy Bush, Prickly Moses, Melaleucas and Blackwood form a corridor of shrubs between the school paddocks and the creek. Masses of Scrambling Coral Fern are a feature of the bush forming dense shrouds and climbing 3-4m up the trunks of Blackwoods. Figure 3 Scrambling Coral Fern, very vigorous and beautiful, climbing the Blackwoods on the edge of the bush.

Soft Tree Ferns occur along the creek, forming a thicket opposite the pump house where several Burrowing Crayfish chimneys were found. The creek banks are lined with Hard Water Fern and Ruddy Ground Fern with Tall Sedge, Square Twigsedge and Pale Rush. Spreading Swordsedge and Cutting Grass are found off stream throughout the riparian vegetation with Butterfly Flag Iris on the northern side. Patches of Bracken were dense in places and are providing valuable ground cover and connection between areas of good condition and disturbance. Figure 4 Soft Tree Ferns on the stream banks where Burrowing Crayfish chimneys are located. Blackberry is present.

Blackberry is evident throughout the bush sparsely intermingling with good native vegetation, dense through Bracken patches and occasionally dominant in patches. Blackberry overhangs the creek in places, trailing into the water and dangling from ferns. The vegetation is mostly dense and continuous around the creek except for the area cleared of Blackberry on the southern bank. Some revegetation has been undertaken near the education centre with Tasmanian and mainland natives and some exotic plants. Figure 5 Good condition riparian bush on the northern side of the stream, with Stringybark, Blackwood, Dolly Bush, Prickly Moses and Tea Tree.

There were no threatened flora species found during the survey. 7 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

5.2 Habitat for threatened and non threatened fauna The Andrew Creek vegetation provides a small area of very good fauna habitat for threatened and non-threatened fauna species. It is a valuable refuge in the surrounding agricultural land for marsupials, birds, reptiles and invertebrates. Chimneys of Burrowing Crayfish were found in moist ground beneath Tree Ferns near the stream. Burrowing Crayfish on site have been identified as the endemic Engaeus mairener (Jim Nelson 4/9/10) and it is also believed that the endangered Engaeus granulatus, Central North Burrowing Crayfish, may be on site (Peter Tonelli pers. com. 25/8/10). On the northern side of the creek cleared and mown areas of pasture grass are maintained for open space adjacent to the native bush. This provides excellent foraging habitat for threatened fauna species Easter Barred Bandicoot which are known to favour bush-pasture interface such as this (Bryant and Jackson 1999). These small, nocturnal animals have been sighted here regularly (Rodney Thomas pers. com. 2/8/10) and many of their conical diggings were clearly apparent in the grassy areas. Figure 7 Chimneys of Burrowing Crayfish found near the creek under Soft Tree Ferns.

Low shelters constructed from timber, iron and straw have been placed in the open ground and are apparently used by the bandicoots. These shelters provide a refuge for the bandicoots additional to the ideal habitat already available in the bush, with an understorey of sedges, grasses and shrubs near to water and food supply.

Figure 8 Conical bandicoot diggings found in the mown grassy area The threatened Green and Gold Frog occurs on site and individuals have been found at the school (Rodney Thomas pers. com. 2/8/10). These frogs like permanent and temporary water bodies with overhanging vegetation and opportunities for basking sites. This well vegetated stream and its connection to nearby farm dams provides good habitat for Green and Gold Frog which are known to move some distance from water when not breeding (Littlejohn, 2003).

Figure 9 Shelters for Eastern Barred Bandicoot and interpretation signage Brown Frog and Smooth Froglet were heard calling at the sunny downstream end of the habitat area during the survey. 8 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

It is likely that other threatened fauna such as Spotted Tail Quoll and Tasmanian Devil pass through this bush while roaming the landscape. Grey Goshawks have been seen in the area (Peter Tonelli pers. com.) but are unlikely to use this immature Blackwood forest for nesting. Non-threatened fauna such as Rufous Wallaby, Brushtail Possum, Platypus and Ringtail Possum are known to be on site as well as snakes which could be either Copperhead or Tiger Snake. Both are venomous so care should be taken here during the summer and autumn when snakes are active and breeding.

Figure 10 Green and Gold Frog, basking (image from Bushways collection).

Figure 11 Vegetation tunnels likely to be made by wallabies

Figure 12 Sand tray placed to record and identify animal tracks

Figure 13 Sandbags placed in the stream to create pools and increase habitat availability

9 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Birds recorded by the school children in the bushland include Dusky Robin, Grey Shrike Thrush, Superb Fairy Wren, Yellow Wattlebird, Tasmanian Thornbill, Black headed Honeyeater (Rodney Thomas pers.com 30/08/10).

5.3 Weeds and feral animals Blackberry is the most dominant weed found on site but Blue Periwinkle, Hawthorn, Sweet Pittosporum and deciduous Elm trees also occur. Broom, Crack Willow and Mirror Bush are established upstream on the neighbouring property and pose a threat of invasion. Blackberry is highly invasive on this site and is well established. It forms dense patches where it can get optimum sunlight and take advantage of gaps in the native vegetation, usually on the edges of the bush. However, it also has the ability to scramble more sparsely in the shade and part-sun over native plants and has invaded parts of the stream bank environment. Blackberry and Bracken form dense patches together which also provide quite good habitat and connection between good condition areas. Blackberry does play a role in offering some habitat for many animals.

