Page 1

Volume 1, Issue 1

September 2013

this issue:


With

The PUBLISHER

Shinita V. Hishaw, Publisher, CPTIME Magazine

What TIME Is It? It’s TIME for Welcome to the FIRST issue of CPTIME Magazine! In this issue and upcoming issues you’ll read a lot about following your dreams. This magazine is my dream! I love magazines! I like shorter stories than those in a book. I can read them faster and move on. And, I like the pictures too. I used to rip out magazine photos of my favorite “boy bands” and put them on my wall and in my locker when I was in school. I encourage you to read…yes, read the articles and learn about how these role models have become successful in their career. You can be successful too! Follow their advice. The careers featured in this issue are: • • • •

Architecture and Construction Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Manufacturing Transportation, Distribution and Logistics

There are many different jobs in each career path, so we couldn’t show you all of them in one issue. But stay tuned…there are more to come! If you have comments, email me! Go to the website, www.cptime.net, send a message and we will respond. You may see your comment in the next issue! Do you want us to write about a specific career? Let us know! This is a magazine for YOU! Did you know there are contests? Yes, there are contests in each issue and you can win prizes! You may even get to be in an upcoming issue of CPTIME Magazine! BUT, you cannot win if you do not enter – so don’t forget! It’s TIME to find out the details of this month’s ART ­CONTEST on page 20. ­ It’s also TIME to sign-up online to talk to the role models too! You can ask questions, but we will only email the phone number or website to those who register. Have you ever read about someone and then had a chance to talk to them? Well, now you do! How cool is that?! Even if you’re shy or scared to ask questions, you can still register. The career schedule is in the back of the magazine and it tells you what careers are coming up and which months. You’ll get the next issue in November. It’s TIME to check to see when your favorite career will be featured. It’s TIME to tell your friends about CPTIME! They can view it online at www.cptime.net. I hope you enjoy CPTIME Magazine. Please tell me what you think Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY! about it. I look forward to hearing from you soon!

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The CPTIME Team Publisher & Editorial Director Shinita V. Hishaw

UNSURE OF YOUR FUTURE?

Assistant Editors Daris Frencha Anika Williams Jarred Howard Jillian Hishaw LaTanya Franklin Debby Duke Contributing Writers Archuleta Chisolm Martha Deller Columnists DeNeen Attard Jennifer Walton Creative Design Hector Martinez Printing Services Midway Press, Dallas TX

www.cptime.net Register Online Today!


Moments In Volume 1, Issue 1 September 2013

CPTIME

What’s In CPTIME For You! Pg. 6

An Appealing Option After High SChool. Pg. 22

Building Success Pg. 9

GETTING TO KNOW YOU BINGO Pg. 27

Name _________________________________________ In each box, write the name of a different classmate who fits the descriptor.

Plays Piano

Hidden Talents and Interests Lead to Dream Career. Pg. 11

Born in another state

Born in July

Likes spinach

Born in another country

Can do a magic trick Has a library card

Has a five-letter name

Plays soccer

Has curly hair

Owns a pet

Plays the drums

Has more than one cat

Wants to be a teacher Has a skateboard

Has taken a train trip

Is wearing something blue Loves pizza

Has three or more siblings

Has a mom who is a teacher

Setting Goals. A Key To Success. Pg. 13

Water Skiing

Has gone snorkeling Plays video games

Has ridden a horse

A Passion for Electronic Design. Pg. 28

Speaks two languages

Timeless Moments

Excerpted from: Your First Year of Teaching and Beyond by Ellen Kronowitz

© 2000-2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Clues U Can Use Pg. 12

http://www.teachervision.com

The Importance of Math & Science. Pg. 14 Like Sudoku? Love Accounting Pg. 18

Contest Corner Pg. 20 JustEnough SoUSucceed Pg. 26 NOB4UGO Pg. 30

CPTIME is published bi-monthly and is a Career Planning Time, LLC publication. CPTIME is a free publication located in Tarrant County, Texas. We reserve the right not to publish ads that are deemed objectionable by management. For advertising rates or editorial comments and s­ uggestions please visit www.cptime.net. CPTIME assumes no responsibility for unsolicited m ­ aterials and r­ eserves the right to edit and modify all materials. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of CPTIME. Contributors of CPTIME acknowledge that their submission becomes the property of CPTIME and may be used in all media, as they see fit. All rights reserved.


