__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

UNIVERSITY HOUSING

STR ATEGIC PLAN

2018–23


We acknowledge that the land on which Cal Poly sits carries the heritage and culture of the Indigenous People of San Luis Obispo County, the yak titʸu titʸu yak t iłhini, Northern Chumash tribe. We honor the Indigenous People’s connection to these territories and respect the land on which we gather today.

19


CON TEN TS 1

From Our Team

2

From Our Executive Director

3–4

Our Organization

5–6

Housing at a Glance

7–8

A Look Through Time

9-10

Envisioning the Future

11

Developing the Plan

12

Results

13–14

Mission, Vision, Principals

15–16

Goal 1: Promote a 24/7 residential campus living-learning model

17–18

Goal 2: Advance innovation in campus housing through technology and space enhancement

19–20

Goal 3: Cultivate an environment of equity and well-being

FROM OUR TE A M In 2017, University Housing reached out to student leaders and asked them to weigh in on the future of housing at Cal Poly. The department didn’t just want the opinions of students — it wanted students to lead a team that would develop University Housing’s Strategic Plan for the next three years. Students co-chaired the Housing Innovation Team, conducted assessments, and worked side by side with staff members to define Housing’s new mission, vision and guiding principles.

1

Addressing the needs of residents was incredibly important to students. Our top priority was to set tangible goals that would benefit all residents so they could “Learn by Living” while at Cal Poly. We researched, we collaborated, we listened. In three years, we’ll do it all again to meet the ever-changing needs of students. For now, we’re excited to share the product of our hard work over the past two years: the Cal Poly University Housing Strategic Plan for 2018-23.

– The Housing Innovation Team


FROM OUR E X ECU T I V E DIR ECTOR This Strategic Plan is a student-centric roadmap for the growth of University Housing through 2023. It is the product of research and discussions led by the Housing Innovation Team, incorporating feedback from staff, students and community partners. The Housing Innovation Team established a plan that will allow us to lead with forethought and vision. As part of our goals, University Housing is committing itself to student success, efficiently allocating resources, and better anticipating changes in higher education and student affairs. This document is the first step toward creating a high-performance, studentfocused University Housing program. As we work to realize our vision, we will share our progress while taking on new challenges to advance University Housing and support students in their Cal Poly journey. Please join us in shaping our future and the future of our students.

Jo Campbell Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Executive Director of University Housing

2


UNIVERSITY HOUSING University Housing provides campus housing, services and community programming for approximately 8,000 student residents. With about 200 staff members and more than 250 resident advisors and student assistants, we are one of the largest departments on campus.

CERRO VISTA APARTMENTS ~POP. 796 POLY CANYON VILLAGE APARTMENTS ~POP. 2,664

3

NORTH MOUNTAIN HALLS ~POP. 460


H O U S I N G A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

PL ANNING AND SUPPORT SERVICES

• Establishes priorities and manages resources.

• Designs and maintains the housing living environments.

• Manages occupancy and student assignments. • Recruits, trains and supports staff development. • Communicates with students, supporters and partners.

• Promotes sustainability in building maintenance and student culture across housing. • Procures and manages housing inventories.

RESIDENTIAL STUDENT EXPERIENCE

C U S T O D I A L O P E R AT I O N S

• Creates residential communities that promote continuous learning.

• Provides clean, orderly living communities for students and staff.

• Assesses students’ needs in order to provide safe, inclusive environments.

• Maintains the safety of spaces.

• Fosters a collaborative housing environment among students, faculty and staff. • Encourages personal accountability, growth and reflection.

SOUTH MOUNTAIN HALLS ~POP. 1,381

UNIVERSIT Y HOUSING TECHNOLOGY • Maintains and expands information systems. • Provides accessible and secure technology solutions. • Enhances the delivery of programs and services.

SIERRA MADRE ~POP. 666

YOSEMITE ~POP. 664

YAKʔITʸUTʸU ~POP. 1,649

4


UNIVERSITY H O U S IN G AT A GL A NCE

S TA F F

184

276

390,344

full-time, part-time

student staff

hours worked each year

and on-call staff

STUDENTS 18.5% Asian American 89.3% In State

>1% Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, or Samoan 2.9% Decline to State

55.3% White

1.4% Black/African American 11.8% Chicanx/Latinx >1% American Indian/Alaska Native 8.7% Two+ Ethnicities/Races

10.7% Out of State

2 0 1 9 –2 0 C O M M U N I T I E S : Continuing Student Programs • Continuing Student Success Program

Residential Learning Communities Introduced in 1988, a Residential Learning Community is a group of students who live together and engage in co-curricular experiences focused around their field of study, career or personal interests.

