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ANNUAL REPORT CRADLE COAST AUTHORITY NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT


Cradle Coast Authority NRM Annual Report 2017-2018 Copyright © Cradle Coast Authority 2018 No part of the publication may be reproduced without the express prior permission of the publisher. Published by: Cradle Coast Authority PO Box 338, Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6433 8400 nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com www.facebook.com/cradlecoastnrm This report is produced to fulfil the statutory reporting obligation of the Cradle Coast Authority’s NRM Committee under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002. The Committee is required to report on its activity to the Minister for Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. The report covers the period from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018. The Cradle Coast Authority’s NRM Committee acknowledges the financial support provided to it by the Australian and Tasmanian Governments and the nine local governments of north-west Tasmania.


Contents 4

Foreword – Chairman’s Report

7

Introduction

8

Cradle Coast NRM Staff and Committee

10

Cradle Coast NRM Manager’s Report

12

Cradle Coast NRM Strategy Summary

15

PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES

16

Soil First

18

Nutrient Management Planning

20

Water Quality Improvement

23

REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR

24

Landholder Engagement

27

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

28

Rice Grass Eradication for Saltmarsh Protection

30

Highland Grassland Management at The Vale of Belvoir Reserve

32

Cradle Coast Farm Conservation Grants

34

Flood Recovery

37

INDIGENOUS ENGAGEMENT

38

Gorse Control

40

Fire and Land Management Capacity Building

43

COMMUNITY, SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE & ENGAGEMENT

44

Discovery Ranger Program

46

Natural Connections Grants

49

COASTAL RESTORATION

50

Macquarie Harbour Shoreline Clean-Up

52

Land Manager Grants

55

Cradle Coast NRM Financial Statements

64

Thank You

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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FOREWORD

Chairman’s Report June 2018 marked the conclusion of our 3.5-year partnership with the Commonwealth Government under the National Landcare Programme. This was a successful program for the region. Cradle Coast Authority NRM staff and community partners were able to meet or substantially exceed all contracted milestones and deliver important programs for natural resource management in the Cradle Coast region.

will guide future Cradle Coast NRM regional funding applications to the Commonwealth Government or other funding sources.

I would like to recognise the valuable efforts of the NRM staff in achieving the positive outcomes listed elsewhere in this report.

• Community, Skills, Knowledge & Engagement

The Commonwealth announced a move to a competitive tendering for ongoing NRM funding this year. In May we were notified Cradle Coast NRM’s bid for five-year funding was unsuccessful. This was a very disappointing outcome for the Committee, staff and our stakeholders. The Committee has resolved to work with the State and Commonwealth representatives to address shortcomings of our previous bid and to obtain five-year funding that can deliver outstanding value for money for NRM outcomes for the region. IDENTIFYING REGIONAL PRIORITIES FOR NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT The 2015-2020 Strategy document, along with community and stakeholder engagement, was used to identify regional priorities for natural resource management. These priorities were also used to inform the bid for continued funding from the Commonwealth Government. FACILITATING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE REGIONAL STRATEGY AND MONITORING AND EVALUATING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE REGIONAL STRATEGY Cradle Coast NRM staff continued to use the 20152020 Strategy document to support landscape-scale projects and to develop an NRM regional investment plan (RIP) to map out actions and opportunities for better natural resource management. The NRM RIP

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

The Cradle Coast NRM focused on five major NRM priority areas during the financial year: • Productive Landscapes • Biodiversity Conservation • Indigenous Engagement • Coastal Restoration The outcomes achieved by the NRM team are described in detail later in this report. PROMOTING NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES AND DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING PROCESSES TO ENSURE APPROPRIATE EDUCATION AND TRAINING IN NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Education and capacity building continued to be supported during the year. Community forums on natural resource topics such as Little Penguins, native orchids, fungi, Giant Freshwater Lobsters, Tasmanian Devils and annual migratory bird and eagle counts were well attended by community members. FACILITATE THE INTEGRATION OF NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING ACTIVITIES FOR THE NORTH WEST REGION This year Cradle Coast NRM staff have continued their involvement with Cradle Coast Councils to maximise cooperation and the outcomes for NRM across the region, particularly through the delivery of our Public Land Mangers Grant Program. Work supporting the State Government with flood recovery initiatives wound up this year. The second year of the Macquarie Harbour Shoreline Clean-up was a significant regional success and the Clean-up process initiated by Cradle Coast NRM staff is being used as a model for other areas. The Cradle Coast NRM Committee continued its engagement with the palawa community and visited preminghana and Kings Run hosted by local palawa rangers.


SEEKING, MANAGING AND ALLOCATING FUNDS ACCORDING TO THE REGIONAL STRATEGY The 2017-18 year was the final year of the current 3.5-year NLP funding round. Cradle Coast NRM staff have continued the contracted programs in accordance with the agreement with the Federal Government and NRM progress is described in detail later in this report. The work done by Cradle Coast NRM staff to acquit and finalise contracted projects on behalf of the Commonwealth was a credit to them all. The improving Cradle Coast NRM relationships with the Federal Government managers who supervise our reporting, and the payment of contracted NLP funding payments based on the achievement of contracted NRM outcomes milestones, was noticeable during the year. This was despite the unsuccessful NLP2 funding bid. Relationships with the State Government (DPIPWE) were also much improved. COORDINATING THE REGION’S PARTICIPATION IN NATIONAL AND STATE PROGRAMS RELATING TO NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT It is clear to the Committee that the way that Cradle Coast NRM undertakes NRM in the region will need to change to accommodate the Commonwealth’s NRM expectations. Cost-effective innovation in the delivery of measurable NRM environmental, economic and social change outcomes, along with measurable value for money for the taxpayers’ funds expended, is required. A renewed emphasis on maximising on-ground NRM outcomes in the region is also needed. NEW STATE NRM MINISTER Minister Sarah Courtney, member for Bass, became responsible for NRM during the year replacing Deputy Premier Jeremy Rockliff. Minister Courtney has a strong interest in NRM and Landcare through her farming background and ministerial responsibilities for Primary Industries and Water. The Cradle Coast NRM Regional Committee met with Minister Courtney only days after the unsuccessful bid result was announced. Frank