What’s In CPTIME

FOR YOU!

What is

?

CPTIME stands for Career Planning TIME. TIME Stands for Talent, Interests, Motivation and Education which are four key areas to focus on for success. The stories will talk about role models who are successful in their careers and tell how they became successful. Some people will be successful at a high level, while others will be successful within their jobs, even though they are not at the top. They may become more successful in the future, but success happens at all levels – especially if you do a good job. Their stories will talk about what tasks they perform at work, what level of education they have and what has led to their success thus far. It will be available every other month printed as a magazine and online at www.cptime.net.

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How can CPTIME Magazine help with career choices? CPTIME will allow you to see different careers and learn from people who have various experience. Articles may also talk about what they like and dislike about their career and if they have talents that helped them succeed, that YOU may have also. Their articles will also tell you their advice in case you’d like to follow in their footsteps. Guess what?! You can ask them questions! If you want answers that are not in the article, you will be able to ask! Isn’t that great?! At the end of the articles, there is a date and time when you can speak to the role models. But, you must sign up online at www.cptime.net to get the call in number or website address to talk to them.


What’s In CPTIME

FOR YOU!

Who are the role models?

How can you talk to the role models?

These are everyday people. They have faced similar circumstances as you. Some may not have had the best grades. Some may not have had a clue what career they wanted, but it will tell you how they figured it out. Some may not have completed college, while others may have more than one college degree. Some may have started in one career and changed their mind, because they didn’t have anyone to help them figure out the best career path at an early age. These are people who may or may not live in your area. These role models may have grown up with a single mom, or a mom and a dad at home. They have all types of backgrounds. Some may even have military experience. There are a variety of people for you to see and talk to about their careers, so if you’re interested in their career or know a friend, brother, sister or cousin who might be, share their stories in your neighborhood, your church, your school or your after school programs and outside activities (like dance, sports, karate, etc.).

As mentioned, the CPTIME Team will make it possible for you to talk to the role models. If you are not sure if you would like their career, ask them questions. If you KNOW FOR SURE you like their career, find out more information that will help you prepare. Every other month, the role models in the magazine will talk to you. All you have to do is log on to www.cptime.net and sign up. Once you do, the call or web information will be sent to you and when the date comes, you’ll call or log on and they will be there to answer your questions. Even better, the CPTIME Team will remind you of upcoming dates so you don’t miss out if you forget. Don’t be shy! There is nothing to be afraid of because no one can see you, but get your parents’ permission before you log on! We encourage parents to be present with you, if possible.

Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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225 Exchange Street, Suite 0 Burleson, TX 76028 817.253.1584 djsdancewear@gmail.com djsdancewear.com

ATTENTION MOMS: Have you launched YOUR dreams yet? Well, YOU CAN! DeNeen Attard, Christian Women's Life Coach, partners with clients to focus on their strengths using Biblical and Coaching principles. -Professional Christian Women -Christian Women's Groups -Female Ministry Leaders -Small Business Owners

Pre-order your copy of her new book, Trinity of Coaching: God, You and Your Life Coach via visit us on Success Tomorrow Starts 8 www.deneenattard.com or TODAY! DeneenAttardLifeCoach 469-718-9140.

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Building Success - Jennifer Walton

Building Success

By Jennifer Walton Have you ever wondered how skyscrapers are put together or how they stay together? What about how they got their shape or who came up with it? Well, welcome to the world of Architecture, Construction, Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, Manufacturing, Transportation, Distribution and Logistics. These different industries represent a team effort to create and build skyscrapers (among other things). Let’s take a quick look. An architect designs large structures like buildings or bridges along with their shape. They are dreamer who invent or create “blueprints” on paper. An engineer takes the blueprints and ensures the structure will be built safely, able to survive wind, earthquakes, etc. Mathematics is the mental study of topics like numbers, space, shape and continued on page 10

