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THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

MAY 2019 £3.90

INSIDE

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BIANCA JAGGER LIVIA FIRTH TRISTRAM STUART ISABELLA TREE NICK BRANDT ALEX EAGLE JULIET KINSMAN

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W W W .W I L L I A M A N D S O N . C O M

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T H E P E R F E C T D E S T I N AT I O N F O R T O W N & C O U N T R Y L I V I N G

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A FA M I L Y S T O R Y

YAS M I N A N D A M B E R L E BON W EAR ‘ W O N D E R L A N D ’

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THE CROWN RING 1 South Molton Street, London W1 41 Cadogan Gardens, London SW3 Harrods / Harvey Nichols / Liberty / Selfridges / The Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong 0800 138 1659

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CONTENTS M AY 2 019

COLUMNS 18 20

THE GOOD LIFE Think twice about that fishy in your dishy, says Alice B-B THE RURBANIST Ben Elliot

UP FRONT 23 24 26 28 29 30 32 34 36 38 39 40 42

REEL IT IN Swimwear with a conscience NATURAL WOMAN Make Mother Nature your source for material STYLE NOTEBOOK Best foot forward MORAL FABRIC Upcycled accessories SLOW FASHION Mix vintage with rental MY STYLE Alex Eagle LUCIA LOVES This design studio proves that furniture does grow on trees GOLD DIGGER Jewellery news COVER GIRL Get photo-ready with probiotic skincare BEAUTY TEST Facial acupuncture BODY & SOUL Retreat to Notting Hill SWAP SHOP Buy better WELL GROOMED Men’s style news

THE GUIDE 47 50 52 53 54 56 58

THE DIARY The exhibition coming to a beach near you ARTS AGENDA Thing are getting hairy in Yorkshire, says Caiti Grove GOOD READS How to give up plastic THE OLYMPIAN Sebastian Coe on a female sporting icon ROAD TEST Jeremy Taylor pitches Tesla against Jaguar in the electric race SEEDER’S DIGEST All hail Highgrove CONVERSATIONS AT SCARFES BAR Bianca Jagger says we must use our voices to effect change, Charlotte Metcalf discovers

FASHION & FEATURES 62

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73 Dress, Temperley London

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DON’T DRESS TO KILL Statements should be about more than style ECO COMES OF AGE Livia Firth on why shopping was never a hard habit to break FASHION CONSCIENCE Eco-Age’s Dolly Jones’ guide to sustainable fashion

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CONTENTS M AY 2 019

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CLARION CALL Photographer Nick Brandt makes his feelings about Africa known on huge canvasses SAVING THE EARTH Charlotte Metcalf meets re-wilding pioneers Isabella Tree and Charles Burrell FOOD FOR THOUGHT Tristram Stuart is making a crust for food waste charities by brewing beer, says Anastasia Bernhardt

THE INSIDER 97 98

GROW AS ONE A console with roots GOOD WILL HUNTING Homeware with heart 100 DESIGN NOTES News, views and inspiration by Carole Annett 102 PAINT IT GREEN Eco paint 103 DESIGN Q&A Nancy Johnston of Tengri

FOOD & TRAVEL 105 THE GREEN ROOM How hotels are

110 111 112 114 117 118 119 120

upping their environmental ante. By Juliet Kinsman THE HOTEL WIZARD Fiona Duncan explores the new Marrakech LESS IS MORE Swap the Algarve for lesser-travelled Alentejo SUGAR, SPICE AND ALL THINGS NICE Head to Sri Lanka for all the above THE BUCKET LIST Gary Barlow’s travel tales GASTRO GOSSIP Supper clubs SHELL OUT Spring-time crab salad FORK & FIELD Fancy a squirrel lasagne? HAPPY HOUR Alice Lascelles has a drink with Giles Coren

ON THE MOVE 123 124 126 127

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ON THE COVER Nelida @ First wears earrings by Lark & Berry. Photography by Vivienne Balla. Fashion direction by Nicole Smallwood. Make-up by Nathalie Eleni using Esse Skin Care and Davines Hair Care. Hair by Jason Crozier at Stella Creative Artists using Davines

PROPERTY OF THE MONTH LET’S MOVE TO... Brighton MY HOUSE David Harber FIVE OF THE BEST Eco homes

REGULARS 10 12 44 122

EDITOR’S LETTER CONTRIBUTORS HIGH SOCIETY STOCKISTS

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EDITOR’S LETTER

EDITOR’S PICK S

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62 whatsoever, whereas real fur, even if ethically sourced to the highest standards, is vilified. Veganism is the latest food fad, and while cutting down on meat is a definite positive for both the environment and our health, cutting it out altogether can have unseen negative impacts too. Travel is ethically charged, given the aviation and hospitality industry’s impact on pollution, but our choices about where we choose to spend our hard-earned cash will inform their long-term direction; money talks, after all. No one will ever get it right all the time, nor should we start green shaming each other, but we should be accountable for our actions and be mindful that little differences can turn into big ones. With that, I really hope you feel empowered and inspired by this issue which tackles many of the issues confronting our daily lives – and, hopefully, you’ll find also lots of practical information. Please visit us online at countryandtownhouse.co.uk – we’re dedicating the whole of April to sustainability, and as a company we’re taking up some challenges too. We’d love to hear from you, so if you feel like dropping us a line with information or ideas, do email editorial@ countryandtownhouse.co.uk n

WEAR Look great and do good in Stella McCartney’s dress made with sustainable viscose

USE Chuck out your bleach – vinegar is my new hero cleaning product

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@countryandtown /countryandtownhousemagazine /countryandtownhouse

TAKE ACTION I’m organising a litter pick-up where I live. Getting involved is empowering

SHOP Organic is best for you and best for the environment. I’m giving my shopping budget to FarmDrop

PHOTOS: REX FEATURES

orking on our first sustainable issue has been both terrifying and edifying, depressing and enlightening. It is no longer acceptable for sustainability to be the zeitgeist, a bandwagon to be jumped on and off of, it has to underpin everything we do. Whether you believe that we will run short of water within 25 years or have only 100 harvests left because our top soil is eroded, what is clear is that our consumer habits need to change. The overwhelming message throughout this issue though, whether it’s talking to eco leader, Livia Firth, food waste campaigner Tristram Stuart, human rights advocate Bianca Jagger or sustainable travel expert, Juliet Kinsman, is that, despite the apocalyptic headlines, there is reason for hope. I know that I agonise when I read what is happening in our world and my lack of control over it, but that’s not going to help anyone or anything. What can help is for all of us to do what we can, when we can and to ask the right questions: do I need it? Where does it come from? How will I get rid of it? Taking individual responsibility for the areas where we can control things is critical for higher level change. That is not to take the joy out of having beautiful things, such as buying a fantastic dress that makes you feel a million dollars, but how many do you need? Is it made from sustainable material? How many years will you wear it? And, goodness, all this can be so difficult to navigate; fake fur does the environment absolutely no good

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Nicole Fuller

CONTRIBUTORS

DOLLY JONES

What are you doing to save the planet this month? Eating less meat and more plants. The most wasteful thing I have ever done was… Probably being a fashion journalist for so many years. Encouraging people to want more, more, more feels awkward. But it got me here. In my recycling bin you will find… The cardboard packaging from my latest Spaza Store buy – fabric dish covers for the fridge. You wait – they will change your life (and make your leftovers so much prettier). Where do you want to save from destruction? My children’s, children’s future, because we still can.

VIVIENNE BALLA

STELLA 01

savoirbeds.com

London

New York

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Paris

Shanghai

Hong Kong

What are you doing to save the planet this month? I will buy an electric scooter instead of a petrol one. The most wasteful thing I have ever done was… Using running water while doing my dishes. In my recycling bin you will find… A different bin for paper, glass and biodegradable waste. I take my waste separation very seriously. Where do you want to save from destruction? Venice is one of the most unique places I have ever visited. I would love to save it, as the city could disappear due to climate change.

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Women’s Collection CARLY | NAVY PEBBLE GRAIN | BY APPOINTMENT TO HRH THE PRINCE OF WALES MANUFACTURER AND SUPPLIER OF FOOTWEAR CROCKETT & JONES LIMITED, NORTHAMPTON

WWW.CROCKETTANDJONES.COM/WOMENS MADE IN NORTHAMPTON, ENGLAND | SINCE 1879

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CONTRIBUTORS

JULIET KINSMAN

What are you doing to save the planet this month? When it comes to the phrase ‘reduce, reuse, recycle’, it’s the first one that matters most: we need to kick our addiction to disposability, convenience and bargains. The most wasteful thing I have ever done was… Buying party favours and single-use decorations for special occasions. We buy so much junk because it’s so cheap and looks fun, but we need to think about where it’s come from, how it was made and where it will end up. In my recycling bin you will find… More glass and metal things than single-use plastic, I’d hope. But it’s so hard when supermarkets package everything in polymers. Where do you want to save from destruction? The planet is essentially one organism so I can’t think about individual places, but rather helping the world as a whole to be mindful of how we need to work together for the benefit of all.

ANASTASIA BERNHARDT

The Finest Tuition With over a century of experience, we have perfected the art of shooting tuition. Book your lesson now with one of our expert instructors. 020 8845 1377 w w w.shoot ingschool.co.u k Shar vel Lane, West End Road Northolt, UB5 6RA

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What are you doing to save the planet this month? I’m planting my garden with veg. Feels good; tastes even better. The most wasteful thing I have ever done was… Marie Kondo’d my house. I fooled myself into thinking that I was doing good by sending everything to the charity shop, but I’m not sure my old tat will raise much money. In my recycling bin you will find… More empty bottles of wine than I would care to admit to. Where do you want to save from destruction? The Amazon. Having spent a few days hiding in a Holiday Inn in Rio Branco (the logging capital of the rainforest), I can tell you that the alternative looks bleak.