discussion of NRM funding options for the future was very positive. We appreciate the Minister’s support and that of her staff at DPIPWE, as we work our way through the reform of NRM and any re-bid process. The Committee very much appreciated the announcement of a $100,000 increase in annual NRM State Government funding for the region. CHANGES IN COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP Terms of some members of the Committee were due to expire this year but we received approval from the State Government to continue those terms until clarity about ongoing funding was determined. Ms Linda Overend left the Committee and we miss her experience and wise support in our deliberations, particularly her wide regional Parks and Wildlife Service experience. Because of the uncertain funding situation current Committee vacancies have not been filled. Richard Ingram, our NRM Manager, left the organisation after 12 years’ service. We thank Richard for his passionate contribution to NRM in the region and will miss his guidance. We all wish Richard and his family well in the future. CRADLE COAST NRM OUTLOOK As anticipated last year the change by the Commonwealth to a competitive tender process has been very challenging for Cradle Coast NRM. However, the Committee is confident the Cradle Coast NRM staff can be assisted in producing a quality bid if the Commonwealth decides to re-open the competitive bid process. The Committee greatly appreciates the continuing efforts of our NRM staff during this very uncertain and stressful period in the history of NRM in the region. On behalf of the Committee I thank our North West regional community, industry representatives and government agencies who continue to provide us and our staff with so much support, encouragement and active participation in our shared vision for our regional NRM activities and outcomes TONY MOORE CRADLE COAST NRM COMMITTEE CHAIR

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18


Introduction

The Cradle Coast Authority’s NRM team works with the communities and industry of Tasmania’s north-west and west coasts and King Island to manage natural resources, such as land, water and coasts, to ensure a sustainable future for the region. Cradle Coast NRM supports community and industry projects, facilitates funding, and coordinates natural resource activities and information sharing. The Cradle Coast region’s natural resources and landscapes sustain primary industries; provide clean water, air and homes for a diverse range of animal and plant communities and are a key pillar of our region’s tourism offerings. The Cradle Coast region is bounded by 2640 km of coastline and covers approximately one-third of Tasmania. The region stretches from Narawntapu National Park in the east, to King Island and Cape Grim in the far north-west and to Port Davey in the south. The region incorporates the nine local government municipalities of Burnie City, Central Coast, Circular Head, Devonport City, Kentish, King Island, Latrobe, Waratah-Wynyard and West Coast.

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In 2000, these nine local government municipalities established a regional organisation known as the Cradle Coast Authority to provide a regional voice for north-west Tasmania. The Cradle Coast Authority’s NRM Committee is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority. The Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report for 2017/2018 outlines some of the achievements of natural resource management activities within the Cradle Coast region.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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Additional Committee Member - Guy Grey

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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Manager’s Report This 2017-2018 financial year again saw significant changes, with some old hands departing and fresh faces arriving. Richard Ingram left the Cradle Coast Authority after 12 years of service, not only to our organisation but to the region. We have all benefited from Richard’s passion for, and contribution to, NRM over the years, which we thank him for; now is the time to build on his legacy. We also farewelled our Operations Manager, Grant Pearce and Project Officers, Dionna Newton and Hannah Sadler during this period, and we thank them all for their contribution.

This year saw the culmination of three and a half years work in delivering the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme. Significant projects have been delivered this year, building on previous success. In this Annual Report we focus on our key projects for the financial year, including examples of some of the 27 projects delivered via small grants across three key areas of farm conservation, public land management and community landcare.

The departures presented opportunities for renewal and we were pleased to welcome three new members to our team. Jay Rowley joined us as our Biodiversity Coordinator and has many years’ experience in our region, particularly in weed management.

We have had great outcomes working with various sectors of the community in managing the Rice Grass threat to saltmarsh along our coasts and estuaries. It is wonderful to see this important threatened ecological community and habitat for many endangered migratory birds, returning naturally in the absence of invasive weed pressure.

We were also fortunate to experience Jarrod Edwards’ knowledge and passion for his Aboriginal community in north-west Tasmania.

The Macquarie Harbour Shoreline Clean-up, in its second year, was again a resounding success with strong support from industry, local community and volunteer groups, resulting in more than 5 tonnes of marine debris and rubbish removed.

Jarrod brought his extensive land management experience to bear in supporting important NRM projects at preminghana as well as building local Aboriginal community capacity in NRM. Finally, in May, Haylee Kaplan joined our team under a new initiative, as our Regional Cat Management Coordinator.

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This is a fantastic opportunity to progress the State Government’s Tasmanian Cat Management Plan, in increasing community awareness, participation and commitment in cat ownership and management.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

Important initiatives have also been delivered in waterway restoration and protection. Cradle Coast NRM made a significant contribution to the State and Federal Government’s response to the devastating floods of June 2016.


We have been able to support large-scale projects in the lower Mersey catchment by rehabilitating riparian areas with native plant species, to stabilise banks, improve water quality and provide important habitat to local and endemic species. The dairy and beef industries have also benefited from our support of the Cows out of Creeks Project, delivered by DairyTas. The small grants delivered to producers in Circular Head, have seen significant efforts in fencing off more than 40 km of waterways to exclude stock, to help improve water quality and enhance our sustainability credentials. Engagement to raise awareness of important issues has again been a feature or our work with further trial field days, in partnership with Soil First, highlighting the benefits of cover cropping and reduce tillage approaches, beekeeping workshops and organics networking events and continuation of initiatives to engage the younger generation such as Discovery Ranger and Kids Teaching Kids. It has been a busy and productive 12 months and I thank the NRM team for all their hard work and dedication. With a transition to new funding programs imminent, now is a time for reflection and evaluation as we begin planning and development of the next phase of natural resource management in the Cradle Coast. SPENCER GIBBS MANAGER, NRM

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Cradle Coast NRM Strategy 2015-2020 PURPOSE OF THE STRATEGY The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Strategy for Cradle Coast 2015–2020 is to guide activity that will help manage and improve the natural resources in the North West of Tasmania. It is a whole-of-community Strategy that identifies the social, economic and environmental values of the region and outlines how the community can work together to manage and improve its condition. The Strategy does not have statutory power or replace any current mechanism or policy relating to natural resource management but encourages partnerships between community, industry and Government.