Figure 14 Deciduous Elm trees were planted off stream many years ago and have become invasive. Many of these trees have already been controlled (Portia Andrew pers. com. 25/8/10)

The wandering low growing herb, Blue Periwinkle, also highly invasive, is dense beneath Blackberry in the off stream area on the school side. The woody weed Sweet Pittosporum is growing near the pump house near the elm trees. Introduced pasture grasses are present on site but tend to be stronger in areas where the native plants are not well established. Pasture grasses are being mown on the northern side of the creek for snake safety as well as maintaining the bandicoot foraging area. On the southern side of the creek pasture grasses are less mown and more weedy, mingled with blackberries in dense patches. The population of rabbits here will effect regeneration of plants and any revegetation plantings. Feral cats are known in the area and have been trapped on adjacent land in the past (Julia Butler-Ross pers. com. 15/10/10). However, it is possible that they prey on rabbits and are playing a role in rabbit control.

10 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

5.4 Natural values and weeds map

High Priority areas 1 -2 -3 Medium Priority areas 4 - 5 Low Priority areas 6 -7- 8

NB: Blackberry is present throughout the bush and has not been specifically mapped.

11 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

6. Threats and Management Recommendations 6.1 Threats to habitat The forest on site has regenerated extremely well in response to the works already done and all future works should aim to enhance this. As it is habitat for threatened species all care should be taken to protect habitat while weed control work is in progress. The site is appreciated and used for educational purposes. These activities may also disturb habitat if care is not always taken. Cattle have been successfully excluded from the site but could damage the bush again if they had access. Maintenance of the fences is paramount to ensure they do not gain access again accidentally. The main threats to the habitat at Andrew Creek are: • Declining habitat value due to weed invasion • Potential disturbance and loss of habitat from weed control works, educational activities and accidental cattle access Recommendations • Protect threatened and endemic species habitat from impacts or disturbance during works - do not use herbicides in areas of Burrowing Crayfish habitat (Management Zone 1) and do not clear vegetation extensively in threatened species nesting habitat (Management Zones 1, 2, and 4). See also section 6.4 •

Strategic approach to weed control and restoration i.e. treat the best condition areas first so they are maintained as such (Management Zones 1 and 2).

Practice sensitive weed control in sensitive areas, i.e. manually weed the stream banks and moist riparian areas and do not apply foliar sprayed herbicides in this zone. See also section 6.4

Restore cleared riparian habitat as soon as possible (Management Zone 3).

Staged removal of Blackberry across the site and especially where it is providing habitat (Management Zones 4,5,8)

Maintain Eastern Barred Bandicoot foraging habitat areas with woody weed control. Don’t mow right up close to the native vegetation edge, to lessen risk of reducing it over time.

Ensure that educational activities do not impact or disturb habitat

Maintain cattle exclusion fences

12 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

6.2 Weeds and recommendations for control 6.2.1 Blackberry Blackberry is the most dominant weed and is widespread through the bush. It is present in varying densities and in all habitats and does have habitat values for birds, marsupials, reptiles and invertebrates. Therefore a strategic approach to its control will be essential for blackberry control without loss of habitat. Recommendations • Staged removal of Blackberry is critical on this site as it has habitat value. Plan carefully what can be achieved in each year. Start with the least invaded areas. •

Manually weed the Blackberry in and near the stream and the priority areas. (Management Zones 1, 2, 3). Cut stems and dig out roots. Replant soon where erosion is a threat.

Cut-and-paint method can be used away from the stream where the Blackberry is sparse and native vegetation is good (Management Zones 2, 4).

Foliar spray in stages with targeted broadleaf herbicide the off-stream dense clumps of Blackberry (Management Zones 5, 6, 8). This is an especially suitable method where Blackberry is over grasses and sedges as they are not susceptible to the broadleaf herbicide and some habitat and groundcover will be maintained. The introduced grasses can be spot sprayed later on for replanting.

Bracken is susceptible to the same herbicide as Blackberry so where these two are forming dense clumps in the good vegetation area use a staged approach over several years (Management Zones 2 and 5).

6.2.2 Blue Periwinkle Blue Periwinkle should be controlled simultaneously with the Blackberry where it is situated in management zone 8. Recommendations • Foliar spray with Blackberry to start with as this is a large area and mostly inaccessible beneath the blackberry. •

Smaller more accessible patches can be smothered with carpet or black plastic or foliar sprayed with glyphosate and a penetrant.

Annual follow up will be essential; this plant is very hard to kill.

Monitor diligently for further invasions around the site and treat small infestations immediately before the problem becomes too big.

6.2.3 Elms Elms are present with Blackberries and Blue Periwinkle in management zone 8. Recommendations • These can be controlled with the cut-and-paint method. However, an experienced operator with machinery will be necessary for the elms due to their size and potential for destruction of the bush around them. •

There is a larger stand of these weedy trees over the fence uphill from this site. Discuss opportunities for their control with the neighbour as they will continue to invade the bushland from here.

13 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

6.2.4 Other woody weeds Control of the other woody weeds present on site, Sweet Pittosporum and Hawthorn does not pose such a difficult problem. Recommendations • Cutting and painting these weeds with glyphosate will be the most effective method and the least intrusive to the bush. 6.2.5 Grassy weeds Grasses are serious competitors for nutrients, water and space. Replanting areas where pasture grasses are strong will require spot spraying and scalping when planting and follow up spraying while the new plant establishes. (Management Zones 6, 7, 8). For this reason it is important to bag and stake new plants for several years so that follow up sprays don’t harm them. 6.2.6 New weed invasions There is always the potential for new weeds to be introduced to the site from nearby sources, spread by birds or wind, on machinery, even seeds caught in people’s socks! The upstream private land is weedy and poses an ongoing threat of weed invasions to Andrew Creek. Recommendations • Nearby weed threats should be identified and controlled if possible and the bushland monitored for new invasions. •

Liaise with the neighbour to control the woody weeds upstream of this site (see map). As this area is strategically important for the ecological health of Andrew Creek a funded project should be considered to assist weed control efforts here as well as on the school reserve.