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CO U NTRYA N DTOW N H O U S E .CO.U K

EDITOR Lucy Cleland EDITOR-AT-LARGE Alice B-B ASSOCIATE EDITOR Charlotte Metcalf MANAGING EDITOR Anastasia Bernhardt FASHION DIRECTOR Nicole Smallwood BEAUTY DIRECTOR Nathalie Eleni FASHION EDITOR Lucy Bond LUXURY EDITOR Lucia van der Post INTERIORS EDITOR Carole Annett JEWELLERY EDITOR Annabel Davidson RETAIL EDITOR Rosalyn Wikeley PROPERTY EDITOR Anna Tyzack MOTORING EDITOR Jeremy Taylor FEATURES ASSISTANT Clementina Jackson PROPERTY & MARKETING ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR Gemma Cowley DIGITAL MANAGER Adam Dean SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER Felicity Reid JUNIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER Ellie Rix CREATIVE & PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Parm Bhamra JUNIOR PRODUCTION DESIGNER Samuel Thomas ONLINE EDITOR Rebecca Cox DIGITAL ASSISTANT Ellie Smith JUNIOR EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Kerri Stolerman TECHNICAL MANAGER Hannah Johnson TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Mark Pearson DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL STRATEGY Wil Harris ACCOUNTS & CREDIT CONTROLLER Aimi Nicastro SALES & OFFICE MANAGER Daisy Orr-Ewing FINANCE DIRECTOR Jill Newey GROUP PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Tia Graham MANAGING DIRECTOR Jeremy Isaac CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Stephen Bayley, Simon de Burton, Fiona Duncan, Daisy Finer, Lydia Gard, Avril Groom, Richard Hopton, Emma Love, Mary Lussiana, Anna Pasternak, Caroline Phillips, Marcus Scriven THE EDITOR editorial@countryandtownhouse.co.uk FASHION fashion@countryandtownhouse.co.uk ADVERTISING advertising@countryandtownhouse.co.uk PROPERTY ADVERTISING property@countryandtownhouse.co.uk ACCOUNTS accounts@countryandtownhouse.co.uk SUBSCRIPTIONS subscribe@countryandtownhouse.co.uk

Handcrafted lighting, furniture and accessories combining sustainable wood, resin and acrylic.

COUNTRY & TOWN HOUSE is a monthly magazine distributed to AB homes in Barnes, Battersea, Bayswater, Belgravia, Brook Green, Chelsea, Chiswick, Clapham, Coombe, Fulham, Holland Park, Kensington, Knightsbridge, Marylebone, Mayfair, Notting Hill, Pimlico, South Kensington, Wandsworth and Wimbledon, as well as being available from leading country and London estate agents. It is also on sale at selected WHSmith, Waitrose, Marks & Spencer and Sainsbury’s stores and independent newsagents nationwide. It has an estimated readership of 150,000. It is available on subscription in the UK for £29.99 per annum. To subscribe online, iPad, iPhone and android all for only £24.99 visit: exacteditions.com/read/countrytownhouse. For subscription enquiries, please call 020 7384 9011 or email subscribe@countryandtownhouse.co.uk. It is published by Country & Town House Ltd, Studio 2, Chelsea Gate Studios, 115 Harwood Road, London SW6 4QL (tel: 020 7384 9011). Registered number 576850 England and Wales. Printed in the UK by William Gibbons and Sons Ltd, West Midlands. Paper supplied by Gerald Judd. Distribution by Letterbox. Copyright © 2019 Country & Town House Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Materials are accepted on the understanding that no liability is incurred for safe custody. The publisher cannot be responsible for unsolicited material. All prices are correct at the time of going to press but are subject to change. Whilst every care is taken to ensure information is correct at time of going to press, it is subject to change, and C&TH Ltd. takes no responsibility for omissions or errors.

T: 0203 384 9633 • www.ilukalondon.com Country & Town House is a member of CPRE (Campaign to Protect Rural England)

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CHANGING THE GAME SINCE 1962

2018 Africa's Leading Luxury Tour Operator

Geoffrey Kent founded A&K in Kenya more than 55 years ago with little more than a refrigerated truck and the best tents money could buy. Back then, the company went by the motto ‘off-the-beaten-track safaris’. A lot has changed in the intervening years, but we still love to devise tailor-made luxury holidays and unparalleled escorted tours, all of which protect and preserve the places our clients travel to… such as our birthplace – Africa.

0207 173 6440 abercrombiekent.co.uk

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COLUMN

WHAT YOU WEARING? Pineapple leaves by hm.com

HOME FOR A HEDGEHOG And hoglets. By Berk at amazon.co.uk

THE GOOD LIFE

THIS MONTH I’LL BE

1

Washing up with Tincture’s chemical free cleaning products. tincturelondon. com

2

Supporting food equality activist Sarah Collins and the Wonderbag; her life-saving, health-enriching, non-electric slow cooker. wonderbagworld. com

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Dreaming of a minimal emissions holiday in Sweden. neste.com

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I

DIP IN New swimmers, old nets. solidandstriped.eu

SASSY SALVAGE Reclaiming Style by Maria Speake and Adam Hills, £19.99 (Ryland Peters & Small)

RAINBOW CLEANSE Vegan and cruelty-free skincare. nazanschnapp.com

PHOTOS: RECLAIMING STYLE BY MARIA SPEAKE & ADAM HILLS, WORDS BY HETTIE JUDAH AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY DEBI TRELOAR, COURTESY OF RYLAND PETERS & SMALL. ALICE PORTRAIT: JANE MCLEISH-KELSEY

rise dramatically. In no other protein production would this be acceptable, but because it’s under the waves, the truth is out of sight. Elvar explains that the best option is to buy landfarmed or closed-pen. Or try Arctic char or trout. Salmon may seem to be the healthy choice, but for Iceland’s pristine environment it’s poison. ‘SUSTAINABLE’ IS NO LONGER A EUPHEMISM FOR ‘HIDEOUS’. There was a time when ‘eco’ clothing companies did themselves no favours. But fashion brands have wised up. Solid & Striped’s Sustainability Capsule includes chic swimwear made from recycled fishing nets, reducing its carbon footprint by 80 per cent. T-shirts and hoodies at The Pangaia are made from seaweed, organic cotton and a dash of peppermint oil. While over at H&M, materials for its Alice B-B goes fishing Conscious Exclusive for answers collection include pineapple leaf fibres, flexible foam from algae biomass ’LL HAVE THE SALMON. It’s and orange peel by-product from the healthy option, right? But a juicing. Design and technology meeting in Reykjavik with Elvar working in wondrous ways. Fridriksson from the North Atlantic BEST OF ALL IS VINTAGE. Salmon Fund (northatlanticsalmonfund. That’s where I’m headed for org) highlighted my ignorance. The a seasonal urge to redecorate wild salmon population in Iceland is at The Magic Cottage in the thought to be less than 50,000. These Cotswolds. We’ve log-cabin-panelled fish will be further affected if the proposed expansion of open-net ocean most of the interior, but the rooms without cladding feel cold and salmon farming by Norwegian fishing bare. So the sitting room is up companies takes place. Part of the salmon’s magical lifecycle next. Rather than use new boards, I’m inspired by the clever folk at is when they hit freshwater, any sea lice reclamation and design company they may have picked up will die. But Retrouvius in Kensal Green, who use open-net farming in the sea means the materials including old industrial fish never have this chance. Some are cheese boards. And for the garden so riddled with lice, they’re eaten alive. I’ve got my eye on a cosy hedgehog Last year 53 million salmon died in house. In the 1950s, 30 million of the pens. And when the nets invariably these prickly creatures tear, the salmon (genetically modified towards human consumption) still have were snuffling about. Now there are fewer than one the urge to make it up stream, only to infect the wild population with lice and million. I’m hoping Mrs Tiggywinkle might find this viruses. The waste beneath the ocean cabin a cosy place to bring pens, (ie. faeces, chemicals, excess feed up her gang of hoglets. n and dead fish) has seen the sea-bed

LU XU RY & N ECESSIT Y

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INTERVIEW An eco item that you couldn’t live without? A Food Waste Caddy (below).

THE RURBANIST

Ben Elliot, co-founder of Quintessentially, has just been named the government’s food surplus and waste champion

What are your ‘sustainability’ rituals at home? We have become much better at meal planning, which not only helps avoid unnecessary waste but also makes mealtimes less chaotic, particularly with young children. At home, in the country, we grow a lot of what we eat, which is sustainable but also very satisfying. Having read about the alarmingly large carbon footprints of household pets, we try to feed our dogs leftovers to keep the balance. I ride a bicycle a lot as well. We aren’t perfect but we try our best. Any ideas are always welcome.

It’s my ambition that every household has one so that we can all measure and visualise how much food is being thrown away per week. Thirty per cent of food is wasted globally, contributing to seven per cent of total global greenhouse gas emissions. If food waste were a country, it would come in third place after the United States and China in terms of the impact on global warming – we have to stop this. Most valuable piece of advice you have ever received? From my mother,

which is: ‘Work hard and be nice to people’. What brings out the worst in you?

Rampant consumerism and the cheapness of products making us think that we can just throw things away. Whether that be fashion or food, the environmental consequences are stark – we are betraying future generations. What are Saturday afternoons made for? Falling asleep, playing

sport and going for a walk with our children and dogs. What would really improve your life?

What is the last book you read that inspired you? I am currently reading Andrew Roberts’ book on Churchill. It says clearly to me that if you believe in something, even if everyone else thinks you’re a fool, you must follow your conviction.

Best thing a cabbie has ever said to you? ‘I think you’re in there, mate!’ Mayor for the day... I would

undertake a huge tree-planting initiative, similar to the one that my great friend and leading environmentalist, Zac Goldsmith, proposed in his election campaign. I would have loved him to have been Mayor of London. Secret shop? I really like LASSCO. My mother, Annabel Elliot, is a brilliant interior designer, and she also helps us to source lovely pieces of furniture. What item do you wear the most?

Where do you go to ‘lose’ yourself? India – the most beautiful place. I have visited once or twice every year since I was 18 (I am now 43). I was inspired by my late uncle, the conservationist Mark Shand, who rode across India on his elephant in the 1980s. He then set up the Elephant Family to protect the Asian elephant.

A 1970s Rolex that belonged to my late grandfather, Major Bruce Shand. I also inherited all of his suits, which still look good 70 years on.

Where should the UK take notice of? According to research by the

Danish Agriculture and Food Council, Denmark reduced its food waste by an estimated 25 per cent between 2013 and 2017. The Danish Government and the not-for-profit Stop Wasting Food run fantastic projects to tackle food waste, including doggy bags for restaurants, a great initiative to fight back against throw away culture. Favourite new eco invention?

Winnow, a new technology that helps chefs measure, monitor and drastically reduce food waste. A smart meter is attached to your food waste bin with the subsequent data identifying the key areas for reducing food waste. Genius! n

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

Where’s home to you? West London and the Cotswolds. Spiritually, Dorset is where I am from.

People agreeing with me more! Signature dish? I am a hopeless chef but I would source ingredients from the Felix Project, a wonderful initiative that saves surplus fresh food from suppliers and redistributes it, resulting in over one million meals a year.

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For us, innovation must always serve function. For example, raising our bezel by 2mm has improved the grip. Just a little. When you care about watches, just a little matters a lot.