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continued from page 9

Building Success - Jennifer Walton

structures. Math is used throughout the engineering process using various measurements and tools. Do you like putting things together? Construction is the act of putting things together. During construction of the skyscraper, materials are needed like metal, wood, concrete, nails, windows, etc. All those things go together to help manufacture the building. Technology is used in computer systems and equipment to help with design and construction. It is also the skills and knowledge of how those machines are best operated. Science is a method of getting knowledge by using observation, testing and experimentation. In the example of building a skyscraper, you would apply science to determine if the ground is strong enough to hold it. Is there rock under the dirt and is it strong enough to hold a 100-story building? Are you a good organizer? Logistics is organizing a large task through planning. You would make sure there is a step by step plan for when things will be done and by whom. Getting the materials and equipment to the work site involves transportation. Transportation is the act of carrying something or somebody from one place to another using a car, plane, train, etc. Transporting workers, equipment and materials is important to completing the project. Distribution is the handing out or delivery of things. In this example, after materials are transported, each construction worker gets the materials needed for his part of the work. As you can see, building a structure like a skyscraper takes a lot of people in various industries working together. Inside this edition are people who have careers in most of these industries. Some may appeal to you. Look up each industry to learn about other careers and where you might fit in.

Good luck and happy researching!

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Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION

Hidden Talents and Interests Lead to Dream Career BY MARTHA DELLER

Laura Williamson didn’t plan on a career in construction. If she had, she might have ­ majored in engineering, ­ been an apprentice in a building trade ­ or taken a ­certification course. All are alternate routes to a job managing major ­ building ­projects. Instead, Ms. ­Williamson has a degree in Accounting and was working as an office “temp” in a construction c ­ ompany. As a “temp”, or temporary, ­shortterm ­employee, she discovered ­hidden talents and interests in her that lead to her dream c ­ areer. While watching Ms. ­ Williamson “play around” on the firm’s construction blueprint program, ­ her temporary boss created her first job writing contracts. She also became responsible for buying the company’s construction materials ­ and managing heating and cooling project files. “I stumbled into it quite ­accidentally, but I knew I was exactly where I wanted to be,” she said. To add job supervision to her paperwork skills, Ms. ­Williamson worked for large construction contractors. She supervised work crews on c ­ onstruction jobs and did the same for ­smaller ­construction services, like ­ electricians. She was able to learn electrical skills from electricians and engineers with ­

more experience who taught her the ropes. She proudly directed a Laura Williamson huge project to switchover to a new Dallas 911 system. The project ­required a 4-hour power ­shutdown and police and fire department leaders guarded the city by r­adio. That experience led to a p ­roject to change the communications at four American Airlines ­ terminals at DFW Airport. “If this failed for even a few minutes, the delays would have a worldwide impact,” Ms. Williamson said. While construction laborers can work their way up to m ­ anagers, Williamson advises teens to get a business degree that opens doors to any job, including ­construction. “A degree tells an employer you’re a finisher,’” she said. Being able to go to college and finish your degree is very ­important. “I got into [construction] with contracts, ­ but it was not good enough for me to see it on paper. I always wanted to go see it on site.” And she did. After 16 years, her job is still fun. “Every project is different,” she said. “If I want to stay in the office, I stay in office. Other times, I go out in the field. It’s been an adventure for me.”

Laura Williamson will be available to answer questions on

Saturday, October 5, 2013 at 10:30am Sign-up online at www.cptime.net

to receive details of how you can talk to Ms. Williamson Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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Labor Unions Since this issue is available in September, let’s reflect back to the Labor Day holiday at the beginning of the month. A labor union was responsible for the start of Labor Day and some of the industries in this issue still have workers in labor unions. Labor unions are legally recognized as representatives of workers who pay membership dues, and the members work in the same job. They work together to get the best wages, benefits, and working conditions for all members. The union also represents the workers in labor disputes with company managers. Transportation and Manufacturing are two huge industries that still have union workers, and other industries Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY! 12 include teachers and police officers.