New invasions should be treated early so as to avoid another big job in years to come.

Diligent follow up of weed control treatments regularly over time will be necessary for all weed control work to be successful. A weed control table for these weeds on this site can be found in Appendix 2 and general weed control advice in Appendix 3.

6.3 Protect habitat while controlling weeds Excessive clearing leaving bare ground and removing habitat, indiscriminate herbicide use, damage to native plants and spread of weed propagules can all occur if weed control work is not strategic or thoughtful. Recommendations • Avoid clearing large amounts of weedy habitat at once. •

Adopt a staged approach to weeding.

Target weeds and avoid damage to natives.

Starting with the least weedy areas will ensure that the best habitat is improved and maintained as soon as possible. On this site, the northern side is in the best condition and offers the best habitat and the soonest good outcomes if it is worked on first.

14 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

6.4 Protect threatened species habitat Threatened and endemic species Green and Gold Frog, Central North Burrowing Crayfish and Eastern Barred Bandicoot are known to be on site. Their habitat areas are mapped and potentially cover the entire site. The highest priority areas are the stream, the moist areas on the stream banks and in the riparian vegetation and the low sedgey and shrubby understorey in the riparian vegetation as well as the grassy areas. Therefore it is critical to be very sensitive when working in these places. Burrowing Crayfish can often be found beneath Soft Tree Ferns in moist ground which is easy to identify and avoid but they are also known to favour moist ground beneath Blackberry, making them vulnerable to damage during weed control work. Aquatic animal such as Burrowing Crayfish and Green and Gold Frog are sensitive to herbicide use and vegetation loss. Eastern Barred Bandicoot shelter in the low sedges and shrubs on the edges of the bushland and will be vulnerable to disturbance during weed control works. Recommendations • Do not clear the weeds or native vegetation from the riparian zone. •

Manually remove trailing Blackberry in the stream and riparian zone from the ground, tree ferns and other stream side vegetation where it is not sheltering chimneys or burrows.

Leave in place Blackberry that is sheltering chimneys or burrows.

Do not apply herbicides in Burrowing Crayfish habitat area.

Only have one or two people working in this area at a time to avoid trampling of burrows and breaking chimneys.

Don’t use mulch in Burrowing Crayfish areas.

Leave Blackberry where it is the only vegetation overhanging the stream.

Cut-and-paint or manually remove sparse and individual weeds in Eastern Barred Bandicoot area adjacent to the mown grass.

Only use foliar spray on dense Blackberry in this area that will take the spray without damaging surrounding natives.

6.5 Pet control Wandering pets and feral animals, such as cats and dogs, are a threat to wildlife and the threatened fauna on site. Recommendations • The children could participate in a 'Responsible Pet Ownership' program so that they understand the importance of desexing cats, keeping them in at night and putting mulitiple bells and small mirror balls on their collars. •

Monitoring the presence of feral cats (and rabbits) will guide the necessity for their control through a correctly implemented trapping program. 15 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

6.5 Restoring habitat Restoring habitat is very important following weed control to replace the cover and vegetative material that has been lost and to gain a big improvement in habitat value. Recommendations • A golden rule for habitat restoration is to use local native species that have evolved in this environment and are suitable for habitat. They are more likely to survive too. •

Another golden rule is to start work in the areas of best condition first. Otherwise if you start on the worst areas, your best areas will deteriorate while you spend your resources on the worst.

Where Blackberry is the only vegetation overhanging the stream, manually clear 1m x1m spaces and plant new plants (ferns and sedges) to overhang stream. Use plant guards to protect new plants from weeds and browsing and so you can find them for follow-up weeding.

In areas that have been cleared or slashed (Management Zones 3 and 7) it would be beneficial to introduce logs as immediate animal habitat and as protectors for new plant s. Plant climbers such as Scrambling Coral Fern, Purple Appleberry and Clematis to scramble over logs and provide cover.

When planting these areas aim to emulate bushland with swathes of sedges, grasses and clumps of ferns and shrubs rather than carefully spaced and regulated individuals. Think about the structure that these plants will provide when they are grown and how the animals will use them. Look at the intact bushland on the site as a reference for this.

Once dense stands of Blackberry have been treated successfully, clear areas and plant into them, leaving the dead Blackberry in situ around the new plant. This will retain some habitat and protection from wind, sun and browsing while the new plants are growing.

The old sewerage pond area, situated off stream, has been suggested as being suitable for future native restoration and habitat enhancement (Peter Tonelli pers. com. 25/8/10). This area was not included in this assessment but may be a potential future project for the school to expand their restoration activities. 6.5.1 Revegetation Revegetation with natives is an important part of any weed control strategy. Revegetation increases competition to weeds and reduces opportunities for re-invasion while promoting habitat values and, erosion control, especially close to the stream bank. Revegetation should be used as an effective second stage to weed control following initial treatments. Once weeds are becoming more controlled planting natives is an effective long term strategy for reducing re-invasion and providing native habitat. •

Plant local native species to promote habitat for native animals such as birds, frogs and butterflies.