Aquis Date Relief

ORIS BOUTIQUE LONDON 41 South Molton Street London W1K 5RP

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HANDMADE IN ENGLAND E T T I N G E R .CO.U K +44 (0)20 8877 1616

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STYLE BEAUTY JEWELLERY PA RT I E S

UP FRONT

REEL IT IN Dive in to summer Help clean the world’s oceans with this colourful PAPER London cossie that’s made largely from recycled fishing nets. Bonus points for every piece in the Plage collection protecting against the sun’s rays, too. paperlondon.com

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UP FRONT Mandkhai Sustainable Mongolian cashmere jumper, £850. mandkhai.com

Sonia Rykiel The Market Bag, limited edition upcycled tote made from the canopies of the Allée Sonia Rykiel in Paris, £290. soniarykiel.com

Zarvich Victoria mini dress made from Uruguayan materials in limited quantities as part of a conscious production system, £263. zarvich.com

Alexandra Hakim Ear cuff made from remelted gold and cast from recycled lemon seeds, £250. alexandrahakim.co

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CO U NTRY

Reformation Cynthia jeans made from deadstock, surplus denim fabric, £234. farfetch.com Kalita Atlas day dress, made with natural fabrics and dyed using low-impact AZO-free dyes, £445. net-aporter.com

Bite Studios Cotton dress upcycled from an old longline vest as part of YOOX’s exclusive Next Green Talents capsule, £598. yoox.com

S T Y L E

Mother of Pearl Cindy shirt made from 100 per cent organic cotton, £250. motherofpearl.co.uk

NATURAL WOMAN

Loeffler Randall Katie sandals made by a cooperative in the Philippines using sustainably harvested rattan wicker, £165. loefflerrandall.com

Fashion that doesn’t cost the earth

Amur Mila skirt made from organic cotton which avoids use of harmful chemicals, pesticides and GM seeds, £477. revolve.com

BAUME Timepiece Moonphase watch with natural linen strap, recycled buttons and 40-month power reserve, £490. baumewatches.com

PALA Eyewear Zuri Rose with recycled acetate frames, £85. palaeyewear.com

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UP FRONT TAKE THREE

PAIRS OF ECO JEANS

SECOND-HAND STYLE

Nothing can justify the 38 million items of new clothing bought each week in the UK, so do the right thing and stock up on pre-loved pieces at #SheInspiresMe Car Boot Sale, where car booters include Alex Eagle, Racil, Noor Fares and Temperley. Ruthlessness is required. All proceeds go to Women for Women International. 11 May. womenforwomen. org.uk

MICRO TREND

HAPPY FEET

F A S H I O N

N E W S

STYLE NOTEBOOK

Put your greenest foot forward, says Clementina Jackson

1 DL1961 Hepburn Amalfi, £216. dl1961.com 2 OUTLAND Harriet, £140. outlanddenim.co.uk 3 BOYISH Charley, £222. boyish-jeans.com

ALLBIRDS Merino wool trainers with recycled bottle laces, £95. allbirds.co.uk

ADIDAS X PARLEY Primeknit trainers made with recycled ocean plastic waste yarn, £104. adidas.co.uk

YATAY Neven shoes handmade in Italy with eco-friendly materials (and a tree planted for every pair sold), £220. yatayatay.com

HAUTE HYDRATION

Accessory of the season? The reusable water bottle, obvs. Single use plastic is on the out and every fashionista with an eco-conscience is sipping from Virgil Abloh’s limited edition glass water bottle for Evian, complete with natural bamboo cap. Extra kudos for keeping it on your person at all times in a specially-made designer pouch, à la Balenciaga AW’19. It’s called haute hydration, darling. evian.co.uk

PRACTISE WHAT YOU PREACH

Vivienne Westwood’s shows are always political, but her statements go well beyond the catwalk. The Vivienne Westwood Ethical Fashion Initiative tackles aid dependency and unsustainable business BU Y BET TE R practice, with each SITE Honest luxury that’s organic, re-made, local and fair. reveAfrica bag handmade en-vert.com SHOP A curated selection of ethical fashion in SW9. by independent artisans thekeepboutique.com LIST Sixty essential eco brands, curated in Nairobi using by sustainable style saviours Goose Studios. goosestudios.co.uk recycled local materials. PAYG Rent clothes designed with integrity. higher.studio viviennewestwood.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY WOMEN FOR WOMEN INTERNATIONAL; BALENCIAGA A/W19

CLARKS KIDS X NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC City Geo recycled plastic bottle canvas shoes, £26. clarks.com

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UP FRONT

FAKE COW Matt & Nat’s Orr bucket bag is beautiful inside and out with its 100 per cent recycled nylon lining. £90. mattandnat.com

SU R PLUS SK I NS

Lovia bags are made using leftover materials from the Nordics, including salmon skin from Iceland and elk hides from Finnish forests left over from population control hunting. Clutch, £520. loviacollection.com

CATCH OF THE DAY Reformation’s latest swimwear collection is made with nylon fibre from fishing nets and plastic ocean waste. Riviera one piece, £98. thereformation.com

S H O P P I N G

MORAL FABRIC

Get down with upcycled accessories, says Rosalyn Wikeley

PLASTIC BAGS Palorosa tote bag, hand-woven by Guatemalan artisans using recycled plastic. £109. couvertureand thegarbstore.com

FISH FEET Osklen takes waste Pirarucu fish skins (a culinary favourite in Brazil) and works them into beautiful accessories. Sliders, £250. osklen.com

SHELL OUT Zoe Morton’s textured Beachcomber earrings are made from recycled brass. £115. zmorton. com

HOT STUFF This Elvis & Kresse weekend bag is made from old firehoses. Fifty per cent of profits go to The Fire Fighters Charity. £299. elvisand kresse.com

SOUND SLEEPER Beulah eye masks are made from fabric scraps with ten per cent of profits going towards ending modernday slavery. £65. beulahlondon.com

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Vestiaire Collective is a treasure trove for label lovers

T R E N D

SLOW FASHION

Curb your consumerism, says Rosalyn Wikeley

F

ast fashion is destroying our planet, polluting our oceans and generating 1.2 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases a year (more than all international flights). Slowing down is the antidote. With the rise of the rental model and a resurgence in vintage and pre-loved fashion, re-programming our shopping habits has never looked – or felt – so good.

HIRE SOCIETY

Rental fashion reduces waste, improves the lifespan of clothing and lessens custodians’ fabric footprint with a more circular economy. Just steer clear of the red wine… WEAR THE WALK Founded in 2017 by Zoe Partridge, Wear the Walk is a rental platform enabling women to access emerging designers that have sustainability at their core, from the materials to the manufacturers used. Best for: Cool, next gen brands from only £99 per month. wearthewalk.co.uk FRONT ROW Shika Bodani launched Front Row, London’s first luxury designer rental service in 2016, viewing the fashion influencer culture as key to peddling the sartorial shift to rotating wardrobes. Best for: Fresh-off-the-runway with a second-to-none styling service. frontrow.uk.com GIRL MEETS DRESS Europe’s leading fashion rental site is on a mission to build a ‘wardrobe in the cloud’. Best for: Shipping and returns are on the house for any UK deliveries. girlmeetsdress.com

A GOOD VINTAGE Vintage YSL at Vestiaire Collective

The pre-loved fashion industry has shrugged off its moth-eaten image and ushered in a more refined and sustainable identity. Second hand doesn’t mean second best. VESTIAIRE COLLECTIVE This Parisian powerhouse defied the naysayers when it launched in 2009 and brought vintage and pre-loved into the tech sphere, with rigorous garment quality checks. Best for: A Chanel coat or Zimmerman dress for under £500 is no longer a fantasy. vestiairecollective.com

Rent statement pieces from Wear the Walk's library of luxury clothing

Clemmie Myers sources vintage gems for Lime Green Bow

Shop vintage Chanel at Farfetch

LIME GREEN BOW Lime Green Bow's Clemmie Myers has observed a move away from digital and an increasing desire to interact with clothing. Best for: Personalities, stories and touch... forgotten amulets of the fashion industry. limegreenbow.co.uk FARFETCH VINTAGE AREA The E-commerce platform has launched a vintage microsite that showcases swag from vintage shops around the world. If your knees buckle at the sight of 1970s tinted sunglasses, Farfetch Vintage is the one. Best for: The website curation is polished to say the least. farfetch.com

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UP FRONT

V IN TAGE F IN DS

M Y

S T Y L E

ALEX EAGLE

Invest in made-to-measure to avoid the landfill, says Alex Eagle How can we shop more sustainably? Less is more. Really

think about what you need and only buy things you know you will get a lot of wear out of. Save up for key pieces – in terms of buy per wear, they will end up as a much better investment. Style hero The actress Charlotte Rampling (below) combines French and English timeless style impeccably. The French stick to a look and aren’t erratic shoppers; I love their uniform of lace shirts, pencil skirts and jeans with boots and a blazer.

with a cashmere jumper from The Row or an Alex Eagle jumpsuit in chocolate brown. And, of course, my Barbour, which I have had for many years. Finishing touches Portrait of a Lady perfume by Frederic Malle, Alex Eagle sunnies and my ’90s Birkin. And on my feet, Le Monde Beryl velvet slippers or a pair of classic Vejas. Labels leading the sustainability charge Stella

McCartney, but I truly believe the most

I recently found some amazing Prada lip print skirts from ReSee that I adore and are totally iconic. Dukes Cupboard in Soho is a treasure trove of amazing streetwear classics.

effective way to support sustainability is by investing in made-tomeasure services – creating life-long pieces that fit you perfectly. Best shops for buying vintage Rellik in West

London and ReSee in Paris. Online, try Vestiaire Collective or Jerome Vintage. Upcycle me Take your old classics to Hand & Lock to get your initials embroidered to freshen them up. Shorten hems or give them a good dry clean for a new lease of life.

