Cow Country News- January 2022

Page 1


OVER 400 Bulls will sell in Seedstock Plus Sales this spring! • • • • • • •

Guaranteed Sight-Unseen Purchases! Free Trucking on every bull! No fine print! The best disposition & soundness sort! Extensive Data & Genomic EPDs! All Bulls Are Semen & Trich Tested! Over 200 RFI tested bulls sell in these sales! Videos of sale bulls on website the week before the sale! www. dvauction.com or www.seedstockplus.com

North Missouri Bull Sale

February 26, 2022 Kingsville Livestock, Kingsville, MO Selling 150 BLACK Balancer & Gelbvieh Bulls! All 18 months old!

Arkansas Bull Sale

March 5, 2022 Hope Livestock, Hope, AR Selling 70 Angus, Balancer & Gelbvieh Bulls! 2 yr olds & 18 months!

Red Reward Bull & Female Sale

March 12, 2022 Wheeler Livestock, Osceola, MO Selling 60 RED Balancer & Gelbvieh Bulls & RED females! Registered & Commercial!

South Missouri Bull & Female Sale

March 26, 2022 Joplin Regional Stockyards, Carthage, MO Selling 150 BLACK Angus, Balancer & Gelbvieh Bulls! 18 months & yearlings! Also BLACK females! Registered & Commercial!

Bid & Buy at:

DVAuction DV

2 • Cow Country • January

REQUEST YOUR CATALOGS TODAY 877-486-1160 john@seedstockplus.com


EARLY

MARCH MADNESS BULL AND HEIFER SALE

United Producers Inc. Livestock Center One mile off I-65 at Exit 28 in Bowling Green, Kentucky

February 26, 2022 • 12:30pm cst

Musgrave 316 Exclusive

AAA 18130471

65

48 AAA 185789

68 SAV Raindance

Deer Valley Gr

owth Fund AA

A 18827828

SAV Rainfall 6846 AAA 18578963

7717

PHF Asset 9039 AAA 1955

LD Capitalist 316 AAA 17666102 PHF Provost 9032 AAA 19592923

W,C Bankroll

811D ASA 3187

005

WLE Copacetic E02 ASA 3299037

WAGR Catalys

t 225C ASA 30

2880060 ked 44B ASA

SSC Shell Shoc

18738

Progeny from these and other industry leading sires will sell!

66863

e 856F ASA 35

PHFC Revenu

SELLING 80 ANGUS, SIMANGUS & SIMMENTAL BULLS

DNA and ultrasound information available on all bulls. All bulls will have passed a breeding soundness evaluation and sell with the Pleasant Hill Farms guarantee.

AN ELITE SET OF COMMERCIAL HEIFERS ALSO SELL, including 50 black and black baldy, ready to breed commercial heifers and 40 bred heifers due to calve in March.

PLEASE CONTACT PHF FOR A SALE BOOK. IF UNABLE TO ATTEND, THE SALE WILL BE BROADCAST IN REAL-TIME AT: Gil, Mary, Corbin, Caroline, and Catherine Cowles 508 Richpond Rockfield Road Rockfield, Kentucky 42274 Gil Cowles (270) 843-9021 or (270) 791-3526 cell Email: pleasanthillfarms@twc.com Corbin Cowles (270) 991-2534 Harvey Mast (270) 791-6873

For LiveAuctions.tv information: Brooklyn Graham (812) 530-0748 brooklyn@liveauctions.tv


TABLE OF CONTENTS COLUMNISTS 07 Chris Cooper: President’s Thoughts 09 Dave Maples: Thoughts from Dave 10 Ryan Quarles: Commissioner's Corner

Your local, trusted source of Livestock Marketing, Credit and Risk Management.

12 Baxter Black: The Dreaded Blue Box 21

Candace Smith & Lindsay Burley: Requirements for Transporting Cattle Into Kentucky

22

Dr. Michelle Arnold: Judicious Use of Antibiotics What’s Next for Beef Producers?

30 Chris Teutsch: Frost Seeding Clover: Getting it Right! 52 Dr. Jeff Lehmkuhler: Feed for Fertilizer

Bowling Green, Ky. Weekly Auction: Tuesday at 1 p.m. CST Cory Wallace • (270)516-9043

FEATURE STORIES 18 University of Kentucky Rises Above Tornado Aftermath 20 Leadership Development Program Completes Session Five In Colorado 24 Beef Export Value Shatters Annual Record;Pork Exports Still on Record Pace 32 Top Livestock Show Attracts Best of the Best 33 Farmers Encouraged To Apply For New Agricultural Exemption Number 44 Kentucky’s Agricultural Economy Thriving; Record Receipts Expected

13 NCBA Legislative Updates 14 County News 16 Economic & Policy Update

Irvington, Ky. Weekly Auction: Monday at 9 a.m. EST Ryan Batt • (812) 620-0769 & John Gibson • (812) 968-4097

Owenton, Ky. Weekly Auction: Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. EST Robert Green • (502) 321-6012

36 Membership 38 Kentucky Beef Council 40 Kentucky Beef Network 43 Kentucky Angus Association News 50 Calendar of Events 51 Advertisers Index 51 Classifieds

Little York, Ind. Weekly Auction: Tuesday at 10 a.m. EST Ryan Batt • (812) 620-0769 2022 Scholarship Program Offering 10 - $1,500 scholarships to graduating high school seniors. Check our website for requirements and to apply!

PAGE 26 - 28

4 • Cow Country • January

Visit us online at www.uproducers.com or find us on Facebook!


sector. Sacrifice of maternal efficiency in your cow herd for the sake of praise from those in the sale barn and feed lot is no different than putting Christmas gifts on the credit card and paying it off for the next year – it is going to cost you PERFORMANCE TESTED PUREBRED ANGUS CATTLE a lot more in the long run. It takes short term sacrifice for long term reward whether it is physical results in the gym, SETTING THE TABLE FOR SUCCESS mental clarity or lowering your cost of production while weaning the same size calf. For most people success doesn’t just happen. Very few of us are fortunate enough to be so naturally talented that Much like I have continually work at optimization in my good things just happen. Even fewer of us are able to just own life, we continually work to push the boundaries of “luck” our way into prolonged success. A famous saying what we can get our cattle to do. The population of cattle is “the harder we work the luckier we will get.” I believe we are working with did not exist even 10 years ago. The that is absolutely true, but what exactly does it look like in progress we can make in the next 10 years will be exponenpractice? I believe to set the table for success that you have tial. We have tools that did not exist 10 years ago for foot to have three areas of your personal life in order. If you structure, fertility, and commercial cow-calf profitability. keep your body, mind and personal finances in order, you’ll We have been able to use these tools to identify sires that be amazed how orderly your life becomes. If we do not do are in a class of their own when it comes to foot structure, these things, our energies are constantly being pulled away fertility, and maternal profitability while also excelling as we approach our goals and leaving them always out of in carcass quality. The EPD searches within the Angus reach. breed prove this, and the bulls we are using this fall are unmatched in the entire industry in this respect. Our cow You have to keep your physical health in order or nothing herd is second to none when it comes to commercial cowelse matters. Missing one day a month of work for a doctor’s calf profitability, and coupled with those bulls the genetic appointment amounts to 12 days off in a year. After copays value of the subsequent calf crops will continue to grow and prescription costs, this sounds like the time and money exponentially. If we do not demand that our cattle are able for a vacation to me. The next area I believe is by far the to breed, walk and grade then our energies are constantly most difficult to master – the mind. The words you speak to being pulled away as we approach our goals, leaving them yourself become the house you build around yourself. How always out of reach. However, if we make sure they are well you speak to yourself can change the entire trajectory of rounded and doing the most fundamental things very well, your day. Whether you wake up in the morning and think we will be setting the table for success. Give us a call and you are going to have a good day or a stressful day, you are we will be happy to show you how we have set the table for most likely right. In agriculture we know we can’t control success. the weather or the markets, and often the cattle, but we can control how we react to those outside factors. Lastly, if you - Joe K . Lowe II can’t control your money then it will control you. I am far M.S. Agricultural Economics from a Dave Ramsey disciple, but I have chosen my priorities when it comes to how my money is spent in my personal life. My truck is paid for, my home is modest and I chose to attend universities that were willing to pay my tuition KENNETH D. LOWE (270) 202-7186 for me. This alone puts me well ahead of the curve when it JOE K. LOWE II (270) 202-4399 comes to peers in my age group.

OAK HOLLOW

There are also three things that are paramount when it comes to success in your cow herd. Without them nothing else matters and you are always going to come up short of your objectives. We have to keep the feet sound under them, have them breeding on a 365-day interval, and produce industry accepted carcasses when it comes to size and quality grade. Without that nothing else matters. That has been the emphasis of our breeding program for over 40 years. If the cattle can’t do those three things it doesn’t matter how much they excel in other areas. Just as individuals may put their physical health, mental health and financial health on the back burner for other pursuits, far too often the most important traits in cattle have been second to increased growth and carcass traits. I fully support selection for terminal traits. However, I know advancements at the very top level in terminal traits have often come at the expense of fertility and structure in the commercial cow-calf

400 OAK HOLLOW DR. - SMITHS GROVE, KY WWW.OAKHOLLOWANGUS.COM

January • Cow Country • 5


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OFFICERS:

KCA PAST PRESIDENTS:

PRESIDENT Chris Cooper 2140 Tates Creek Road Richmond, KY 40475 (859) 200-7711

PAST PRESIDENT Steve Dunning 8200 Antioch Road Hopkinsville, KY 42240 (270) 498-8180

1972-73 Jere Caldwell† - Boyle

PRESIDENT ELECT Cary King 250 Bright Leaf Drive Harrodsburg, KY 40330 (859) 734-2173

KCA PROGRAM CHAIRMAN Jeff Pettit 5745 US Highway 41 S Seebree, KY 42455 (270) 836-2963

VICE PRESIDENT Andy Bishop 6135 High Grove Rd Cox’s Creek, KY 40013 (502) 350-7609 TREASURER Ken Adams 90 E Horseshoe Ave. Upton, KY 42784 (270) 734-1443

KBN CHAIRMAN Allan Bryant 1429 Hillspring Rd Eminence, KY 40019 (502) 548-1379

2002 Jack Kimbrough† - Shelby

1974-77 Smith T. Powell - Lincoln

2003 Mark Williams - Crittenden

1978-79 Larry Lovell† - Union

2004 Paul Napier - Lincoln

1980-82 John Masters† - Mason

2005 Eddie Young - Washington

1983-85 Seldon Hail† - Laurel

2006 Greg Ritter† - Barren

1986-87 Bob Vickery† - Wayne

2007 Don Pemberton - Christian

1988 Glenn Mackie - Bourbon

KBC CHAIRMAN Joe Lowe PO Box 205 Smith’s Grove, KY 42171 (270) 202-4399

REGIONAL DIRECTORS:

2008 Billy Glenn Turpin - Madison

1989 Dale Lovell - Muhlenberg

2009 Scotty Parsons - Christian

1990 Steve Henshaw† - Union

2010 Corinne Kephart - Shelby

1991 Jerry Fraim - Grayson

2011 Greg Robey - Mercer

1992 Glen Massengale† - Wayne

2012 Mike Bach - Bath

1993 Dell King - Christian

2013 Don Reynolds - Hart

1994 Kenneth Lowe - Warren

2014 Steve Downs - Marion

1995 Dr. J.L.Cole - Monroe

2015 Gary Woodall - Logan

1996 Harvey Mitchell - Mercer

2016 David Lemaster - Clark

1997 Jim Naive† - Spencer

2017 Chuck Crutcher - Hardin

1998 Shelby Hughes - Logan

2018 Bobby Foree - Henry

1999 Hoppy Lovell - Barren

2019 Tim White - Fayette

2000 Charles Miller - Jessamine

2020 Steve Dunning - Christian

2001 Larry Clay - Perry

(Deceased)

REGION 1 Bobby Bell*.................................270-547-8547 Buddy Cook.................................270-275-1274 Ashley Holloway................................................. Leland Steely...............................270-339-3476 Don Pemberton...........................270-889-3855 Don Clements..............................270-389-0527 Mark Heimgartner.......................270-875-2585 Jeremy Armstrong......................270-668-2056 Blake Munger..............................270-293-8830 Sara Roberson............................270-668-2428 REGION 2 Adam Maulden*..........................270-590-1005 Dennis Smith..............................270-590-2840 Trent Jones.................................270-590-5266 Chuck Crutcher...........................270-272-6269 Allison Nissley.............................270-403-3205 Steven Green...............................270-528-1720 Don Reynolds..............................270-528-5239 Mike Bullock................................270-792-9644 Dr. Kenneth Green.......................270-589-7175 Corbin Cowles.............................270-991-2534 Kirk Cecil.....................................270-692-7698 Chris Imbruglio...........................270-993-0543 Rayetta Boone.............................270-230-5488 Andy Joe Moore..........................270-590-0841 Brian Manion...............................270-868-0253 Phyllis Gentry..............................502-331-1146 REGION 3 Allan Bryant*..............................502-548-1379 Allen Phillips...............................502-220-0948 Wanda Hawkins..........................502-321-5602 Phillip Douglas............................502-552-0688 Larry Bryant................................502-845-4615 Amanda Hall................................859-333-5001 Nicole Goecke.............................606-782-2263 Maynard Stetten..........................502-609-4986 Kevin Perkins..............................502-269-7189 John Allison................................502-220-3170 Lincoln Clifford...........................859-954-0102

Cover photo by Matt Barton, UK Agricultural Communications

VOLUME 35 • ISSUE 1 176 PASADENA DRIVE • SUITE 4 • LEXINGTON, KY 40503 • PHONE: (859) 278-0899 FAX: (859) 260-2060 • WWW.KYCATTLE.ORG • INFO@KYCATTLE.ORG

Dave Maples Executive Vice President Staff Accountant Kelly Tucker

Membership Coordinator Nikki Whitaker

Graphic Designer Todd Brown

Director of Kentucky Beef Network Becky Thompson

KBC Director of Product Development Katelyn Hawkins

Video Production Specialist Danny Coy

KBN Industry Coordinator Dan Miller

KBC Director of Brand Management Kylie Trail

Office Manager/Communications Assistant Jesslyn Watson

Publication Coordinator Carey Brown

KBC Director of Education Bradon Burks

National Advertising Sales, Livestock Advertising Network Debby Nichols (859) 321-8770

COW COUNTRY is published monthly by THE KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any material which he feels is unsuitable for the publication. Although the highest journalistic ethics will be maintained, the KENTUCKY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION limits its responsibilities for any errors, inaccuracies, or misprints in advertising or editorial copy. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume liability for all content of advertisements made against the publisher.

6 • Cow Country • January

REGION 4 Randy Warner*............................859-771-5280 Lisa Baesler................................859-509-5020 David Lemaster...........................859-749-0258 Ron Ray.......................................859-825-8516 Amy White...................................859-227-2552 Donovan Pigg..............................502-229-9187 Bruce Witt...................................859-585-8889 Danielle Harmon.........................606-748-8059 Ronnie Lowe...............................606-782-5058 Brandon Sears................................................... Danny Callahan...........................859-388-0910 REGION 5 Phillip Reese*..............................859-339-0450 Herman Benge.............................606-862-6451 Tommy Spalding..........................270-402-9157 Dean Craft....................................606-634-0191 Brent Ware..................................606-305-8612 Rick Brewer.................................606-682-2352 Danny Ray Spalding....................859-336-0444 Gary Ford....................................270-402-2194 Aaron Burke................................859-265-1172 Ryan Miller..................................502-827-5027 C. Mike Spalding..........................270-699-6587 Jared Foley..................................270-585-1331 * Denotes member of Executive committee


Presidents Thoughts Chris Cooper KCA President “The Best crop we ever raised” is a quote I will never forget and I know we have heard it and used it before several times. However, it took on a whole new meaning when Royce Vincent, a fellow cattle producer/member from Edmondson County, shared this statement with me at the 2020 KCA Convention in Owensboro, KY. Mr. Vincent was referring to his FAMILY as the “Best crop they had ever raised”. He said he realized this one Sunday as he looked around the room and the table while his family was gathered for Sunday dinner. I have to agree with Mr. Vincent when I look at our family and so I share this photo of our family as the “Best crop we ever raised”. Patty and I are very thankful for our family and grateful to the Lord for His blessings. We are sure many of you would agree that the LORD has been the One to bless us with our health and ability to do anything. Jesus said in John 15:5 - I am the Vine, ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same bringeth forth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing. I have to admit that if it had not been for the LORD, where would I be. Our thoughts and prayers are still with our Western KY families who experienced those tragic tornados on December 10th and 11th. I appreciate all the folks who have come together to help those families in need. It always amazes me and reassures me that no matter how mixed up our country may seem to be at times, that when a tragedy hits, everyone comes together with compassion and willingness to help. We just saw this back in March of 2021 when our friends in Eastern KY experienced massive and devastating flooding. KY Farm families are really special people that have huge hearts and hands that are second to none. I hope that as we have just passed through the Christmas season that each one has had the opportunity to reflect on their blessings and thank God for his goodness and for His wonderful works to the children of men. May each one of us look forward to 2022 with an earnest expectation and hope that the LORD will carry us through the days that lie ahead. I hope everyone has all of their plans in place to attend our KCA Convention January 13-14, 2022 at the Central Bank Center in Lexington, KY. I am excited to see everyone and I believe you will enjoy the new convention center. The KCA staff has a great lineup of speakers for the Beef Efficiency Conference, Forage Conference and General Sessions plus a bigger and better than ever Trade Show. Our Banquet Friday night always is a great way to end our Convention with the KCA Hall of Fame and videos. I look forward to seeing everyone at our KCA Convention. As always, a very important part of our KCA Convention will be the election of Directors and Regional Vice-Presidents for our state board as well as your KCA Executive Team. I encourage everyone to be engaged in this process in whatever capacity you feel led to participate whether to become a director or move into a Regional VP position. It is very important to become familiar with the process and be involved. Remember too that KCA is a grassroots organization and your voice needs to be heard so please bring any prepared resolutions and concerns to be considered to your Regional meetings. I am looking forward to passing the torch of President to my good friend and fellow board member Cary King of Mercer County during the convention. I am confident that Cary will be a good leader and President of KCA in 2022. Cary and I have worked closely over the last few years on several projects and he has proven his work ethic

towards KCA’s Long Range Plan. I have been involved with KCA at the local, regional and now state level for 20 years and I have enjoyed being part of such a great organization that focuses on the sustainability and profitability of Beef. I have had the privilege over the last 12 months to be your President and I hope that I have represented you well and most of all I hope that I have honored the LORD. I do plan to stay involved with KCA because I believe it is and will continue to be the voice of KY Cattle men and women across our great Commonwealth. May God Bless you and your families in 2022. I Corinthians 10:31 – Whether therefore ye eat or drink or whatsoever ye do, do all to the Glory of God.

Chris Cooper

Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association President

STONE GATE FARMS OPTIMUM TRAIT GENETICS ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE Monday March 7, 2022 12:30 at the farm Selling 65 Angus Bulls Registered females: 10 fall calving cows 8 fall bred heifers 15 Spring Bred Heifers 15 Open heifers Commercial females: 45 bred heifers, start calving March 25 1669 MILL CREEK RD. • FLEMINGSBURG, KY 41041 CHARLES CANNON: 606-849-4278 • CELL: 606-748-0747 JERE CANNON: 606-849-4360 • CELL: 606-748-6306 CHRIS CANNON: 606-748-0407 • VICTORIA CANNON: 606-748-5420 WWW.STONEGATEFARMS.COM • STONEGATEANGUS@GMAIL.COM

January • Cow Country • 7


Spring Sale February 19, 2022

11 a.m. at the farm in Ridge Spring, SC

SELLING 200 BULLS & 100 FEMALES Forage-Developed Angus Cattle Select Offering of SimAngus & Ultrablack Cattle

Free bull delivery with $5,000 total bull purchases

www.yonfamilyfarms.com lydia@yonfamilyfarms.com

Kevin Yon 803-622803622-41 4140 40 Sally Harrison 803-312-4837

Lydia Yon 803-622803622-8597 8597 Corbin Yon 803-480-2307

Drake Yon 803-622803622-5015 5015 Michael Jensen 336-769-6700


Thoughts From Dave

Maternal Matters!