5

• Cal Poly Scholars

• PRIDE Community • Substance Free • Cal Poly Lofts (off-campus)

Transfer Student Programs • Cultural and Identity Communities

• PRIDE Community • Transfer Program


6,986

3

336

14,643

on-call hours worked

faculty-inresidence

housing tours given by

work orders completed

student ambassadors

per year on average

each year

per year

16.7% CAFES 51% Male

56.5% First-year

>1% Gender X

9% CAED

13.2% CSM

4.7% Transfer 14.1% OCOB

16% CLA

38.8% Continuing

49% Female

30.4% ENG

First-year Interest-based Programs • Collaborative Leadership

• Entrepreneur iCommunity

• Mindful Living

• TRIO Achievers

• Pride Community

• Poly Tech

• Educational Opportunity Program

• Global Living

• Pre-Med and Health

• Cultural and Identity Communities

• Honors

• Substance Free • Cal Poly Scholars

First-year College-based Programs • College of Architecture and Environmental Design

• College of Science and Mathematics

• College of Engineering

• College of Liberal Arts

• Orfalea College of Business • College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences

6


C A M P U S H O U S IN G /

20,000 17,066

17,401

17,257

15,867

16,636

17,488

A LOOK BACK

17,777

18,842

18,516

18,302

15,000

10,000

5,000

2,816

2,934

2,775

2000

2001

2002

3,551

3,680

3,620

3,621

2003

2004

2005

2006

Cal Poly turns 100 years old!

Cerro Vista Apartments open for continuing students. Residential Learning Communities introduced for sophomores.

7

3,872

2007

5,362

2008

Housing Administration Building finished. Phase 1 of Poly Canyon Village Apartments is complete and students move in.

6,493

2009 Phase 2 of Poly Canyon Village complete.


In order to accommodate the recent and projected growth of our campus community, Cal Poly has invested more than half a billion dollars into student housing facilities since 2003. With the completion of yakʔitʸutʸu in fall of 2018, the university has added more than 5,600 new student beds over

17,332

6,395

2010

17,725

17,680

6,959

6,657

2011

2012

Genderinclusive housing option introduced.

18,739

19,246

a 15-year span. These communities aren’t just places where students live, they’re places students learn. For students to get the most out of their housing experience, we need to remain innovative in the programs, technology and administrative services we offer.

20,049

20,426

7,244

7,150

7,377

7,038

2013

2014

2015

2016

Housing gets Wi-Fi. Interestbased Residential Learning Communities introduced. Continuing students pick their own apartments.

First-year students required to live on campus.

Jo Campbell joins University Housing as executive Mustang director. Move-in becomes a volunteerassisted event.

Cal Poly Lofts open in downtown San Luis Obispo.

21,297

21,037

7,807

7,770

2017

2018

Laundry made free for residents. Housing Innovation Team starts work on Strategic Plan.

20,454

7,839

Campus Residents Undergraduate Enrollment

RESIDENTIAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES

2019

Faculty-inresidence added to student communities. yakʔityutyu opens for first-year students. Culture and Identity Residential Learning Communities added.

8


EN V ISIONING THE FU T UR E OF HOUSING Living on campus is a foundational experience. In residence halls, students forge relationships that carry them through their entire college career — and often beyond. Our research also indicates that campus living has academic benefits: Students who live in campus communities their first two years have higher retention rates than students who live off campus. To provide all Mustangs with the on-campus experience, Cal Poly implemented a first-year residential requirement in 2016. The Campus Master Plan established a goal of housing 65% of students on campus by 2035, at the latest. As we move toward that goal, we’re expanding and modernizing our housing options for students. With the completion of yakʔit yut yu in 2018, we were able to house all first-year students in residence halls and offer more spaces in apartments to continuing students. As we move toward our goal of housing all first- and second-year students on campus, more campus partners are adding a two-year housing requirement for their own students, including the Cal Poly Scholars and Athletics programs. In 2019, the College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) became the first college to add a two-year requirement. For CAED students, the benefit of a campus living experience has real-life results. Roughly 98.6% of CAED students who lived on campus their first two years continued as Cal Poly students for a third year, as opposed to 90%, who lived on only campus for one year.* Ultimately, Housing’s primary mission is to help residents reach their own goals: a well-earned cap, gown and diploma. *Retention statistic is calculated for first-time freshmen in fall 2016 who enrolled in fall quarter 2018.