What materials should we be looking for? We use

Loro Piana fabric for our own brand 1 Celine tortoiseshell sunglasses, £288. harveynichols.com 2 Loewe Gate bucket bag, as it is made beautifully and lasts for £875. net-a-porter.com 3 Cartier Juste un Clou bracelet in 18k yellow gold, £5,850 cartier.com 4 Prada lipstick print trousers, ¤280 resee.com 5 Prada S/S 2000 lip print years. Always look out for ‘ethically scarf, ¤180. resee.com. 6 Prada lip print skirt, ¤450, resee.com. 7 Barbour Liberty sourced’ on the labels and go for London Evelyn jacket, £139. barbour.com 8 The Row Janillen cashmere jumper, £1,300. net-a-porter.com 9 Frederic Malle Portrait of a Lady EDP, £160. selfridges.com natural fabrics. 10 Le Monde Beryl Venetian slippers, £275. matchesfashion.com 11 New & Lingwood x Alex Eagle pyjama set, £175. alexeagle.co.uk 12 Alex Eagle Bespoke blazer, from Lounge lizard New & £2,300. By appointment only at Alex Eagle Studio, London. alexeagle.co.uk Lingwood x Alex Eagle cotton PJs. ST Y L E CH E AT S Country walk I have A trip to the NARS counter at Liberty London for a quick makea Holland & Holland up spruce always makes my look feel fresher. Failing that, men’s coat that I a big tailored coat or jacket slung over your shoulders will live in in the make your silhouette look more sophisticated. country along

PHOTOS: REX FEATURES; OLIVIER YOAN; GENEVIEVE LUTKIN

Everyday uniform A white shirt or tee, a cashmere roll neck with jeans or cigarette pants, topped with a blazer or great coat. I have a 1970s Cartier Nail bracelet that I love and a Cartier Reworked MAD from Alex Eagle Studio. Sophie Keegan made me a charm bracelet which I live in, as well as my Irene Danilovich name bracelets. A pair of Celine sunnies and a handbag from The Row or Loewe.

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UP FRONT It can take up to nine years to grow a single chair

L U X U R Y

LUCIA LOVES

STYLE SHORTCUT There’s something about a dress that so simplifies the matter of dressing and, if chosen well, should flatter and charm. For those wanting something that is just, as they say, ‘a little bit different’ look no further than Eponine. I came upon her years ago when a Kensington hairdresser told me every time she admired a dress on one of her customers it turned out to be by Eponine. Since then she has been discovered by the Duchess of Cambridge and what was once a well-kept secret is now well and truly out. eponinelondon.com

Grow your own, says Lucia van der Post

At Full Grown, furniture actually grows on trees

S Gavin Munro

tarted by a maverick designer with a deep love of nature, Full Grown is, as far as I know, a complete one-off – its speciality is growing chairs. As its founder, Gavin Munro, puts it: ‘We’re not your average design studio’. Munro is pioneering a new form of manufacturing, which he calls bio-facturing – that is to say he harnesses Mother Nature herself to help shape growing trees into chairs, tables, lamps and sculpture. This is not a process for the ‘I want it and I want it NOW’ generation – it has taken Munro over ten years of experimenting to get it to work and, even now, it takes anywhere between six and nine years to grow a chair.

LIFE’S LIT TLE LU XURIES

The notion behind it is to work with nature to make a chair or a table that is all of a single piece. Nothing is destroyed. Firstly there is no waste, secondly there is the emotional connection with a living tree – which many of its fans are deeply moved by – and finally, each and every piece is utterly individual. ‘Sometimes,’ says Munro, ‘we start growing a chair and it ends up as a table. We like to go with nature.’ He has a 2.5-acre field in Derbyshire, where he and his team are tending some 400 trees. So far he has produced a few lampshades and a batch of nine chairs, some of which, as I write, are on their way to the Biennale in Saint-Étienne, France. Munro thinks he will only be able to produce a maximum of 30 pieces a year. Those who want to acquire one have to pre-order on the website. Currently the waiting time is about ten years. As to the chairs themselves, it has to be said that they are strangely beautiful, slightly twisted and utterly organic, quite unlike anything. Chairs, from £10,000. fullgrown.co.uk n

IN A JAM The best marmalade, it goes without saying, is home-made. I haven’t yet come across a commercial version that beats my son’s annual batch. Since we only get one pot a year, however, I am obliged to turn to a steadier source and very happy to report that Rosebud Preserves’ coarse-cut Seville Orange Marmalade is addictive. There are several other versions too – with gin, ginger, lemons and grapefruit. Well worth trying. £3.40 a pot. rosebud preserves.co.uk

GINGHAM GIRLS Swimsuit time is looming and Polish/ American designer Maria Dobrzanska Reeves has some beguiling designs to tempt us. For this summer her Marysia swim brand is purveying a cool American vibe – all crisp ginghams and lots of red, white and blue with playful details such as patchwork, artificial flowers, ruffles and French knots. net-a-porter.com

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PROMOTION

The Nautilus collection

LEFT: Panthera earrings RIGHT: Panthera pendant

NATURE KNOWS BEST

Tuscan designer, Giovanni Raspini

Giovanni Raspini realises natural forms with wax casting techniques

I

talian designer Giovanni Raspini is the name to know for silverware and jewellery. Handmade in Tuscany, close to Arezzo, Giovanni Raspini has half a century’s experience in the industry. His collections take inspiration from nature, such as the wild creatures that informed the Animalier collection. Collections are sketched, modelled, created and packaged exclusively in house – ‘handmade with care and infinite passion’. The team begins by sketching a design before modelling the piece with an ancient wax casting technique. It is then either buffed, burnished in silver, or embedded with jewellery stones. For S/S’19, Raspini unveils four new collections – Nautilus, Panthera, Paillettes and Mini Bowl – which take forms found in the animal kingdom and beneath the sea, two of his favourite subjects. The Nautilus collection takes its spiraling shapes from coral, shells and anemones, realised in iridescent blue opals and rock crystal. He achieves high levels of detail in silver by using wax micro-sculptures to create the pieces. Pack the full set to dress up a kaftan on holiday. For Panthera, Raspini takes his iconic big cat motif, buffs it to a high

shine in silver and adds a hand-hammered tubular element, creating a striking contrast to elevate a classic design. The result? A collection as powerful as the animal that lends its image. For pieces with a sense of movement, there is the Paillettes collection, which gets its sense of lightness by piecing together lots of little lenticular elements. If you’re looking for something to throw on with a pair of jeans, try the Mini Bowl collection. The pieces are made of small hammered silver balls, available in eight different types. Visit the South Molton Street store for the full Italian job. Giovanni Raspini specialises in jewellery, sculptures and homeware, with boutiques in Monaco, Moscow, Rome, Milan, Venice, Florence, Verona and Naples. ABOVE: Paillettes ring LEFT: Nautilus necklace

5 South Molton Street, Mayfair, London W1; 020 7629 1401. giovanniraspini.com

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UP FRONT

ROCK IT RESPONSIBLY

The Lesedi La Rona diamond in its rough form

WHO’S THE DADDY?

Knowing which mine a diamond came from is one thing, but knowing which rough rock it started out as is another entirely. The enormous 1,109 carat Lesedi La Rona rough diamond, found in Botswana, is yet to yield its ‘principal’ stone (although it should do any day now), but there are over 60 ‘satellite’ stones being turned into jewellery. Each will be inscribed with ‘Graff’, ‘Lesedi La Rona’ and a unique GIA number, making its paternity indisputable. graff.com

THIRD TIME’S THE CHARM Guya Merkle is a force to be reckoned with – you read it here first. The third-generation jewellery founder has transformed her grandfather’s 80-year-old company into a socially and environmentally responsible business, named Vieri, that focuses on not just recycling gold but helping gold mining communities reinvent themselves. vieri.com

J E W E L L E R Y

THE GOLD DIGGER

Sparkling examples of sustainability. By Annabel Davidson MINE OF INFORMATION

An example of a fully traceable Tiffany & Co diamond

Tiffany & Co comes up tops when it comes to its ethical credentials, and its latest initiative only serves to rank them even higher. Understanding that provenance is everything, all newly mined diamonds that are individually registered will have their origins cited – and not just for those customers who care enough to ask the question. In an industry where consumer ignorance does not equal ecological or ethical bliss, Tiffany & Co hopes that the source of origin for diamonds will become standard, on-the-label information. tiffany.co.uk

THREE OF THE BEST

Lab-grown diamonds as favoured by The Duchess of Sussex. Kimaï Twist earring, £275. kimai.co.uk

MAN-MADE JEWELS Swarovski is one of the forerunners in the created gemstones category. Atelier Swarovski by Paige Novick, mismatched arc-enciel earrings, £1,590. atelierswarovski.com

NORSE CODE Icelandic jewellery brand Aurum has sustainability at its heart; even its packaging is created from Mulberry paper. The new Ran collection, named for the Norse Sea Goddess, sees recycled sterling silver pieces plated in yellow gold, in a pleasingly flat, slightly moltenlooking array of earrings, rings, and necklaces. aurum.is

Diamond Foundry makes lab-grown stones ‘cool’. This ring from the Shahla Karimi x Diamond Foundry capsule collection is a prime example, starting at £5,200. diamondfoundry.com

COMING FULL CIRCLE From whence it came, Sarah Ho’s Full Circle Project sees a collection of jewellery that gives back to the communities and environments that spawned the main gemstones and pearls in each piece. From Madagascar to the Arabian Gulf, the planting of trees and cleaning of bay water will be just some of the steps taken to give back. shojewellery.com

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UP FRONT

B E A U T Y

COVER GIRL

Prep your skin with probiotics for a cover girl glow, says Nathalie Eleni

F

resh skin is always in. Get cover girl Nelida’s look by creating a smooth and glossy complexion and maxing out your glow. To prep her skin, we used Esse Probiotic Skincare, the world’s first live probiotic skincare brand. Both organic and vegan, it actively shapes the skin’s ecosystem as it contains one billion live probiotic microbes per millilitre to boost the skin’s microbiome for maximum anti-ageing and skin health.

TEAM Make-up: Nathalie Eleni Hair: Jason Crozier Stylist: Nicole Smallwood Photo: Vivienne Balla

GET THE LOOK

1

Spritz Esse Toner Plus onto your skin to give it a burst of hydration and moisture. Pat into your skin using rain-like tapping movements with your fingertips to encourage a circulation boost for a natural rosy glow. £49. esseskincare.co.uk

2

Apply Esse Intensity Serum to your skin, massaging in an upward motion for instant skin smoothing. Contains Mafane extract which has the effect of relaxing muscles

in a similar way to Botox. £115. esseskincare.co.uk

3

Keep skin coverage to a minimum. Use a creamy concealer or retouching fluid, such as Hourglass Veil, to perfect any areas of discolouration or redness. £31. spacenk.com

4

For glossy, hydrated lips, with a sheer berry stain, apply Burt’s Bees Lip Oil in Misted Plum. £9.99. lookfantastic.com

5

Apply Davines Silkening Oil Mist to damp hair to treat and restore shine. Suits all hair types and textures from fine to coarse. £25.50. libertylondon.com

6

Spray Davines Definition Mist on dry hair for natural texture and a light hold for ‘undone’ hair while eliminating frizz. Once you use this you won’t know how you survived without it! £23.50. libertylondon.com

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Make it personal.