VISION The Vision for natural resource management in the Cradle Coast region is:

HOW THE STRATEGY SUPPORTS THIS VISION The Strategy supports this Vision by: • Providing a guide to anyone living or working in the region to engage in activities that promote and foster healthy natural resource management • Outlining the current condition of the region’s natural resources, so we can build on previous achievements and recognise key areas for future activities, increasing the community’s awareness and capacity to manage natural resources • Identifying the main threats and issues facing these resources, so we can plan preventative actions and implement restorative works where necessary • Setting out what is known about the resources, so we are working from a common understanding and can help to fill any knowledge gaps and share knowledge from experience • Having focus areas for action so we know what we are working towards; and

TO HAVE PROACTIVE, VIBRANT COMMUNITIES WHO PROTECT AND ADVOCATE ENVIRONMENTAL, SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC PROGRESS FOR A SUSTAINABLE AND BRIGHT FUTURE FOR OUR REGION.

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

• Providing a summary of community priorities for the region based on state and regional surveys and workshops.


The Strategy is available to download at cradlecoast.com/nrm

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18


Productive Landscapes The Productive Landscapes Program focuses on improving land management. The aim is to encourage improved practices through offering land and soil management support, property management planning, trials and demonstrations in innovative and best farming practices. All of this is delivered with on-ground support.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES

Soil First

One of the great successes achieved during 2017-18 has been following the progress of Soil First Tasmania Inc., a farm discussion group with a focus on improving soil management through demonstration and field days investigating options around reduced tillage and cover cropping. Soil First Tasmania Inc. formed following a Cradle Coast NRM Farm Conservation grant administered through the Productive Landscapes project. The grant was used to implement a cover crop demonstration trial in a 5-hectare paddock on Table Cape’s iconic tulip farm. Following a well-attended field day discussing the learnings of the demonstration and general principles around soil health, Soil First Tasmania Inc. was formed. A ground swell of support from commercial farmers, agronomists, service providers and researchers in Soil First Tasmania activities strongly suggests that both the topic and the delivery mechanism supported here are appropriate.

PARTNERS Soil First Tasmania Inc., Van Diemen Quality Bulbs (Soil First farmer member), MG Farms (Soil First farmer member), Premium Fresh Farms (Soil First farmer member, ServeAg, RM Consulting Group, Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA).

Cradle Coast NRM, with the help of Tom O’Malley, was instrumental in helping to get this (checkerboard demonstration) trial off the ground. Support from Cradle Coast NRM gives Soil First Tasmania both the confidence and resources to establish these projects, and importantly, share the learnings we gain with the wider agricultural community throughout Tasmania. – DAVE ROBERTS-THOMPSON, PRESIDENT OF SOIL FIRST TASMANIA / MANAGER OF VDQ BULBS

Cradle Coast NRM and Soil First Tasmania Inc. have collaborated to deliver 4 events during 2017-18, with details summarised below.

HIGHLIGHTS More than

200

commercial farmers, agronomists and consultants engaged across four events

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Cover cropping and reduced tillage field walk

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

Business of Soil - cover cropping and reduced tillage conference

Seed versus Steel - cover crop demonstration field day


PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES

OVERVIEW Soil First Tasmania Inc. formed following a Cradle Coast NRM Farm Conservation grant administered through the Productive Landscapes project. The grant was used to implement a cover crop demonstration trial in a 5-hectare paddock on Table Cape’s iconic tulip farm.

OUTCOME Improving management of soil health to promote greater farm productivity and environmental outcomes, is the focus of the Soil First Inc.’s Cover Crop Trial series of events. Following on from the initial cover crop demonstration trial during Stage 3 of the National Landcare Programme, Soil First Tasmania Inc. have expanded their membership across the farming community. During 2017-18, Soil First Tasmania Inc. have continued to be active, and through support from the Cradle Coast Authority NRM team have delivered four capacity building events addressing a range of soil health issues such as soil erosion, using cover crops in rotation and remediating soil structure.

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PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES

Nutrient Management Planning

Around 940 hectares of intensively grazed improved pasture across 47 dairy farms is now under bestmanagement practice guidelines, due to the Fert$mart project. During 2017-18, the Cradle Coast Authority NRM team have supported landholders to develop and implement nutrient management plans tailored specifically for their farm. Increased adoption of science-based nutrient management planning has resulted in greater use of on farm resources for fertiliser, predominantly dairy effluent, in addition to highlighting the value to farmers of investing in soil testing. Previously seen largely as a waste problem to deal with, the nutritional value of effluent as a fertiliser is now widely recognised from building the capacity of dairy farmers in nutrient budgeting. This has given rise to confidence for agricultural contractors to provide services in this area.

We used to get a lot of phone calls from farmers asking if there was any funding support for soil testing. Since Fert$mart has become established in Tasmania, we no longer get those phone calls. Fert$mart has given farmers a reason to appreciate the value of soil testing. Farmers are spending around $1,200 to $2,000 on soil testing for their Fert$mart plan. Some farms have even paid to soil test every paddock, which is generally $15,000 plus for a dairy farm. – RACHEL BROWN, DAIRYTAS NRM SPECIALIST

PARTNERS DairyTas.

HIGHLIGHTS

47

Fert$mart nutrient management plans supported

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940 hectares of pasture has been improved

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

Increased adoption of science-based nutrient management planning

Greater use of on-farm resources for fertiliser


PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES

OVERVIEW The Cradle Coast Authority NRM team have supported 47 commercial dairy farms to develop and implement nutrient management plans tailored specifically for their farm.

OUTCOME Around 940 hectares of intensively grazed improved pasture across 47 dairy farms is now under best-management practice guidelines, due to the Fert$mart project. Increased adoption of science-based nutrient management planning has resulted in greater use of on farm resources for fertiliser, predominantly dairy effluent, in addition to highlighting the value to farmers of investing in soil testing.