Dave Maples Executive Vice President These past two years may be the most interesting and challenging years that I have observed in my 30 plus years in the association business. Hopefully 2021 will bring an end to some very challenging years. What are the prospects for 2022? The forces of supply and demand can not be over looked. If you follow the markets both have played an important role in what has taken place over the past year to six months and they will play a role in the outlook going forward. On the supply side, cattle numbers will be declining as low prices in our area, and low prices and drought in the west, have both led to herd liquidation over the past two years. When I talk to Kentucky Livestock Market operators and order buyers, they tell me that I will be shocked when I see the year end numbers with the amount of people that have exited the business. As I study the data it looks like through the end of October, beef cow slaughter was 10% higher than a year earlier. One report stated that the industry slaughtered the largest number of beef cows since 2011. Dairy cow slaughter is up 3% year-to-date while total cow slaughter through October posted a 6% increase from year-earlier and the highest since 1996. The other part of the breeding herd would be heifers. Heifer slaughter through the end of October was the highest since 2011. If the reports are right, reduced cattle numbers for 2022 and on into 2024 are evident. We could see cattle numbers as low as the 2015 numbers. Beef Demand - the outlook for prices next year will be highly dependent upon demand following this year’s surge as consumers satisfied their taste with beef. It takes a consumer willing and able to buy your beef. Demand has definitely increased and a great deal of credit goes to you, the American beef producer, because you’re producing a higher quality, more consistent product. The consumer is dealing with an inflation rate of 6% annualized increase, the highest in 30 years. Watching to see what the consumer chooses to spend their food dollars on will be the big question to be answered. Even if we assume that beef demand weakens, prices across the beef sector should still post notable gains during 2022. The support for this assumption comes from global beef demand as a key indicator in the equation. U.S. beef exports through September are up 21% from a year earlier with the value of fresh and frozen beef exports and variety meats posting a 40% increase over the same period a year earlier. The value of those U.S. beef export categories is over $7 billion! Japan accounted for 24% of those exports while China’s share grew from 2% for all of 2020 to 15% for January-September 2021. I was in Greeley, Colorado last month with the KCA leadership class. We stopped by one of Five Rivers’ massive feedlots and Jordan Levey informed the class that three days of production out of five was going to China. From a producer’s point of view that is massive. For a domestic U.S. consumer, beef prices will go higher.

REDHILL 176A AMBER 208C (#3521863) At Red Hill Farms, we are extremely pleased Red Angus has a new MATERNAL Index, HERDBUILDER. This new index is closely aligned with our maternal selection goals – cows that breed regularly, calve easily and early in the breeding season, and wean a high percent of their body weight. In addition to this important index, we put extra emphasis on udders, feet and disposition. Profitability starts with the cow!

Terminal Matters!

REDHILL 672X X004 231A (#2847534) The SimGenetics bulls at Red Hill are selected to add payweight in all phases of production – weaning, yearling and carcass. As a bonus, these bulls are selected for KY-31 fescue adaptability, slick hair, good feet and remarkably calm dispositions. These bulls are ideal for mating to British-based cows to produce calves with added hybrid vigor, feedlot demand and consumer acceptance. 231A, along with other Red Hill sires, have proven track records of adding value in all segments of the beef business!

Visit www.RedHillFarms.net for information about our sale and breeding program.

XVII

MORE THAN A BULL SALE

If you put it all together the industry is looking quite optimistic going into 2022. I am ready for some better times.

17th Annual Sale

One last comment. I hope you will take time to attend the KCA Convention January 13-14. There are some really top-level speakers on the agenda and this is a wonderful opportunity to network.

g Sellin

Saturday, March 19, 2022 1 p.m. CDT • At the Farm

:

Bart, Sarah & Ty Jones (615) 666-3098

466 Red Hill Road • Lafayette, TN 37083

mail@redhillfarms.net Gordon & Susan Jones (270) 991-2663

80 Red Angus, SimAngus™, Charolais and Cross-Ty Bulls January • Cow Country • 9


Ryan Quarles

Commissioner of Agriculture

After nearly two years of dealing with COVID-19, I hope you were able to gather together once more with your families for Christmas. In January, the Kentucky General Assembly will gavel in for the 2022 legislative session. This a budget year, so I will be working with the legislature on a number of important priorities, including research and infrastructure, investments in our agricultural community, and to secure funding needed so the Kentucky Department of Agriculture can continue serving you and your family. I’ll also be holding the line on tax exemptions that benefit our sector. We received positive news from ag economists from the University of Kentucky at the Kentucky Farm Bureau annual meeting. Ag economists expect this year’s agricultural receipts to exceed $6.7 billion, which would break 2014’s record year of $6.5 billion. They also projected net farm income to reach $2.5 billion, a number they noted would be the highest since 2013. The good news for Kentucky’s cattle producers? UK’s Dr. Kenny Burdine projected for us to end the year with record beef exports and also believes continued global demand will improve prices for calves and feeder cattle in 2022. While this is good, we can’t rest on our laurels. The supply chain

(70 + 90 = 160) ÷ 2 = 80 Anyone who passed sixth grade math can breed numbers,

BUT CAN THEY BREED CATTLE? In the real world of beef production, making a profit is the bottom line, not maximum EPDs.

87 TH ANNIVERSARY PRODUCTION SALE Monday, February 28, 2022

1291 North Stroudsville Road, Adams, TN Check the February issue of Cow Country for more details! Visit our website for an in-depth look at our breeding and management philosophy!

Since 1935

w w w.robertelliottandsons f a r m . c o m Joe Elliott • (615) 969-2205 resjoe@bellsouth.net William B. Elliott • (615) 505-9234 reswbe@outlook.com Lake Elliott • (615) 483-2444 resdubman@gmail.com 10 • Cow Country • January

(580) 595-0901

and labor crisis continues, affecting every sector of our economy. Whether you are a farmer needing inputs like seed, fertilizer, or parts, or if you’re a consumer shopping for next week’s meals, you’re seeing the effects of inflation. We also have a lot of able-bodied Americans who are not returning to the workforce. It’s time to stop paying people not to work. Even though the answers to inflation and labor problems may be complicated, the ag community has worked hard to strengthen our food supply where we can. Since the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board started the Meat Processing Incentive Program (MPIP) in 2020, we have invested more than $7 million into expanding small meat processors across our commonwealth. At the KDA, we will continue to identify stress points in our food supply chain and work to build out our capacity so that families have more local food options and our producers have more ways of marketing their goods. As we embark upon 2022, I want to wish you and your families well. I’m looking forward to this year. I’m excited about the positive economic news and the fact that the world is beginning to look normal again. If you ever need anything from me or my office, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us at www.kyagr.com or call us at (502) 573-0282.


27th Buyer’s Choice Annual Bull Sale

Monday • 5:30PM (dinner served presale) February 28th at the farm Quality, Kentucky

SELLING SIRES OF:

SAV Rainfall, Connealy Emerald, Connealy Maternal Made, Connealy Commonwealth, Connealy Concord 65 Bulls • 30 Registered Pairs (most 3-in-1s) 30 Registered Bred Heifers • 25 Bred Commercial Heifers O U R SERVIC E Foot Guarantee • Huge emphasis on soundness and foot quality • Breeder’s Guarantee • Breeding soundness examined BVD PI Tested • All bulls foot-scored O U R PROG RA M Non-Pampered Forage Developed Bulls • Athletic Bulls • Huge emphasis on fertility Johne’s NG herd status with annual testing Comprehensive herd health program CALL TO RE QUE ST A SAL E BO O K David Woodall, DVM (270) 847-1010 • Gary Woodall (270) 725-0819 Luke Woodall (270) 889-1138 • Ian Woodall (270) 893-8424 woodallangus@aol.com • www.woodallangus.com Find us on facebook @WoodallAngus

FREE DELIVERY WITH QUALIFIED PURCHASES!


The Dreaded Blue Box Baxter Black www.baxterblack.com I had just finished loading 184 sevenfoot steel T-posts, old ones, by the way, in my pickup and was unloading a mere 24 bales of hay from the front section of my gooseneck stock trailer. It was a hot, humid afternoon in early fall when the dead branches begin to stick out of the cottonwood greenery, and the garden starts goin’ to heck and no one cares. I could almost smell the cumin from Ramon’s #6 Combination Plate being distilled in my sweat from lunch earlier. Then I saw the blue box. The dreaded blue box. It was still in the stock trailer. It needed to be moved. The blue box is a metal toolbox I have had since I bought my first set of “made in America” sidecutters, thinking they would last longer. I have now realized that all sidecutters have the sharpness longevity

12 • Cow Country • January

of fresh fruit. They should be thrown out about as often as you empty the trash barrel in the shop.

and cussed it through a lifetime succession of jobs and homes, horses, and kids, and ups and downs.

Anyway, over the years, the blue box has become my chain holder. It will hold four or five good log chains. I have always said that a hundred pounds of salt weighs more than a hundred pounds of anything else. But a 10 by 10 by 18-inch metal tool box full of log chains is harder to carry than a sheet of plywood in a hurricane.

Maybe it’s not because it’s heavier than God’s own anvil, clumsier than an ostrich in a Porta Potty or uglier than a ’58 Buick. No, maybe it’s because I realize it’s gonna outlive me by a long time. By its earthly clock, I’m just a temporary passerby, while it will still be here when men are walking on Pluto.

There are other things that can stimulate a similar sinking feeling, e.g., the same cow prolapsing for the third time, somebody commenting that my horse seems to be favoring his left front or the phone ringing in the deep of night.

I have thoughts of storing my chains in a gunny sack, takin’ the ole tool box to the dump and reestablishing the peckin’ order in my life. But everytime I get as far as step one, I see it layin’ there like a concrete loaf of bread, like a 200-pound rattlesnake, and the dread sweeps over me in a wave.

I don’t know exactly what it is about the old blue tool box that I dread. I’ve heaved it, moved it, loaded it, dropped it, pushed it

So, I let it lay or move it if I have to. I’ve come to realize there are some things you just can’t do anything about.


LEGISLATIVE UPDATES

NCBA FIGHTS FOR DEFINITIVE LABELS ON LAB-GROWN MEAT WASHINGTON (December 1, 2021) — Today, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) submitted comments to the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) related to the labeling of meat or poultry products that contain lab-grown animal cells. NCBA believes that the term “beef ” should only be applicable to products derived from livestock raised by farmers and ranchers. As USDA-FSIS works to develop regulatory standards for labeling lab-grown, or cell-cultured, protein products, NCBA is committed to ensuring that product labels are fair, accurate, and will safeguard a level playing field for all protein products competing in the marketplace. The regulations USDA develops now will play a crucial role in ensuring adequate consumer understanding, and NCBA feels strongly that the best way to accomplish this is through labeling standards that will clearly differentiate these products by way of a “lab-grown” label. “An NCBA consumer survey showed that when purchasing protein, 74 percent of consumers agree that there should be a definitive indication of whether meat being purchased is labgrown or conventionally produced,” said NCBA Senior Executive Director of Government Affairs Danielle Beck. “If one thing is clear from our research, it’s that consumers want clear and definitive labels.” The word “beef ” represents a brand that has been cultivated through decades of innovation and stewardship by farmers and ranchers across the U.S. NCBA will continue to engage with both USDA and FDA to ensure that the regulations governing these products are science-based, appropriately prioritize food safety, and promote honesty and fair dealing in the interest of consumers.

NCBA OPPOSES BIDEN ADMINISTRATION REPEAL OF NWPR WASHINGTON (November 18, 2021) — Today, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) criticized the Biden administration’s repeal of the Navigable Waters Protection Rule (NWPR), which provided regulatory certainty to farmers and ranchers and limited federal overreach. “The NWPR was a solution to the disastrous 2015 ‘Waters of the United States’ (WOTUS) rule that vastly expanded federal jurisdiction over small, isolated water features. NCBA supported the NWPR and was disappointed when it was struck down in court,” said NCBA Chief Environmental Counsel Scott Yager. “With the Biden administration announcing their intent to craft their own WOTUS rule, NCBA will remain engaged with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to ensure that any future rulemaking respects the needs of American cattle producers and their right to make investments in their land and care for their cattle."

HOUSE PASSES TWO NCBA-BACKED BILLS ON MARKET TRANSPARENCY WASHINGTON (December 8, 2021) — Today, the U.S. House voted to pass two NCBA-supported pieces of legislation that are critical to providing producers with greater transparency in the cattle markets. The House voted 418-9 to advance H.R. 5290, introduced by House Agriculture Committee Chairman David Scott (D-GA). This legislation, which was supported by Ranking Member Glenn "G.T." Thompson (R-PA) and unanimously approved by the Committee, would extend authorization for livestock mandatory reporting (LMR) through September 30, 2022. The authorization for LMR — the most important tool cattle producers have for understanding transactions and trends in the cattle markets — is currently set to expire along with federal funding on February 18, 2022. By an overwhelming vote of 411-13, the House also passed the Cattle Contract Library Act of 2021. NCBA secured the introduction of this bipartisan legislation in October, led by Rep. Dusty Johnson (R-SD) and Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-TX). “The fact that House Agriculture Committee Chairman Scott and Ranking Member Thompson have both been vocal champions for LMR reauthorization is yet another indication of the broad-base support this measure has among producers across the country. LMR is absolutely essential to fair, competitive, and transparent cattle markets. We appreciate Chairman Scott's leadership, and the heavy engagement we have seen from both sides of the committee on this issue. We also thank Rep. Johnson and Rep. Cuellar for their work to equip producers with vital market data through a cattle contract library,” said NCBA President Jerry Bohn. The creation of a cattle contract library and the reauthorization of LMR are both widely supported across the cattle and beef industry. When livestock groups met in Phoenix earlier this year to identify common goals and priorities, those two measures were agreed upon as urgent. NCBA left that meeting and immediately set to work advancing these proposals. We upheld our commitment to the industry, even when R-CALF changed their tune and refused to support these viable, popular solutions.

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) has represented America’s cattle producers since 1898, preserving the heritage and strength of the industry through education and public policy. As the largest association of cattle producers, NCBA works to create new markets and increase demand for beef. Efforts are made possible through membership contributions. To join, contact NCBA at 1-866-BEEF-USA or membership@beef.org.

January • Cow Country • 13


BARREN COUNTY NEWS Submitted by James Bailey

The Barren County Cattlemen’s meeting was held Thursday evening, November 18th, at the Barren County High School Trojan Academy. During the meeting Joey Shive, Kenny Arterburn, and Carie Odell of Wright Implement Company presented a program on John Deere Operation and Management during the Pandemic. A delicious steak dinner was served which was sponsored by Wright Implement Company.

METCALFE COUNTY NEWS

(L to R) Kenny Arterburn, Carie Odell, Joey Shive, and Eric Walton, all representing Wright Implement Co. Pictured on far right is Don Wilson, Treasurer of the Barren County Cattlemen’s Association.

Submitted by Moe Hensley

The Metcalfe County Cattlemen met on November 11 at the Metcalfe County Extension office. After routine business, everyone enjoyed a ribeye steak dinner cooked by the "Cooking Crew" and sponsored by CPC. Teri Atkins, with CPC, was on hand to discuss supplementing winter feeding. She discussed the different types of tubs CPC has to offer. Brandon Bell briefly went over the new Agriculture Farm Exempt Number. The next meeting was held on December 16, 2021 at 7:00pm. I leave you with this: Without the farmer, there is no food.

The crowd waiting for their meal

Teri Atkins with CPC discussing issues with Eddie Jessie prior to the meeting

The Cooking Crew with a little added help 14 • Cow Country • January


WEBSTER COUNTY NEWS Submitted by Mary Steely

After a one-year hiatus due to COVID, the Webster County Cattlemen's Association held their annual meeting banquet and fundraiser on December 3, 2021. Guests were treated to a delicious ribeye dinner prepared by members of the board. Officers for the upcoming year were elected, and the cake auction fundraiser raised $4,000 to go towards local beef vouchers for families in need and 4-H, FFA, Junior Cattlemen's Youth Programs, and scholarships.

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E C O NO MI C & P O L I C Y U P D A T E

Building a Farm Balance Sheet Kayla Brashears Contributing Writer As December 31 approaches, producers should work towards developing a quality balance sheet. Doing so is critical to measure business growth year over year, liquidity, solvency, and borrowing power. Most lenders require a year-end balance sheet, and even if the farm does not utilize a lender, knowing how to build a balance sheet will give the owners insightful information to make management decisions for the upcoming year. Balance Sheet Categories Balance sheet information is organized into two categories: assets and liabilities. These categories are further divided into three subcategories: current, intermediate, and long-term. • Current assets – cash or cash equivalents

that can be easily converted to cash within one year. Common examples of current assets include bank accounts, prepaid expenses, crop inventories in the bins, market livestock, and accounts receivable. Don’t forget to consider hidden current assets like fuel in the farm tanks, chemical and/or seed on hand, hay rolls to be fed within the year, and investment in fallplanted crops like small grains.

• Intermediate assets – are used for longer

than one year, but before the 10-year mark. Intermediate assets include farm machinery, breeding livestock, and vehicles. A less common intermediate asset to remember is not-readily marketable bonds and securities, such as retained patronage earnings.

• Long-Term assets – assets that are

permanent, or have a useful like of greater than 10 years. The most common example of this is farmland. However, long-term assets also include things like investments and land improvements.

• Current liabilities – debts due within

a year. The most recognized current liabilities are operating notes, upcoming bills and other accounts payable, and credit card balances. Do not forget to consider other current liabilities like accrued interest on debts, and the current principal due on intermediate and long-term notes.

fluctuations in breeding livestock from year to year.

• Farmland should also not see large shifts

in value year over year. However, an evaluation of owned land every 5-7 years is practical. Reevaluating every few years will keep the land on par with fair market value.

• Intermediate liabilities – debts due within

1-10 years. The most common example of an intermediate liability are loans for farm equipment and breeding livestock.

• Be sure to consider investments in fall

crops as a current asset. A commonly overlooked example is wheat saved for seed. Fall fertilizer for the upcoming crop year is also a current asset that should be included on the balance sheet.

• Long-term liabilities – debts due after 10

years. The most common example of a long-term liability is real estate mortgages for farmland.

Tips for Accuracy It is best to complete the balance sheet at the same time each year. For most cash-basis taxpayers, such as farmers, December 31 is a great post-harvest time for completion. Liabilities are generally easy to track. Principal loan balances, as well as accrued interest, can be obtained from the financial institution. There is typically an invoice to accompany any outstanding payables. Assets in all three categories can be a bit harder to value. Listed below are some of the more common snags farmers encounter when completing a balance sheet as well as tips to mitigate variance. • Grain values – grain can be hard to value

due to variance in price as well as quantity. For grain that remains in bins, crossreference the amounts with grain already sold as well as what was turned into the insurance agent to ensure accuracy. When valuing the crop, be sure to take into consideration grain already contracted. The market price at the date of completion is an acceptable way to value grain not yet sold.

• Market livestock should also be valued

with contracts in mind.

The Agricultural Economics Department publishes the Economic and Policy Update towards the end of each month.  Each issue features articles written by extension personnel within the department and other experts across the country.