The Hydrator

The Moisturiser

Your skin’s needs are unique and always changing. The world-renowned beauty trailblazer, Dr Jean-Louis Sebagh pioneered the concept of mixing different, powerful serums to create a personalised daily ritual that perfectly meets your skin’s needs. Potent and award-winning, Dr Sebagh’s iconic serums—including the trio of super-serums featured here—can all be used alone or combined, for agelessly radiant results. Moisturising is essential to restore the skin barrier, protect against environmental aggressors, seal in hydration and keep skin plump. Deeply moisturise and soothe your skin using Rose de Vie Serum, with antioxidant and nourishing rosehip oil, blended with the hydrating, hyaluronic acid-rich Serum Repair, which instantly leaves skin looking and feeling plumped, firmer and tighter.

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The Firmer

The Brightener

The luxurious Platinum Gold Elixir can also be added to your serum mix, for an extra intensive firming, tightening and lifting effect. The blend of 13 active bio-tech ingredients includes two original peptides to help boost collagen synthesis and light-reflecting golden pigments. It can also be used on its own as a four week treatment. Power-up your serum blend even more with a little Pure Vitamin C Powder Cream. This patented, highly concentrated and stabilised powder–to–cream formula can be mixed with any serum to brighten the skin, prevent pigmentation and bring back its glow. Available in-store and at drsebagh.com

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SK IN SAV IOU R S Natural beauty solutions that will save your skin

Skin Food A nourishing treatment for the whole body by Weleda. Full of natural actives. £12.50 for 75ml. lookfantastic.com

Organic Facial Oil This facial oil by plant-based skincare brand By Sarah London is full of heavenly natural ingredients. £32 for 30ml. bysarahlondon.com

R E V I E W

BEAUTY TEST

I

’ve heard many incredible things from fellow beauty insiders about the miracles performed by Dr John Tsagaris. A few had fallen pregnant after a couple of visits, following years of trying; others had found skin allergies and blemishes magically cleared up. Another said that she now sleeps better than ever. So much more than just a facial, a treatment with Dr Tsagaris is a health journey. It just also happens to lead to a glowing complexion – the perfect kind of TLC if you ask me. Dr Tsagaris has over 20 years’ experience in traditional Chinese medicine and human bioscience and is a pioneer in cosmetic acupuncture. I was unsure of what to expect when I visited him at his recently launched treatment room in Harrods’ Wellness Clinic for the exclusive signature beauty cosmetic acupuncture treatment. After a thorough consultation, my skin was prepared with the SkinPointEight (his skincare brand) cleansing ritual, gentle exfoliation, skin refining scraping and followed by the bespoke

SkinPointEight mask for advanced soothing and deep hydration. A combination of facial acupressure, shiatsu and a silver derma-roller Chinese tool (with no needles) alleviates muscular tension, activates facial energy channels and reduces fluid retention, allowing the nourishing actives of the mask to penetrate deeper into the skin. The energy lines on my hands and feet were energetically massaged with a green jade Gua Sha (stone scraper) and essential oils, before Dr Tsagaris performed his signature beauty acupuncture on my face and body (with painless insertion) followed by facial cupping, LED therapy and lymphatic drainage. I was given a selection of supplements to take between my treatments to prolong the results. I felt and looked years younger – with restored energy and a plump, glowing complexion. Now that I know what all the fuss is about, I’ve booked in for another appointment. Harrods offers 50 minutes with Dr Tsagaris for £450. johntsagariswellnessharrods.co.uk n

Aloe Vera Micellar Cleansing Water Dr. Organic’s smart cleanser uses the active power of micelles to gently remove makeup, absorb impurities and improve skin tone. £5.99. hollandandbarrett.com

Clean Screen Mineral SPF30 This mattifying face sun screen by REN protects skin with non-nano naturally derived zinc oxide. £30. renskincare.com

Purifying Facial Cleansing Duo Urban Veda’s cleanser has antibacterial extracts to detoxify congested skin. £22.99. hollandandbarrett.com

PHOTO: VISIBLEBYHANNAH.COM; GETTY IMAGES

Nathalie Eleni allows Dr John Tsagaris to turn her face into a pin cushion

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UP FRONT

HEALTH HOT LIST

W E L L N E S S

BODY & SOUL

Soup to put a spring in your step. By Camilla Hewitt LEAGUE OF HER OWN

Lilly Richardson, founder of sustainable sportswear brand, League Collective, tells us about her efforts to live sustainably Use natural products, from toothpaste to shampoo, skincare and even applicators, like bamboo toothbrushes, washable dishcloths and sustainable clothing. League Collective garments are made from 100 per cent recycled fabric in the heart of London. I cycle everywhere I can in London. As well as running League Collective, I teach yoga full time, so whether I’m racing to a class or a meeting, I bike whenever possible. It gives you so much freedom and you arrive energised and always on time. Do less washing. It saves time, water, energy and makes you ask yourself, ‘does this really need washing just yet?’. leaguecollective.co.uk

Clean Reserve A collection of eco-friendly fragrances created using responsibly sourced ingredients and manufactured using solar power. cleanbeauty.com Walk-in Backrub Six shops in central London providing no appointment chair massage and full body shiatsu massage. walkinbackrub.co.uk

1

2 3

E SC APE TH E O FFIC E

Cloud Twelve, Notting Hill Committed to creating an environmentally responsible concept, this lifestyle club is home to a family space, luxury spa and salon, a nutritionally focused and plant-based brasserie and a wellness clinic. The wellness clinic offers both traditional and scientifically driven therapies including nutrition, herbal medicine, osteopathy, acupuncture, IV infusions, colonic irrigation and cryotherapy. cloudtwelve.co.uk

SPR ING GR EEN MIN EST RON E A RECIPE FOR WELLNESS

INGR EDIENTS » 2 tbsp olive oil » 225g spinach, washed » 225g rocket, washed » 1 onion, diced » 2 celery sticks, diced » 2 courgettes, diced » 2 leeks, trimmed, washed and diced » 180g green beans, trimmed and diced » 1.2 litres chicken bone broth or good-quality vegetable stock » Bouquet garni » 100g peas » 100g broad beans, tough skins removed » Juice of ½ lemon » Salt and pepper TO SERVE » Regular shopbought or homemade pesto

METHOD Heat the oil in a pan and wilt the spinach and rocket. Remove from the pan, cool and roughly chop. Add the onion and celery to the same pan and cook for ten minutes until softened, then add the courgettes, leeks and beans and sauté for five minutes. Pour in the stock and add the bouquet garni, bring to a simmer and cook for five minutes, then add the peas and broad beans. Add the wilted spinach and rocket with the lemon juice and check for seasoning. Serve with a spoonful of pesto on top of each serving. Recipe from Nurture: Notes and Recipes from Daylesford Farm by Carole Bamford, £35. daylesford.com

Kiss the Ground Josh Tickell’s book on how what we eat can have a real impact on health and planet. kissthegroundbook.com The Positive Planner A mindful journal to help alleviate stress and anxiety through daily gratitude, mood tracking and reflections. thepositive planner.co.uk

Davines Committed to improving the world as well as your hair with a wealth of sustainability projects. davines.com

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UP FRONT

Plastic straws to...

GLASS STRAWS Plastic bottles to...

REUSABLE BOTTLE

Disposable razor to...

BAMBOO RAZOR

HIP water bottle, Cloud 650ml, £14.95. harveynichols.com

Bulldog original bamboo razor, £8. bulldogskincare.com

E C O

Disposable makeup wipes to...

REUSABLE CLEANSING CLOTH Neom Organics 100 per cent cotton cleansing cloth twin pack, £9. neomorganics.com

Dior Toile de Jouy straws, £120 for six. dior.com

S T Y L E

SWAP SHOP

Cling film to...

REUSABLE NATURAL FOOD WRAPS Bee’s Wrap three wrap set, £15.50. thewisehouse.co.uk

Lip balm plastic tube to...

LIP BALM TIN

Shampoo to...

Burt’s Bees beeswax lip balm tin, £3.69. johnlewis.com

By 2050 there will be more plastic in the sea than fish, so start buying responsibly, says Kerri Stolerman

SHAMPOO BAR Lush Seanik shampoo bar, £7.50. uk.lush.com

Plastic toothbrush to... Disposable tampons to...

ORGANIC COTTON TAMPONS One box of 16 regular applicator tampons, £6.80. ohne.co

RECYCLABLE ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSH HEADS Oral-B electric toothbrush replacement heads with charcoal fibre bristles, £9.99. livecoco.com

Toothpaste to...

TOOTHPOWDER Georganics spearmint natural toothpowder, £6.90. georganics.co.uk

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at

CHELSEA HARBOUR, GROUND FLOOR, DESIGN CENTRE EAST • 020 7352 9518 WWW.NINAC AMPBELL.COM

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UP FRONT SUSTAINABLE FEAT

Ancient Greek Sandals score high points on the sustainability front, as well as recreating stylish, classic designs fit for the ancient gods. Each pair is handcrafted using vegetable tanned leathers and recycled PVC, and production is all carried out in Greece, supporting the local economy with very little environmental impact. From £105. matchesfashion.com

FACING THE FUTURE

Oris’ campaign to clean up the oceans continues with the launch of two watches – the Clean Ocean Limited Edition, developed in partnership with Pacific Garbage Screening, and the Great Barrier Reef Limited Edition III, created with the Reef Restoration Foundation. The brand has also adopted the UN’s 17 sustainable development goals. Clean Ocean Limited Edition, £1,800. oris.ch

M E N ’ S

S T Y L E

WELL GROOMED Conscious carry-ons and green feet. By Matt Thomas

WAXING LYRICAL

LONG HAUL

HUGS FOR THE PLANET

Absolutely Bear wants to give the world a big bear hug and is conscious to the hilt: no chemical fertilisers, pesticides or defoliants are used in its organic cottons and they use facilities powered by green renewable energy. Arlington Breton style jumper, £70. absolutelybear.com

MOVING MOUNTAINS

John Lewis has introduced a number of exciting new independent menswear brands including Wax London, which has a local outlook when it comes to manufacturing. The exclusive Navarino mac is a prime example – made in East London and waxed in Dundee. Navarino Jacket 2.0, £199. johnlewis.com

The S’Cure ECO collection takes Samsonite's sustainable philosophy one step further. Each piece is made out of at least 85 per cent recycled polypropylene (from the brand’s own production process) and features recycled wood waste elements. Carry-ons, from £175. samsonite.co.uk

Outdoor clothing specialist Patagonia has been committed to giving at least one per cent of sales to grassroots environmental organisations worldwide since 1985, raising over $89m to date. Patagonia long-sleeve Sol Patrol II shirt, £74.99. farlows.co.uk

THOUGHTFUL CREATIONS

Originally Australian and now based in London, Thought presents an easy-wear and fun range of casual men’s clothing developed from sustainable materials including bamboo, hemp and super-soft organic cottons. Franklyn organic cotton chinos, £49.90. wearethought.com

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UP FRONT S O C I A L

S C E N E

HIGH SOCIETY People, parties, places

Klein and Hans Ulrich-Obrist Patricia Arquette

Ambra Medda

Paul Price Indre Serpytyte-Roberts From left: Marlene von Carnap, Maria-Theresia Pongracz, Julia Wharton, Katarina Simundic and Yosuzi Sylvester

Alex Eagle

Julius Getty

CHARITY CHIC

Tatum Getty

Lizzie Bowden

When Rosetta Getty and Patricia Arquette call, the cream of the fashion and arts crowd arrives en masse. This time it was in support of their charity, Give Love, which was discussed over figs and burrata, onglet steak and crab salad at Laylow, the Notting Hill members’ club of the moment.