Low growing native shrubs, sedges and grasses can be planted on the edges of the riparian bushland to provide diversity of structure and habitat for bandicoots, birds, reptiles and invertebrates.

16 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Revegetate the cleared riparian area (Management Zone 3) with ferns on the stream edge, grasses and sedges on the banks of the stream, as well as shrubs in sunlit spots.

Very weedy areas can be replanted with natives once the weeds are becoming controlled. Try to replace and improve the type of habitat that has been there, i.e. replace introduced grasses with native grasses for ground cover, blackberries with bushy shrubs and sedges below for shelter and nesting, tall woody weeds with trees for perching birds, climbing marsupials and shade.

Use mulch mats for weed control and stakes and bags for protection from browsing as well as follow up weed control (see pictures below for guidance).

Maintenance of revegetation sites is critical and follow up hand weeding, stake strengthening and in some sites spot spraying will make the difference between success and failure.

Don’t plant environmental weeds! Be careful not to plant environmental weeds or plants that may become weedy. Mainland natives and introduced species can become environmental weeds in this patch of bush as well as spreading across the landscape. Many plants used for farm windbreaks and gardens in the past are now known to be weeds.

Use local native species grown from local native seed for plantings - recommended Native Plant nurseries: Habitat Nursery, Liffey (ph 6397 3400) and Oldina Nursery (ph 6438 1266).

Recent tree planting near the education centre has been done with the students to commemorate “Tree Day”. Unfortunately some exotic trees were planted which detract from the native restoration aims of the project at Andrew Creek. Future plantings should be of local native plants that are appropriate in this site to enhance the work already done as well as to expand the students’ education in ecology. Figure15 (right) Native Needle bush before planting, healthy seedlings are essential.

Figure 16 (left) A good riparian planting with weed control and browsing protection, the site was spot sprayed with glyphosate prior to planting.

Figure 17(right) Correctly planted Silver Wattle seedling in the centre of the bag with mulch mat, bag is firm and stakes are straight

17 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010 6.5.2 Plants for revegetation

Many of the plants present at Andrew Creek are ideal for revegetation; these are highlighted in green in the species list in Appendix 1. Table 1: Planting guide with additional species that are suitable

Climbers

Common name

Plant into Management Zone

Clematis aristata

mountain clematis

2,4,5,6,7,8

Clematis microphylla

small-leaf clematis

2,4,5,6,7,8

Billardiera longiflora

purple appleberry

2,4,5,6,7,8

Acacia verticillata Leptospermum lanigerum Leptospermum scoparium

prickly moses

2,4,5,6,7,8

woolly teatree

1, 3, 4

common teatree

1, 3, 4

Melaleuca ericifolia

1, 3, 4

Melaleuca gibbosa

swamp paperbark small-leafed paperbark

Melaleuca squarrosa

scented paperbark

1, 3, 4

Blechnum nudum

fishbone fern

1, 3

Blechnum wattsii

hard water fern

1, 3

Hypolepis rugosula

ruddy ground fern

1, 3

Gleichenia microphylla

scrambling coral fern

1, 3, 4

Baumea tetragona

square twigsedge

1, 3

Carex appressa

tall sedge

1, 3

Dianella tasmanica

forest flax lily

2,3,4,5,6,7,8

Diplarrena latifolia

white flag iris

2,4,5,6,7,8

Lomandra longifolia

sagg

2,4,5,6,7,8

Poa labillardierei

silver tussockgrass

2,4,5,6,7,8

Themeda triandra

kangaroo grass

2,4,5,6,7,8

Eucalyptus obliqua

stringy bark

6,7,8

Eucalyptus ovata

black gum

2,4,6,7,8

Euclayptus viminalis

white gum

2,4,5,6,7,8

Eucalyptus globulus

blue gum

5,6,7,8

Shrubs for damp-wet areas

1, 3, 4

Ferns for the stream

Groundcovers

Canopy trees

18 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

6.6 Liaison with contractors and volunteers Many well-intentioned management plans fail due to lack of communication with workers. It is important to engage contractors that understand native habitat requirements and native bushland management and those who can tell the difference between weeds and natives. It is also important to give volunteers the support and training they need to do the jobs. Supervision of works should be carried out by someone who understands the aims of the plan and how to implement on ground works. The site and tasks should be clearly defined prior to work beginning. Equipment should be appropriate for the job, especially as Blackberries are very prickly and awkward for manual removal. Long sleeves, overalls, protective eye wear and thick strong gloves are recommended. Disposal of Blackberry waste should also be planned; i.e. arrange with council to remove vegetative material or stack and burn well away from the bushland.

19 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

6.7 Management zone table Priority Zone Name HIGHEST 1 Edge of stream Priority to and stream protect channel – very good native vegetation

Special Values Aim Very good aquatic and riparian Protect and habitat. Threatened species habitat. maintain Burrowing Crayfish here. Green and with Gold frog potentially here. Also birds strategic and Ringtail possums. Pump house weed area notably weed free. control

Problem Blackberry in amongst healthy riparian understorey High habitat values may be threatened by works, herbicide use not recommended.

HIGH Priority to protect and control weeds

2

Very good native vegetation with few weeds

Excellent habitat values here, even Protect and though weedy. enhance Threatened species habitat. Eastern native Barred Bandicoot nest and shelter habitat with in here. Also many birds. strategic Important buffer zone to stream weed control

Blackberry scattered in amongst healthy riparian understorey, excellent habitat values may be threatened by works Blackberry dense in places and threatens long term viability

HIGH Priority to restore

3

Cleared riparian Shade for creek, Blackwoods zone retaining some bank stability.