16 • Cow Country • January

• In general, it is best not to create large

• Similarly, do not forget to include the feed

on hand for cattle, including hay rolls.

• Chemicals or seed on hand should also be

included as a current asset.

• Farm equipment is a tricky asset to value.

Typically, a cost-basis approach is used. It is important to depreciate that equipment on the balance sheet each year.

Preparing a balance sheet each year is an important health check-up for the farming operation. Once the farm has a good balance sheet, they can understand if they need to refinance debt, search for ways to improve their solvency position and more. When a balance sheet is prepared each year, the farm will be able to see the change in net worth from year to year. A profitable year typically increases net worth, while a less profitable year may require the farm to “burn equity” and deteriorate the net worth position. Being able to put together a high-quality, accurate balance sheet is an important skill for a producer to master. In addition, it can be a great idea to work with an accountant, or a Kentucky Farm Business Management Specialist to assist in developing a year-end balance sheet, as well as other important financial reports.

Topics will vary greatly but regularly include marketing, management, policy, natural resources, and rural development issues. If you would like to recieve this newsletter by email, please contact Kenny Burdine at kburdine@uky. edu.

You can also view current and past issues online at https://bit.ly/2PoHsZj Co-editors: Kenny Burdine, Alison Davis, and Greg Halich



University of Kentucky Rises Above Tornado Aftermath In the midst of utter destruction caused by the Dec. 11 tornado outbreak, University of Kentucky employees continue to press on, offering help where and when their fellow Kentuckians need it the most. The UK Research and Education Center in Princeton took a direct hit from the powerful tornado that began in northwestern Arkansas and carved a path of destruction across the western half of Kentucky. UKREC employees, led by director Carrie Knott, worked through the weekend, securing and caring for animals, assessing damage and offering support. “Our hometown heroes of hope—our faculty, staff and Extension agents in our Western Kentucky communities have rallied to assist others even as we were dealing with damages to critical UK facilities in Western Kentucky,” said UK President Eli Capilouto. “As the University for Kentucky, we understand how important faculty and staff at the UK Research and Education Center and Cooperative Extension Service are to relaying educational information to their communities. We are committed to rebuilding, helping the area recover and emerging stronger than before.” “The center is the home to a group of very dedicated UK employees, and I commend Dr. Knott and her staff for their heroic weekend recovery efforts,” said Nancy Cox, dean of the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and UK vice president for land-grant engagement. “While the center won’t be the same for some time, the college is committed to helping our employees and communities recover from these devastating events and serving the Western Kentucky agricultural community.” While the physical structure that housed the UKREC is gone, the center has been, and always will be, vital to Kentucky agriculture. As a testament to the importance of the center to the state’s agriculture industry, two temporary office buildings and two temporary storage buildings will be placed on-site Dec. 14 for UKREC personnel. “The outpouring of community support has been very humbling to us,” Knott said. “We are not closing our doors, but we will look a little different and be a little more fragmented at least for the near future.” Due to the number of debris, officials ask that the public stay away from the center as the area is unsafe and structurally unsound. The center was established in 1925 on nearly 1,300 acres about one mile from downtown Princeton. In 1980, the Rottgering-Kuegel Agricultural and Extension Building was added and housed the center’s nearly 50 staff and hosted countless extension and area meetings. That facility underwent a major renovation and addition to house the UK Grain and Forage Center of Excellence, which opened in 2019. Since its inception, numerous stakeholders have provided strong support to the center and critical funding for many

18 • Cow Country • January

of its improvements. “The Kentucky agricultural community is a strong community. It is a kind community, and it is a generous community,” said Chad Lee, director of the Grain and Forage Center of Excellence. “We are going to rely heavily on them to help us get through this as we work to build anew. Our hearts are broken but not our spirits.” Over the years, scientists at the center have spearheaded many important research endeavors including numerous no-till research projects, precision agriculture application studies and a soil fragipan research breakthrough. Center specialists have been the area farmers’ go-to resource for research-based information in agronomics, forages, beef management, disease control, pest control, precision agriculture, grain storage systems, soil fertility and grain marketing. Numerous counties are dealing with the aftermath of the destructive tornadoes. The UK Cooperative Extension Service is diligently working with area organizations to meet the needs of tornado victims. Extension has partnered with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture to offer support for affected farmers. Those who wish to donate farm supplies should contact their local extension office. Extension agents will deliver products to the KDA for distribution to farm organizations working to meet the needs of impacted farmers. Kentucky 4-H has a 4-H’ers Helping 4-H’ers Relief Fund https:// kentucky4hfoundation.org/relief-fund/ that is collecting donations to help affected 4-H members, families and staff. The Kentucky Division of Emergency Management is also accepting donations and relief effort volunteer applications. Individuals can offer to donate supplies or apply to volunteer at https://arcg.is/8aqnO. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has partnered with the Kentucky Farm Bureau to develop a GoFundMe account at https:// gofund.me/6855c668 to provide monetary support for affected farmers. Donations are tax deductible. Individuals, who wish to make monetary donations to the tornado victims, may do so by donating through UK’s Office of Philanthropy at https://uky.networkforgood.com/causes/9900-cafeannual-discretionary-fund. Individuals may donate to help affected UK students at https://uky.networkforgood.com/causes/10124basic-needs-and-persistence-fund. UK also offers the C.R.I.S.I.S. (Crisis Relief in Situations Involving Staff and Faculty) Program to help UK employees experiencing personal hardship. UK faculty and staff may request assistance at https://staffsenate.uky.edu/crisis. Individuals may also mail checks with a comment to support UK CAFE Tornado Relief to UK Philanthropy, P.O. Box 23552, Lexington, KY 40523.


The Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association is saddened by the loss and destruction felt across the state by the recent tornadoes. The KCA office has been in touch with local, state and national contacts to determine what needs there are and how we can assist in cleanup and rebuilding efforts. There has been a devastating loss in many communities across Kentucky, including significant damage to agricultural infrastructure.

TORNADO RELIEF EFFORTS SUPPLY LIST BARBED WIRE 48 INCH WOVEN WIRE 6 FOOT T-POSTS

KCA staff has been working to secure funding for cattle producers due to the recent tornadoes. Staff has been in contact with local producers, county extension agents, KDA, Governor's Office and NCBA to determine funding available at the local, state and national level. Due to the timing of the tornadoes and Cow Country print dates we ask that you continue to monitor your email, our facebook page and website for the latest information.

8’ X 8” WOOD POSTS

We will remain in contact with our ag counterparts across the state to continue to determine needs but at this time there are two ways we are requesting help.

ELECTRIC FENCE INSULATORS FOR T-POSTS

You can donate to the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Foundation. All donations will be used to help our local producers in need of farm supplies. These donations can be made by calling 859278-0899, through Paypal at https:// bit.ly/DonateKY or by mail at KY Cattlemen’s Foundation Attn: Tornado Relief 176 Pasadena Drive Suite 4 Lexington, KY 40503 Materials – Anyone wishing to donate materials are asked to coordinate with the Hardin County Extension Office. A list of materials needed in our farming communities is listed to the right. All materials can be dropped off at the Extension office and they will be distributed accordingly to other Extension Offices in the areas affected. You can call the Hardin County Extension office at 270-765-4121 or drop things off at 111 Opportunity Way Elizabethtown, KY 42701 We had whole communities devastated with loss and we ask that you continue to keep them in your prayers. Our Kentucky Agriculture Community is strong and we will do everything we can to help those in need. We appreciate your support!

METAL ELECTRIC FENCE POSTS ¼ MILE ELECTRIC FENCE WIRE ELECTRIC FENCE INSULATORS FOR ROUND METAL POSTS

SOLAR FENCE CHARGERS GROUND RODS FOR FENCE CHARGERS BARBED WIRE FENCE STRETCHERS WOVEN WIRE STRETCHERS 2” FENCE STAPLES 10’X20’ TARPS 1’ BUNGEE CORDS 2’ BUNGEE CORDS ROPE HI- MAG MINERAL CATTLE MINERAL FEEDERS BAGGED CATTLE FEED LARGE LEATHER WORK GLOVES EXTRA LARGE LEATHER WORK GLOVES January • Cow Country • 19


Leadership Development Program Completes Session Five In Colorado Nikki Whitaker Kentucky Cattlemen's Association Class IX of the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Leadership Program held their fifth session in Colorado November 1-4. The group’s first stop was to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) office. Mary Bea Halimeh, NCBA Director of Member & Affiliate Services, welcomed the group and gave a tour of the NCBA office where the group was able to view the Cattlemen to Cattlemen studio and the Beef It’s What’s for Dinner culinary kitchen. Colin Woodall, NCBA CEO, spent the morning with the group explaining NCBA’s history, structure, and long range plan for the beef industry. The next morning the class traveled to Fort Collins to tour the JBS Global Food Innovation Center at Colorado State University. The recently opened facility includes a complete livestock and meat processing center, spanning the meat-animal harvesting process, fully equipped with a livestock arena, Temple Grandin-designed holding and harvesting areas, a research and development center and sensory analysis room, an auditorium lecture hall and meat demonstration classroom, and a retail meat and dairy store and café. Next, the group went east a few miles to the 69,000 head Five River’s Gilcrest Feedlot where the group heard from Jordan Levi and Cole Evans on how Five River’s feeds their cattle and the importance of health management in the feedlot. The visit concluded with a bus tour of the feedlot. On Thursday, the group was able to tour two cattle ranches; Leachman Cattle Company of Colorado, an organization that markets more than 2,000 bulls annually including Angus, Charolais, Red Angus and Stabilizer composites and Weaver Ranch, a Black Angus seedstock ranch operated by three sisters that spans

20 • Cow Country • January

properties in Sedgwick, Virginia Dale and Owl Canyon, Colorado. Both tours proved to be an eye-opening experience for the group. The average size of a Colorado farm and ranch is 890 acres and most cattle are open range on native grasses. The group also learned about irrigated and sub-irrigated pastures as well as dealing with a mix of federal and private lands and water rights issues. Thursday evening brought Session 5 to an end with a late night plane ride back home to Kentucky. Class 9 is sponsored by Alltech and funded through the Kentucky Cattlemen's Foundation. Session 6, the final session for Class IX, is scheduled for Spring 2022 in Washington, DC.


Requirements for Transporting Cattle Into Kentucky Candace Smith & Lindsay Burley Steptoe & Johnson, PLLC There are many reasons why you may want to transport cattle or other livestock, including for slaughter, auctions, breeding, shows, rodeos, fairs, and grazing, among others. If you are transporting cattle across state lines, however, you may have to comply with certain import requirements.

or photograph; or breed registration brand, among others. Id. Additionally, an entry permit is required for cattle entering Kentucky, except for steers, spayed heifers, or cattle being presented at exhibition only. 302 KAR 20:040. The permit number must be recorded on the CVI. Id.

Some of these requirements are in place to ensure the health of the cattle being imported. For example, importing beef cattle and dairy cattle, as well as importing cattle for sale, breeding, and exhibition, all require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (“CVI”). In general, CVIs help to guarantee that the cattle being moved do not carry illnesses or parasites that would be harmful to the other people or animals that are in the destination area or attending the same event. For example, cattle with specific diseases such as brucellosis, tuberculosis, scabies, ticks, or Johne’s disease may be prevented from entering Kentucky or face additional requirements to enter the state. 302 KAR 20:040. A CVI must contain the following information:

Cattle being transported into Kentucky for slaughter, however, do not have to meet such rigorous import requirements. For example, neither a CVI nor an entry permit is required for cattle entering the state for slaughter. Instead, the cattle must simply move directly to a state-federal approved stockyard or to a recognized slaughter facility for slaughter within 72 hours of entering the state, and must have an Owner-Shipment Statement, which states the address the cattle was moved from, the destination, and the owner’s and shipper’s name and address.

1. Identification of each animal recorded on the certificate. An official individual identification shall be required unless group or lot identification numbers are approved by U.S. Department of Agriculture or the Office of State Veterinarian;

It is important to determine what import requirements apply to cattle that you are transporting or receiving on the front end. An attorney can help you determine what requirements are necessary to comply with the import laws. On the other hand, an attorney can also help you determine if certain requirements are unnecessary, which could save you time and money.

2. The species, breed, sex, and age of the animal; ! Wher s t

Gone to

mee ry t

5. The following statement or one substantially similar: "I certify as an accredited veterinarian that the above described animals have been inspected by me and that they are not showing signs of infection or communicable disease (except if noted). The vaccinations and results of tests are as indicated on the certificate. To the best of my knowledge, the animals listed on this certificate meet the state of destination and federal interstate requirements." 302 KAR 20:020.

the be

indus

4. The name and address of the person receiving the animal and the location at which the animal will be received; and

e

f e

3. The name and address of the owner or agent shipping the animal and the location from which the animal is shipped;

Cattle that are imported for exhibition, breeding, or sale, as well as dairy cattle, must have an official identifier, such as an official USDA animal tag; official breed association tattoo, tag, These materials are public information and have been prepared solely for educational purposes. These materials reflect only the personal views of the authors and are not individualized legal advice. It is understood that each case is fact-specific, and that the appropriate solution in any case will vary. Therefore, these materials may or may not be relevant to any particular situation. Thus, the authors and Steptoe & Johnson PLLC cannot be bound either philosophically or as representatives of their various present and future clients to the comments expressed in these materials. The presentation of these materials does not establish any form of attorney-client relationship with the authors or Steptoe & Johnson PLLC. While every attempt was made to ensure that these materials are accurate, errors or omissions may be contained therein, for which any liability is disclaimed.

 2 2 0 2 , 3 1 Y R A  FEBRU REGISTRATION & HOUSING NOW OPEN VISIT US AT FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

TEXT BEEF TO 25827

CONVENTION.NCBA.ORG

CONTINUED ON PAGE 20 January • Cow Country • 21


Judicious Use of Antibiotics What’s Next for Beef Producers? Michelle Arnold University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is continuing to implement strategies to promote the *judicious or appropriate use of antibiotics considered important in human medicine when they are used in foodproducing animals. FDA’s goal is to curb the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and, in turn, reduce the risk of human infections that are difficult to treat due to ineffective antibiotics. On June 11th, 2021, FDA finalized a Guidance for Industry (GFI) #263, which outlines the process for animal drug manufacturers to change all remaining antibiotic formulations used in animal health care from over-the-counter (OTC) to prescription status. Manufacturers will have two years from the date of issue to make this label change to their products. Basically, this means products commonly used by beef producers such as injectable penicillin and oxytetracycline (for example, LA-300) will no longer be available without a prescription from a veterinarian as of June 2023. The new GFI #263 is an extension of an earlier guidance published in 2013 designated GFI #213. As of January 2017, GFI #213 effectively moved all OTC antibiotics used in feed to Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) status and those used in drinking water to prescription (Rx) status as well as eliminated production uses such as growth promotion. Of the 292 drugs affected by this government directive #213, 93 products used in drinking water were converted to prescription status; 115 products used in feed were converted from OTC to veterinary feed directive status; and 84 were removed from the market. Production indications were withdrawn from 31 product labels. With full implementation of GFI #213, approximately 96% of medically important antimicrobials used in animals are now under veterinary oversight. Once the recommendations in the new GFI #263 are fully implemented, the remaining 4% will fall under veterinary oversight as well. All dosage forms of medically important antimicrobials approved for use in animals will only be available from, or under the supervision of, a licensed veterinarian, and only when necessary for the treatment, control or 22 • Cow Country • January

prevention of specific diseases. Producers will have to consult his or her veterinarian to obtain all antibiotics in any form (injectable, bolus, topical, intramammary) or for a prescription to purchase them from a distributor. FDA’s new strategy with GFI #263 is primarily focused on “medically important antimicrobial drugs” that are available without a prescription and can be given without a veterinarian’s involvement. This includes, but is not limited to, beta-lactams (Penicillin G, Cephapirin), aminoglycosides (Gentamicin), lincosamides (Lincomycin), macrolides (Tylosin, Erythromycin), sulfonamides (Sulfadimethoxine, Sulfamethazine, Sulfachlorpyridazine) and tetracyclines (Oxytetracycline, Chlortetracycline). FDA first developed its list of antimicrobial drugs (antibiotics) considered “medically important” in Guidance #152 entitled Evaluating the Safety of Antimicrobial New Animal Drugs with Regard to Their Microbiological Effects on Bacteria of Human Health Concern, published in October 2003. This list is available in Appendix A of GFI #152 on pages 3134 and can be accessed at the following link: https://www.fda.gov/media/69949/ download . Medical “importance” of a drug is based on its efficacy in human medicine and other factors including the usefulness of the drug in food-borne infections, the types of infections treated, the availability of alternative therapies, the uniqueness of the mechanism of action, and the ease with which resistance develops and is transferred between organisms. There are several growth promotion products in the cattle industry that are not listed in Appendix A. Bacitracin, bambermycins (Gainpro®), laidlomycin (Cattlyst®), and ionophores (such as monensin and lasalocid) are not affected by this GFI. The FDA has made available a webpage entitled “GFI #263: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for Farmers and Ranchers” available at https://www.fda.gov/animalveterinary/judicious-use-antimicrobials/ gfi-263-frequently-asked-questions-farmers-

Box 1 321.185 Veterinarian-client-patient relationship (VCPR) (1) In order for a veterinarian to practice veterinary medicine, a relationship among the veterinarian, the client, and the patient shall be established and maintained. "Veterinarian-client-patient relationship" means that: (a) The veterinarian has assumed the responsibility for making judgments regarding the health of the animal and the need for veterinary treatment, and the client, whether owner or other caretaker, has agreed to follow the instructions of the veterinarian; (b) There is sufficient knowledge of the animal by the veterinarian to initiate at least a general or preliminary diagnosis of the medical condition of the animal. This means that the veterinarian has recently seen and is personally acquainted with the keeping and care of the animal by virtue of an examination of the animal or by medically appropriate and timely visits to the premises where the animal is kept; and (c) The practicing veterinarian is readily available or shall provide medical service for follow-up in case of adverse reactions or failure of the regimen of therapy. A new regimen of therapy shall be contingent only upon cooperation of the client and availability of the subject animal. and-ranchers . One specific question of interest addressed on this website is “Will a veterinarian be required to physically examine each animal before writing a prescription?” The following answer is provided by FDA: “Although specific requirements vary by state, veterinarians are generally not required to examine each individual animal for which a prescription is issued, as long as the veterinarian has established a valid


veterinarian-client-patient relationship (VCPR) with the farmer or rancher that owns or cares for the animal(s) in need of treatment. Establishing a VCPR generally requires, among other things, that the veterinarian has become familiar with the management of the animals on a given farm or ranch by examining the animals and/or visiting the facility where the animals are managed. [See Box 1 for KY VCPR Requirements] Farmers and ranchers may want to consult with their veterinarian to have a plan in place prior to the transition period, including a plan for getting access to appropriate antimicrobial products to address animal health issues when a veterinary visit is not feasible or not considered necessary by the veterinarian.” During the two-year timeframe for implementation that began on June 11, 2021, FDA plans to work with affected stakeholders and state partners to answer questions about the voluntary transition process and to provide assistance, hear feedback and respond to concerns about the guidance where possible. There are legitimate concerns regarding the increased cost of this legislation to beef producers and the lack of food animal veterinarians to implement this policy in many parts of the country. Similarly, veterinarians are concerned about the increased regulatory burden this move to prescription status will impose. The guidance document and a link for submission of comments can be found at https:// www.fda.gov/regulatory-information/ search-fda-guidance-documents/cvmgfi-263-recommendations-sponsorsmedically-important-antimicrobialdrugs-approved-use-animals. The FDA is reaching out to stakeholders for input and public comments. Comments on the proposal are due online via www. regulations.gov by December 24, 2021 but often these deadlines are extended so check the website for the final deadline. Comments may also be submitted by mail to: Dockets Management Staff HFA-305 Food and Drug Administration 5630 Fishers Lane, Room 1061 Rockville, MD 20852 Comments should reference docket number

FDA-2019-D-3614.