Sheena Mohs and Philippe Tardivel

Yana Peel and Jamie Hawksworth

Grace Wales Bonner

Pierre Keller

Lily Guinness, Jasmine Guinness and guest Adele Mildred, Gabrielle Djanogly, Sascha Lilic and Ellen von Unwerth

Alexander Hankin and Tiffany Zabludowicz Sarah Staton and Tanya Ling Cary Kwok and Gabrielle Djanogly

HATS OFF!

There’s nothing quite like a millinery party: an eccentricsstudded guestlist, plenty of questionable headgear and fashion world originals make for one hell of a bash. Adèle Mildred and Gabrielle Djanogly’s brand, HOOD, launched to high acclaim – and hats off to them for even impressing Stephen Jones!

NEXT BIG THING

Meihui Liu

Grace Woodward

Frances O’Sullivan and Jan de Villeneuve

Hannah Weiland

Jenny Packham and Adele Mildred

Who but the Serpentine could convince top art collectors and philanthropists to open up their private homes for a series of dinner parties in aid of the Emerging Art Fund? Hublot also got involved to toast artist and designer Grace Wales Bonner at her Sackler Gallery exhibition.

PHOTOS: NICHOLAS HARVEY FOR HUBLOT;

Stephen Jones and Jan de Villeneuve

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2 3 M AY — 2 JUNE 2019 READERS THINKERS DREAMERS 01497 822 629 H AY F E S T I VA L . O R G @ H AY F E S T I VA L

Imagine the world

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ART CU LT U R E BOOKS PEOPLE

THE GUIDE

NOT ANOTHER SOCIAL CENSURER

PHOTO: HE WAS ONLY TRYING TO HELP, OLIVER JEFFERS (2017), COURTESY THE ARTIST AND LAZINC

Award-winning artist, illustrator and author Oliver Jeffers’ largest UK solo exhibition ever, Observations on Modern Life, is currently on show at Mayfair’s Lazinc Gallery. Fifty of his characteristically humorous yet political pieces collectively highlight the arbitrary nature of cartography and society’s thirst for spectacle, while Jeffers himself refrains from pointless blame and complaint. Until 15 May. lazinc.com

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THE GUIDE

FESTIVAL

BONES ARE BORING

Keeping their carbon pawprint to a minimum by harvesting food from the locale is a priority for Dogstival, a new boutique festival setting up home in the doggy paradise that is the New Forest. Pylewell Park Estate is the ultimate destination for you and your four-legged friends to learn more about canine psychology on the Dog House behavioural stage and trial agility equipment. Plus, it’s the UK’s first pet fest to have its own dog-friendly beach. 18–19 May. dogstival.co.uk

DON’T MISS FOOD

A Sustainable Lifeline

Dogstival considers its carbon pawprint

The New Forest is barking up the right tree, says Jenny Rowe

Paterson will also produce a digital anthology

PARTICIPATORY ART

TURNING THE TIDE

Katie Paterson’s newest artwork First There is a Mountain is touring UK beaches to highlight the effect of high sea levels. The public are invited to use scalemodel plant starch pails in the shape of Earth’s mountains to build sandcastles, before observing their erosion. Take part in Swansea and Llandudno in May. firstthereisamountain.com

OUTDOOR EXHIBITION

MOVING OUT

A unique collaboration between Houghton Hall in Norfolk and the Henry Moore Foundation will exhibit several monumental outdoor sculptures in the estate’s grounds, smaller models and etchings in the house’s gallery, as well as installations in the state rooms. A fitting environment for Moore’s most celebrated works. 1 May to 29 September. houghtonhall.com

View Vertebrae by Henry Moore at Houghton Hall

ACTIVISM

The Pen Is Mightier The Royal Court Theatre, Shakespeare’s Globe and National Theatre Wales are calling on the creative industries to do their bit to save the planet. Having collected the British public’s letters to the Earth, they have organised a day of joint action. These messages – personal entreaties, dramatic pieces and manifestos for change – will be released and presented by artists, actors and communities at venues across the country to spread the truth about the ecological crisis. 12 April. letterstotheearth.com

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PHOTOS: HISTORIC ROYAL PALACES; HYPHEN-LABS

COUNTRY LIFE

PHOTOS: KATIE PATERSON; THE HENRY MOORE FOUNDATION

E V E N T S

River Cottage originated as a country bolthole for Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall but life in Dorset quickly won him over and he has led a famously uncompromising and self-sufficient life there for 20 years now. This year’s Food Fair is a bumper birthday edition. See the animals, not to mention Yotam Ottolenghi, Kate Humble and Samin Nosrat, who will sink their teeth into some controversial issues over this family-friendly weekend for food lovers. 25–26 May. rivercottage.net


ANNIVERSARY

A ROYAL REBIRTH

Queen Victoria is 200 this May, and Historic Royal Palaces, an independent charity, has spent years collecting, curating and conserving an invaluable legacy of never-seen-before possessions, diaries and even locks of her hair – scrapbooked by her governess. At Kensington Palace, A Royal Childhood and Woman & Crown are two separate exhibitions that question our preconception of Victoria from womb to widow. Opens 24 May. hrp.org.uk

DON’T MISS HORTICULTURE

Flower Power E V E N T S

TOWN LIFE

London Craft Week shines the spotlight on artisan makers

CRAFT

MADE UP

London Craft Week is an Aladdin’s cave of innovation and craft. Celebrated masters such as Floris and Daylesford will get crafty alongside little-known makers, including Felicity Irons – one of England’s last remaining bulrush weavers – who will also launch a new range of sustainable rush tabletop accessories in partnership with British Standard by Plain English. 8–12 May. londoncraftweek.com

EXHIBITION PHOTOS: HISTORIC ROYAL PALACES; HYPHEN-LABS

PHOTOS: KATIE PATERSON; THE HENRY MOORE FOUNDATION

The Queen’s hair and a botanical fair

Two exhibitions celebrating Queen Victoria open this month

MOTHER EARTH

Earth Day season is the fortnightlong highlight of Somerset House’s year-round sustainable agenda. The series of installations and interactive events explore ways to engage with climate change, including Reduce Speed Now!, a series of solar-power LED signs curated by American artist and environmental activist, Justin Brice Guariglia. 16–29 April. somersethouse.org.uk

Hyphen-Labs will present an immersive artwork examining a post-human future

Coinciding with The RHS Chelsea Flower Show, Belgravia in Bloom sees 50 extravagant floral displays popping up in the surrounding areas of Elizabeth Street, Motcomb Street and Pimlico Road. Peggy Porschen and Les Senteurs join the celebrations of this year’s theme, The Language of Flowers, while a variety of eateries shake up themed floral cocktails and Pierre Hermé steadies your hand with macaron motifs. 20–25 May CONCERT

Season of Love Songs from Jesus Christ Superstar, Evita, RENT, We Will Rock You and Wicked are among those to be performed by the cream of West End and Broadway talent at a charity concert in aid of the Charlie Waller Memorial Trust at the Eventim Apollo, Hammersmith. Charlie Waller tragically took his own life while suffering from depression and the concert aims to see past the cheerful façade of musical theatre to the real people and feelings at its heart. 12 May. thebestofmusicals.com

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THE GUIDE FOOD: Bigger than the plate

An image by interdisciplinary architecture studio honey & bunny, from the V&A’s Bigger than the Plate

A R T S

ARTS AGENDA

Ella Doran: Sheep to Seat, Fleece to Floor

Ella Doran spins a grand story from a humble material at YSP

London 2026: Recipes for building a food capital Roca London Gallery, London SW6 An underground farm growing everything from fennel to wasabi has sprouted 100 feet below Clapham High Street, in a former WWII air raid shelter. It’s one of 25 real-life schemes to chew over at Roca London. Other inspiration includes Sweden’s ‘plantscraper’ and a ‘floating farm’ in Rotterdam that will bring cattle into the city. Once fodder for an April Fool caper, but on your table soon. Until 18 May. rocalondongallery.com

Roca London sinks its teeth into the most innovative food schemes

Yorkshire Sculpture Park, West Yorkshire Henry Moore’s outdoor sculptures get a regular polish from sheep that rub their coats against the huge bronzes at YSP. Now ovine artistry has moved into the gallery as textile designer Ella Doran reveals the process needed to transform wool into her creations. Scoured, spun and woven, nothing is wasted in a circular economy. She proves that luxury textiles can be made sustainably. Truly inspiring. 15 June to 15 Sept. ysp.org.uk

ELLA DORAN Textile designer with a summer exhibition at Yorkshire Sculpture Park I was initially commissioned to create a collection for the shop to celebrate 40 years of art without walls. During a residency at the park, the sheep were a big deal for me. I realised I could demonstrate the circular economy in practice through the park. The water used to clean off the wool muck returns to the land and contains a lot of vitamin D. In many ways we’ve lost touch with value and material, so knowing the process brings us down to earth and back to the use of what we have to hand. There are a lot of sayings about wool – for example, ‘Where there’s muck, there’s brass’.

PHOTOS: © DAISUKE AKITA; © PAUL WYATT; © SUSAN SMART PHOTOGRAPHY

Artists who harness the power of raw materials. By Caiti Grove SECON D NAT U R E True innovation is possible when science and the arts intersect. These galleries ask how we can tread the planet more lightly – and have fun while we learn

FIVE MINUTES W ITH...