1. Why do Americans celebrate Labor Day in the United States? 2. Which state was the first to make Labor Day a law and when? 3. When did Labor Day become a National holiday? 4. How was Labor Day originally celebrated? 5. What was Labor Day originally called? 6. List 3 things people associate with Labor Day – now or recent past. Answers on page 31


TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION AND LOGISTICS

Setting Goals – A Key to Success “Celebrate going above and beyond your goals.”

Tommie Collins has had a great career at BNSF Railway, including moving to several locations in his career, and now living in Chicago, Illinois. He also has gained the leadership experience to go along with it. After serving in the United States Marine Corps, he wasn’t quite sure what he wanted to do with his future. When a letter arrived in the mail from BNSF inviting him to take the conductor’s Tommie Collins exam, he took a chance, and there began his 17 year career with the company. As a conductor, Mr. Collins was responsible for linking railcars together in a rail yard to create a train, as well as the overall safety of the train while moving from place to place.

Mr. Collins was promoted to Train Master – with responsibility for controlling and coordinating the movement of multiple trains and making sure they arrived on time. He is now a Manager over international shipments for the company. ­Collins makes sure 220 employees are safe, that International shipments arrive on time, and customer problems are solved. He used to wear a uniform ­including hard hat, reflective vest, steel-toe boots and safety goggles, but now he wears business casual clothes. Mr. Collins says that he works mostly indoors and no ­longer has to work in snow, rain and heat. At times, he has to be outdoors climbing on mechanical equipment to make sure it is running right, but that’s minimal. “My favorite subjects in school were history, science, and literature. I ­believe English and Business classes (economics, accounting, finance) are very ­important to understanding and communicating in the rail industry.” Collins has a high school diploma and three years of college, although he’s c ­ urrently ­pursuing his degree. He says the best opportunities for railroad e ­ mployees are available to those with a Bachelor’s degree in Business, Logistics or ­Transportation. Mr. Collins truly loves being able to help the employees he supervises to develop their leadership skills. He recommends getting a mentor – someone that will help with setting goals and creating plans to reach those goals. He wants students to know, “You can’t be the CEO today but you can be tomorrow if you plan for it. Start setting goals and make it a habit.”

Tommie Collins will be available to answer questions on

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 6:30pm Sign-up online at www.cptime.net

to receive details of how you can talk to Mr. Collins. Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING AND MATH

The Importance of

Math & Science By Archuleta Chisolm

C

ervente Sudduth discovered his career during a high school internship. “I saw drawings of a [building] project that was happening in my neighborhood”, he remembers. “That inspired me to pursue a career in Civil Engineering”. With nearly 20 Cervente Sudduth years of experience, he recalls starting at the bottom as a Staff Engineer and working hard to advance to his current job as a Project Manager for Kiewit Power, in Kansas City, Missouri. He is responsible for planning, executing and c ­ ompleting power plant projects, which supply electricity to turn the lights on when the switch is flipped. Mr. Sudduth stressed the importance of taking math and science ­courses, and says foreign language is important too. His advice is, “Don’t shy away from those courses. Take algebra, geometry AND calculus, and learn from them.” He knows first-hand that these courses prove to be important in this field. Math courses can help students learn what it takes to calculate things like:

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SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING AND MATH

• How tall and wide a school can be within a neighborhood area • How much weight the upper level in the Mall can hold • How much space to put between floors in an apartment building An example of using science in engineering is determining how to secure beams underwater to hold up a bridge. While he really liked math and science, Mr. Sudduth LOVED gym, like most boys. Mr. Sudduth not only earned a Bachelor’s degree, he also has a ­Master’s degree in Civil Engineering, a Professional Engineer Certification

and is currently pursuing a Doctorate degree in Structural Engineering and Geology. He graduated from the University of Missouri – Columbia (MU) and continues his legacy at the University of Missouri - Kansas City (UMKC). He’s a member of professional organizations that help him stay up-to-date on new procedures, techniques and technology. Although a degree is required for his field, Mr. Sudduth says don’t get d ­ iscouraged about grades, just stick to it. His grades have improved with each ­degree from 2.0 to 3.5 GPA, as he has grown up and become more focused. When asked, “how important is a mentor?”, Mr. Sudduth replied “­definitely important! Partnering with someone who is doing the very thing you want to do can make all the difference in your success.” He encourages students to “surround yourself with family, live the life you want to live and everything else is over and above.”