CKAA 58TH ANNUAL WINTER SALE

*What is “Judicious Use”? “Judicious use”, according to FDA, is using a drug appropriately and only when necessary. The development of resistance to medically important drugs, and the resulting loss of their effectiveness, poses a serious public health threat. Misuse and overuse of antimicrobial drugs creates selective pressure that allows resistant bacteria (the “bad bugs”) to increase in number faster than susceptible bacteria. It is believed (hypothesized) that these resistant bacteria will transfer through the food chain to humans, potentially increasing the opportunity for individuals to become infected by resistant bacteria. This scenario may result in treatment failure or a prolonged course of disease in a human patient because the antibiotics routinely used for that condition were ineffective. Because antibiotic overuse contributes to the formation of drug resistant organisms (for example: methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus or MRSA), these important drugs must be used carefully in both animal and human medicine to slow the development of resistance.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25 2:00PM

CKAA Sales Pavilion • Danville, KY See ad on page 53

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C


Beef Export Value Shatters Annual Record; Pork Exports Still on Record Pace October was another strong month for U.S. red meat exports as beef export value continued to soar, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). October pork exports were below last year's large total but year-to-date shipments remained slightly above the record pace of 2020. "USMEF has always prioritized market diversification, and this is more critical than ever now that the red meat industry faces unprecedented transportation challenges and rising input costs," said President and CEO Dan Halstrom. "Exports will likely reach about $18 billion in 2021, which is a remarkable achievement. While global demand

is tremendous and we are cautiously optimistic about further growth in 2022, supply chain pressures are not easy to overcome and are a growing concern for exporters and their international customers." Broad-based growth puts beef exports on $10 billion pace Beef exports reached 115,709 metric tons (mt) in October, up 7.5% from a year ago, while export value climbed 48% to $956.9 million – the second-highest total on record, behind August 2021. Through the first 10 months of the year, beef exports totaled 1.19 million mt, up 17% from a year ago. Export value increased 38% to $8.53 billion, surpassing the 2018 record ($8.33 billion) with two months to spare.

9th APRIL 2, 2022 ● 1 PM Bull sale will immediately follow the Heifer Sale

LAUREL COUNTY CATTLEMEN SALE FACILITIES 3610 SLATE LICK CHURCH ROAD  LONDON, KY

for more information: Laurel County Extension Office..................... 606.864.4167 Wes Evans, Association President................. 606.682.1583 Glenn Williams, Ag Agent.............................. 606.682.0665

24 • Cow Country • January

U.S. beef exports will top $2 billion this year in each of three key Asian markets – South Korea, Japan and China/Hong Kong. Exports have already surpassed previous annual records in China/Hong Kong and Central America and October exports to Colombia were record-large. Record shipments to Mexico and Colombia bolster October pork exports Pork exports totaled 226,206 mt in October, down 7% from a year ago, while export value slipped 3.5% to $618.8 million. For January through October, pork exports were up slightly from a year ago in volume (2.47 million mt) and increased 8% in value ($6.84 billion). Exports to Mexico continued to strengthen in October as shipments reached a new monthly high of 83,929 mt, up 38% from a year ago. January-October exports to Mexico are ahead of the record pace established in 2017, when full-year shipments exceeded 800,000 mt and topped $1.5 billion in value. Pork exports to Central America and the Dominican Republic continued to shine in October and have already set annual records, while exports to Colombia have rebounded to pre-COVID levels. Although China's demand for pork muscle cuts has softened significantly, it remains a critical, value-adding destination for U.S. pork variety meat. October lamb export value highest in nearly two years Fueled by growth in leading market Mexico, as well as in the Caribbean and Singapore, October exports of U.S. lamb totaled 1,075 mt (up 56% from a year ago) and reached $1.95 million in value – also up 56% and the highest since January 2020. Through October, lamb exports increased 8% to 11,020 mt valued at $15.9 million (up 15%). A detailed summary of the JanuaryOctober red meat export results, including market-specific highlights, is available from the USMEF website.


LIVESTOCK MARKETING GROUP Albany

Cattle Sale Every Wednesday 9:30 AM(CT) Cow Sale 2nd Friday of Every Month 6:00 PM(CT) Bret Carver 270-459-0724

Campbellsville

Cattle Sales Every Wednesday & Saturday 10:00 AM Cow Sales As Announced Ronnie Choate 270-465-4051 or 270-766-8240

East-Mt. Sterling

Cattle Sales Every Wednesday 8:30 AM 1st Friday Every Month 6:30 PM Jeff Copher 859-229-7587

Maysville

Cattle Sales Every Tuesday 10:30 AM Cow Sale 3rd Friday of Every Month 6:30 PM Corey Story 606-209-1543

Lexington

Cattle Sales Every Monday & Tuesday 9:00 AM Cow Sale 4th Wednesday of Every Month 6:30 PM Jeremy Shryock 859-967-6479

Richmond

Cattle Sales Every Friday 9:00 AM Cow Sale 2nd Friday of Every Month 1:00 PM

Hog, Goat & Sheep Sale 2nd & 4th Monday Every Month 1:00 PM

Jim Dause 859-314-7211

South-Stanford

Cattle Sales Every Monday & Thursday 8:30 AM Cow Sale 3rd Friday of Every Month 6:30 PM David Holt 502-680-0797

Internet at Blue Grass

Video Sales 2nd & 4th Tuesday Every Month 1:00 PM Adam Menker 419-310-5344

Let Blue Grass Host Your Next Event or Purebred Sale State of the art facilities, conveniently located close to I-75 & I-64.

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South-Stanford 606-365-0665

Albany 606-387-4681

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Richmond 859-623-1280

Campbellsville 270-465-4051

East-Mt. Sterling 859-498-9625 Maysville 606-759-7280

January • Cow Country • 25


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12 10:00-5:00 Trade Show Move-In 4:00 KCA Executive Committee Meeting 6:00 KCA Leadership & Convention Guests Dinner (Invitation Only)

Exhibition Hall B&C Scott-Woodford Room-Hyatt* Jessamine-Franklin-Hyatt*

THURSDAY, JANUARY 13 7:00-6:00 Registration Hours

Exhibition Hall B&C

7:00-10:00 Trade Show Move-In

Exhibition Hall B&C

9:00-11:30 Beef Efficiency Conference: Adapting Production Decisions to Fit Available Resources Dr. Gordon Jones, Red Hill Farm: Welcome Dr. David Lalman, Oklahoma State University: Minimum Wage Cows Don Schiefelbein, Schiefelbein Farms: Putting it All Together to Optimize Farm Resources Dr. Dan Thomas, Iowa State University: One Beef Industry: We Can Sell More Beef

Meeting Room 1-2

10:00 Trade Show Opens

Exhibition Hall B&C

11:30 Welcome Lunch

Exhibition Hall B&C

1:30-3:30 Opening General Business Session Chris Cooper 2021 KCA President: Welcome 2022 Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Convention KBC Annual Report: Celebrating 35 Years of Checkoff Investments Beef Solutions Annual Report: A Production Process Insight Andy Beshear, Governor of Kentucky Dr. Katie Flynn- Kentucky Department of Agriculture: Kentucky Office of State Veterinarian Update KBN Annual Report: Reflection on 20 years of Kentucky Agriculture Development Board Beef Industry Investments

Meeting Room 1-2

4:00 A Taste of Lexington Restaurant Sampling & Trivia Game Night

Exhibition Hall B&C

6:00 Trade Show Closes

Exhibition Hall B&C

FRIDAY, JANUARY 14 6:30-5:00 Registration Hours 7:00-9:00 County President Breakfast (Invitation Only) 8:00 Trade Show Opens

Registration Booth Regency Ballroom-Hyatt* Exhibition Hall B&C

8:45 KJCA - Load Bus for Tour 9:00 KJCA - Depart for Industry Tour 9:30-12:30 KJCA - Industry Tour 10:00 KAFC - Kentucky Agricultural Finance Corporation Monthly Meeting 10:00-11:00 Regional Meetings Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5 10:30 4-H Kentucky Livestock Quiz Bowl Check-In

Kentucky-Hyatt* Meeting Room 3 Meeting Room 4 Meeting Room 5 Meeting Room 6 Meeting Room 7 Registration Booth

11:00 4-H Kentucky Livestock Quiz Bowl Holding Room

Meeting Room 7

11:00 4-H Kentucky Livestock Quiz Bowl Contest

Meeting Room 8

11:00 KLMA - Annual Meeting

Meeting Room 4

12:30-2:00 Closing Business Session Ryan Quarles, Commissioner of Agriculture: Kentucky Department of Agriculture Update Don Schiefelbein, NCBA President Elect: National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Update Ken Adams, KCA Treasurer: 2021 Financial Review 2021 Communications Review/Outlook Dave Maples, Executive Vice President: A Year in Review and 2022 Outlook

Meeting Room 1-2


1:00 KJCA - Lunch & Trade Show Viewing

Meeting Room 6

2:00 Trade Show Closes

Exhibition Hall B&C

2:00 KJCA - Beef Leadership Town Hall

Meeting Room 6

2:30-4:30 Forages at KCA: Weathering High Fertilizer Prices Chris Teutsch, UK Research and Education Center: Welcome and Introduction Nick Roy, UK Cooperative Extension: Hay Feeding Strategies to Build Fertility in Grazing Systems Jimmy Henning, UK Plant & Soil Sciences: Legumes as Part of Profitable Ruminant Livestock Systems John Grove, UK Research and Education Center: Strategies for Improving Fertilizer Use Efficiency

Meeting Room 1-2

2:30-4:30 Ladies Program: Farm Photos & Branding; Creating a Door Hanger

Meeting Room 5

3:00 2022 Legislative Session Update

Meeting Room 1-2

3:00 KJCA - Officer Elections (Current KJCA Board Members Only)

Meeting Room 6

3:15 KJCA - Annual Membership Meeting & KJCA Board of Director Elections

Meeting Room 6

4:00 KJCA - Reception

Meeting Room 6

5:00-6:00 KCA Leadership Alumni & Past President’s Reception (Invitation Only)

Ballroom Pre-function

6:00 Evening Banquet KCA & KBC Awards 2022 KCA Hall of Fame Inductions Foundation Auction

Ballroom 1

* Events located in Hyatt Hotel

Event

Number Attending

Cost

Full Registration

Totals

(Includes Trade Show and Business Meetings)

$85

x

=

Trade Show Only

$25

x

=

$20

x

=

x

=

Junior Registration (21 years or younger)

Names as they should appear on badges. Please only one family or individual per registration form. NAME

NAME

NAME

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY, STATE ZIP CODE

COUNTY (Required)

PHONE

THURSDAY, JANUARY 13 Beef Efficiency Conference (8:30am - 11:30am)

FRIDAY, JANUARY 14

EMAIL

Evening Banquet

$60

x

=

Banquet Preferred Seating

$600

x

=

Ladies Program

$30

x

=

(Table of 8)

Total Amount Due

CREDIT CARD TYPE

CREDIT CARD NO.

EXPIRATION DATE

SIGNATURE

Mail to: KCA Convention Registration 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, Kentucky 40503 Or Fax: (859) 260-2060

For Hyatt reservations call 1-800-233-1234 and give Code G-CA22 or ask for Kentucky Cattlemen’s Block or register online at https://www.hyatt.com/en-US/group-booking/LEXRL/G-CA22


FRIDAY, JANUARY 14 8:45-12:30 Industry Tour 8:45

Load Bus

9:00

Depart from Rupp Arena

9:30-10:30 11:00-12:00 12:30

Meet at Registration Booth

Golden Age Farm Tour Halloway Feeds Tour Return to Rupp Arena

1:00 Lunch & Trade Show Viewing

Meeting Room 6

2:00 Beef Leadership Town Hall

Meeting Room 6

3:00 Officer Meeting (Board Members Only)

Meeting Room 6

3:15 Annual Membership Meeting/Officer Elections

Meeting Room 6

4:00 Reception

Meeting Room 6

KJCA CONVENTION REGISTRATION FORM JANUARY 13 - 14, 2022 • CENTRAL BANK CENTER • LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY List your name as it should appear on badges. NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

COUNTY

STATE

PHONE

ZIP

Event

Cost

KJCA Registration

$20

Evening Banquet

$60

x No. Attending

EMAIL Send pre-registration with payment to KCA Convention: 176 Pasadena Drive – Lexington, KY 40503 Call Bradon Burks with questions at (270)-991-6232 or visit www.kycattle.org for full agenda

28 • Cow Country • January

Total Due:

= Totals


NEED A GOOD ANGUS BULL? WE HAVE ONE FOR YOU. Bridgeview Angus Bulls For Sale

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69

137

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73

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13

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Frost Seeding Clover: Getting it Right! Chris Teutsch Univerity of Kentucky Grain and Forage Center of Excellence, Princeton, Kentucky

In last month’s article I discussed the important role that legumes play in sustainable grassland ecosystems. This is especially true at current fertilizer prices. Since last month, nitrogen prices have continued to increase (Figure 1). Currently, one pound of nitrogen as urea is coming in at $0.95. In this month’s article I want to provide some practical suggestions for establishing and maintaining legumes in your pastures.

seed since there is no way to tell how it will perform in Kentucky. Choose clover varieties that have been tested in Kentucky. The University of Kentucky has one of the most extensive variety testing programs in the country. The 2021 variety testing results can be found on the UK Forage Extension website or by visiting your local extension office. Use correct seeding rate. In Kentucky, a good mixture for frost seeding is 6-8 lb/A of red clover, 1-2 lb/A of ladino or grazing white clover. On rented farms or where soil fertility is marginal, adding 10-15 lb/A of annual lespedeza to this mixture can be beneficial. Calibrate seeding equipment. Maintain and calibrate seeding equipment prior to seeding. Several approaches to calibrating small spinner seeders can be viewed on the KYForages YouTube Channel at https://youtu.be/E0wSBYlJDbw. Inoculate Legume Seed. Most improved clover seed comes with a clay-based coating that contains inoculant. Make sure that the seed is fresh and has not been stored under adverse conditions. If the seed is not pre-inoculated, inoculate it with the proper strain of nitrogen fixing bacteria prior to seeding. This is relatively inexpensive insurance that legume roots will be well nodulated and efficient nitrogen fixation will take place.

Figure 1. Nitrogen price trends over the last 12 months. Data are from DTN and available at https://www.dtnpf.com/agriculture/web/ag/crops/article/2021/12/08/ nitrogen-fertilizers-lead-pack-start

Tips for Getting Clover into Pastures Soil test and adjust fertility. In order for clover and other improved legumes to persist and thrive in pastures, we must create an environment conducive to their growth. This starts with soil fertility. Prior to frost seeding clover, lime and fertilize pastures according to soil test recommendations. Suppress sod and decrease residue. The existing sod must be suppressed and plant residue reduced prior to frost seeding. The reduction in plant residue allows seed to reach the soil surface where it can be incorporated by freezing and thawing events. Sod suppression and residue reduction is best accomplished by hard grazing in late fall and early winter. Ensure good soil-seed contact. Good soil-seed contact is required for seed germination and emergence. In frost seedings, this occurs when freezing and thawing cycles form cracks in the soil surface, often referred to as a honeycomb. Seed on Proper Date. Frost seeding is best accomplished in late winter or very early spring (February and early March). Frost seeding is accomplished by simply broadcasting the seed on the soil surface and allowing the freezing and thawing cycles to incorporate the seed into the soil. Success with frost seeding can be enhanced by dragging your pasture as, or immediately after, you broadcast the seed. Use High-Quality Seed and Adapted Varieties. Use either certified or proprietary seed to ensure high germination, seed genetics, and low noxious weed content. Do NOT use VNS or Variety Not Stated 30 • Cow Country • January

Control Seeding Depth. Small-seeded forages should never be placed deeper than ½ inch. If using a drill always check seeding depth since it will vary with seedbed condition and soil moisture status. Placing small-seeded forages too deep will universally result in stand failures. Since frost seeding broadcasts the seed on top of the soil, this problem is minimized. Check seed distribution pattern. When using a spinner type spreader/seeder make sure and check you spreading pattern. In many cases small-seeded forages are not thrown as far as you think. This can result is strips of clover in your pastures rather than a uniform stand. Use GPS guidance to eliminate overlaps and misses. A recent study conducted at UK Research and Education Center in Princeton found that frost seeding without GPS Guidance resulted in a 35% overlap. Using GPS guidance reduced the overlap to 3%. At an overlap of 20% and an overseeding cost of $30/A, a portable GPS unit will pay for itself in less than 250 acres.