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PHOTOS:© LAKELAND ARTS TRUST; LESLIE CAROL BERGE. MALES CONES OF ENCEPHALARTOS WOODII, 1999 © THE SHIRLEY SHERWOOD COLLECTION, RBG KEW; RHS GARDEN BRIDGEWATER, DRAWING BY TOM STUART-SMITH; © DAVID JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

Victoria & Albert Museum, SW7 The V&A asks how we relate to the natural world and what we’ll eat in the future. In the gallery’s dark attics, coffee grounds will be used to feed oyster mushrooms, for later re-use in the café, while cheese is to be created from the human bacteria of three celebrities chosen from an Instagram ballot. Seriously. This daring exposition also features the V&A’s early food advertisements, illustrations and ceramics. Back to the future indeed. 18 May to 20 Oct. vam.ac.uk


REVIEW

PHOTOS:© LAKELAND ARTS TRUST; LESLIE CAROL BERGE. MALES CONES OF ENCEPHALARTOS WOODII, 1999 © THE SHIRLEY SHERWOOD COLLECTION, RBG KEW; RHS GARDEN BRIDGEWATER, DRAWING BY TOM STUART-SMITH; © DAVID JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: © DAISUKE AKITA; © PAUL WYATT; © SUSAN SMART PHOTOGRAPHY

RUSKIN, TURNER & THE STORM CLOUD: WATERCOLOURS AND DRAWINGS

York Art Gallery Celebrated Victorian critic John Ruskin had his head in the clouds in the latter years of his life – he’d become obsessed with them: their form, composition and mystery. Biographers quietly ignore this one-track theme from his later life, but York Art Gallery celebrates this phase and links it cleverly to the great man’s first landscape love affair – the stormy works of epic painter JMW Turner. Without Ruskin, the works of arguably Britain’s greatest landscape artist might have been overlooked by posterity. To add a contemporary twist to the show, artist Emma Stibbon’s recent return to the wild mountains of Chamonix, where the glaciers of Mont Blanc had inspired both artists, produces works that reflect the impact of climate change on the melting Alpine scene. Until 23 June. yorkartgallery.org.uk

FIVE OF THE BEST GARDENS CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW Aye, it’s grand. The Welcome to Yorkshire Garden presents the beauty of landscape alongside solid engineering, a canal and lock house, key to Yorkshire’s prosperity. Industrial but bonny – there’s nowt quite like it. 21–25 May. rhs.org.uk

Rocks and Vegetation, Chamonix (1854) by John Ruskin

SPEKE HALL, LIVERPOOL Inspired by fairy stories about bluebells that grow on the forest floor, artist Serena Korda has adorned an oak tree with 300 bells. The Bell Tree chimes with a recording of bell ringing by Garston St Michael’s Church. Magical. nationaltrust.org.uk

The View from My Window, Mornex (1862) by John Ruskin

Netflix’s latest documentary tackles wasteful fashion

REVIEW

THE TRUE COST

Netflix ‘Clothes are our second skin… our personal communication,’ says fashion designer Orsola De Castro in this documentary about the effects of fast, cheap fashion. Factory workers from Dhaka remember the Rana Plaza disaster and Texan farmers question the effect of fertilisers on soil. Where will it end? Organic cotton farmers and sustainable fashion brands offer some solutions. Profit can be made while doing good, it seems – and there are plenty of brands already doing so. Don’t miss environmentalist Livia Firth challenge an H&M spokeswoman about workers’ salaries. Hopefully the future will hold higher standards of quality, fairness and mindful consumption. truecostmovie.com

THE EDEN PROJECT Since being demilitarised, a corridor of nature has sprung up between North and South Korea. Two and a half miles wide and 160 miles long, its swamps and mountains are now populated with wild lilies and forests of oak trees. Some of this wild habitat is to be recreated in Cornwall – while avoiding correspondence with the northern dictatorship. edenproject.com RHS GARDEN BRIDGEWATER, SALFORD In a survey, ten per cent of four to eight-year-olds thought cows were as big as buses and ten per cent said they were as small as cats. Step forth Worsley New Hall’s new 154-acre garden, explaining the origins of food to the North West’s next generation. Yikes. Opens 2020. rhs.org.uk KEW GARDENS Exotica will celebrate beautifullyunfamiliar plants in a series of 30 paintings, many originating from the southern hemisphere tropics. Find them in the hothouse afterwards. 13 April to 27 Oct. kew.org

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THE GUIDE B O O K S

GOOD READS

Richard Hopton reviews four books that reassess the relationship between people and planet HOW TO GIVE UP PLASTIC WILL McCALLUM

The tsunami of plastic smothering our planet’s oceans is an ecological catastrophe, at least as threatening as the menace of global warming. Millions of people watching Sir David Attenborough’s Blue Planet II saw an albatross feed its chicks small pieces of plastic in the mistaken belief that they were food. It was a powerful image of the damage man is inflicting on his environment; the villain of the piece is single-use plastic. It would be easy to dismiss Will McCallum, Greenpeace UK’s Head of Oceans, as an eco-warrior professing extreme views, but it would be a great mistake to do so. The book has a mildly right-on tone but McCallum’s arguments against plastic are entirely reasonable and realistic. We have got ourselves, he argues, into a ridiculous situation: ‘We managed to create a material and use it at unbelievable scale with no plan for how to deal with it afterwards.’ A plastic bottle takes centuries to break down in the wild.

ROOT TO STEM Alex Laird There is real power in plants and expert medical herbalist Alex Laird knows just how to tap into it. This, the author’s latest book, is a hymn to ‘a seasonal and holistic approach to health that puts plants, herbs and nature at the heart of how we live and eat.’ She advocates the benefits of eating ‘whole food’ in its natural state; skin, pith, seeds and all. The benefits of this approach are wide ranging: it improves our diet and it’s good for the planet. The book offers common-sense advice about foraging for wild food, season by season, and ways to prepare it as well as a host of natural remedies for afflictions as varied as air sickness and asthma. Penguin Life, £9.99

THE FORAGED HOME Joanna Maclennan and Oliver Maclennan Architectural foraging takes many forms, from collecting a few seashells to decorate a wall to amassing the wherewithal to build an entire house. The Foraged Home covers the whole spectrum, from beach shack to Georgian townhouse, by way of an upturned boat, an artist’s cabin and a caravan. Foraging constitutes, say the authors, ‘a modest push against consumerism and increasing waste.’ The ecological message aside, much of the pleasure of the book lies in Joanna Maclennan’s inspiring photographs, which bring to life architectural foraging as far afield as north Devon, Cape Cod, Queensland, the Norwegian fjords and rural Bulgaria. Thames & Hudson, £24.95

The statistics are horrifying: in Britain alone we use 35 million plastic bottles a day. That’s 13 billion plastic bottles a year, of which less than half are recycled. A rubbish truck’s worth of plastic enters the oceans every minute. As a result, it’s thought that 90 per cent of seabirds have plastic in their guts. Nor are bottles the only offenders: the plastic in coffee cups, bags, cutlery, nappies, clothes, and microbeads contribute mightily to the clogging of the seas. Plastic endangers wildlife through ingestion and entanglement and the marine ecosystem by contributing to the build-up of toxins in the food chain. This book is a wake-up call and a guide. McCallum is a crusader but never loses sight of the fact that we all, however committed we may be to reducing our use of plastics, have lives to lead. It is this reasonableness, this practicality, which gives the book its force. ‘Every victory against plastic,’ he writes, ‘begins with a single person or small group of people deciding that the time to take action is now.’ Penguin Life, £6.99

STILL WATER John Lewis-Stempel This book celebrates the pond, once an indivisible part of the imagined Victorian rural idyll, along with half-timbered cottages and bewhiskered yokels. There were 800,000 ponds in Victorian England; now there are just 470,000, of which 80 per cent are polluted or in need of maintenance. Lewis-Stempel is a prolific and accomplished nature writer, whose ruminations on the fate of our countryside and its management are trenchantly and beautifully expressed. His investigation of the pond takes him down many a byway, some nostalgic, some amusing but all enlightening. He finds beauty and wonder wherever he looks, even in the humblest leaf. Doubleday, £14.99

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Fanny Blankers-Koen changed the very perception of women in sport

S P O R T S

THE OLYMPIAN

Fanny Blankers-Koen smashed the boundaries of athletics and gender, says Sebastian Coe

PHOTO: REX FEATURES

S

o far, our gamechangers have been men and, although they all made unique contributions to modern sport, they were not sportsmen of any great achievement. Our gamechanger this month is a woman and, arguably, athletics’ most iconic female. Dutch athlete Francina ‘Fanny’ Blankers-Koen not only left the London Olympic Games of 1948 with four gold medals over sprint distances including the relay, she also left behind the nostrum of the age that women were neither physically or mentally wired to break into that male-dominated preserve. By the time she arrived in London as a relative unknown, she was already 30 years old and a mother of two, but had six world records and two European championship golds under her belt. And, at the age of 18, she had competed at the 1936 Berlin Games.

If Jesse Owens (she got his autograph) will forever be synonymous with those games that were as much a platform for Nazi Germany as for Olympism, BlankersKoen will always be remembered for her Herculean performances on the cinder track in the old Wembley stadium. However, despite her pedigree, her biggest challenges were the prevailing social and cultural norms of the time. This was not helped by the British Athletics’ team manager, Jack Crump, who questioned, in print, whether a 30-year-old mother was really a credible competitor. Understandably, he proved to be the spur she needed, although later in life the pair became good friends, often joking about the effect his words had on her races. In the 100-metres at the 1948 London Olympics, she crossed the line with a winning margin, in the mud, of three yards.