HIGH Priority to protect and control weeds

4

Native Good native habitat and buffer for vegetation with riparian area Blackberries

Action Leave largely alone as this represents best riparian habitat on site. Manually remove blackberry with care over time, minimal disturbance at all times Make no drastic changes to cover. Keep pump house area weed free

Monitor weed free areas for weed invasions and treat immediately. Manual removal of sparse Blackberries from areas of good native vegetation. Cut and paint Blackberries where possible. Only use targeted foliar spraying where Blackberry in dense patches over grasses or graminoids and very little or no native shrubs or ferns. Restore Riparian habitat low value due Replant native understorey with ferns on understorey to current condition, risk of soil edge of creek Tall Sedge on banks, , to native loss and reinvasion from Cutting Grass further back, Tea Tree and habitat blackberry Paperbark where sun can reach, Revegetation may be slow due follow-up manual weed control and to shading maintenance of revegetation. No herbicides use here. Protect and Retain and protect existing Manual removal of Blackberries from good enhance habitat while controlling native vegetation. Cut and paint native Blackberry. Prevent Blackberry Blackberries where possible. habitat with from invading riparian zone Only use targeted foliar spraying where strategic through this buffer Blackberry in dense patches over grasses weed or graminoids and very little or no native control shrubs or ferns.

20 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Priority Zone Name MEDIUM 5 Good veg around Blackberry

Special Values Wallaby tunnels, Eastern Barred Bandicoot nest and shelter in here. Also many birds.

MEDIUM

6

Blackberry and grass

LOW

7

LOWEST

Maintain Current Management

Aim Restore to native habitat

Problem Dense Blackberry over bracken, currently providing good habitat, but represents source of weed to this otherwise good side of creek.

Action Targeted foliar spray blackberry in stages, leave in situ to die, follow up in two or three years with foliar spray, replant with natives, White gums, shrubs and sedges for habitat

Some shelter available Good Restore to native vegetation on edge joins native to riparian area habitat

Weed source, low habitat value

Slashed Blackberry

Little habitat value now but due Restore to to Black berry control efforts native can be restored if resources habitat allow

Blackberry regrowth now vigorous following slashing several years ago, no native regeneration

Targeted foliar spraying of blackberry, leave in situ to die, follow up in two or three years with foliar spray, and then replant with natives, White gums, shrubs, sedges for habitat. Grasses can be spot sprayed and planted into as soon as resources allow. Targeted foliar spray Blackberry regrowth this year, leave to die in situ, clear spots and replant with white gums, sedges, shrubs.

8

Blackberry, Blue Periwinkle and Elm

Shelter for marsupials and small birds, perching sites for larger birds joins native edge to riparian area

Contain weeds until control possible then restore to native habitat

Weed source as they are dense and mature. A big job so ensure resources can cover it before beginning. Contain weeds here until control possible, especially Blue Periwinkle.

9

Mown grass

Eastern Barred Bandicoot forage for insects in the soil here.

Maintain

Potential for weed invasion, but low because grass so strong

Targeted foliar spraying of Blackberry and Periwinkle, leave in situ to die, follow up Periwinkle annually and Blackberry control in two or three years with foliar spray. Cut and paint deciduous trees and remove. Monitor and follow up control of any regrowth. Replant with natives, including White gums, shrubs, sedges for habitat Maintain grassy area and keep weeds out

21 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

6.8 Management zone map

Manual weeding, minimal disturbance, limited use of cut and paint with herbicide, some targeted foliar spraying of dense blackberry may be appropriate.

Staged blackberry control, start with half or one third of area, foliar spray, leave in situ, follow up 2-3 years later, then plant into spots. Get habitat re-established before doing the remainder.

Manual weeding, minimal disturbance, no use of herbicide.

Targeted foliar spray blackberry, leave in situ, follow up 2-3 years later then plant into dead blackberry. Spot spray grasses and plant into spots with natives. Slashed blackberry area should be followed up with foliar spray then plant into spots, spot spray grasses and replant spots with natives. NB: Blackberry is present throughout the bush and has not been specifically mapped.

Restoration with planting native ferns, sedges, grasses and shrubs, important to follow up weed control. Place logs in here for habitat.

Cut and paint elms, targeted foliar spray of blackberry and periwinkle, cut and paint other woody weeds. Replant as weeds come under control.

22 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

7. Strategic Priorities For greatest overall effectiveness and to address both the immediate issues and desirable long term outcomes, efforts should focus on the following priorities: 1. Protect high priority aquatic and riparian habitat area. 2. Maintain and protect areas of good native vegetation as a priority. 3. Target isolated and smallest weed infestations first eg: pittosporum and hawthorn. 4. Restore native understorey and follow up weed control in cleared riparian area. 5. Monitor for and control new invasions of other weeds known in the surrounding area eg: Broom, Mirror Bush, Willow. 6. Revegetate following weed control treatments. 7. Keep a diary of works for monitoring and future planning.