Control Post-Seeding Competition. Not controlling post-seeding competition is one of the most common causes of stand failures. One of the best management practices is to leave cattle on pastures that have been overseeded with clover until the clover seedlings get tall enough to get grazed off. Then remove animals from the pasture and allow that clover to reach a height of 6-8 inches. At that time the paddock can be placed back into the rotation. If the existing vegetation is not controlled, the new clover seedlings will be shaded out. Tips for Maintaining Clover into Pastures Maintain adequate phosphorus and potassium. Maintain soil test levels of P and K in the MEDIUM soil test range or higher. This is best accomplished by routine soil testing. Maintain soil pH above 6.0. The ideal pH for mixtures of coolseason grasses and legumes is 6.0 to 6.4. Regular soil testing and adding lime when needed, will create an environment in which legumes can thrive. Implement rotational stocking. A summary studies comparing rotational and continuous stocking shows that implementation of rotational stocking increases pasture productivity by 30%. In addition to increased productivity, rotational stocking can also be used as a tool to manage botanical composition of pastures. Manage grazing to favor legumes. How we manage grazing can impact the proportion of legumes in stands. Grazing a little bit closer with rest between grazing events puts grasses at a disadvantage since they are dependent on both leaf area remaining after grazing and stored energy for regrowth (Figure 3). This allows legumes to be more competitive in mixed stands. Frost seed legumes on a regular basis. Red clover is a short-lived perennial in pastures and hayfields. In most cases, improved red clover varieties will persist for 2-3 years. Overseeding pastures every year or every other year at a lower seeding rate may result in more consistent stands of legumes in pastures. 2. Using GPS guidance reduces overlaps and misses. Small portable GPS units V Figure like the one below can be transferred between implements and used for spreading fertilizer, litter, and lime or spraying pastures

3. A closer grazing height with rest between grazing events favors legumes, T Figure while a higher grazing height favors grasses. This diagram was adapted from ForageAnimal Management Systems by Roy E. Blaser and Colleagues, VAES, Bulletin 86-7

For more information on frost seeding contact your local extension agent or visit the UK Forage Extension website at https://forages.ca.uky.edu/

This month’s FEATURED EVENT is 2021 VIRTUAL Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference in Bowling Green on February 24 at the Warren County Extension Office. More information at https://forages.ca.uky.edu/ and clicking on “UPCOMING EVENTS”. This month’s FEATURED VIDEO is: is Bale grazing: challenges, opportunities, and tips for getting it right by Greg Halich. This presentation was given as part of the 2021 Kentucky Forage and Grassland Council Fall Grazing Conference, "Sustainable Intensification of of Pasture Management in the Mid-South". This conference was held on October 26, 27, and 28 in Princeton, Elizabethtown, and Winchester, KY, respectively. Proceedings of this conference can be found at https://uknowledge.uky.edu/ky_grazing/. This month’s FEATURED PUBLICATION is AGR-26 Renovating Hay and Pasture Fields” by G.D. Lacefield and S.R. Smith. It can be accessed at https://forages.ca.uky. edu/files/agr26.pdf or by visiting your local extension office. FENCING TIP Selecting an energizer. Energizers are the heart of electric fencing systems and are NOT a component that you should try to “save” money on. A low-cost energizer often costs more in terms of future repairs and replacements. If electrical service is available, plug-in energizers are considerably more powerful and offer the best value in terms of cost to power ratio. For remote areas, solar or battery powered energizers are viable alternatives for smaller acreages. Power comparisons of energizers should be done using “stored energy” which is measured in joules. FORAGE MANAGEMENT TIPS • Remove animals from wet pastures to limit pugging and soil compaction. • Feed best quality hay to livestock groups with the highest nutritional requirements. Supplement poor quality hay as needed. • Feed hay on your poorest pastures to improve soil fertility and organic matter. • Move feeding points around the pasture to improve nutrient distribution. • Consider bale grazing to improve nutrient distribution. See this month’s featured video. • Buy clover seed early since supplies will likely be tight this spring. Store seed in a cool dry place until frost seeding begins in February. • Inspect and repair seeding equipment. • Consider purchasing a GPS guidance system for improving your frost seeding precision. January • Cow Country • 31


Top Livestock Show Attracts Best of the Best LOUISVILLE, Ky. (Nov. 22, 2021) — The North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE) wrapped up its annual show at the Kentucky Exposition Center, ending a two-week run filled with top livestock competition and the North American Championship Rodeo. NAILE drew more than 25,000 entries with competitors, exhibitors and attendees from 48 states and Canada. The North American Championship Rodeo, held in conjunction with NAILE, saw Saturday sell-out with record-breaking attendance for the three nights of the show. “The success of this year’s North American is a testament to the hard work and perseverance of our livestock industry. The past two years have brought innumerous obstacles within the industry, but this year’s NAILE saw increases in entries, auction sales and attendance. It’s wonderful to see this level of livestock exhibitors in Louisville and we look forward to what the 2022 show will bring,” said David S. Beck, President and CEO of Kentucky Venues. NAILE is the world’s largest purebred livestock show and is considered a major livestock event. The exhibitors and animals that win at NAILE are the top of their respective breeds. Included are national collegiate and youth livestock judging contests, competition within ten livestock divisions and livestock sales. “There is something really special about youth in agriculture competing to the best of their ability and supporting the winner no matter where they themselves placed. NAILE allows Kentucky Venues and the Commonwealth of Kentucky to showcase their support of both the agriculture industry and youth livestock exhibitors. The

young people competing in NAILE are the future of the industry,” said Jonathan Pinkston the Kentucky FFA President. North American Championship Rodeo: Saturday Sell -Out and Record Breaking Attendance The Great Lakes Circuit Finals Rodeo saw the highest attendance in 10 years with more than 25,100 paid ticketholders enjoying the three performances in Freedom Hall. Ticket sales increased by nearly 20% over 2019’s event with Thursday night seeing a 111% increase. Pent-up demand and increased weekend attendance helped propel the North American Championship Rodeo to a record-breaking year. Induction Ceremony for the Saddle and Sirloin Club Portrait Collection The Saddle and Sirloin Club Portrait Collection is an agricultural hall of fame that resides at the Kentucky Exposition Center. Each year a new member is inducted and their portrait unveiled. J. Neil Orth is the 2021 inductee into the Saddle and Sirloin Club. During a career that has spanned more than 50 years, Orth has mentored three generations within the livestock industry through his work as a livestock marketer and breed association executive. Miss Rodeo Kentucky Pageant makes NAILE debut The Miss Rodeo Kentucky Pageant was held Saturday, Nov. 13 during NAILE, a new addition to this year’s show. The pageant crowned three new winners: Junior Miss Rodeo Kentucky Tinzley Doss, Miss Teen Rodeo Kentucky Allie Congleton and Miss Rodeo Kentucky Morgan Askins. The women selected excel in agriculture, horsemanship and will serve as ambassadors for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys

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Farmers Encouraged To Apply For New Agricultural Exemption Number D E A D L I N E F O R C U R R E N T FA R M E R S I S J A N . 1 , 2 0 2 2 FRANKFORT (Dec. 8, 2021) – Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture Dr. Ryan Quarles is reminding agricultural producers about the upcoming deadline to apply for Kentucky’s new agriculture exemption number. The deadline to apply for current farmers is Jan. 1, 2022. “As the new rules take effect next year, we don’t want our Kentucky agriculture producers to be caught off guard,” Commissioner Quarles said. “With inflation and supply chain issues affecting farm input costs, now is the time to get for farmers to get their new exemption number so they can protect the sales and use tax exclusions available to them.” While the statutory provisions for agriculture sales and use tax exemptions have not changed, the Kentucky Department of Revenue (DOR) now requires agricultural producers to pre-qualify for a new tax identification number to claim exemption from taxes. The DOR is now accepting applications from eligible farmers for new agriculture exemption numbers. Under the provisions of SB 148, enacted by the 2020 General Assembly and signed into law by Gov. Andy Beshear on March 27, 2020, all eligible farmers exempt from sales and use tax for

the purchase of certain items must apply for and use their new agriculture exemption number when claiming applicable tax exemptions under KRS 139.481. The Application for the Agriculture Exemption Number, Form 51A800, is available at www.revenue.ky.gov under Sales Tax forms. Completed applications should be submitted by email to DOR. Webresponsesalestax@ky.gov or mailed to DOR's Division of Sales and Use Tax, Station 66, P.O. Box 181, Frankfort, KY 40602-0181. Applicants must verify their engagement in the type of farming eligible for sales and use tax exemptions included in KRS Chapter 139. These exclusions include certain items purchased for the purpose of raising livestock as food for human consumption or producing crops. To expedite the application process, DOR advises applicants to supply the IRS Schedule F, Profit or Loss from Farming form, if possible. The agriculture exemption number is valid for three years from the date issued by DOR. Contact the Division of Sales and Use Tax with questions at (502) 564-5170 or DOR.Webresponsesalestax@ky.gov

26th Annual SMITHLAND ANGUS Bull & Female Sale

Friday, March 11, 2022 • 6:30 P.M. CDT Russell County Stockyard Russell Springs, KY

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Since 1940 January • Cow Country • 33


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January • Cow Country • 35


2021-22 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION * MEMBERSHIP YEAR 10/1/21– 9/30/22

NAME

SPOUSE NAME

FARM NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

COUNTY

RECRUITED BY

PHONE

FAX

EMAIL

ZIP

*Payments of KCA membership dues are tax deductible for most members as an ordinary and necessary business expense. However, charitable contributions of gifts to KCA are not tax deductible for Federal Income Tax purposes. Due to new IRS regulations, $2.24 of your dues would not be deductible. Approximately $12 of your dues will go towards the monthly publication Cow Country News. PLEASE CHECK THE MEMBERSHIP(S) YOU WOULD LIKE TO JOIN: KCA MEMBERSHIP ($30/YR) Membership dues are $30 unless otherwise listed below

NEW

RENEWAL

NEW

RENEWAL

KCA COUPLE MEMBERSHIP To add your spouse, please add $15 to your KCA Membership KENTUCKY JUNIOR CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION ($10/YR)

I WOULD LIKE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE YOUNG PRODUCER’S COUNCIL

COUNTY DUES Dues are $30 except for the counties listed below. Allen................................$40 Anderson........................$25 Bourbon..........................$20 Boyle ..............................$35 Bullitt ...............................$20 Butler ..............................$25 Franklin ...........................$25 Highlands .......................$20 (Boyd, Floyd, Johnson, Lawrence, & Martin)

Hopkins ..........................$35 Laurel..............................$35 Lincoln ............................$25 Louisville Area ................$20 (Jefferson, & Spencer) Magoffin ..........................$20 Menifee ...........................$25

Mountain........................$25 (Breathitt, Knott, Lee, Leslie, Letcher, Morgan, Owsley, Perry & Wolfe) Oldham ...........................$35 Taylor ..............................$20 Twin Lakes ......................$25 Warren ............................$40 Wayne ............................$25 Whitley ............................$25 Woodford ........................$25

TOTAL MEMBERSHIP: KCA

KJCA

$

$

TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS: CATTLEMEN’S FOUNDATION DONATION (voluntary)

$

TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED: ALL DONATIONS TO KCF ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE

36 • Cow Country • January

$

IF YOU WOULD ALSO LIKE TO JOIN THE NATIONAL CATTLEMEN’S BEEF ASSOCIATION The NCBA is now a State Marketing Partner with the KCA. You can pay your dues to both organizations with one check, at the same time. # HEAD 1-100

DUES $150

# HEAD 1,001-1,250

DUES $1,150

101-250

$300

1,251-1,500

$1,400

251-500

$450

1,501-1,750

$1,650

501-750

$650

1,751-2,000

$1,900

751-1000

$650

> 2,000

$1,900 + .38/HD

Complete and return to: Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association 176 Pasadena Drive • Suite 4 • Lexington, KY 40503 Join online at www.kycattle.org or call (859) 278-0899


MEMBERSHIP

DIVISION 1

DIVISION 2

2022

2021

Diff

Edmonson

135

138

-3

-238

Warren

121

148

-27

283

-81

Jessamine

116

136

-20

198

262

-64

Allen

110

106

4

Shelby

190

335

-145

Laurel

103

141

-38

Christian

185

258

-73

Metcalfe

98

143

-45

Bath

183

271

-88

Pulaski

98

128

-30

Lincoln

170

257

-87

Franklin

95

117

-22

Grayson

163

248

-85

Larue

93

138

-45

Washington

156

179

-23

Monroe

90

134

-44

Breckinridge

144

279

-135

Henry

89

150

-61

Northeast Area

81

104

-23

Boyle

73

92

-19

Caldwell/Lyon

73

110

-37

Scott

70

99

-29

Daviess

66

124

-58

Fleming

64

122

-58

Mountain

64

84

-20

Owen

64

77

-13

Trigg

64

90

-26

Trimble

64

102

-38

Bourbon

63

89

-26

Louisville Area

63

86

-23

Garrard

62

91

-29

Jackson

61

97

-36

Anderson

58

81

-23

Muhlenberg

49

79

-30

Russell

47

76

-29

Twin Lakes

38

80

-42

2022

2021

Diff

Adair

274

306

-32

Barren

234

472

Marion

202

Madison

(151+ MEMBERS)

Mercer

126

171

-45

Bracken

124

177

-53

Casey

120

154

-34

Clark

115

187

-72

Green

108

159

-51

Northern KY

105

153

-48

Logan

102

209

-107

Hardin

100

174

-74

Hart

92

197

-105

Harrison

91

162

-71

Meade

Totals as of: Dec. 10, 2021

36

178

-142

2022

2021

Difference

6,530

10,115

-3,585

(76-150 MEMBERS)

If you need anything for membership, please contact Nikki Whitaker at (859) 278-0899 or nwhitaker@kycattle.org

DIVISION 3

2022

2021

Calloway

64

32

32

Purchase Area

60

77

-17

Fayette

58

75

-17

Robertson

58

56

2

Clinton-Cumberland

52

67

-15

Grant

51

65

-14

Campbell

46

66

-20

Out of State

46

67

-21

Mason

45

58

-13

Taylor

43

60

-17

Oldham

42

55

-13

Rockcastle

42

54

-12

Woodford

41

63

-22

Todd

39

48

-9

Webster

39

75

-36

Montgomery

35

44

-9

Ohio

34

53

-19

Pendleton

33

66

-33

Nelson

32

60

-28

Highlands

31

42

-11

Hancock

30

46

-16

Lewis

30

52

-22

Estill

28

33

-5

McCreary

28

29

-1

Simpson

26

35

-9

Union

26

37

-11

Wayne

26

45

-19

Nicholas

24

38

-14

Bullitt

22

32

-10

Clay

20

28

-8

Butler

19

28

-9

Carroll

18

36

-18

Crittenden

18

23

-5

Livingston

15

22

-7

McLean

15

27

-12

Hopkins

13

25

-12

Knox

13

35

-22

Whitley

13

52

-39

Henderson

10

11

-1

Menifee

7

17

-10

Magoffin

6

10

-4

Powell

6

8

-2

River Hills

6

6

0

Eastern Foothills

4

7

-3

Gallatin

4

7

-3

Pike

4

7

-3

Bell

1

1

0

Harlan

1

2

-1

(UP TO 75 MEMBERS)

Diff


Katelyn Hawkins Director of Product Marketing, Kentucky Beef Council

January? Already? The start of another year can be both exciting and intimidating. Between catching your breath after the rush of the holiday season and trying to determine goals you intend on crushing in the new year, it can be hard to remember which end is up. Thankfully at Kentucky Beef Council we always have our focus on beef. In typical January fashion, consumers are rushing to return gifts, longing for warmer days or over hauling their eating habits as they adopt the “new year, new me” mentality. While I have been guilty of partaking in all three of these habits, the “new year, new me” mentality sticks out the most. Don’t get me wrong, I am all for self-growth and development; however, what I am not for is the stereotypical conversation around “good” foods and “bad” foods taking place like clockwork in homes across Kentucky (and the nation) that accompanies some consumer 2022 goals. Beef gets caught in the cross hairs of the healthy diet debate every year like clockwork. While we all know beef is a great source of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients (cue every talk given by a Checkoff staff member), how does the beef industry continue to appeal to an ever-evolving consumer and their outlook on health? Short answer, we meet them where they are. Long answer, tune into monthly KBC Cow Country articles for that one. Kicking off 2022 we will focus our messaging on the importance of fueling your body for strength, wellness, and overall health with beef. Through a multifaceted approach using social media posts and stories, strategically placed digital ads, and partnerships with social media influencers, KBC will meet consumers in the digital space as they seek out tips for batch cooking, healthy recipes and quick meals. Our primary focus is to showcase how beef fits into any lifestyle and diet. Beef is great on its own, but paired with colorful vegetables and accompanying herbs, spices and sauces we can awaken consumer minds to the endless possibilities beef has to offer for fueling them throughout their day. Talking nutrition can be intimidating and overwhelming. In addition to content created to share directly with consumers, KBC staff also works to share beef ’s story with health professionals. We have seen great success in tackling beef misconceptions with the health industry through the help of Janine Faber, Kentucky Beef Council’s contracted dietitian. Janine knows how to connect with the health community in a way you and I may lack as she has built her professional career in dietetics. Our work with Janine allows beef ’s voice to be heard in conversations and professional trainings in a manner that connects with fellow health professionals including the next generation of dieticians. We look forward to 2022 and the opportunities it holds in this area of focus. While KBC began our “New Year” in October with the start of a fiscal year, January always brings a reset on campaigns and season of focus for our programs, events and advertising. We look forward to sharing the importance of beef in a healthy diet, but most importantly we look forward to sharing with consumers the importance of Kentucky’s beef farm families. We thank each of you for your dedication to raising healthy animals to provide consumers across the state and nation with quality meat products to feed their families, and look forward to sharing your stories with consumers throughout 2022. 38 • Cow Country • January

KBC WELCOMES BRADON BURKS Hello, my name is Bradon Burks and I have been blessed to become the new Director of Education for the Kentucky Beef Council. I grew up on my families Angus and Hereford cattle farm in Park City, KY where my roots for the beef industry were grounded. I was an active member of our FFA Chapter where I was involved in showing livestock, speaking contests, and leadership positions. After graduating high school, I attended Western Kentucky University where I received my Bachelors of Science in Agriculture with an emphasis on Education, along with a minor in Sales. While in college, I was an active member of the Student Government Association, Student Alumni Ambassador Team, Block and Bridle Club, the Agricultural Education Society, and served as a Kentucky FFA State Officer. I am now in the Versailles, Kentucky area where I am eager and excited to work within an industry that I have had a passion for since the moment I could talk. As the Director of Education, one of my areas of emphasis is focusing on how we are increasing our demand for beef. I will focus on directing and creating educational opportunities for beef producers, consumers, and youth. Many consumers today are not aware of what we do in our industry; I am eager to share how the Kentucky Beef Industry works to showcase our products as beef producers. You can find me teaching groups at the YARDS Classroom in the Blue Grass Stockyard in Lexington, in a teacher’s classroom within Kentucky, or through online educational opportunities. No matter where in the state I might be, you can feel confident that I will be accurately sharing our beef story with people of all backgrounds. I am also the new advisor for the Kentucky Junior Cattlemen’s Association. A previous member myself, I am committed to growing our Junior Cattlemen’s Association into an organization that builds advocates and leaders for our industry. I will be leading junior programs such as Leadership Camps and the Fall Classic as well. I am humbled and eager to learn about your beef stories which I can then share with others across the state; I am dedicated to working for you. The Kentucky Beef Industry has impacted my life, and I am prepared to share our stories with others. Feel free to reach out to me with any questions you might have.


MEDITERRANEAN BEEF

FLANK STEAK PITA INGREDIENTS: 1 beef Flank Steak (about 1-1/2 pounds) Spicy Green Seasoning: 1 cup fresh parsley, loosely packed 1 cup fresh basil leaves, loosely packed 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1 teaspoon minced jalapeño pepper 3 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt Cucumber Salad: 1/3 cup reduced-fat feta cheese crumbles 1 dozen cherry tomatoes, sliced 2 cups diced cucumber 1/4 cup fresh oregano 1-1/2 cups diced red onions 1 lemon, zested and juiced 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 4 whole wheat pita breads 1 cup hummus

COOKING: To prepare Spicy Green Seasoning, combine all ingredients in blender or food processor; process on and off until all ingredients are blended. Remove 2 tablespoons of Spicy Green Seasoning; rub on all side of beef Flank Steak. Place steak in food-safe plastic bag. Close bag securely and marinate for 6 hours or up to over night. Reserve the remaining salsa for later. Combine all ingredients for Cucumber Salad in large bowl; toss gently. Cover and refrigerate 20 minutes. Remove steak from marinade; discard marinade. Place steak on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 11 to 16 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, 16 to 21 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Cook's Tip: You may cook steak on stove top: Heat large, nonstick skillet over medium until hot. Remove steak from marinade; discard marinade. Place beef Flank Steak in skillet; cook 16 to 20 minutes until instant-read thermometer inserted horizontally into center registers 145°F (for medium) to 160°F (medium) doneness, turning occasionally. Place 1/4 cup hummus on each pita; top with Cucumber Salad. Carve steak into thin slices. Top Cucumber Salad with steak; top with Spicy Green Seasoning.

more recipes at www.kybeef.com

January • Cow Country • 39


BEEF EFFICIENCY CONFERENCE T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 3 9 : 0 0 - 11 : 3 0 A M M E E T I N G R O O M 1- 2

A D A PTI NG PR OD UC TI ON D E C I S I O N S

TO FIT AVAILABLE RESOURCES Welcome Dr. Gordon Jones, Red Hill Farm

Minimum Wage Cows Dr. David Lalman, Oklahoma State University

Putting it All Together to Optimize Resources Don Schiefelbein, Schiefelbein Farms

One Beef Industry: We Can Sell More Beef Dr. Dan Thomas, Iowa State University

F O R A G E S AT K C A F R I D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 4 2:30-4:30PM MEETING ROOM 3

W E AT H E R I N G H I G H F E RT I L I Z E R P R I C E S Welcome & Introduction Chris Teutsch, UK Research and Education Center

Hay Feeding Strategies to Build Fertility in Grazing Systems Jimmy Henning, UK Plant & Soil Sciences

Legumes as Part of Profitable Ruminant Livestock Systems Nick Roy, UK Cooperative Extension

Strategies for Improving Fertilizer Use Efficiency John Grove, UK Research and Education Center

40 • Cow Country • January


Eden Shale Update Dan Miller Industry Coordinator, Kentucky Beef Network December is a month that I am not at the farm as frequently as usual. Preparation for the KCA Convention & Trade Show keeps me at the office more than I like. However, the timing works out well because there isn’t a lot of activity going on at the farm during this time. The cows are still grazing stockpiled fescue (not needing hay yet), and they are not due to calve for another 90 days. Our construction projects are wrapped up for the year, and we typically don’t host many tours due to the colder weather.

of Dr. Higgin’s construction projects. We installed several new tire water tanks in locations that we do some winter feeding at. Both of these new tire tanks will service the cows both during winter feeding, but also in the summer as we implement our rotational grazing schedule. We used 8 foot tires and installed a full 8 foot apron around the entire tire so that the cows will be able to get all four feet on the concrete while they are drinking at the tank. This helps reduce erosion around the tank during the wet winter months.