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PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES

Water Quality Improvement – Cows out of Creeks Engagement with the dairy sector through Fert$mart nutrient management planning support, and a close working relationship with DairyTas NRM Specialist Rachel Brown led to a further partnership being forged between Cradle Coast NRM and DairyTas to deliver a small grants program. The grants program, entitled “Cows out of Creeks”, was designed to encourage intensive graziers to exclude stock from waterways. The “Cows out of Creeks” grants program was open to both commercial dairy and beef producers in the Circular Head municipality, an area where highly intensive grazing dominates the agricultural landscape and where fertiliser and soil amendment application rates are unsurpassed across Australia. Improved water quality and bolstered sustainability credentials for the Circular Head region are the result of the Cows out of Creeks project. Across the 11 grants funded for beef and dairy producers through the “Cows out of Creeks”

grants program, 40.4 km of fencing was erected which excluded stock from waterways predominantly along the Montagu and Duck rivers. In addition to protecting waterways and the associated valuable riparian habitat, strong animal health outcomes are expected from excluding large numbers of cattle from these waterways. Cows out of Creeks grants program and Fert$mart nutrient management planning support deliver synergies and significant outcomes for water quality improvement. Through balancing soil amendment rates to prevent excess applications and excluding cattle from waterways in a landscape dominated by surface runoff as opposed to infiltration through the soil profile, the health of rivers in the Circular Head municipality can expect significant improvements.

PARTNERS DairyTas.

HIGHLIGHTS

11

intensive graziers supported to keep cows out of waterways

20

40 km

of fencing erected excluding stock from waterways

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

Improved river health in Circular Head region

Improved water quality


PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES

OVERVIEW “Cows out of Creeks” is designed to encourage intensive graziers to exclude stock from waterways.

OUTCOME Improved water quality and bolstered sustainability credentials for the Circular Head region are the result of the Cows out of Creeks project. In addition to protecting waterways and valuable riparian habitat, strong animal health outcomes are expected from excluding large numbers of cattle from these waterways.

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RLF REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR The Regional Landcare Facilitator role enables community access to skills and knowledge related to sustainable land management practices. One of the avenues used to achieve this is the Smallholder Property Management Planning Programme, which delivers educational programs, support and advice to small landholders in the Cradle Coast Region.

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REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR

Landholder Engagement

Cradle Coast smallholders have increased their capacity During the 2017-18 financial year, due to the Regional Landcare Facilitator (RLF) project. The project delivered eight capacity building workshops attracting 135 participants in total. Two of the events provided a forum to discuss the rise in organic dairying in Tasmania, and the opportunities it represents for organic stock feed producers. Four of the events provided training in beekeeping, while the RLF presence on King Island delivered benchmarking and decision-making workshops for the island’s beef producers. Practical beekeeping training will continue due to support from the Cradle Coast Authority NRM team. Smallholder couple Matt Wooldridge and Jess Webster, who were previously part of the smallholder property management planning workshop program and practical beekeeping training, have now built enough capacity to take over delivery of the beekeeping training. Matt and Jess have grown from beginner beekeepers with two hives to 30 hives on their small farm, because of the skills they learned in the capacity building workshops.

In addition to producing around 400 kg of honey for market per year, Matt and Jess also produce and sell about 30 “nucleus” beehives per year, small hives to start fledgling beekeepers off on their journey.

PARTNERS Oldina Landcare Group, Tasmanian Organic Network, North-West Beekeepers Association, Fairfax Media, King Island NRM Group Inc.

We’ve gathered an immense amount of knowledge from Cradle Coast; in addition to that, we have met so many like-minded landholders through Cradle Coast that has given us a massive network of like-minded people who are struggling with the same issues we are. That’s one of the biggest gifts Cradle Coast has given us—they’ve given us a community. – JESSICA WEBSTER

HIGHLIGHTS

8 capacity building workshops

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

135 participants

Business workshops for King Island beef farmers

Beekeeping training succession plan implemented


REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR

OVERVIEW The Regional Landcare Facilitator (RLF) project delivered capacity building workshops to the region’s smallholders, from practical beekeeping to benchmarking and workshops for beef farmers. Events provided a forum for discussion about the rise in organic dairying in Tasmania, and the opportunity this represents for organic producers.

OUTCOME Cradle Coast smallholders have increased their capacity During the 2017-18 financial year, due to the Regional Landcare Facilitator (RLF) project.

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Biodiversity Conservation CONSERVE AND PROTECT SPECIES AND ECOSYSTEMS This program strives to maintain and enhance natural values throughout north-west Tasmania, and primarily focuses on plants, animals and waterway management. This is delivered through the Biodiversity program, which partners with a large range of stakeholders and the community to deliver a suite of environmental and conservation projects throughout the region.

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BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

Rice Grass Eradication for Saltmarsh Protection Rice Grass infestation has reduced by 34 per cent due to Rice Grass control programs spanning five years. Cradle Coast NRM’s Rice Grass projects focused on the weed’s incursion within Duck Bay, the Mersey and Rubicon estuaries. The weed poses a serious threat to Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC)-listed saltmarsh communities which provide habitat for EPBC-listed threatened species including Hooded Plovers, Eastern Curlews, Red Knots, Great Knots and Fairy Terns. Rice Grass may also impact the region’s oyster industry by causing a reduction in usable sites and reducing the flow of water through the leases. Rice Grass also poses a threat to the region’s oyster industry; due to a reduction in the volume of water passing through oyster leases, resulting in a decrease of nutrients to the oysters.

at Duck Bay, Smithton, which was previously a 100% Rice Grass meadow. The analysis confirmed that a concerted program of Rice Grass control reduced the primary infestation in the control area by 34 per cent. A comparison of monitoring results from 2015 and 2018 shows the area of Rice Grass in part of the Duck Bay control area has reduced from 26 hectares to 17 hectares. Further analysis from satellite imagery indicates a 15% increase in Beaded Glasswort (Sarcocornia quinqueflora) in the coastal saltmarsh wetlands in Duck Bay, Smithton.