Cervente Sudduth will be available to answer questions on

Monday, October 14, 2013 at 6:30pm Sign-up online at www.cptime.net

to receive details of how you can talk to Mr. Sudduth. Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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mary kay ad

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d with bleed

Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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Like Sudoku?

SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING AND MATH

love accounting Zachary Welborn, had no idea what career he wanted when he enrolled at Tarleton State University. His dad helped him choose courses his first semester and within two weeks he knew Accounting was the perfect career. He’d never heard of Accounting before the class! People think accounting means you have to love math, but Mr. Welborn’s favorite subject was history. He liked figuring things out and working with people. His duties as a Staff Accountant include working Zachary Welborn with businesses to prepare tax returns and financial statements, using sales receipts from their customers. He also completes forms to file their state sales tax every month, and makes sure the numbers equal what the sales records show. When problems occur or numbers do not match, Mr. Welborn is the go-to person to figure out what went wrong. He makes sure everything he does is documented so if anyone asks what problems he’s faced or how he solved them, they can read his notes and be Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY! able to solve the problems too. 18


SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING AND MATH

Mr. Welborn has worked in accounting for 4 years. He happened to be there when his boss, Lewis Leatherman, needed to hire someone in his Saginaw, TX office. Because Mr. Welborn jumped in and learned quickly, he has kept his job and is now Mr. Leatherman’s right-hand-man. He is able to make logical, educated guesses and figure things out on his own, as well as, remain calm under pressure. All of these characteristics have proved to work well, especially when dealing with money, taxes and government agencies like the IRS. To succeed in accounting it’s important to be a strong reader and really like helping people solve money problems. Many customers have problems because they don’t know the tax rules. Mr. Welborn enjoys giving advice and direction so customers learn to do the right thing. During tax season (January 1st - April 15th), most people get excited to buy new things with their income tax returns. However, that’s Mr. Welborn’s toughest time because he gets so busy that he works every day of the week. Many accountants are getting close to retirement, according to Mr. Welborn, so accounting jobs will be available. A degree is not required to enter the accounting field, but it’s definitely helpful to earn more money. Mr. Welborn advises, “play Sudoku puzzles because the skills used in that game are the skills I need in this office.” He is willing to teach accounting to those who WANT to learn, and says “it doesn’t matter how much you like math or don’t like math, if you can problem solve and work with people, that’s what I need.”

Zak Welborn will be available to answer questions on

Monday, October 21, 2013 at 6:30pm Sign-up online at www.cptime.net

to receive details of how you can talk to Mr. Welborn.

Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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EPTIM:E WEBSITE D U L C N I PRIZRD,ECERSTIFICATES, RECOGNITILIOLNROECNEIVC E A PLAQUE AND

S AS ER W T CA A $100 GIF - GRAND PRIZE WINN DITIONAL COMIC STRIP E D A N. ZIN AND MAGA CE TO CONTRIBUTE 6 ME MASCOT/CARTOO N TI A P H C HAVE A C L CREATOR OF THE THE OFFICIA

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What’s Needed?

CPTIME needs a character to represent the magazine. We want an original character that you draw just for CPTIME. It will be our very own mascot! Remember, the magazine is about careers. The character can represent following your dreams, time, careers or planning for the future...it can be ANYTHING! You decide! Don’t forget...CPTIME stands for ­Career Planning Time. We also want the character to be in a comic strip. Make it do or say something funny and have 1-3 lines of a joke, caption or storyline to go with the picture(s). What To Do: Create the character in action, add a funny joke and ­submit your artwork with this REQUIRED INFORMATION: your name, parent’s name, parent’s email address, parent’s phone number, your school and your age. Email a PDF file to contest-corner@cptime.net (ask your parents for help). The deadline is 6:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 27, 2013. Log on to www.cptime.net to read the rules before you send your submission to make sure you do everything ­ orrectly. Not following the rules will result in disqualification. c All prizes are listed online at www.cptime.net. There will be 4 finalists and 1 will become the GRAND PRIZE WINNER who gets their character in future CPTIME magazines AND a $100 Gift Card!!! Remember the CPTIME Motto: Success Tomorrow, Starts TODAY!