I was at the farm more at the beginning of December as we were finishing up a couple

The dry conditions this fall allowed us to get some manure cleaned up and spread onto some pasture ground. Our heifer

calving facility still had some manure that needed cleaned up before we bring animals back for calving season this spring. This facility has a stack pad and the manure had been sitting there waiting on transportation to the pastures. This was the first chore for one of our new tractors. Nothing breaks them in faster than flinging manure all over brand new paint! So far through the first half of December we still have enough grass for all of the 110 bred females and the 70 weaned calves. Both groups are still grazing stockpiled fescue and are maintaining great body condition. The picture below was taken on December 7th as the cows were turned in to one of the last sections of pasture that had not been grazed for several months. Hopefully our weather will continue to be good for us and we will be able to graze past the first of the year.

K E N T U C K Y B E E F N E T W O R K FA C I L I TAT O R S

Ben Lloyd

Whitesville, KY (270) 993-1074 strridge@aol.com

Ron Shrout

Winchester, KY (606) 205-6143 ronshrout@bellsouth.net

Charles Embry

Cave City, KY (270) 646-5939 dale.embry@yahoo.com

Jeff Stephens

Ewing, KY (606) 782-7640 stephensbeef@gmail.com

Jacob Settles

Springfield, KY (859) 805-0724 jacob.settles4@yahoo.com January • Cow Country • 41


y.

HERITAGE FARM Tom McGinnis 1024 Hinkle Lane • Shelbyville, KY (502) 633-1634, home • (502) 633-5100, work (502) 655-0164, cell HIGHVIEW FARMS 827BEEF West Main Street BOYD CATTLE Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718 6077 Helena Road Mayslick, 41055 Ben T.KYCox DVM Charlie Boyd II: (606) 584-5194 • Blake Boyd: (606) 375-3718 (270) 469-5517 www.boydbeef.com • cboyd2@maysvilleky.net Registered Angus Cattle

RAGS ANGUS FARM Richard and Glenda Stallons 1240 Dogwood Kelly Road Hopkinsville, KY 42240President: Jason Crowe Home: (270) 885-4352 Cell: (270) 839-2442Vice President: Henry B Smith rstallons@bellsouth.net Secretary/Treasurer: Anne DeMott

ANGUS THE BUSINESS BREED

HILL VIEW FARMS Jimmy Gilles 5160 Lee Rudy Road Owensboro, KY 42301 (270) 686-8876 (270) 929-537

BRANCH VIEW ANGUS VIEW 927HILL Old Liberty Pike FARMS • Hustonville, KY 40437 Jimmy Gilles (859) 238-0771 • www.branchviewangus.com James S. & LuAnn Coffey, Donald & Donna Coffey 5160 Lee Rudy Road Annual Production Sale- 2nd Saturday in April

JOHNSON FARMS ANGUS Angus Bulls & Females Slaughters, KY Keith: (270) 635-0723 Reese: (270) 635-1137

531 Rick Rd. Park City, KY 42160 Eddie Burks • (270) 991-6398 JOHNSON FARMS ANGUS www.burkscattle.com

LYNN CREEK FARMS Kris and Sara Lynn 2184 Bardstown Rd Springfield KY 40069 573-721-6663

Owensboro, KY 42301 (270) 686-8876 BURKS CATTLE CO. (270) 929-537

Angus Bulls & Females

BURTON & SONSKY ANGUS Slaughters,

Joe D. or Karen Burton Bryan Carman,(270) Partner,635-0723 Ridgeview Angus Keith: 480 Hominy Hill Rd. Nancy, KY 42544 Reese: (270) 635-1137 Joe: (606) 305-3081 • Bryan: (606) 875-3453 Located 15 miles West of Somerset • klburton01@windstream.net Bulls & females sold private treaty. Inquiries Welcome. Sell only what we would buy.

SHAW FAMILY ANGUS Jim & Cathy Shaw RAGS ANGUS FARM 935 Miller Road • Hodgenville, 42748 Richard andKY Glenda Stallons 1240 Dogwood Kelly Road Hopkinsville, KY 42240 (270) 769-8260 Home: (270) 885-4352 Cell: (270) 839-2442 www.shawfamilyangus.com rstallons@bellsouth.net Quality Registered Angus Cattle since 1975 SHAW FAMILY ANGUS Jim & Cathy Shaw 935 Miller Road • Hodgenville, KY 42748 SMITHLAND ANGUS FARM (270) 769-8260 5202 East Hwy 80, Russell Springs, KY 42642 www.shawfamilyangus.com Charles “Bud” & Pam Smith: (270) 866-3898 Quality Registered Angus Cattle since 1975

Henry & Melissa Smith: (270) 866-2311

SMITHLAND ANGUS FARM 5202 East Hwy 80, Russell Springs, KY 42642 Charles “Bud” & Pam Smith: (270) 866-3898 ST. CLAIR FARMS REGISTERED ANGUS Henry & Melissa Smith: (270) 866-2311

Eric & Sherry St. Clair

13433 Falls of Rough Road • Falls of Rough, KY ANGUS 40119 MT. MORIAH ANGUS FARMS ST. CLAIR FARMS REGISTERED Bob, Kathy, and Rob Clark (859) 748-5558 & Sherry St. 617-1079 Clair Home: (270) 257-2965 Eric • Cell: (270) 1446 Kennedy Bridge Rd. Harrodsburg, www.stclairangus.com KY 40330 13433 Falls of Rough Road • Falls of Rough, KY 40119 Bob: (859)339-2610 • Rob: (859)612-1594 Home: (270) 257-2965 • Cell: (270) 617-1079 Performance Tested Bull & Female Sale April 2016 mtmoriahfarms1@gmail.com www.stclairangus.com www.mtmoriahangus.com Performance Tested Bull & Female Sale April 2020

LEGACY COFFEY ANGUSFARMS FARMS 661Daniel Hopewell Road and Lindsey Reynolds Liberty, KY 42539 1709 South Jackson Highway Matt Coffey: (270) 799-6288 Hardyville, KY787-2620 42746 Dewey Coffey: (606) Genetics Maximum Profitability since 1984 (270)for528-6275/(270) 528-6120

TAMME VALLEY FARM FOUR KINGS ANGUS TAMME VALLEY FARM 250 Bright Leaf Dr. • Harrodsburg, KY 40330 Jacob Tamme, Owner-Operator Jacob Tamme, Owner-Operator Cary & Kim King (859) 583-7134 (859) 583-7134 jacob.tamme@gmail.com Carymking@yahoo.com • fourkingsangus.com jacob.tamme@gmail.com Cary Cell: (859) 613-3734 • Colby Myers - Purebred Manager www.tammevalley.com & Find us on Facebook!

JASON & KATIE CROWE ELI HASKELL MILLERS RUN FARM 10825 Red Lick Road William N. Offutt IV Irvine, KY 40336 (859) 582-0761 3790 Paris Road Georgetown, KY 40324

OLD BARK FARM 370 Ferrill Hill, Buffalo, KY 42716 Kenley Conner 270/358-8057 Registered Angus Cattle

DAVIS BEND FARMS www.millersrunfarm.com 2315 Davis Bend Road Heifers for sale Canmer, KY 42722 timmothyljeffries@gmail.com www.davisbendfarms.com Tim: (270) 528-6605 Leslie: (270) 528-6435 MUD RIVER •ANGUS

PLEASANT HILL FARMS TWIN CREEK FARM 270/337-2128 or 270/402-4338 Gil, Mary, Corbin, Caroline, and Catherine Cowles Shawn, Melissa, Devin & Dylan Gibson Watch Branch(270) View Production in April 500 Rockfield Richpond Road 337-3072 or (270)Sale 692-5304 A N TusHin Sfor ILL LEA P Rockfield, KY 42274 Dennis & Emily f a r m s (270) 843-9021 • Fax (270) 843-9005 270/337-2128 or 270/402-4338 Located 7 miles west of Bowling Green, 1/2 mile off Hwy 68/80 Watch for us in Branch View Production Sale in April

www.tammevalley.com & Find us on Facebook!

www.legacyfarmsangus.com

(859) 533-2020 • millersrunfarm@aol.com

Dennis & Emily

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KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

10 Oak Hill Drive

FALL CREEK ANGUS Russellville, KY 42276 448 Corder Farm Road WayneKY Johnson: Monticello, 42633 (270) 303-6354 Ronnie GaryCorder Johnson: (270) 498-7208 (606) 348-6588 GREAT MEADOWS ANGUS ASSOCIATION FOUR KINGS ANGUS GMAA 20th Annual Fall Sale • October 16, 2021 250 Bright Leaf Dr. • Harrodsburg, KY 40330 www.greatmeadowsangus.com Cary & Kim King Paul Bradshaw (502) 817-7502 Carymking@yahoo.com • fourkingsangus.com

TRIPLE D ANGUS Nathaniel & Darla Denham TWIN CREEK FARMNathaniel(Bub), Sarah, Ashley Denham Shawn, Melissa, Devin (606) & Dylan Gibson 423-2457 • (606) 875-0780 (270) 337-3072 or (270)tripledangus.com 692-5304

L I S T I N G S A V A INAME LABLE Contact Anne DeMott (606) 782-1118 FARM NAME

WHITE FARM Tim and Amy White 3664 Military Pike • Lexington, KY 40513 Home: (859)223-0326 Tim: (859) 509-5401 • Amy (859)227-2552 whitefarm4@twc.com

KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION

MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION NAME

ADDRESS

Cary Cell: (859) 613-3734 • Colby Myers - Purebred Manager FARM NAME

HAINES ANGUS FARMS 5294 Park City- Glasgow Rd. Park City, KY 42160 OLDHaines, BARK Kenneth Jr.:FARM (270) 749-8862

CITY

STATE

ZIP

ADDRESS

370 Ferrill Hill, Buffalo, KY 42716

KenleyANGUS Conner 270/358-8057 HAMILTON FARMS Registered Angus Cattle Eddie Hamilton 2142 Stilesville Road Science Hill, KY 42553 edjohami@aol.com (606) 271-1286 PLEASANT HILL FARMS Bulls and Females for Sale

Gil, Mary, Corbin, Caroline, and Catherine Cowles

CITY

PHONE 1

PHONESTATE 1

ZIPPHONE

2

PHONE 2

EMAIL

500 Rockfield Richpond Road HERITAGE FARM Tom McGinnis KY 42274 Rockfield, 1024 Hinkle Lane • Shelbyville, KY (270) 843-9021 • Fax (270) 843-9005 (502) 633-1634, home • (502) 633-5100, work Located 7 miles (502) 655-0164, cell west of Bowling Green, 1/2 mile off Hwy 68/80 EMAIL

Return to: Anne DeMott • 1220 Angus Trail • Lexington, Kentucky 40509 • Annaul Dues $35 Return to: Anne DeMott 1220 Angus Trail • Lexington, Kentucky 40509 • Annaul Dues $35


KENTUCKY ANGUS ASSOCIATION NEWS Anne Stewart DeMott, Secretary/Treasurer www.kentuckyangus.org • kyangusassociation@gmail.com •

Greetings from the Kentucky Angus Association and the Board of Directors. Happy New Year from all of us at the Kentucky Angus Association. Hope this finds you and your family doing well and looking forward to what 2022 will bring. As we move into the new year it is good to reflect on the last year but never loose sight that tomorrow brings a new day with a bright beginning... you just have to make the most of it! Spring calving season is right around the corner so make

@kyangusassoc •

@kyangusassoc •

sure you start getting everything prepared for the next generation to enter the world. The spring sale season is fast approaching as well and there is sure to be genetics to move your herd forward. Be sure to mark those catalogs and get out and find what your herd needs. The 2022 Kentucky Farm Bureau Beef Expo and the Kentucky Angus Sweepstakes show and sale is in the final stages of planning. Be sure to join us the first weekend of March in Louisville for this historic event. Consignments have been coming in and there is sure to be a fantastic group of cattle there for you to select from

@kyangusassociation

that will work in your operation. The Kentucky Angus will also hold it’s annual meeting on Friday March 4th at the Beef Expo. If myself or any of the other officers and directors can be of assistance feel free to let us know. We’re here to help you in any way we can. Enjoy the gradually longer glimpse of daylight and stay warm. See you down the road. Jason Crowe Kentucky Angus Association President

2021 NAILE RESULTS 1. Roll of Victory (ROV) Reserve Junior Champion Bull of the Year S A F Diesel 9060 won Roll of Victory (ROV) reserve junior champion bull of the year at the 2021 North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE) Super Point Roll of Victory (ROV) Angus Show, Nov. 16 in Louisville, Ky. Blane Smith, Russell Springs, Ky., right, owns the winning bull. Presenting the award is Miss American Angus Mary Wood, left. Photo by Whitney Whitaker, American Angus Association.

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2. Roll of Victory (ROV) Reserve Intermediate Champion Bull of the Year Horstman Secret Society 961G won Roll of Victory (ROV) reserve intermediate champion bull of the year at the 2021 North American International Livestock

3

Exposition (NAILE) Super Point Roll of Victory (ROV) Angus Show, Nov. 16 in Louisville, Ky. Larry and Joe Horstman, West Lafayette, Ind., and Ard Ridge Cattle Company, Nancy, Ky., own the winning bull. Pictured from left are Miss American Angus Mary Wood, presenting; and Joe Horstman, recipient. Photo by Whitney Whitaker, American Angus Association. 3. Grand Champion Cow-calf Pair BJF KCC Elba 9326 won grand champion cow-calf pair at the 2021 North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE) Super Point Roll of Victory (ROV)

Angus Show, Nov. 16 in Louisville, Ky. Taylor Jeffries, Canmer, Ky., owns the March 2019 daughter of Colburn Primo 5153. An April 2021 bull calf sired by KR Cadillac Ranch completes the winning pair. Dave Duello, Pine Bluffs, Wyo., evaluated the 165 entries. Photo by Linde’s Livestock Photos. 4. Reserve Senior Champion Bull S A F Diesel 9060 won reserve senior champion bull at the 2021 North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE) Super Point Roll of Victory (ROV)

Angus Show, Nov. 16 in Louisville, Ky. Blane Smith, Russell Springs, Ky., owns the winning bull. Photo by Linde’s Livestock Photos. 5. Reserve Spring Bull Calf Champion BJF KCC Hondo 1405 won reserve spring bull calf champion at the 2021 North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE) Super Point Roll of Victory (ROV) Angus Show, Nov. 16 in Louisville, Ky. Taylor Jeffries, Canmer, Ky., owns the winning bull. Photo by Linde’s Livestock Photos.

Watch for our booth at the Cattlemen’s Convention! January • Cow Country • 43


Kentucky’s Agricultural Economy Thriving; Record Receipts Expected Katie Pratt University of Kentucky LOUISVILLE, Ky., (Dec. 2, 2021) – University of Kentucky agricultural economists are predicting the state’s 2021 agricultural receipts will exceed $6.7 billion. If realized, this will be a new record, surpassing the previous record of $6.5 billion in 2014 and the $5.5 billion average over the past five years. They expect net farm income to approach $2.5 billion, which is the highest since 2013. Economists in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment shared their predictions for the Kentucky agriculture and forest economies during the annual Kentucky Farm Bureau meeting. Kentucky’s agriculture sectors powered through many challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and are in the midst of tremendous economic growth due to increases in grain exports, strong crop yields and a high global demand for meats. As a result, corn and soybeans are tied with poultry as the state’s top agricultural commodities in 2021. Each comprises 18% of all projected sales. “Nationwide, grain inventory was lower at the beginning of 2021, and with increased exports, our stocks dropped even more as the year progressed. This led to higher prices throughout 2021,” said Greg Halich, UK agricultural economist. “For the upcoming 2022 crop season, prices are predicted to hold steady or may even increase, but profits will tighten due to rising input costs.”

economy has not only survived, but has experienced remarkable growth, initially on the heels of government financial support, followed by significant export gains, impressive crop yields and a growing global demand for meat products,” said Will Snell, UK agricultural economist. Clients in the Kentucky Farm Business Management program saw record net farm income in 2020, and 2021’s profits are expected to exceed those. “The average, commercial-size crop farm is in excellent financial health in terms of solvency and liquidity,” said Jerry Pierce, coordinator for Kentucky Farm Business Management. “Farms in the bottom third of net farm income made huge gains in financial health in 2020 and are poised to solidify their position in 2021.” The forest industry, which includes logging, primary wood manufacturing, secondary wood manufacturing, pulp and paper, paper converters and wood residue, continues to trend upward. In 2020, the sector added nearly $14 billion to the state’s economy. High demand for Kentucky hardwood continues to outpace harvest and processing and has led to a seller’s market for timber.

Corn, soybeans and poultry are followed by equine, which had a strong sales season and has a 16% market share. Cattle is next with 11% of projected sales.

“Prices for important species, such as white oak and yellow-poplar, have increased over 50% this year,” said Jeff Stringer, chair of the UK Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. “As demand for high quality white oak continues, driven by the cooperage industry supplying white oak barrels to the state’s bourbon distillers, prices for white oak timber will remain robust. While supply and demand are closer for other species, pricing will remain on an upward trajectory in 2022.”

“In 2021, the equine market made a huge recovery, and Keeneland sales were up 35% from 2020,” said Kenny Burdine, UK agricultural economist. “Beef exports are expected to set a record in 2021. After several frustrating years for cattle producers, another decrease in beef cow numbers and continued global demand should lead to improved prices for calves and feeder cattle in 2022.”

Higher prices and good yields in specialty crops, which includes produce and nursery, will likely allow the sector to exceed the record revenues of 2020, but rising input costs will limit profitability and sector growth. Cash receipts for 2021 are expected to be $16 million for fruit, $44 million for vegetables and $118 million for nursery and greenhouse production.

Kentucky’s agricultural economy is consistent with national trends. U.S. farm exports will likely finish 2021 at record levels that approach $175 billion. As of September, corn exports have more than doubled, beef exports are up 37% and forest products are up 29% on the year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is predicting a 23% increase in net farm income, which will only be surpassed by the all-time record high of $123.7 billion set in 2013. In 2020, producers’ incomes increased by nearly 20%, mostly due to government payments from the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program designed to help farmers work through the challenges of the pandemic and the Market Facilitation Program payments to help export losses evolving from the trade war. While government payments are projected to be 40% lower in 2021, they continue to make up about one-fourth of U.S. net farm income.

“Strong competitive pressures will continue from outside of the U.S. in the produce market,” said Tim Woods, agricultural economist. “While Kentucky growers benefit from strong local demand, and strong local prices may remain in direct markets, import supply will continue to rise. Labor costs are a big constraint for this sector.”

“Despite the impactful events of the pandemic, the U.S. farm 44 • Cow Country • January

Going into 2022, the economists predict commodity prices will continue to be relatively high but increasing input costs will tighten farmers’ profits in the next year. “Farm input costs will likely be up double-digit percentages in 2022, with much higher fuel, fertilizer and feed prices,” Snell said. “Labor costs and supplies continue to be a concern, not only among farmers but throughout the entire food supply chain and the rest of economy. Farmers will be advised to monitor input and commodity markets closely in developing purchasing and marketing strategies amidst this turbulent, volatile, and uncertain farm economy.”