PARTNERS Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme, Circular Head Landcare Group, Parks and Wildlife Service (DPIPWE), Latrobe Council, Fonterra, DigitalGlobe.

Cradle Coast NRM established a monitoring program in 2014 to document saltmarsh recovery

HIGHLIGHTS

Rice Grass in Duck Bay, the Mersey and Rubicon rivers reduced by

34%

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

Rice Grass in Duck Bay reduced from 26 hectares to 17 hectares

15% increase in

Beaded Glasswort

Improved growing conditions for oyster leases


BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

OVERVIEW Cradle Coast NRM’s Rice Grass project has focused on the weed’s incursion within Duck Bay, the Mersey and Rubicon estuaries. This weed poses a serious threat to EPBC-listed saltmarsh communities which provide habitat for EPBC-listed threatened species.

OUTCOME Rice Grass infestation within Duck Bay, the Mersey and Rubicon estuaries, has reduced by 34 per cent due to Rice Grass control programs spanning five years.

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BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

Highland Grassland Management at The Vale of Belvoir Reserve Surveying and monitoring of Highland Poa Grasslands, which is a threatened community and home to the EPBC-listed Ptunarra Brown Butterfly, has identified key management techniques to maintain diversity of this vegetation community. These include the effects of low-intensity cattle grazing and late winter/spring burning on the grassland composition. The project has identified burning is required to maintain Highland Poa Grasslands and without burning, these vegetation communities gradually transition to sedge-land. Cattle grazing can assist with the maintenance of high-diversity highland Poa grasslands, however grazing alone is unlikely to maintain the condition of grasslands and only slow the transition to sedge-land. The timing of the burns in September, while Ptunarra Brown Butterflies are in the larval stage and burrowed into the base of the tussocks, has not impacted on their numbers. Additional monitoring of the Highland Poa Grasslands has been undertaken to understand the associations between population characteristics, climate and interventions.

This involved transect monitoring for Prasophyllum sp. ‘Vale of Belvoir’, a rare and unique leek orchid species, which included species recovery actions involving propagation at the Tasmanian Royal Botanical Gardens in Hobart. Results from the study indicate the habitat for the Vale of Belvoir Leek Orchid is reasonably stable in the absence of cattle grazing. Burning the grasslands is necessary to maintain species diversity and provide suitable habitat for Ptunarra Brown Butterfly and the Vale of Belvoir Leek Orchid. A healthy grassland community within this site is also beneficial to carnivorous marsupials such as Tasmanian Devils, Eastern Quolls and Spotted-tailed Quolls, all EPBC-listed species, which reside in the adjacent forests and prey on animals which use the area for foraging.

PARTNERS Tas Land Conservancy.

HIGHLIGHTS

Identification of key management techniques

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Healthy grassland benefit EPBC-listed species (including the Eastern Quoll and the Tasmanian Devil)

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

Monitoring of rare Vale of Belvoir Leek Orchid

Monitoring of EPBC-listed Ptunarra Brown Butterfly


BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

OVERVIEW The TLC fire ecology and outcomes project focused on Highland Poa Grasslands, home to the EPBC-listed Ptunarra Brown Butterfly and the Vale of Belvoir Leek Orchid. A healthy grassland community within the site is also beneficial to carnivorous marsupials which reside in the adjacent forests.

OUTCOME Surveying and monitoring of Highland Poa Grasslands which is a threatened community and home to the EPBC-listed Ptunarra Brown Butterfly, has identified key management techniques to maintain diversity of this vegetation community.

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BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

Cradle Coast Farm Conservation Grants Native forest which is habitat to endangered and EPBC-listed species such as Burrowing Crayfish, Eastern Barred Bandicoots, Spotted-tailed Quolls, Wedge-tailed Eagles and Grey Goshawks, has been protected and enhanced due to our Farm Conservation Grants. Sue Hartley has been part of several Cradle Coast NRM projects and is enthusiastic about regenerative agriculture and sustainability principles. The project on her property involved fencing off an extensive area of habitat (6.7 ha) and dealing with surrounding weeds. Ms Hartley and her husband have dealt with blackberry, holly and thistle infestations, Ragwort, and the aquatic invasive, Glyceria maxima, on their farm dams. With their recent training in soil health and pasture management (partly through Cradle Coast NRM’s small-holder program), the landholders learned that high-quality habitat is likely to encourage native birds, which assist with pasture pest control.

1.1 km of fencing to exclude stock and 500 native plantings to revegetate. Weed control, stock exclusion and revegetation addressed erosion and sedimentation issues, providing better biodiversity and habitat for the Giant Freshwater Lobster. Part of the Guide Falls Farm - where a Farm Conservation Grant project was undertaken with landholder Rachel Jacka - is a public farm, where visitors interact with wildlife, domestic and farm animals, and learn about local food production and environmental management. Community tree planting days organised as part of the project saw increased numbers of participants who also have the chance to learn about the project’s objectives.

PARTNERS Landholders Rachel Jacka (Guide Falls Farm) and Sue Hartley.

The Guide Falls project protected and enhanced 3.7 ha of riparian and erosion-prone areas with

HIGHLIGHTS

Community tree planting day

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Improved habitat for key EPBC-listed species

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Reduced weed infestation

Community awareness and engagement


BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

OVERVIEW Two Farm Conservation Grant projects focused on building the capacity of landholders to improve habitat for endangered and EPBC-listed species, exclude stock from waterways to prevent erosion and sedimentation issues, and provide improved biodiversity by removing weeds.

OUTCOME Native remnant forest, which is habitat to Burrowing Crayfish, Eastern Barred Bandicoots, Spotted-tailed Quolls, Wedge-tailed Eagles, Grey Goshawks, and other iconic species, has been protected and enhanced due to Farm Conservation Grant projects.

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BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

Flood Recovery

Cradle Coast NRM’s flood recovery investment resulted in significant improvements to riparian areas in the lower to mid Mersey catchment damaged by the floods of June 2016.

establishment and provide the greatest protection to water quality, including mitigating the threats of sedimentation and nutrient and pesticide incursions into waterways over the long term.

This has improved the extent and condition of native riparian vegetation and reduced the threat of willow infestation to improve bank stabilisation over the long term, reducing the risks to water quality.