MANUFACTURING

An Appealing Option After High School

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MANUFACTURING

“Realizing I am a valuable member at my job”, is Joshua Wilson’s

best memory in his career. He is a Line Worker at General Motors (GM) in Kansas City, Kansas, and supervisors request him to help in their areas because the assembly line runs smoothly when he’s working. Mr. Wilson has been at General Motors since May of 2009 and in that time he has learned 86 different jobs within the Trim Department. The Trim Department (which Joshua Wilson follows the Paint Department) assembles parts into the car. His primary duties occur in the trunks of the Buick LaCrosse and Chevrolet Malibu, including securing radio speakers and wiring. Mr. Wilson is successful because he’s flexible and learns quickly. He can watch someone do a job one time and do it on his own right away. He has improved production to 98% by keeping the line running. If there is a jam, he can work around it. The only time it stops is when something has to be repaired. At a production factory like GM, the line is constantly moving, along with forklifts and it’s noisy. For safety reasons he wears personal protective equipment (PPE) to help with bending and ear buds for hearing. The most important safety factor is paying attention to his surroundings, including having an eye for details as cars move down the line. With many jobs in the plant, all subjects in school are helpful, from computers to repair skills. A college degree is not required for Line Workers, however to get into management, it may be necessary. Line Workers advance and receive regular raises based on the labor union’s agreement with the company. Mr. Wilson is a member of the United Auto Workers Union. Although his co-workers are also members, not everyone does their part, which is what Mr. Wilson likes the least about his job. However, he enjoys going to work getting his job done without distractions, and a built-in break every 2 ½ hours. His advice is “never be scared to try, but always have a school option as a back-up plan because you can’t count on being hired right away”. It took him 2 years and 11 months working as a temporary employee before he became an actual GM employee. With a starting pay near $15 per hour, and the company willing to help pay for college, he admits, it’s appealing, especially for someone right out of high school.

Joshua Wilson will be available to answer questions on

Saturday, October 19, 2013 at 11:00am Sign-up online at www.cptime.net

to receive details of how you can talk to Mr. Wilson.

Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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UPCOMING EDITIONS

CURRENT: September 25, 2013 Architecture & Construction/STEM/Manufacturing/ Transportation, Distribution & Logistics NEXT: November 20, 2013 Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources/Government & Public Admin/Human Services/Health Science January 29, 2014 Arts, AV Tech & Communications/Education & Training/Marketing, Sales & Service March 26, 2014 Hospitality & Tourism/Public Safety, Corrections & Security/Information Technology May 28, 2014 Business, Management & Admin/Finance/Science, Technology, Education & Mathematics/Graduate Edition July 30, 2014 Readers’ Choice

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Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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Just Enough So U Succeed - A Time For Inspiration

Just Enough So U Succeed What Dream Is Inside You?

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The time is coming when you will need to start t­ hinking about what career would be best for you and your future. Some people know right away. Others struggle to figure it out. It is okay either way. Figuring it out isn’t hard if you pay attention to ­yourself. Is there something you find yourself doing d ­ uring your free time like d ­ rawing, doing puzzles or writing poems? Pay attention to those m ­ oments. What gives you goose bumps? Do some ­reflecting and keep a journal of things you enjoy. Write them down. Fear will try to come and make you believe you cannot do something or be someone. It is not real. As negative thoughts try to flood your mind, learn to replace them with positive ones. Facing fear will make it go away. If you feed into the fear, it will grow bigger and you will end up missing out on opportunities. You are able to do whatever you put your mind to. You have the ability and the power, you just have to believe! Pay attention to the signs that come your way and you will figure out what dream is inside you trying to get out. -By Jennifer Walton


Name _________________________________________ In each box, write the name of a different classmate who fits the descriptor.