9


Cal Poly students who live on campus for two years have higher retention rates than students who live off campus. The retention benefit is particularly significant for students with limited financial support and for first-generation college students.

F I R S T-T I M E F R E S H M E N R E T E N T I O N T O T H E T H I R D Y E A R E N R O L L E D F A L L 2 0 1 6 CO L L EG E

CO L L EG E A V E R A G E ALL STUDENTS

LIVES ON BOTH 1 ST A N D 2 ND Y E A R S

L I V E S O N 1 ST Y E A R A N D O F F 2 ND Y E A R

RETENTION DIFFERENCE

A LL ST U DEN T S C AFES

9 0. 3 4%

9 4.92%

91.8 4%

3.08%

C AED

9 0.98%

98.61%

9 0.0 0 %

8.61%

CENG

91.98%

95. 58%

92.71%

2.87%

CL A

9 0. 30 %

9 4.89%

92.69%

2. 20 %

COS AM

89.18%

9 4. 30 %

93. 24%

1.0 6%

OCOB

92.67%

95. 5 4%

9 4.71%

.8 4%

F IR ST- GEN ER AT ION ST U DEN T S C AFES

92. 31%

10 0 %

86.8 4%

1 3.16%

C AED

97.14%

10 0 %

95.0 0 %

5.0 0 %

CENG

8 3. 56%

91.11%

71.43%

19.6 8%

CL A

8 4. 31%

91.91%

8 5.19%

5.72%

COS AM

9 0.91%

96. 30 %

87. 50 %

8.80 %

OCOB

92.45%

96.1 5%

95.65%

0. 50 %

A N N UA L FA MILY INCOME <$8 0K C AFES

9 0.0 6%

91.11%

91.07%

0.0 4%

C AED

9 4. 59%

96.97%

92.11%

4.86%

CENG

9 0.0 4%

93. 39%

8 8.73%

4.66%

CL A

8 8.11%

95.08%

86. 30 %

8.78%

COS AM

92.74%

96. 55%

92.0 6%

4.49%

OCOB

9 4.96%

95.8 3%

95. 38%

0.45%

10


DEV ELOPI NG A ST R AT EGIC PL A N Before drafting a plan, the Housing Innovation Team spent months evaluating Cal Polyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housing program and researching other programs around the nation. In order to ensure that the Strategic Plan reflected the real-life needs of Cal Poly students, the Innovation Team also engaged in a critical review of the Mustang

Housing experience. They sought candid feedback and insights through face-to-face engagement circles with students, staff and campus partners. In addition, the team surveyed first-year students and Housing staff to identify services and programs that our stakeholders valued and areas where we could improve.

RESEARCH

SURVEY OF

1,100

first-year students and

11

150

staff

ENGAGEMENT CIRCLES

REVIEW OF

WITH

15+

70

participants

OTHER CA MPUS HOUSING PROGR A MS


R E S U LT S When the data was analyzed, a few common themes emerged: a need for improved communication, better staffing, and more innovative technology solutions. Stakeholders also rated resources, infrastructure and opportunities to learn outside of the classroom as highly important to the residential experience. The Housing Innovation Team used that information to craft a new Mission, Vision, and set of Guiding Principles that spoke to the actual needs of Cal Poly’s residents.

C AMPUS VOICES

“Create safe spaces for LBGTQIA.” “Affinity group gatherings have been effective and fun.”

“Lessen the financial burden on low-income students having to pay for two years on campus.”

“We need better technology in general.”

12


13


S T R AT E G I C P L A N 2018-23

MISSION University Housing creates a diverse and engaging experience that inspires all residents to “Learn by Living”.

VISION Engage students in residential learning environments that promote student success in a multiyear, innovative and inclusive environment.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES • Furthering inclusive and proactive student support . • Innovating technology and facilities. • Promoting the well-being of residents and staff.

GOALS 1. Promote a 24/7 Residential Campus Living-Learning Model. 2. Advance innovation in campus housing through technology and space enhancement. 3. Cultivate an environment of equity and well-being.