KENTUCKY

GELBVIEH GELBVIEH KENTUCKY

AA LAND & CATTLE

A S S O C I AT I O N

LARRY CLARK & SONS LLC

Registered Gelbvieh & Balancers William McIntosh, President...........................................................................(502) Registered Gelbvieh Cattle Cynthiana, KY 106 Clark Houk Road • Greensburg, KY 42743 Luke Arthur (859) 298-8323 Luke Arthur, Vice President.............................................................................(859) Larry Clark, Owner & Operator luke.arthur93@gmail.com (270) 299-5167 • (270) 405-6848 Bulls • Show Prospects • Embryos Pat Tilghman, Secretary/Treasurer.....................................................................(270) Lpclarkandsons@msn.com Bulls sell with GE EPD’s • Show Prospects

BAR IVAALIVESTOCK LAND & CATTLE

Barry, Beth & Ben Racke • Brad&Racke Registered Gelbvieh Balancers 7416 Tippenhauer Rd. • Cold Cynthiana, KY Spring, KY 41076 Phone (859) 635-3832 • Barry cell (859) 991-1992 Arthur (859) Brad cellLuke (859) 393-3677 • Ben cell298-8323 (859) 393-3730 Fax (859)luke.arthur93@gmail.com 635-3832 • bar4@twc.com

Bulls • Show Prospects • Embryos Bulls sell with GE EPD’s • Show Prospects

BEE LICK GELBVIEHS

Eddie Reynolds IV Rd. LIVESTOCK 277 OldBAR Bee Lick Barry, KY Beth & Ben Racke • Brad Racke Crab Orchard, 40419 7416 Tippenhauer Rd. • Cold Spring, KY 41076 606-379-2281(H) 606-305-1972(C) (859) • Barry cell (859) 991-1992 Bulls &Phone Females for 635-3832 sale Brad cell (859) 393-3677 • Ben cell (859) 393-3730 Fax (859) 635-3832 • bar4@twc.com

David Slaughter, President.......................(270) 556-4259 JoeA Piles, President...........................(502) 507-3845 S SVice OC I AT I O N PatTilghman,Secretary/Treasurer..............(270) 670-8449

867-3132 298-8323 670-8449

CLIFFORD BRIANFARMS W. DYER, DVM

3459Owner/Manager KY HWY 1284E GELBVIEH/BALANCERS Cynthiana, KY 41031 2050 Glasgow Road Since 1937 Cattle for sale Burkesville, at all times. (859) 234-6956 KY 42717 Brian, Lauren, Kristen Barry, Emily & Julia (270) 864-5909

BRIAN W. DYER, DVM

Owner/Manager FULL CIRCLE FARMS GELBVIEH/BALANCERS 2050Registered Glasgow Road Gelbvieh Cattle Burkesville, KY 42717 Brad Burke Brian,989 Lauren, Kristen & Julia Metcalf MillBarry, RoadEmily • Ewing KY 41039 (270)(H) 864-5909 606-267-5609 • (C) 606-782-1367

gbb789@windstream.net

FULL CIRCLE FARMS

BEE LICK GELBVIEHS

Eddie Reynolds 277 Old Bee Lick Rd. Crab Orchard, KY 40419 606-379-2281(H) 606-305-1972(C) Bulls & Females for sale CD FARMS Clayton & Debbie Cash 1214 Ottawa School Road BRAY’S GELBVIEH CATTLE Brodhead, KY 40409 Niles & Betty K Bray (606)-308-3247 • (606)-758-8994

1568 Bray Ridge Road Gelbvieh-Balancer Bulls & Heifers For Sale Bedford, by Private Treaty KY 40006

Registered Gelbvieh Cattle BradKILBOURNE Burke GELBVIEH 989 Metcalf Mill Road KY • Ewing KY 41039 East Bernstadt, (H) 606-267-5609 • (C) 606-782-1367 606-843-6583 gbb789@windstream.net

cell 606-309-4662 Black Replacement Heifers & Bulls Available Embryo transplant & AI sired calves

KILBOURNE GELBVIEH

East Bernstadt, KY 606-843-6583 MOCKINGBIRD HILL FARMS cell 606-309-4662 BlackRegistered Replacement Heifers &Cattle Bulls Available Gelbvieh Embryo transplant AI sired calvesRd. Shane Wells & 10172 Provo

Rochester, KY H: 270-934-2198 C: 270-791-8196 swells@logantele.com MOCKINGBIRD HILL FARMS

(502) 255-3584

UPCOMING EVENTS

CD FARMS

Saturday Clayton & Debbie Cash May 15 1214 Ottawa Road Kentucky JuniorSchool Gelbvieh Show & Learning Clinic Brodhead, KY 40409 McIntosh Brothers Farm • 3348 Frankfort Road • Georgetown (606)-308-3247 • (606)-758-8994

Registered Gelbvieh Cattle Shane Wells 10172 Provo Rd. Rochester, KY H: 270-934-2198 C: 270-791-8196 swells@logantele.com

AGJA 3459 Eastern Junior Show “Run for the Roses” KYRegional HWY 1284E

information at 270-670-8449 JOIN KENTUCKY GELBVIEH ASSOCIATION Mail to: 690 Lick Branch Road, Glasgow, Kentucky 42141 FARM NAME

JOIN KENTUCKY GELBVIEH ASSOCIATION Mail to: 690 Lick Branch Road, Glasgow, Kentucky 42141 FARM NAME

ADRESS

YOUR NAME

PLEASANT MEADOWS FARM

Gary & Pat Tilghman Carrie & Daryl Derossett Family BurleyCynthiana, Fields Livestock Center • 709 Oil Fields Road • Horse Cave KY 41031 Lindsey & Garland Gilliam Family CallSince Carrie Derossett 1937 for more information. (270) 404-0828 PLEASANT MEADOWS FARM 690 Lick Branch Road Glasgow, KY 42141 Cattle for sale & Pat Tilghman (859) 234-6956 Entry and room information available at www.gelbvieh.org at all times. Gary 270.646.7024 • pleasantmeadowsfarm@hotmail.com (Juniors/Regional Shows/AGJA Eastern Regional)

American Gelbvieh Association Advertise today! 303-465-2333 | www.gelbvieh.org Contact Pat Tilghman for more

YOUR NAME

10AM Learning • 12:30PM Show Gelbvieh-Balancer BullsClinic & Heifers Sale McIntosh by Privatefor Treaty CallFor William more information. (502) 867-3132

May 28 - May 30 CLIFFORDFriday FARMS

Meeting modern industry demands: • Added Fertility • Increased Efficiency • More pounds of calf weaned

Lindsey Tilghman Jones Family Carrie & Daryl Derossett Family 690 Lick Branch Road Glasgow, KY 42141 270.646.7024 • pleasantmeadowsfarm@hotmail.com

KENTUCKY GELBVIEH ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING Saturday, January 29, 2022 11:00am EST Lunch will be provided Nelson County Extension Office 317 S. Third Street • Bardstown, KY 40004

CITY, STATE

ZIP

ADRESS EMAIL

PHONE

CITY, STATE

ZIP

Dues are $25/year, payable to Kentucky Gelbvieh Association

EMAIL

PHONE

Dues are $25/year, payable to Kentucky Gelbvieh Association


HEAD TO

HEAD Modern-day ranching requires more information to produce better animals. International Genetic Solutions works across breeds to provide more accurate head-to-head comparisons and maximum profitability. IGS incorporates generations of data and the world’s largest multi-breed database to enable more powerful breeding decisions than ever before. Better cattle. Better profits.

IGS STAND TOGETHER Genetic Solutions IGSInternational

KEVIN AND RACHEL BARRON Crestwood, Ky (502) 905-5851 rkbarron812@gmail.com

SWAIN SELECT SIMMENTAL 12113 Green Valley Dr. Louisville, KY 40243 frederickswain@bellsouth.net facebook.com/swainselectsimmental Fred & Phyllis: 502-245-3866 502-599-4560 Chi & Angie: 502-287-2116

JUDY AND RONDAL DAWSON 1156 Buzzard Roost Road Shelbyville, KY 40065 502-593-5136 • jrdawson22@outlook.com

406.205.3033 • internationalgeneticsolutions.com

ROCKING P LIVESTOCK 8308 Orangeburg Road Maysville, KY 41056 Chan: 606-584-7581 Keith: 606-584-5626 rockingplivestock@maysvilleky.net

JOIN KENTUCKY SIMMENTAL ASSOCIATION Mail to: Laura Jackson 1254 Cynthiana Road Paris, KY 40361 FARM NAME

YOUR NAME

BRIAN & HEATHER SWAIN 3906 Pottertown Road Murray, KY 42071 • 270-293-4440 wksbswain@murray-ky.net SIMMENTAL AND SIMANGUS BULLS FOR SALE

ADRESS

CITY, STATE

1939 Huntertown Road Versailles, KY 40383 BULLS FOR SALE Chris Allen 859-351-4486 callenuky@hotmail.com Dr. Henry Allen 859-229-0755

ZIP

WORK PHONE

HOME PHONE

Call or visit one of these Simmental breeders for cattle that work!

BILL KAISER • Shelbyville, KY • 502.639.4337

BRET AND LAURA JACKSON 859.533.3718 or 859.707.7200

www.kysimmental.com Membership Fee is $25.00


PRIVATE TREATY SALES CHECKOFF INVESTMENT FORM State and National Beef Promotion and Research Programs Information is required by 7 CRF 1260.201. Failure to report can result in a fine. Information is held confidential per 7 CRF 1260.203.

TODAY’S DATE

ID NUMBER (IF KNOWN)

SELLER’S NAME

BUYER’S NAME

ADDRESS

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

CITY

SELLER’S SIGNATURE

STATE

ZIP

BUYER’S SIGNATURE

Both the seller and the buyer are responsible for making sure that the $1 per head assessment is collected and remitted to the Kentucky Beef Council. DATE OF SALE

TOTAL NUMBER OF CATTLE SOLD

STATE OF ORIGIN*

X X

$1.OO per Head Federal Checkoff $1.OO per Head State Checkoff

Total Checkoff Payment for Federal and State

$

PERSON REMITTING FORM

+

BUYER

SELLER

PHONE

$

=

*If the cattle purchased came from another state within the last 30 days, indicate from which state the cattle were purchased.

$

Send Report and Remittance to: Kentucky Beef Council 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, KY 40503 For additional information: call 859-278-0899 or email beef@kycattle.org

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 05810093. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. January • Cow Country • 47


Kentucky Hereford Association KHA MEMBERS: FINAL CALL If you want to be included in our membership directory, updated information needs to be sent to Earlene. If you wish to place an ad in the directory, please send that information as well. This directory will be printed soon with or without your information. So, if you want to be included, please send information if you haven’t already.

Toby & Debby Dulworth 2492 S. Kirkman Road LaCenter, KY 42056 (270) 224-2993 dogwood@brtc.net

The Dogwood Difference? Total Performance Polled Herefords that trive on forages. www.dogwoodherefords.com

WELLS FARM Polled Herefords

439 Flatwoods Frozen Camp Rd, Corbin KY 40701 Bobby & Brenda Wells (606) 523-0569 or (606) 344-0417 wells_farm@yahoo.com Kevin, Angela, Kenlea & Kyler Murray (606) 528-1691 or (606) 682-8413

KHA OFFICERS President: Chris Schalk Secretary/ Treasurer: Earlene Thomas 859-623-5734 thomasep@roadrunner.com

NJB Limited Dale Stith

5239 Old Sardis Pike Mays Lick, KY 41055 dalestith@yahoo.com (918) 760-1550 Home of Select Sires’ Boyd Fort Knox 17yxz54040

TK4 Herefords

K3 CATTLE REGISTERED HEREFORDS 6077 Helena Road Mayslick, KY 41055 Charlie Boyd II 606-584-5194

Annual Bull Sale second Saturday in March Hereford and Angus Bulls

MPH Farms

Registered Polled Herefords PAUL L. HANCOCK 8559 KY 56 Owensboro, KY 42301 270-771-4194

Chambliss Hereford Farms Brad, Carla, Clay & Clint Chambliss

1101 Driftwood Lane Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Home (270) 982-3905 Cell (270) 668-7126 fax 270-735-9922 www.chamblissherefordfarms.com

KYLE BUSH K3CATTLE@YAHOO.COM 859-588-4531 198 HICKS PIKE CYNTHIANA, KY 41031

THOMAS FARM

Jackson Farms

Registered Polled Herefords 8103 Bill Moss Road White House, TN 37188 Home/Fax: 615-672-4483 Cell: 615-478-4483 billymjackson@aol.com “Farming the Same Land Since 1834”

Eric & Ronnie Thomas 2396 Union City Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 (859) 623-5734 Eric’s Cell (859) 314-8256

“Cattle for sale at all times”

HEREFORDS

Codee Guffey • 1815 Grassy Springs Road Versailles, Kentucky 40383 (502) 598-6355 rockridgeherefords@gmail.com www.rockridgeherefords.com

Polled Hereford and Gelbvieh Cattle 3459 KY Hwy. 1284 E. Cythiana, KY 41031

Tony & Kathy Staples 992 Knotts Road

(859) 234-6956

Brandenburg, KY 40108 (270) 422-4220 tstaples@bbtel.com

Windy Hills Farm

Registered Polled Herefords

Ben, Jane, Shelby and Lincoln

Jackie D. Perkins II 367 Mt. Pisgah Rd. Bremen, KY 42325 (270) 543-3586

Breeding to produce good cows since 1981

PILE STOCK FARM HANSELL PILE, JR.

12045 St. John Rd. Cecilia, KY 42724 270-735-5192 270-862-4462 12 miles West of Elizabethtown

WOLF FARM

WCN Polled Herefords Since 1961 Bill & Libby Norris 2220 Celina Road Burkesville, KY 42717

Phone (270) 433-7256 Cell (270) 433-1525 “Every calf needs a white face”

Registered Polled Herefords

Bulls & Females for sale

Tim & Peggy Wolf 12939 Peach Grove Road Alexandria, KY 41001 Home: 859-635-0899 Cell: 859-991-3484

BECKLEY HEREFORDS L. Wayne Beckley • 1420 Fitchburg Rd. Ravenna, KY 40472 • 606-723-3021 Cell: 859-779-0962 L.W. Beckley D.V.M 284 Pyrse Lane • Irvine, KY 40336 Cell: 859-779-1419 • Clinic: 606-726-0000

www.beckleyherefords.com

“Breeding Polled Herefords for over 58 Years” Breeding cattle for sale at all times.

1999 Walnut Hill Rd. Lexington, KY 40515 (859) 271-9086 cell (859)533-3790

WATSON LAND & CATTLE Peyton’s Well Polled Herefords The Lowell Atwood Family

133 Edgewood Drive • Stanford, KY (606) 365-2520 home/fax (606) 669-1455 cell

Victor- influenced cattle bred for performance on grass.

“Black cows need a good Hereford Bull”

Old Fall Creek Farms

AHA & KHA member • Proven bloodlines Private treaty sales • Visitors welcome 1874 Old Fall Creek Road Monticello, KY 42633 Reed Bertram (606) 348-7486 David Bertram (606) 278-3630 www.ofcfarms.com

Danny Miller jmspolledherefords.com 270-465-6984 270-566-2694

Matt, Melinda, Harlee, & Wyatt Watson 6196 Mount Sterling Rd Flemingsburg, Kentucky melindawatson8660@gmail.com Matt - 606-748-1600 Melinda - 859-625-8660

CATTLE FOR SALE AT ALL TIMES

Tucker Stock Farms “Registered Angus and Polled Herefords”

John Tucker II 1790 Hidden Valley Lane Hudson, KY 40145 270-617-0301 “Bulls always for Sale”


LIMOUSIN

B.F. Evans Cattle Company Byron Evans

CUMMINS POLLED LIMOUSIN

David & Donald P. Cummins 4312 Willow-Lenoxburg Rd. Foster, KY 41043 David: 606-747-5886 (C) 606.782.7003 cumminsd@windstream.net

G

ING ET T

S LAND & C AT T

Buck’s Limousin Farm

“The Best Kept Secret in Eastern Kentucky” John Buck: (606) 474-7451 • (606) 922-8174 2494 South St. Hwy. 7, Grayson, KY. 41143 johnbuck474@windstream.net “cattle for sale - private treaty”

P.O. Box 1509 599 Ray Allen Lane Versailles, KY 40383 Byron 859-509-8046 bfevanscattlecompany@gmail.com byron.evans59@yahoo.com byron.evans59@yahoo.co m

Fullblood & Purebred Embryos & Semen Stephen: 270-799-8685 760 Emily Court Bowling Green, KY 42101 achhlimousin@twc.com Facebook: ACHH Limousin

Breeders of the Bluegrass

LE

Tom & Chris Daniel

Daniel Gettings

Elbow Bend & Center Point Rd. Tompkinsville, KY 42167

(270) 487-9454 or (270) 202-7755

“Registered Limousin - LimFlex - Angus Genetics”

5171 Camargo-Levee Rd. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 859-498-0030 859-585-1785 859-585-8388 “Your source of purebred homopolled/homoblack.”

Ri c c i R o l a nD Ricci & Brenda Roland 423 Lebus Lane Cynthiana, KY 41031 859-234-3986 • 859-234-7344 rolandlimousin@earthlink.net

Allen & Jon Anderson 260 Henderson Rd. Eubank, KY 42567 Allen: 606-872-8072 Jon: 606-305-8859 “Quality Limousin + LimFlex Cattle!”

WHITE LIMOUSIN & WHITE ANGUS

Donald & Mary Ann Wenzel

994 Airport Road • Falmouth, KY 41040

(859) 654-3612 • (859) 322-0752 maryawenz@aol.com

TOMORROW’S REGISTERED WHITE ANGUS TODAY!