23 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

9. References Blood, K. (2001), Environmental Weeds, a Field Guide for SE Australia. CH Jerram Science Publishers, Mt Waverley, Victoria. Bradley, J. (2002) Bringing Back the Bush - The Bradley method of bush regeneration.Reed New Holland Publishers of Australia Pty. Ltd. Bryant, S. L. and Jackson, J. (1999), Tasmania’s Threatened Fauna Handbook. Threatened Species Unit, Parks and Wildlife Service, Hobart. Buchanan, A.M. (2009), A Census of the Vascular Plants of Tasmania, Tasmanian Herbarium website, www.tmag.tas.gov.au/Herbarium/TasVascPlants.pdf Coastal Weeds of the Cradle Coast Region A Guide to Coastal and Environmental Weeds of Tasmania - are you growing invaders? CRC for Australian Weed Management (2004) Introductory Weed Management Manual Module 1 Developing and Implementing a Vegetation Management Plan. Published by the Department of Environment under the Natural Heritage Trust. Harris, S. and Kitchener, A. (2005), From Forest to Fjaeldmark: Descriptions of Tasmania’s Vegetation. Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Printing Authority of Tasmania, Hobart. Kirkpatrick, J.B. and Gilfedder, L.A. (1999), Tasmanian Bushcare Toolkit, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Hobart. McNaught, I., Thackway, R., Brown, L. and Parsons, M. (2006). A field manual for surveying and mapping nationally significant weeds. Bureau of Rural Sciences, Canberra. Muyt, Adam (2001) Bush Invaders of South-East Australia: a guide to the identification and control of environmental weeds found in South-East Australia. Published by R.G. and F.J. Richardson, PO Box 42 Meredith, Victoria 3333, Australia. Natural Values Atlas, Department www.naturalvaluesatlas.dpiw.tas.gov.au

of

Primary

Industries

and

Water,

Hobart.

Richardson R.G. And F.J. and Shepherd, R.C.H., (2006) Weeds of the south east: an identification guide for Australia R.G. and F.J. Richardson, PO Box 42 Meredith, Victoria 3333, Australia.

24 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

10. Appendices Appendix 1. Plant Species List Major vascular plants only surveyed 2/8/10. Key i – introduced Plants highlighted green are suitable for revegetation Family

Species name Common name Dicotyledonae – Broad leaf plants APOCYNACEAE Vinca major blue periwinkle Cassinia aculeata dollybush Olearia argophylla musk daisybush Olearia lirata forest daisybush MIMOSACEAE Acacia verticillata prickly moses MYRTACEAE Leptospermum lanigerum woolly teatree Melaleuca ericifolia coast paperbark Melaleuca squamea swamp honeymyrtle OXALIDACEAE Oxalis perennans grassland woodsorrel PITTOSPORACEAE Pittosporum undulatum sweet pittosporum PROTEACEAE Banksia marginata silver banksia ROSACEAE Crataegus monogyna hawthorn Rubus fruticosus blackberry RUTACEAE Zieria arborescens stinkwood Monocotyledonae – Narrow leaf plants CYPERACEAE Baumea tetragona square twigsedge Carex appressa tall sedge Gahnia grandis cutting grass Lepidosperma longitudinale spreading swordsedge IRIDACEAE Diplarrena latifolia butterfly flag iris JUNCACEAE Juncus pallidus pale rush POACEAE Dactylis glomerata cocksfoot Holcus lanatus yorkshire fog Pteridophyta - Ferns BLECHNACEAE Blechnum watsii hard water fern DENNSTAEDTIACEAE Pteridium esculentum bracken Hypolepis rugosula ruddy ground fern DICKSONIACEAE Dicksonia antarctica soft treefern GLEICHENIACEA Gleichenia microphylla scrambling coral fern

Status i

i i i

i i

25 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Appendix 2. Weed control table (Tasmanian Bushcare Toolkit 2006; DPIPWE 2009; Tamar Valley Weed Strategy 2009; ; Muyt 2001) Herbicides include non-selective Glyphosate (e.g. Roundup速, Weedmaster速, etc) and broadleaf-specific Metsulfuron Methyl (e.g. Brush Off 速, Brush Killer速 etc). Some herbicides come already mixed with a wetting agent; others may need a wetter to be added so that the herbicide is absorbed by the plant. Marker dyes can also be useful. Targeted control methods such as cut-and-paint are preferable to foliar spraying which may affect wildlife. ALWAYS READ THE LABEL BEFORE USING HERBICIDES AND FOLLOW LABEL INSTRUCTIONS. ALWAYS FOLLOW BEST PRACTICE GUIDELINES. It is the user's responsibility to check that registration or an off-label permit covers the proposed use. If in doubt, check with the Registrar of Chemical Products, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment. Statewide Freecall 1300 368 550. Weeds that may be in the district have been included Weeds Blackberry

Blue Periwinkle

Treatment alternatives Blackberry control will be an ongoing and long term management activity. Manual removal necessary in sensitive areas, dig up, dispose of tops carefully, cut and paint. and leave to die. Slashing can be effective as a first stage to reduce biomass where habitat provision is not an issue. Foliar spraying with selective herbicide: Metsulfuron Methyl is the most effective herbicide to use for blackberry and will not kill grasses. Take every care to use away from any wet area and do not risk any run off or spray drift into water or onto native plants. Do not slash or burn treated bushes for at least six months after herbicide application. Cut-and-paint (with glyphosate). Leave to die standing where they are providing habitat and wind protection etc. NOTE: Where the public has free access to blackberry bushes, herbicides must not be applied to plants carrying mature or near mature fruit. Seedlings can be hand-pulled or dug-out, ensure all roots are removed to prevent regrowth. Larger plants should be sprayed with non-selective herbicide (i.e. glyphosate) in autumn. Surfactant may be necessary particularly for Blue Periwinkle.