One sensitive corridor planting of 3.5 ha has been further protected from stock with the erection of 1.7 km of fencing.

It also improved the condition and extent of habitat for threatened and EPBC-listed species such as Eastern Barred Bandicoot, Tasmanian Devil, Giant Freshwater Lobster and Central North Burrowing Crayfish. Habitat was improved with the planting of 30,000 native seedlings across 6.1 ha. Planting densities were high to improve chances of broader

Decreasing the extent of 8.4 ha of willow, with willows cut, debris burned onsite but with stumps left in situ and poisoned, ensuring that root balls provide bank stability whilst native plants grow to provide short term water quality protection.

PARTNERS State and Federal Governments.

HIGHLIGHTS

30000 plants across 6.1 hectares

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8.4

hectares willow control

1.7 km of fencing

Improved conditions for EPBC-listed species: Giant Freshwater Lobster and Central North Burrowing Crayfish, Azure Kingfisher, Eastern Quolls, Eastern Barred Bandicoot and Tasmanian Devil


BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

OVERVIEW Rehabilitation of sites significantly damaged during the floods of June 2016.

OUTCOME River bank stability, reduced threats to water quality and improved conditions, range and connectivity of habitat for threatened and EPBClisted species are all due to improvements made to riparian areas in the lower Mersey catchment.

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Indigenous Engagement BUILDING INDIGENOUS PEOPLE’S CAPACITY FOR NRM This program is an iterative consultation with the Aboriginal Community to develop relationships, partnerships and ultimately build capacity in the community to participate in NRM activities. This work is strongly focused on maintaining and developing our relationships with Aboriginal organisations.

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INDIGENOUS ENGAGEMENT

Gorse Control

Native grasslands are returning after significant levels of gorse infestation has been treated and removed at preminghana.

this program, with training selected and designed to complement the aspirations of the program and individual participants.

The outcome is a result of capacity building in fire and weed management. Additional on-ground support complemented the Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre’s efforts to deliver gorse eradication over 8 ha at preminghana IPA. 85-90% of the initial gorse infestation has now been treated and removed.

Significant improvements in the contribution and participation of the community in NRM activities in our region were a direct result of the Building Indigenous People’s Capacity for NRM program.

In addition to the on-ground impacts, the program allowed for improved relationships and communications with the Tasmanian Aboriginal community. The Aboriginal community now has better-equipped land management workers through participation in

Most significantly it has been the change in approach and attitude, which seeks to build capacity and empower the community to identify and determine their NRM priorities that has been the greatest outcome of this work.

PARTNERS Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre.

HIGHLIGHTS

The Aboriginal community now has better-equipped land management workers

38

The program assisted in capacity building and empowered the community

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

Significant gorse reduction at preminghana with native grasslands returning

Improved relationships with the Tasmanian Aboriginal community


INDIGENOUS ENGAGEMENT

OVERVIEW Engaging the Tasmanian Aboriginal community through the Building Indigenous People’s Capacity for NRM program focused on building skills, and improved relationships and communication with the Aboriginal community while engaging in the removal of gorse infestation at preminghana Indigenous Protected Area.

OUTCOME An infestation of gorse at preminghana has been reduced by up to 90 per cent, and native grasslands are returning. The Aboriginal community now has better-equipped land management workers through participation in this program.

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INDIGENOUS ENGAGEMENT

Fire and Land Management Capacity Building Community members who participated in the Fire and Land management capacity building program have gone on to gain further employment in land management positions, extended their professional scope to mainstream NRM bodies and become involved in highly prized volunteer capacities with organisations such as the Tasmania Fire Service. Cradle Coast NRM provided funding for six Aboriginal people from Tasmania to take part in Indigenous Fire Management training. The Indigenous Fire Workshop was hosted by the Balnggarrawarra Gaarraay Traditional Owners at Melsonby, Cape York, July 3- 7, 2017. Twenty Aboriginal people from Tasmania attended the workshop. Aboriginal people in Tasmania have embraced the program and continue to support it whenever the opportunity arises. The Tasmanian

Aboriginal Centre also contributed to the program by funding an additional six places demonstrating that it is committed to growing the program on a state-wide level. Further initiatives in fire and land management were supported by our program locally on lungtalanana (Clark Island) and in The Midlands, enabling a practical transfer of knowledge to the Tasmanian Aboriginal community. A total of 35 community members participated in the lungtalanana fire program, which also included practical training in feral cat control, trapping and monitoring while on the island.

PARTNERS Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre.

HIGHLIGHTS

100%

of CCA staff and Board members have increased their knowledge of Tasmanian Aboriginal culture

40

35

community members participated in the lungtalanana fire program

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

Development of an On-ground Grants for Aboriginal Lands Program

Practical transfer of knowledge to the Tasmanian Aboriginal community


INDIGENOUS ENGAGEMENT

OVERVIEW Cradle Coast NRM provided funding for six Aboriginal people from Tasmania to take part in Indigenous Fire Management training. All CCA’s staff and Board members have increased their knowledge and awareness of Tasmanian Aboriginal culture, NRM needs and aspirations and the obligations of Cradle Coast NRM with respect to Aboriginal Cultural Heritage.

OUTCOME Significant improvements in the contribution and participation of the community in NRM activities in our region were a direct result of the Building Indigenous People’s Capacity for NRM program. Community members who participated in the Fire and Land management capacity building program have gone on to gain further employment in land management positions.

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Community, Skills, Knowledge & Engagement (COMMSKE) This program is designed to increase community skills, knowledge and engagement across four project areas: Community Group Support, Citizen Science, Youth Education and Community Education Projects. Fifteen community groups and 1,173 individuals engaged with 11 events and activities during the highly successful COMMSKE program. Natural Connections Grants provided project funding to: Apex Club of Ulverstone, Reef Life Survey Inc, King Island Natural Resources Management Group, Friends of Burnie Penguins, Circular Head Landcare, Anglers Alliance Tas, Mt Roland Rivercare and Andrews Creek Primary School.