Plays Piano

Born in July

Likes spinach

Born in another state

Born in another country

Can do a magic trick Has a library card

Has a five-letter name

Plays soccer

Has curly hair

Owns a pet

Plays the drums

Has more than one cat

Wants to be a teacher Has a skateboard

Has taken a train trip

Is wearing something blue Loves pizza

Has three or more siblings

Has a mom who is a teacher

Water Skiing

Has gone snorkeling Plays video games

Has ridden a horse

Speaks two languages

Excerpted from: Your First Year of Teaching and Beyond by Ellen Kronowitz Š 2000-2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved. http://www.teachervision.com

Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING AND MATH

A Passion for Electronic Design

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By Archuleta Chisolm


SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING AND MATH

F

or the last 10 years, John Jolly has owned C&J Technical S­olutions and Services, Inc., located in ­Diamond Bar, CA (near Los Angeles). As President of his own company, he says that he always wanted to give young engineers the chance to grow and develop their career path; s­omething he didn’t have the chance to do when he was young. His passion was to build his own company by ­design­ing projects and spending time outside of the office at project sites ­­­ – not having to be in the­ office all day. He has had contracts (which are work agreements with

machines. His company also designs heating and a/­c units and provides power and lighting for businesses. As the owner, he supervises the people who work for him.

John Jolly

Before owning his company, he sold heating and air conditioning units, was a Design Build Contractor, and an Equipment Manufacturer. Mr. Jolly always had a passion for designing. He received a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering. Afterwards, he took the California state exam to earn a professional license and passed on the first try. Later, he received a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering. The starting pay for this type of engineer is $45,000 - $52,000 per year.

other businesses) in many states, ­including Texas, so he travels across the country to visit his clients and ­project sites in those areas. Mr. Jolly is an Electrical Engineer and a Mechanical Engineer which means he designs, develops, and tests any type of electronic system. These ­systems can be the electrical wiring in ­buildings, or the control buttons for

Good communication and team work are two great skills to have, says Mr. Jolly. The ability to speak clearly, listen and answer questions well is i­mportant. A key to success according to Mr. Jolly is giving and ­accepting feedback. His advice to students is, “Focus on your studies – math, science, oral and written communication skills.”

John Jolly will be available to answer questions on

Monday, October 07, 2013 at 6:30pm Sign-up online at www.cptime.net

to receive details of how you can talk to Mr. Jolly. Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!

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( You Go ) NOB4UGO Know Before

College and Career Helpful Hints

The 411 on Informational Interviews -By DeNeen Attard

One fun and easy way to prepare for your career is to conduct informational interviews with professionals in industries that interest you. Think of yourself as the next great explorer on an adventure–seeking out valuable information that will help to propel you to success! Informational interviews help you find out information on careers and industries that you cannot find out by yourself. For ideas on who to interview ask your teacher, principal or family member for help. When planning for your interview be sure that you prepare your questions prior to your meeting. Keep your questions brief and limit them to no more than five or seven. Some good questions might include the following: • How did you get started in your career? • What do you like best about your job? • What type of training or education would I need to succeed in this job? Keep in mind that while informational interviews are not the same as job interviews they are just as important. This means dress professional, be polite and prepared. Make sure that you send a note or card following your interview to show your appreciation and to thank the person for taking the time to meet with you. Do not wait another day to schedule your first informational interview happy adventures to you!

REMEMBER: CPTIME Magazine answers some of the above questions for you and gives you a chance to meet the role models and ask more questions. Sign-up TODAY at www.cptime.net!

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Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY!


Labor Unions ANSWERS From page 12

Why do Americans celebrate Labor Day in the United States? According to the United States Department of Labor, Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It is a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country. Which state was the first to make Labor Day a law and when? The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. When did Labor Day become a National holiday? On June 28, 1894 Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday. How was Labor Day originally celebrated? The Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. What was Labor Day originally called? Workingmen's holiday. List 3 things people associate with Labor Day – now or recent past. (Any of these are correct) 1. End of summer 2. Start of football season (1st NFL usually plays the Thursday after Labor Day; NCAA usually plays Labor Day weekend) 3. Sales at local retail stores (biggest sales until Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving) 4. Last day of the year to wear white Success Tomorrow Starts TODAY! 31 5. Return to school


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CPTIME is a bi-monthly career magazine, primarily for middle and high school students, that engages them in career exploration through succe...

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