Joey & Donnie Massey 80 Sublimity School Rd. • London, KY 40744 606-682-2126 • 606-682-2125

Decker Family Limousin & LimFlex Kenny & Tiffany Decker Leitchfield, KY • (270) 589-7999

R

ING OAKS FAR O LL M

Terry W. McPhetridge • 606-843-6903 Cell: 606-524-9241 1645 Winding Blade Rd. East Bernstadt, KY 40729

Bob Minerich, 859-582-6888 2003 Barnes Mill Rd. Richmond, KY 40475 minegwen@aol.com “Cattle for sale private treaty”

Greg Blaydes 859-338-9402 James Hicks 859-227-0490 1225 E. Leestown Rd. Midway, KY 40347

BULLS - HEIFERS PROCESSED BEEF

Brad Kidd (606) 495-6396 (606) 738-9493 Paul Kidd (606) 743-7349 8254 Hwy 711 West Liberty KY 41472

Performance you can count on! Russ Crum • 2423 KY Hwy 3003 Cynthiana, KY 41031 • 859-298-8713

FOUNDATION SALE VII

September 18, 2021 • 1PM CST United Producers Facility • Bowling Green, KY Selling FULLBLOOD & PUREBRED LIMOUSIN Genetics • To consign or for catalog call ACH Holdings, LLC, Steven Haynes 270-799-8685


CALENDAR OF EVENTS DATE

EVENT

LOCATION

AD

JAN 1

18th Annual Genetic Excellence Angus Bull Sale

Cookeville, TN

JAN 13-14

KCA Convention & Ag Industry Trade Show

Lexington, KY

JAN 15

58th Annual CKAA Annual Winter Sale

Danville, KY

53

FEB 1-3

NCBA Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade Show

Houston, TX

21

FEB 16-19

National Farm Machinery Show

Louisville, KY

FEB 18

White Hawk Ranch

Buchanan, GA

15

FEB 19

Yon Family Farms Spring Sale

Ridge Spring, SC

8

FEB 24

2021 Virtual Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Bowling Green, KY

31

FEB 26

Pleasant Hill Farms March Madness Bull & Heifer Sale

Bowling Green, KY

3

FEB 26

North Missouri Bull Sale

Kingsville, MO

2

FEB 28

Woodall Angus 27th Annual Buyer’s Choice Bull Sale

Quality, KY

11

FEB 28

Robert Elliott & Sons 87th Anniversary Production Sale

Adams, TN

10

MARCH 4-6

Kentucky Beef Expo

Louisville, KY

33

MARCH 5

Arkansas Bull Sale

Hope, AR

2

MARCH 7

Stone Gate Farm Annual Sale

Flemingsburg, KY

7

MARCH 11

26th Annual Smithland Angus Bull & Female Sale

Russell Springs, KY

33

MARCH 12

Red Reward Bul & Female Sale

Osceola, MO

2

MARCH 19

Red Hill Farms More Than a Bull Sale

Lafayette, TN

9

MARCH 26

South Missouri Bull & Female Sale

Carthage, MO

2

MARCH 28

Oak Hollow First Choice Bull Sale

Smiths Grove, KY

APR 2

Laurel County Cattlemen’s Association 9th Annual Commercial Open Heifer Sale

London, KY

24

APR 9

Branch View Angus

Hustonville, KY

56

APR 9

Knoll Crest Farm Spring Bull & Female Sale

Red House, VA

26-28

DIAMOND J SALERS

SALERS T H E

B A L A N C E D

B R E E D

Donald Johnson • 11660 N. Hwy 1247 • Eubank, KY 42564 606-379-1558

WILLIS FARMS

Danny Willis • 964 Johnson Rd • Frankfort, KY 40601 • 502-803-5011 drwc21@aol.com

DEL-SU FARM

Howard & Sue Edwards • 420 Rose Rd • Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-1675 • Jeriah Privett • 606-416-1154

KNOB LICK FARM - BULLS & HEIFERS FOR SALE Larry Cox • Tina Cox-Lynch • Amanda Cox Gibson • 1315 Knob Lick Road • Irvine, KY 40336 • 606-723-3077 • 606-975-1716

50 • Cow Country • January


REGISTERED RED ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE * FREE DELIVERY * FOUR WINDS FARM

New Castle, Kentucky

(502) 296-1044

AD INDEX Allison Charolais.....................................23 American Angus Association.......................23 BioZyme, Inc............................................12 Blue Grass Stockyards...............................25 Branch View Angus...................................56 Bridgeview Angus Farm.............................29 Burkmann Nutrition....................................17 Bush Hog................................................54 Central Farm Supply.................................55 CKAA Winter Sale ....................................53

LIME -LITTER- FERTILIZER Spreader John Deere 4020 -3 to choose from Manure spreaders- 8 instock John Deere 5325 - 2 wd drive with loader John Deere 7200- cab -16 speed Esch High speed Grain Drills- 7/10/12 ft in stock Horning Headers - ready to ship! John Deere 3975 - base unit- $30,Xxx Artex SB 600 Spreader -in stock John Deere 468 - net $14,500 John Deere 566- twine $12,000 Meyer 510 TMR mixers - In STOCK Cloverdale 500 T -TMR mixers - in Stock Stoltzfus 10 ton Litter spreader $30,000 Caterpillar 242B skid loader-$17,500 New Holland 790 choppers-@$7500 John Deere 8200 drills $5850 Gehl 8335 feeder wagon $7500 Patz 290- auger feeder wagon $8500 Artex SB 200- vertical beaterfor rental Stoltzfus lime - litter- fert cu 50 $19,500 JD 6400- loader-4wd- no cab Farmco feeder wagons-15 in stock-call John Deere 7405 -4wd -canopy -$24,750 WWW.REDBARNANDASSOCIATES.COM Charlie B. Edgington 859-608-9745 PERFORMANCE TESTED PUREBRED ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE Call 270-202-7186 for more info or check out www.oakhollowangus.com for current availability. FOR SALE 19-20 month old Polled Hereford bulls. Good selection. Low birthweight, medium frame. Free Delivery Available.JMS Polled Herefords, Knifley, KY Danny 270-566-2694 Trent 270-566-2000 FOUNDATION SALE VIII September 17, 2022 • Selling FULLBLOOD & PUREBRED LIMOUSIN Genetics • For info call: A C H Holdings, LLC Stephen Haynes 270-799-8685

RED ANGUS FOR SALE Bulls: Yearlings and 2-year-olds. Open Heifers. Show Heifer Prospects. Contact: Johnnie Cundiff 606-305-6443 or 606-871-7438

Dievert Sales Service................................23

REGISTERED BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS Many blaze faced. Excellent EPD’s. Semen Tested. Delivery Available. Maximize your profit with proven performance. All bulls qualify for new CAIP cost-share. Adam Wheatley 502-349-2665

Kentucky Angus Association...................42-43

BREEDING AGE HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE AT ALL TIMES Over 60 years of Line 1 Hereford Genetics. Groups of open and bred heifers available for sale at all times. Chambliss Hereford Farms. 270-668-7126 Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans (CNMPs) Livestock manure management planning, manure storage facility planning, and water quality BMPs implementation. Ben Koostra - Professional Engineer and NRCS Technical Service Provider Lexington - 859-559-4662 SORTING POLES – PADDLES – FLAGS Poles with your 8” decal, $6.70 each for 50 or $7.25 each per 25. Sorting flag, $12.00, Sorting paddles, $9. Ear tag cutters with print, quantities at $3.25 each. Kerndt Livestock Products 800-207-3115 BUSH SIMMENTALS Black Simmental and Simangus Bulls Genomic Enhanced EPDS Homozygous Black 502-750-4190 I'm building a pole barn and LOOKING FOR A WOODEN/OAK BARN TO TAKE DOWN and haul off for this purpose. Please call 859-797-0106 if you have an old barn you want taken down. within 60 miles of Cynthiana preferred

Dura Cast...............................................32 Green River Fence....................................32

Kentucky Beef Expo..................................33 Kentucky Gelbvieh Association...................45 Kentucky Hereford Association....................48 Kentucky Hoop Barns................................34 Kentucky Salers Association.......................50 Kentucky Simmental Association..................46 Laurel County Cattlemen’s Open Heifer Sale...24 Limousin Breeders of the Bluegrass..............49 Mid South Ag, LLC.....................................14 Moly Mfg................................................35 NCBA Convention.....................................21 Oak Hollow...............................................5 Pleasant Hill Farms................................... 3 Red Barn & Associates..............................10 Red Hill Farms.......................................... 9 Robert Elliott & Sons Angus........................10 Seedstock Plus......................................... 2 Smithland Angus......................................33 Stone Gate Farms.......................................7 United Producers, Inc.................................4 White Hawk Ranch...................................15 Woodall Angus........................................11 Yon Family Farms...................................... 8 January • Cow Country • 51


Feed for Fertilizer Dr. Jeff Lehmkuhler Extension Professor, University of Kentucky

Fertilizer values have increased dramatically since a year ago. Urea is more than $800 per ton or about $1 per pound of nitrogen. Potash and phosphorus fertilizer have similarly increased in cost. If a lot of hay tests 12% crude protein, 2.5% potassium and 0.25% phosphorus, a ton of this hay would contain the equivalent of 38 pounds of nitrogen, 83 pounds of potash and 11 pounds of P2O5. The fertilizer value would be $70-$75 per ton. Don’t overlook the fertility value in hay and develop a strategy to capture the value from manure. Feeding hay on fields can be a strategy to deposit manure nutrients in pastures. Bale grazing, unrolling hay or other feeding approaches can be implemented. Feeding hay on a concrete pad can allow for the collection and spreading of the manure. We import nutrients onto the farm in other feedstuffs as well. The recent bourbon production boom has increased access to distillery grain products. Stillage is readily available and can be a source of both protein and energy for supplementation. Stillage is approximately 93% water. However, on a dry matter basis the nitrogen content is 4.5% nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium is near 1%. Retention of nutrients may only be 10-20% leading to 80-90% of nutrients excreted in the manure. This would lead to the excretion of approximately 70, 28 and 40 pounds of nitrogen, K2O and P2O5, respectively, for each ton of stillage fed on a dry matter basis. This would equate to roughly $90-$100 in fertility value. However, as much as 70-75% of the nitrogen excreted may be lost to volatilization reducing the potential value captured to about $40$45 per ton. If we add the water back to calculate the value on an as-is basis, the value is 7% of the above or roughly $2-$3 per ton. Several years ago, researchers at the University of Nebraska evaluated distillers grains as a forage substitution for pastures. The researchers compared low stocking rate control (2.8 aum/acre), 80 pounds of nitrogen fertilizer per acre and a stocking rate of 4.0 aum/acre, and supplementing 5 pounds of dried distillers grain per head having a stocking rate of 4.0 aum/acre. The cost of urea was $363 and dried distillers grains were $110 per ton at the time of the report in 2009. Profitability was lowest for the low stocking rate, control reflecting the lower production per acre. Profitability was similar for the N fertilizer and distillers supplementation treatments with the nitrogen fertilizer treatment returning only $4.55 per acre more than the distillers grain supplementation strategy. Average daily gains were 1.37 pound for the control and nitrogen fertilizer treatments while the supplemented groups gained 1.95 pounds per day. Given the cost differential of urea and distillers grains currently, the analysis would likely favor the dried distillers grains supplementation over the urea fertilization. Operations that are able to get distillery feeds at a low cost would have a greater economic advantage. As fertilizer prices have escalated and bourbon production has increased leading to greater access to distillery grain by-products,

52 • Cow Country • January

feeding distillery feedstuffs has the potential to lower cost of production while importing fertility. Sustainable operations will capture the manure fertility value from feeding distillery grains by-products. Producers should develop a manure nutrient management plan and feed reasonable amounts of stillage, syrup or distillers grains to achieve desired animal performance. Avoid excessive levels of feeding to reduce nutrient importation to the farm if there is limited opportunity to export nutrients through the sale of grains like soybeans or corn. Additionally, excessive feeding can have a detrimental effect on rumen fiber digestibility from the high level of fat intake potentially lowering animal performance. For more information on utilizing bourbon distillery grains feedstuffs, contact your local extension office. Consider reading our fact sheets on distillers grain feedstuffs for more information and consult with your nutritionist for developing feeding programs utilizing distillers grain feedstuffs. Have a great New Year and I look forward to seeing you in 2022.

VISIT US TODAY! ALL AGES WELCOME SCHEDULE A GROUP VISIT AND CHOOSE YOUR LESSON PLAN CATERING IS AVAILABLE

THE YARDS is an education center focusing on the science and practices of the beef industry. Educational opportunities provide a unique learning experience based on its location in the Blue Grass Regional Stockyards Marketplace. This environment fosters complex thinking, experiential learning, and life skill application. Call Bradon Burks for more information

(859) 278-0899


T I M E L Y

T I P S

F O R

J A N U A R Y

Spring Calving Herds

Fall-Calving Herds

• Study the performance of last year's calf crop and plan for improvement. Plan your breeding program and consider a better herd sire(s). Select herd sires which will allow you to meet your goals and be willing to pay for superior animals.

• Provide clean windbreaks and shelter for young calves.

• Consider vaccinating the cows to help prevent calf scours.

• Catch up on castrating, dehorning and implanting

• Keep replacement heifer calves gaining to increase the probability of puberty occurring before the start of the spring breeding season. • Start cows on the high magnesium mineral supplement soon. Consider protein supplementation if hay is less than 10% crude protein. If cows are thin, begin energy (grain) supplementation now. Cows must reach a body condition score of 5 before calving to maximize their opportunity for reproductive success. Supplementation now allows adequate time for cows to calving in adequate body condition score. • Get ready for calving season! See that all equipment and materials are ready, including obstetrical equipment, record forms or booklets, eartags, scales for obtaining birthweights, etc. Prepare a calving area where assistance can be provided easily if needed. Purchase ear tags for calves and number them ahead of time if possible. Plan for enough labor to watch/assist during the calving period. • Move early calving heifers and cows to pastures that are relatively small and easily accessible to facilities in case calving assistance is needed. Keep them in good condition but don't overfeed them at this time. Increase their nutrient intake after they calve.

• Breeding season continues. Keep fall calving cows on accumulated pasture as long as possible, then start feeding hay/grain. Don’t let these cows lose body condition!

General Reminders • Feed hay in areas where mud is less of a problem. Consider preparing a feeding area with gravel over geotextile fabric or maybe a concrete feeding pad. • Increase feed as the temperature drops, especially when the weather is extremely cold and damp. When temperature drops to 15°F, cattle need access to windbreaks. • Provide water at all times. Cattle need 5 to 11 gallons per head daily even in the coldest weather. Be aware of frozen pond hazards. Keep ice "broken" so that cattle won't walk out on the pond trying to get water. Automatic waterers, even the “frost-free” or “energy-free” waterers can freeze up in extremely cold weather. Watch closely. • Consider renovating and improving pastures with legumes, especially if they have poor stands of grass or if they contain high levels of the fescue endophyte. Purchase seed and get equipment ready this month.

58th ANNUAL WINTER SALE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 2022 • 1PM EST • CKAA Sales Pavilion SELLING: 65 head of registered Angus cattle, 30 embryos & 122 straws of semen 18 pairs, most of which have fall calves with many rebred AI. 21 bred females including 18 bred heifers, mostly fall calvers. Majority carry AI service. 2 open heifers, ready to breed. 6 bulls, all are fall yearlings and will sell with current BSE’s and DNA tested. 122 straws of semen from 21 noted Angus sires. Call for a complete listing. 31 embryos from BLACK GOLD GENETICS,BOYD BEEF CATTLE, LYNN CREEK FARMS, & MYERS ANGUS. EMBRYO MATINGS SIRE

59 ANNUAL TH

FALL SALE 230th Sale Sponsored by the Central Kentucky Angus Association SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13

SIRE REG

DAM

DAM REG

3x

E&B PLUS ONE

1996960

FROSTY ELBA LIZZY 564

17999529

4x

GAR HOME TOWN

19266718

TEHAMA MARY BLACKBIRD C290

17986182

2x

E&B PLUS ONE

1996960

GAR SUNRISE 2086

18635932

4x

BAR R JET BLACK 5063

18389838

HR 2002B OF 0042 4755

18030533

CKAA Sales Pavilion • Danville, KY

GPS Address: 2286 Fork Church Road • Lancaster, KY 40444 Sale will be held back in the heated sale arena.

See ad on page 41

Bid online at topshelf-auctions.com Sale Day Phone: 859.238.3195 or 859.583.0364 Tim Dievert 478 Dry Fork Rd. Sale Manager: Dievert Sales Service • Tim Dievert • 478 Danville, Dry Fork Road KY 40422 859/238-3195 Danville, KY 40422 • (859) 238-3195 • Catalog at dievertsales.com tdievert@dievertsales.com www.dievertsales.com tdievert@dievertsales.com • Like us on facebook • Call for more details Auctioneer: Eddie Burks (270) 991-6398

3x

VAR POWER PLAY 7018

18717078

FWY RITA 4779

18071432

3x

PLATTEMERE WEIGH UP K360

16692552

MINDEMANN LADY B15

17860163

4x

STEVENSON TURNING POINT

18434747

BURKS 518Y ROSEBUD 904E

19094070

4x

JINDRA ACCLAIM

17972810

GAR DAYBREAK M562

17360223

4x

MYERS FAIR-N-SQUARE M39

19418329

MYERS MISS BLACKCAP M34

17968529

January • Cow Country • 53


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Flex-Wing Rotary Cutters perfect for maintaining a rolling pasture or orchard, or clearing heavy crops.


FOR A SUCCESSFUL CALVIN

A variety of Trust FOR A SUCCESSFUL CALVING SEASON

R

Bioplex® and Sel-Plex® for performance •

Added technology; Bio-Mos®, Actigen®, Bioplex® and Sel-Plex® for better animal

performance •

Helps increase colostrum quality and

calf vigor to combat stressful conditions

Helps promote gut health in calves

Helps promote gut health

during demanding situati

during demanding situations

FOR A SUCCESSFUL CALVING SEASON FOR A SUCCESSFUL CALVING SEASON

Helps increase colostrum

calf vigor to combat stress

A variety of Trust A variety of Trust

500 Grade Ln, isville, KY 40219

Added technology; Bio-M

R

R

Triple Trust® HerdBuilder™ Calving and Rebreeding Mineral prepares your spring calving herd for

Triple Trust® HerdBuilder™ Calvin

the challenges of wet weather and the threat of scours. Elevated trace mineral levels help keep • Added technology; Bio-Mos®, immune and Actigen®, reproduction of chelated trace minerals the challenges of wet weather and • Added technology;functions Bio-Mos®,performing Actigen®, properly. The addition Bioplex® and Sel-Plex® for better animal helps negate any antagonists on pasture Bioplex® and Sel-Plex®present for better animal or in water. immune and reproduction functio performance performance Cattle Lix 20% AN with Bio-Mos® is a an all natural self-fed protein supplement that promotes intestinal pres helps negate any antagonists • Helps increase colostrum quality and health while increasing forage digestibility in a low intake, economical cost per day package. 7500 Grade Ln, • Helps increase colostrum quality and conditions Louisville, KY 40219 calf vigor to combat stressful calf vigor to combat stressful conditions Cattle Lix 20% AN with Bio-Mos®

1-800-777-5923

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Helps promote gut health in calves 7500 Grade Ln, • Helps promote gut health in calves during demanding situations during demanding situations

Louisville, KY 40219

health while increasing forage dig

1-800-777-5923

www.c

Contact your local dealer for more information on how Triple Trust® HerdBuilder™ minerals can help your herd.

Triple Trust® HerdBuilder™ Calving and Rebreeding Mineral prepares your spring calving herd for Triple Trust® HerdBuilder™ Calving and Rebreeding Mineral prepares your spring calving herd for the challenges of wet weather and the threat of scours. Elevated trace mineral levels help keep the challenges of wet weather and the threat of scours. Elevated trace mineral levels help keep immune and reproduction functions performing properly. The addition of chelated trace minerals immune and reproduction functions performing properly. The addition of chelated trace minerals helps negate any antagonists present on pasture or in water. helps negate any antagonists present on pasture or in water. Cattle Lix 20% AN with Bio-Mos® is a an all natural self-fed protein supplement that promotes intestinal Cattle Lix 20% AN with Bio-Mos® is a an all natural self-fed protein supplement that promotes intestinal health while increasing forage digestibility in a low intake, economical cost per day package. health while increasing forage digestibility in a low intake, economical cost per day package. 7500 Grade Ln, Louisville, KY 40219 1-800-777-5923 www.centralfarmky.com

1-800-777-5923

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Contact your local dealer for more information Contact your local dealer for more information on how Triple Trust® HerdBuilder™ minerals on how Triple Trust® HerdBuilder™ minerals can help your herd. can help your herd.


400+ HEAD SELL

100 BULLS | 60 FEMALES | 250 COMMERCIAL FEMALES

APRIL 9, 2022

Add REAL Dollars To Your Calf Crop This group of customer steers sold for $2,200 and earned $212.72 premium over cash market.

GAR Inertia 5226

Deer Valley Growth Fund

10 sons sell! Musgrave 316 Exclusive 1175

10 sons sell!

20 sons sell!

Calf buy-back program You buy the bulls….we buy your calves Contact Tim Dietrich for more information:

859-619-0342

tim@branchviewangus.com

branchviewangus.com 859-533-1301 or 606-706-0355 james@branchviewangus.com