Timing Foliar spray best applied during growing season, avoid treating during extended dry periods. Herbicide spray for greatest effect in the period from petal fall to leaf fall (December to May).

Follow up Continue to follow up where needed every year. Regrowth may take 2 years so continue follow up with vigilance.

Foliar spray best applied during growing season, avoid treating during extended dry periods

Well established infestations will require treatments over 2 - 4 years before all material is destroyed.

26 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Climbing, Woody and Grassy Weeds Brooms

Elm, Hawthorn, Sweet Pittosporum, Cotoneaster and Privet Gorse

Mirror bush

Treatment alternatives

Timing

Follow up

Cut-and-paint. Any ripe pods/seeds should be removed carefully (e.g. in bags). Hand pull, dig out or cut-and-paint seedlings Mulch heavily after treatment Triclopyr (Garlon®) and triclopyr/picloram (Grazon DS®) are the only herbicides registered for use on broom in Tasmania. However, a permit has now been issued specifically designed for basal bark and cut stump applications in bush land using triclopyr, triclopyr/picloram and glyphosate (e.g. Roundup®, Roundup Biactive®). This permit also covers metsulfuron methyl (e.g. Brushoff®, Brushkiller®) for spot spray application. For further information contact your regional weeds officer. Use glyphosate and kill by cutting and painting the stumps, or frill cut if it is judged best to leave them standing to die.

Canary Broom: Flowers late winter-spring so best to kill prior to this. English broom: Best to kill plant spring and early summer before it fruits (Jan-Mar). However, if timetable restricted can cut and paint any time just make sure to collect fruiting material in a bag and dispose safely. Best to cut and paint prior to flowering and fruiting, in spring to early summer.

Check for seedlings and re-growth every year and control.

Triclopyr, Picloram, Metsulfuron-methyl, Glyphosate, Ammonium thiocyanate are registered for use on Gorse in Tasmania. The details for each chemical and application are extensive and available on the DPIPWE website. Foliar spray, cut and paint Frill-cut and poison with glyphosate larger trees and leave to die standing. This will reduce the risk of fruit or broken twigs reestablishing if removal was attempted and also retain some habitat value while native plants establish. Cut-and-paint smaller plants with glyphosate. Hand pull or cut-and-paint seedlings.

Best to use herbicides in spring to early summer when plants are growing and before full flowering

Check for seedlings and re-growth every year and follow up with treatment

Best to kill plant spring and early summer before it fruits (Jan-April). However, if timetable restricted can cut and paint any time just make sure to collect fruiting material in a bag and dispose safely.

Check every year and continue control until all are eradicated. Plant Clematis or Macquarie Vine to climb over dead Mirror Bushes.

Check for seedlings and re-growth every year and follow up with treatment

27 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Climbing, Woody and Grassy Weeds Pampas Grass

Pine

Spanish Heath

Treatment alternatives

Timing

Follow up

Spot - spray small plants with with glyphosate. Slash, burn or dig out larger plants and spray re-growth Prolific seeds in winter-spring Eradication of pampas grass is required by law. Cut below lowest branch. Hand pull wildings

Kill any time, make sure regrowth treated before flowering again

Check for re-growth every year and follow up with treatment

Any time, best to get young pines before cone production starts Hand Pull Feb-Jul Foliar spray Nov-Feb

Follow up should look out for wildings

Hand pull small plants in winter when soil is moist Prolific seed producer, do not handle when seeds are ripening. Cut-and-paint / spray carefully: Herbicides such as Grazon can be used as a foliar spray (2.5 ml Grazon DS R/L). Both Grazon and glyphosate could be applied (neat) as a cut stump or basal bark application.

Follow up essential, seed bank will persist actively for years and older plants hard to kill with one spray application.

28 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Appendix 3. General Weed Control Advice Weed control methods can be varied depending on the type and situation of the weed and the densities and distributions. Methods can include non-chemical and chemical controls, and biological controls. Various treatments may be successful such as hand pulling, mechanical removal, slashing and mowing, mulches, foliar spray, cut and paint, frilling and drilling, use of controlled fire, and applications of steam (Muyt 2001). Nearly always an integrated management approach is the most successful where a range of treatments is applied according to the stage and characteristics of the weed invasion. Control methods adopted must be practical for the situation and possible to implement most effectively. Important points for weed control work: • Weed control treatments should avoid native plants. • Manual removal is appropriate in and near the creek where threatened species and aquatic habitat is at risk of pollution from herbicides. Be careful not to leave disturbed exposed soil for another invasion, follow up with mulch or plant a native in the space left. Follow up weed control over time will be essential for success. • When controlling weeds near water refer to “Rivercare Guidelines for Herbicide Use Near Water” available on DPIPWE website. • Foliar sprayed herbicide for Blackberry control sites away from the creek should be broad-leaf specific for woody weeds (i.e. NOT glyphosate such as Roundup®), to reduce off-target damage to native sedges, grasses and other understorey plants. • Use a wetting agent/penetrant for foliar spray and aim for complete foliar coverage. • Cut-and-paint methods can use broad-spectrum herbicides (e.g. glyphosate such as Roundup®). • Always follow the herbicide label and “best practice” application. • Aim to treat weeds at the most effective stage, i.e. while actively growing and before fruiting and seed set. Blackberry must not be foliar sprayed while flowering and fruiting. • Laying deep mulch over areas of successful treatment is an option for non-chemical control of weed re-growth. Use weed-free mulch (bark and wood chips) and lay thickly to exclude light and maintain low temperatures at the soil surface. • Some herbicides are toxic to bees. As a general rule, avoid applying herbicides when and where bees are foraging. • Do not plant environmental weeds. Even some mainland natives can become environmental weeds, and spread into bushland (e.g. birds eat berries, wind carries seeds). A list of known environmental weeds to avoid is available from council and on the DPIPWE website. • Hygiene management is an important part of weed control. To ensure that weeds are not inadvertently introduced or spread around the site don’t bring in soil, don’t dump cuttings in the bush, bag, tie and dispose carefully of any fertile material from weed waste. • Machinery should be washed before entering and leaving the site, to prevent introduction of further spread of weeds or pathogens. See Tasmanian Washdown Guidelines for Weed and Disease Control: Machinery, Vehicles and Equipment, Edition 1, which can be obtained at http://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/Publications/LJEM-5ZM3LJ?open