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C O M M U N I T Y, S K I L L S , K N O W L E D G E & E N G A G E M E N T

Discovery Ranger Program

Increased awareness of biodiversity values and an increase in skills, knowledge and participation in natural resource management has been the result of the 2018 Discovery Ranger Program. Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service Discovery Ranger Program reached out to visitors and communities in Arthur River, Strahan, Queenstown, Rosebery, Zeehan, Boat Harbour and Sisters Beach this summer. Public events and activities included quiz nights, shearwater tours and fun games such as ocean doctors, super shorebirds and wildlife detectives. The employment of an Aboriginal Discovery Ranger further enhanced the program. Participants were enthusiastic about the subject matter, and according to the final report by the Rangers involved,

responded particularly well to education activities about marine debris impacts on wildlife. The program’s key environment messages are delivered via fun activities in a non-threatening manner. One important local and relevant topic (due to the recent Macquarie Harbour Shoreline Clean-up) was the impacts of marine debris on wildlife, where participants discussed practical mitigation measures.

PARTNERS Discovery Ranger Program, Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (DPIPWE).

HIGHLIGHTS

1088

participants

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25

activities

PWS and Cradle Coast NRM strengthen partnership

Increased the size and scope of the partnership into western and north-western Tasmania


C O M M U N I T Y, S K I L L S , K N O W L E D G E & E N G A G E M E N T

OVERVIEW The 2017-2018 Discovery Ranger program engaged more than 1000 people during the peak summer period from December 2017 to January 2018 and offered visitors outside of Tasmania’s national parks the chance to join in a wide range of activities.

OUTCOME Increased awareness of biodiversity values and an increase in skills, knowledge and participation in natural resource management has been the result of the 2017-2018 Discovery Ranger Program.

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C O M M U N I T Y, S K I L L S , K N O W L E D G E & E N G A G E M E N T

Natural Connections Grants West Ulverstone Foreshore Rehabilitation Little Penguin habitat and coastal vegetation has been protected after fencing was erected along a section of Ulverstone’s foreshore. The Apex Club Ulverstone Inc installed almost 1 km of fencing between the Apex Ulverstone Beachside Holiday Park and the coastal foreshore reserve (between West Ulverstone and Picnic Point Foreshore Reserve).

of the main caravan park and the summer caravan overflow area at popular Picnic Point. The vegetation protection fencing has protected native vegetation and Little Penguin nesting habitat. The Apex Club has replanted with 200 native grasses where there has been encroachment onto the coastal reserve.

The vegetation-protection fencing will act as a barrier to pedestrian traffic and deter the removal of vegetation and planting of introduced species.

The Apex Club has promoted the benefits that come from being involved in service projects such as the foreshore fencing and revegetation.

The fencing will also assist in stabilising the dunes and maintaining the integrity of the coastal ecosystem and Little Penguin nesting habitat.

PARTNERS

The barrier fencing has now helped define the coastal reserve between the permanent residents

Ulverstone Lions Club, Apex Club Ulverstone Inc, Turners Beach Scout Group, Pitt and Sherry, residents of the caravan park.

HIGHLIGHTS

Stabilised the dunes to maintain the integrity of the coastal ecosystem

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Protected Little Penguin nesting habitat

973 m of fencing and 200 plants installed

60 4 organisations

volunteers and

involved


C O M M U N I T Y, S K I L L S , K N O W L E D G E & E N G A G E M E N T

OVERVIEW Almost 1 km of fencing has been installed between the Apex Ulverstone Beachside Holiday Park and the coastal foreshore reserve to better protect Little Penguins and native vegetation. The project brought together various groups ensuring a broad section of the community understands and appreciates the importance of protecting local wildlife, their habitat and protected the local Little Penguin colony.

OUTCOME Little Penguin habitat and coastal vegetation has been protected after fencing was erected along a section of Ulverstone’s foreshore.

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Coastal Restoration In partnership with regional public land managers and key stakeholder organisations, Cradle Coast NRM delivered a targeted grant program to decrease key threats to coastal and waterway environments. Projects delivered improved access management, weed control, interpretation signage and protected threatened species and geo-heritage sites in reserves, National Parks and areas of high conservation value.

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COASTAL RESTORATION

Macquarie Harbour Shoreline Clean-Up Significant amounts of debris have been removed from Macquarie Harbour improving the marine environment, reducing threats of ingestion and entanglement of resident shorebirds, migratory birds and marine species. Additionally, the Harbour is now a cleaner, visual amenity for tourists and West Coast residents alike. Over two years, the project has removed more than 11 tonnes of rubbish from Macquarie Harbour and surrounds. This is equivalent to ~120 cubic metres, and more than 60,000 individual pieces. Approximately 80% of the debris is made of plastic. In April 2018, over 5 days, 168 volunteers from 13 organisations, removed 5 tonnes of debris from 97 hectares and 36 locations – a total distance of approximately 112 kilometres, using 10 boats and various vehicles.

All rope collected was separated, and every bottle and can (if in suitable condition) was counted and sent for recycling.

PARTNERS Tasmania Parks and Wildlife, Wildcare, Conservation Volunteers Australia, Tassal, Petuna and Huon Aquaculture, Active Strahan, Strahan Primary School, King River Rafting, DPIPWE Marine Farming Branch, Strahan Beach Tourist Park, RACT Strahan Village, Tasmanian Seafood Industry Council, Gordon River Cruises, World Heritage Cruises and West Coast Wilderness Railway, West Coast Council, West Coast Yacht Charters, Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

Because of the clean-ups, all three commercial fish farms who use the Harbour have implemented their own regular clean-ups.

HIGHLIGHTS

5

tonnes of debris removed

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13

organisations involved

36 locations across 112 km

23-page Macquarie Harbour Clean-up Outcomes and Discussion Report


COASTAL RESTORATION

OVERVIEW The second Macquarie Harbour Clean-up held over five days in April 2018, saw more than 5 tonnes of debris removed from some of Tasmania’s most significant coasts and waterways across 112 km.