14


15


GO A L 1.

Promote a 24/7 Residential Campus Living-Learning Model

DE V ELOP S TRONG ER C A MPUS PA R TNERSHIPS TO INCRE A SE ACCESS TO STUDENT RESOURCES. Strengthen and support partnerships to create active learning communities linked to classes, career mentorships, faculty interaction and wellness. Create engagement opportunities for academic support services. Provide opportunities for pop-up services based on resident needs and preferences. Collaborate with Campus Dining to better meet resident needs in dining quality and variety.

P R O M O T E I N N O V AT I V E , S T U D E N T- C E N T E R E D L E A R N I N G , E N G A G E M E N T A N D D I S C O V E R Y. Streamline and enhance Residential Learning Community options and goals. Create a culture of assessment to develop innovative spaces for learning. Strengthen educational partnerships with Campus Health and Wellbeing.

I N C R E A S E Q U A L I T Y O F C O M M U N I C AT I O N A N D S E R V I C E . Create a culture of proactive and inclusive communication to students, staff and partners. Develop consistent staff training initiatives to improve business continuity and customer service. Increase staff engagement, responsiveness and visibility with campus residents

N U R T U R E C O M M U N I T I E S T H AT S U P P O R T S T U D E N T R E T E N T I O N A N D G R A D U AT I O N . Align policies and priorities that support retention, belonging and degree completion. Strengthen campus partnerships to cultivate retention and graduation. Foster inclusive and welcoming spaces for underrepresented students on campus. Implement sophomore and transfer initiatives related to retention and mentorship.

16


17


GO A L 2.

Advance innovation in campus housing through technology and space enhancement

I N T E G R AT E S O L U T I O N S F O R A C C E S S I B L E O N L I N E A N D M O B I L E - F I R S T DELIVERY OF SERVICES. Implement digital delivery of services within housing communities. Improve the user experience of current and prospective students seeking online information and services. Expand mobile-friendly resources for residents and prospective students.

D E V E L O P, M A I N TA I N A N D E N H A N C E Q U A L I T Y I N E N V I R O N M E N TA L LY FOCUSED FACILITIES. Taking student feedback into consideration, prioritize resources for facility improvements. Advance community accessibility through universal design. Advance zero-waste programming.

A D V A N C E S O C I A L , E C O N O M I C A N D S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y P R A C T I C E S AND POLICIES. Support student basic needs initiatives in collaboration with campus partners. Adapt spaces and amenities to improve the experience of campus residents from various identities. Advance waste reduction and reuse initiatives in collaboration with campus partners.

18


19


GO A L 3.

Cultivate an environment of equity and well-being

ENH A NCE SPACES A ND RESOURCES TO B E MORE INCLUS I V E FOR INDIVIDUALS FROM VARIOUS IDENTITIES AND BACKGROUNDS. Enhance residential spaces to be inclusive of the diverse needs and identities of our student population. Support dedicated spaces for religious practices, mindfulness and outdoor living. Enhance relationships with campus partners to promote equitable access to resources.

P R O M O T E S A F E T Y, A W A R E N E S S , R E S P E C T A N D A P P R E C I AT I O N OF DIFFERENCES. Take purposeful steps to attract diverse staff and student leaders. Increase and enhance training focused on inclusion. Structure educational initiatives around self-awareness and appreciation of differences.

U S E F E E D B A C K A N D D ATA - D R I V E N R E S E A R C H T O I M P R O V E T H E E X P E R I E N C E O F R E S I D E N T S A N D S TA F F. Measure and track residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sense of belonging and needs to advance retention. Consult with Inter Housing Council Inclusion Committee, Resident Advisors and residents to capture diverse perspectives and hear concerns. Identify and benchmark best practices for diversity and inclusion.

S U P P O R T R E S I D E N T S A N D S TA F F B Y F O C U S I N G O N H O L I S T I C P E R S O N A L A N D P R O F E S S I O N A L D E V E L O P M E N T. Drive engagement in holistic professional development programs. Foster the retention of staff in order to enrich the student experience.

20


KEEP IN TOUCH!

housing.calpoly.edu @cp_housing 805-756-1226 / housing@calpoly.edu

Profile for Cal Poly University Housing

2018-23 University Housing Strategic Plan  

2018-23 University Housing Strategic Plan  

Advertisement