29 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Appendix 4. Dont kill natives! Some native species that resemble weeds It is important to be sure of the identification of a plant before removing it as a weed. Below is a selection of native species that are sometimes mistaken for weeds. The Tasmanian Herbarium can assist with plant identification. Figure 18 Boneseed leaves (on left) can be mistaken for native Boobyalla leaves (on right), but notice the serration on Boneseed leaves. The flowers of each species are quite different.

WEED

African Box-thorn (Lycium ferocissimum) Banana Passionfruit (Passiflora mollissima) Blackberry (Rubus fruticosus agg.) Bluebell Creeper (Billardiera heterophylla, was Sollya heterophylla) Boneseed (Chrysanthemoides monilifera) Canary/Montpellier Broom (Genista monspessulana) English/Scotch Broom (Cytisus scoparius)

Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster spp) Golden Wattle (Acacia pycnantha) Gorse (Ulex europaeus)

Marram Grass (Ammophila arenaria) Old Mans Beard (Clematis alba) Pampas Grasses (Cortaderia spp) Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) Sallow Wattle (Acacia longifolia ssp. longifolia) Serrated Tussock (Nassella trichotoma) and Chilean Needle Grass (Nassella neesiana) Spanish Heath (Erica lusitanica)

NATIVE PLANT Prickly Box (Bursaria spinosa) Native Clematis (Clematis aristata) Native Raspberry (Rubus parvifolius) Native Appleberry creepers (Billardiera longiflora, B. mutabilis, etc). Boobyalla (Myoporum insulare) Goldentip (Goodia lotifolia) and other bushpeas like Golden Bushpea (Pultenaea gunnii) Drupe Bush (Leptomeria drupacea), Golden Spray (Viminaria juncea) and Broom Spurge (Amperea xiphoclada). Yellow Dogwood (Pomaderris elliptica) Blackwood (Acacia melanoxylon) Native Gorse (Daviesia ulicifolia), Tree Violet (Melicytus dentatus) & many other prickly native plants Coast Fescue (Austrofestuca littoralis) Native Clematis (Clematis aristata) Cutting Grass (Gahnia spp.) Fireweed (Senecio linearifolius) and 20 other native Senecio daisies. Coastal Wattle / False Boobialla (Acacia longifolia ssp. sophorae) Various tussock grasses (Poa species) and spear grasses (Austrostipa species). Various Epacrids, such as Common Heath (Epacris impressa) and also Spike Beardheath (Leucapogon australis), which has white flowers at the same time.

30 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania


Vegetation Management Plan Andrew Creek, Wesley Vale Primary School October 2010

Appendix 6. Useful contacts Bushways Environmental Services Tasmania Environmental consultants – revegetation advice, flora and fauna surveys and information. Helen Morgan and Anna Povey 175 Glenford Farm Rd Underwood Tasmania 7268 bushways@intas.net.au Ph: 0429 197 671 03 6334 6633 Department of Primary Industries and Water Loads of information about environmental issues from water to weeds to wildlife www.dpiw.tas.gov.au DPIW Weeds Regional Weeds Officer - North (ph: 6336 5365, 0417 348 912) Vegetation Management Planning Officer (ph: 64215100) DPIW weeds website: www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/ThemeNodes/SSKA-52J2K4?open Tamar Valley Weed Strategy Another excellent Tasmanian weed website www.weeds.asn.au Tasmanian Bushcare Toolkit Practical bush management info including weed control www.bushcare.tas.gov.au/publish/toolkit.htm Nature of Tasmania Lots of information about wildlife, plants etc www.parks.tas.gov.au/nature.html Understorey Network – growing native plants Seed collection, growing plants, database etc http://www.understorey-network.org.au/ Tasmanian Herbarium Send plant samples for free identification to: Alex Buchanan, Tasmanian Herbarium Private Bag 4 Hobart, Tasmania 7001 E-mail: herbarium@tmag.tas.gov.au www.tmag.tas.gov.au/Herbarium/Herbarium2.html Australian Plant Society– growing native plants Meetings, excursions, plant propagation Launceston group: www.apstasnorth.org

31 Bushways Environmental Services - Tasmania

Profile for Cradle Coast Authority

Vegetation Management Plan for Andrew Creek Wesley Vale Primary School Tasmania  

Vegetation Management Plan for Andrew Creek Wesley Vale Primary School Tasmania 2010

Vegetation Management Plan for Andrew Creek Wesley Vale Primary School Tasmania  

Vegetation Management Plan for Andrew Creek Wesley Vale Primary School Tasmania 2010