OUTCOME Significant amounts of debris have been removed from Macquarie Harbour improving the marine environment, reducing threats to resident shorebirds, migratory birds and marine species. The Harbour is now a cleaner, visual amenity for tourists and West Coast residents alike. Because of the Clean-up fish farms agreed to their own rubbish monitoring and regular clean-ups.

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COASTAL RESTORATION

Land Manager Grants West Inlet Rehabilitation The West Inlet Rehabilitation project will improve conditions for native species to flourish and promote the area’s natural values. The project focused on protecting and promoting the natural values of 4.3 hectares of remnant melaleuca forest, adjacent to a functional Lawn Cemetery at Circular Head. The project included a natural values site assessment, the development of a management plan, weed control and signage to promote the natural values of coastal wetland saltmarsh and the area. Circular Head has large areas of coastal saltmarshes and other wetlands which are important fish nurseries and provide a buffer for flood and storm surge protection.

legislation, the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 (EPBC Act). This legislation acknowledges that wetlands are important coastal ecosystems which face threats arising from human activities, invasive species and climate change. The interpretation signage will raise awareness and understanding of the environmental and economic benefits of conserving the natural values of coastal saltmarsh to the local community. The West Inlet Rehabilitation project was a Cradle Coast Authority NRM-funded Land Manager grant of $15,000 to the Circular Head Council.

PARTNERS Circular Head Council, UTAS, Living Wetlands.

Coastal saltmarshes were listed in 2013 as a Vulnerable Ecological Community under Federal

HIGHLIGHTS

Development of a weed control management plan

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Signage to promote the area’s natural values and saltmarsh

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

Media coverage at launch

UTAS Lecturer Vishnu Prahalad spoke about the benefits of saltmarsh at signage launch


COASTAL RESTORATION

OVERVIEW The West Inlet Rehabilitation project was a Cradle Coast Authority NRM-funded Land Manager grant of $15,000 to the Circular Head Council. The project site is a remnant melaleuca forest and coastal saltmarsh wetland and included the development of a management plan, weed control and signage to promote the natural values of saltmarsh and the area.

OUTCOME The West Inlet Rehabilitation project will improve conditions for native species to flourish and promote the area’s natural values.

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Financial Report

The 2017-18 Audit Report and Financial Statements for Cradle Coast Authority Natural Resource Management (NRM), a business unit of the Cradle Coast Authority (CCA) are presented in the following pages. The statements represent the consolidated performance for the delivery of Regional NRM activities. This year’s deficit of ($364,621) (2017 deficit: $239,372) represents a decrease in project reserves at 30 June 2018, comprising predominantly of grant funding being drawn down in accordance with project delivery in relation to the National Landcare Programme. After accounting for outstanding creditors and leave provisions, the Authority held consolidated reserves of $620,931 (2016: $985,211) representing unexpended grant funds held restricted for NRM. Grant funding received by the CCA is generally provided for the purpose of achieving specific outcomes. CCA manages these outcomes through the appointment of service providers through a competitive process. Service providers contracted by CCA are engaged to deliver agreed services, and funds paid under those contracts are conditional upon successful completion of milestones and reporting targets. Whilst funding received by the CCA is recognised as revenue when control of funds is obtained, the unspent portion is set aside as reserves for future and ongoing project commitments. See the notes to the financial statements for details of areas these funds are committed. The accompanying Financial Statements agree with the relevant accounts and records and have been prepared in compliance with: • Australian Accounting Standards • The Local Government Act 1993

CLAIRE SMITH CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DATE: 20 AUGUST 2018

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Financial Statements

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2018

Note

2018 $

2017 $

1

1,840,987

1,720,986

21,707

23,851

29,802

57,561

1,892,496

1,802,398

Employee benefits

701,311

693,679

Project management expenses

977,776

781,440

INCOME Government grants Interest received Other Income

2

Total Income EXPENSES

Other administrative and operating expenses Total Expenses Net surplus/(deficit) and Comprehensive Result

3

578,030

566,651

2,257,117

2,041,770

(364,621)

(239,372)

The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements in relation to funding received for Natural Resource Management. This Statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2018

2018 $

2017 $

366,667

246,666

Dept. Environment (Cwth)

1,474,320

1,474,320

TOTAL GOVERNMENT GRANTS

1,840,987

1,720,986

9,000

35,940

-

4,545

Other Contributions

20,802

17,076

TOTAL OTHER INCOME

29,802

57,561

985,211

1,224,583

(364,280)

(239,372)

620,931

985,211

Note 1

GOVERNMENT GRANTS Dept. Primary Industry, Parks, Water & Environment (State)

2

OTHER INCOME Project Contributions Sponsorship

3

COMPREHENSIVE RESULT Carryforward reserves Surplus/Deficit TOTAL RESERVES

Total reserves held include: State Support for Regional NRM $458,489 (2017: $425,561), National Landcare Programme $48,004 (2017: $559,652) and the Tasmanian Cat Management Plan $114,348 (2017: Nil). CCA receives grant funding from the Tasmanian Government for the provision and support of regional NRM functions, these reserves are not conditional nor tied to specific activities. CCA anticipates that the conditions attached to all amounts of funding received but not yet spent will be satisfied in accordance with funding requirements.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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Thank You

Thank you to everyone involved with our work throughout the 2017/2018 year.

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Additional copies of this report can be found at www.cradlecoast.com/nrm For information on the objectives and strategic direction of natural resource management in the Cradle Coast, refer to the 2015-2020 Cradle Coast Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy also available from www.cradlecoast.com/nrm Cradle Coast Authority NRM would like to acknowledge the following photographers for their contribution to this publication: Anna Wind, Cape Studios, Jay Rowley, Iona Flett, Julie Bernhagen, Jake Richards, Emily Pressnell, Grant Wells, Jarrod Edwards, David McCormack, Dave Roberts-Thompson, Tom O’Malley and Tasmanian Land Conservancy. Designed by Emma Duncan, Red Bird Design


Cradle Coast NRM 1 – 3 Spring Street, Burnie PO Box 338, Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6433 8400 Fax: 03 6431 7014 nrm@cradlecoast.com Cradle Coast NRM is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority

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2017-2018 Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report  

2017-2018 Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report

2017-2018 Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report  

2017-2018 Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report