Later that week she scooped up the 80-metre hurdles, 200-metres and, for good measure, in the relays took her team from third to pole position on the final leg. Only the rules at the time prevented her from almost certainly winning the long jump and probably the high jump too. By the time she left London, she had become athletics’ first global female superstar and paved the way for other women athletes like Irena Szewińska from Poland, Americans Wilma Rudolph and Wyomia Tyus and Betty Cuthbert from Australia. Blankers-Koen went on to win three further European titles in 1950, another Olympic Games appearance in Helsinki, retiring shortly afterwards. After her competitive career, she led the Dutch team as manager in the 1960, ’64 and ’68 Olympics. In 2007, three years after her death, I was honoured to unveil an imposing two-metre high bronze statue at the track in Hengelo. She didn’t enter the sport with an ambition to further the cause of gender equality but I can think of few women in sport who have done more to change that very perception. n

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THE GUIDE

C A R S

ROAD TEST

Tesla still leads the charge in the electric race, says Jeremy Taylor

VITA L STATS Tesla Model S PRICE £79,833 BATTERY 100kWh POWER 440bhp 0-62MPH 4.3 seconds RANGE Up to 381 miles

TOWN

COUNTRY

Elon Musk’s Tesla company will launch the eagerlyawaited Model 3 in Britain this summer – a budget five-seater that will bring electric car ownership within the reach of a much wider audience. Our larger Model S was the Californian company’s first mass market, all-electric car. Launched in 2012, the luxury saloon is loaded with technology, plus a cool interior that is like nothing you have seen before. If the sleek exterior looks a little conventional, inside everything is operated by a huge 17-inch touchscreen display. Warning: if you struggle with an iPad, this might not be the car for you. Around town, it glides through city traffic, regenerating electric power automatically when you lift off the accelerator pedal. Model S is a little wider than premium brand German rivals but excellent all-round visibility makes parking easy. Noiseless and serene, this Tesla is a relaxing drive. The only stress is charging – use a high street charger, Tesla’s rapidly expanding Supercharger network, or plug in to a three-pin socket at home. The latter is slow, so most owners buy a wallmounted rapid charger for around £300. RATING: 4/5 HANDBAGS

Tesla doesn’t do conventional car dealerships – simply choose online or you may have spotted their stores in out-of-town shopping centres too. It’s as easy as buying a sofa and a lot more fun. Model S is whisper quiet on the motorway and, with almost 400 miles of range, the driving experience is equal to a conventional car. It’s also sure-footed around a corner, thanks to permanent four-wheel drive. Its performance is hugely impressive – there is one version of the S that will outperform a Lamborghini from the traffic lights. Heavy-footed action will eat into the battery power though. The Model S is specced up with plenty of standard equipment, such as leather trim and textured wood on the dashboard. The seats are big and comfortable, while the boot is enormous. If it sounds like the perfect electric car, it is – apart from the price. Second-hand Model S cars hold their value well though, or get your order in now for the new Model 3. RATING: 4/5 WELLIES

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SUPER CHARGED

C A R S

THE DRIVE

CUT DOWN ON RANGE ANXIETY

Jaguar’s electric SUV proves to be anything but static, says Jeremy Taylor

I

VITA L STATS Jaguar I-Pace 400PS HSE PRICE £74,445 BATTERY 90kWh POWER 394 bhp 0-62MPH 4.5 seconds RANGE Up to 292 miles

n 1990 I took a draughty ferry to the Paris Motor Show because the Channel Tunnel still hadn’t been completed. Glamorous models draped themselves over bonnets, and forgettable cars like the Renault Laguna and Rover 100 were born. Citroën dominated the main hall and pride of place went to their new, very unsexy C5 electric van. It seemed like a pointless exercise in an age before the diesel revolution – and petrol was still only 39 pence a litre in the UK anyway. Now every car manufacturer is feverishly preparing a fleet of hybrid and electric cars to replace the combustion engine, officially due for the scrap heap in this country by 2040 at the latest. The government’s Road To Zero campaign will make sure of that – but does it mean the end of the road for exciting cars too? If the Jaguar’s newest SUV is anything to go by, the answer is a resounding no. The

I-Pace is a fast, good-looking and desirable all-wheel drive that just happens to have batteries and a couple of electric motors instead of an engine. How fast? Well, the I-Pace will see off a Porsche Boxster or the fastest hot hatchbacks. The heavy batteries are spread out evenly under the floor, giving the Jaguar excellent handling characteristics without eating into valuable luggage space. No engine means there is a stash of extra carrying capacity under the bonnet, while the boot is as roomy as a BMW 3 Series estate. Inside, the I-Pace isn’t as space-age as its only all-electric SUV rival, the Tesla Model X, but it is all stylishly screwed together with a variety of leather, wood and metal finish trims to choose from. However, it’s the quietness of the cabin at speed that will surprise most electric car newbies. Barrelling into a corner minus any engine noise is a very odd experience but all EVs feel the same and make for a more relaxed mode of travelling. The I-Pace has been called the most important Jaguar since the iconic E-Type and it’s easy to understand why. It is truly ground-breaking and has stolen a march on German rivals who have yet to enter the electric SUV fray. Drivers still need to get their heads around the dreaded range anxiety as the battery energy drains away. But, with up to 292 miles of battery power from one top up and more and more charging points springing up around the country, there’s really no excuse not to join the EV revolution. RATING: 5/5 n

ZAP MAP Plans your route via 10,000 charging stations across the UK. zap-map.com OPEN CHARGE Shares tips from drivers using charge points on a daily basis. openchargemap.org PLUGSHARE Maps every type of charger point – even caravan hook ups. plugshare.com

TOTES SPEEDY Still scrabbling around for plastic bags on shopping day? Maserati’s chic and desirable synthetic shopper bag will last for years. £167. maseratistore.com BOTTLE IT Only the Scandinavians could make a water bottle this cool. Eva Solo has been designing household kit for 100 years. Made from BPA-free plastic and dishwasher safe. £23.50. collection. volvocars. com

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THE GUIDE

ECO ESSENTIALS

G A R D E N I N G

SEEDER’S DIGEST

Wuddl Mini bee hotel, £16.45. notonthe highstreet.com

Prince Charles leads the way, says Clementina Jackson

John Lewis Solar-powered outdoor light, £12. johnlewis.com

GARDEN OF THE MONTH

HIGHGROVE ROYAL GARDENS, Gloucestershire

Follow The Prince of Wales’ example: his private gardens at Highgrove have long adhered to the strictest sustainable principles to become one of the country’s leading lights in organic gardening. From recycling all waste materials to composting onsite, using rainwater for irrigation and solar panels for heating, the garden is self-sufficient wherever possible – and the spectacular results are living proof that sustainable is always best. Join a spring walk to see for yourself. highgrovegardens.com

Pikaplant Self-feeding and self-watering plant, £59. padlifestyle.com

Rowlinson Wooden compost bin, £89.99. primrose.co.uk

Ecopots Recycled plastic Amsterdam pot, £11.95. ashortwalk.com

Maxicrop Organic seaweed fertiliser, £10.95. sarahraven.com

BE INSPIRED BY

1

LEAVE OUT Water dishes for thirsty birds and bees.

2

SOW A wildflower meadow on a sunny patch of bare ground.

3

PLANT Lily bulbs in pots for a spectacular summer display.

THE GARDEN CHEF

With sales of fruit and vegetable seeds outstripping those of flowers, it seems everyone is growing their own these days. The Garden Chef is the ultimate tome for garden-to-fork enthusiasts, collating stories and recipes from the kitchen gardens of the world’s top chefs – and showing how even the smallest space can grow something delicious to eat. (Phaidon, £29.95)

TREND

SHOW ME THE HONEY

There’s a buzz around beekeeping at the moment – a response to the marked decline in our bee population, the numerous ecological benefits and, of course, the sweet results! Introductory courses are popping up all over the country, and even city folk can get in on the action with dedicated urban beekeeping workshops atop St Ermin’s Hotel in SW1. sterminshotel.co.uk

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

THIS MONTH

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A different perspective.

Twenty-eight. That’s the number of paint shades in our collection and the only colours you’ll ever need. Each one as timeless as the next. Each one blended using our water-based formulas that are loved by decorators. Each one better for you and the environment. Paint, made easy.

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THE GUIDE

Bianca Jagger wishes we could all be more childlike when it comes to confronting the government about climate change, says Charlotte Metcalf Portrait by RANKIN

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efore Bianca arrives I find myself rehearsing her titles. There are so many that I’m nervous of slipping up over one. They include Founder, President and Chief Executive of the Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation, Council of Europe Goodwill Ambassador, Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and a member of the Executive Director’s Leadership Council of Amnesty International USA. Her reputation as a fierce human rights defender precedes her and I am expecting her to be intensely focussed with zero time for small talk. I am delighted and surprised when she arrives, warm, smiling, relaxed and happy to talk. ‘What people don’t understand is that I’m not from Paris, New York or London but Nicaragua,’ she begins. ‘I grew up under Anastasio Somoza’s dictatorship. My parents divorced when I was ten. My mother had a small place selling organic juices but in conservative, Catholic Nicaragua she was looked down on as a divorced, working woman. I inherited her independence, her progressive political views and love of the environment. She was and continues to be my inspiration and role model.’ ‘I didn’t want to be subjected to the same fate and promised myself I’d have an education,’ says Bianca. At 16 she won a scholarship to study political science in Paris. Her father opposed the idea, believing Paris was a ‘hotbed of sin’, but he underestimated his daughter’s determination. She arrived there on Bastille Day. ‘At first I was placed in a hotel and I hardly dared scuttle to the corner and back,’ she laughs, ‘I’d never been without a chaperone so I was terrified. But eventually I found lodgings and I was so young that my teachers looked after me as a sort of mascot.’ Bianca stayed in Paris for four years. In 1972 an earthquake hit Nicaragua, killing 10,000. She and Mick, whom she’d recently married, went there as fast as they could. ‘I was devastated,’ she remembers. ‘Managua airport was almost completely destroyed and was full of containers of aid that Somoza had appropriated. I can still smell the stench of burnt bodies as we drove through Managua.’

Bianca couldn’t find her parents as their homes were both destroyed. ‘In desperation I put out a radio announcement and finally tracked them down in another town,’ she says. ‘On my return, I asked the Rolling Stones to do a relief concert to help the victims. I wanted to build a small children’s clinic with the funds but Mrs Somoza was the President of the National Board for Assistance and Social Security and was building her own children’s hospital. She invited us for tea, hoping we’d give our funds direct to her. We sat by the swimming pool in the blazing heat and she kept fiddling with the buttons on her denim dress. I explained that the American people who’d contributed so generously would not think kindly of donating the funds to her government as they didn’t trust it. She regarded my answer as a declaration of war.’ The relief concert money was used to build shelter for earthquake victims but Bianca became persona non grata in Nicaragua. She describes the earthquake as one of her ‘epiphanies’, opening her eyes to poverty, child mortality, oppression and corruption. When the current President, Daniel Ortega, toppled Somoza in 1979, Bianca found Ortega to be even more ruthless, barbaric and corrupt. ‘I feel so betrayed,’ she says, ‘I supported the revolution as I hoped it would bring democracy and free elections but now we have a criminal despot killing innocent students, journalists, farmers, women and torturing political prisoners.’ She has visited Nicaragua several times in the last few years, helping Amnesty and other organisations give voice to those being persecuted and killed. Yet her work for her home country is just one aspect of what she does globally. Recently she’s contributed to an ambitious book, 2030 Now, which brings together artists, campaigners and global ‘action heroes’ to highlight the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Illustrated with spectacular photography by Yann Arthus-Bertrand, the book marks the start of a worldwide project to raise awareness of the UN’s work. It was launched at Harvey Nichols in early March, where Bianca made a speech as Ambassador for Goal 13: Climate Action. Other

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Bianca Jagger urges us to stand up to big business, industry and government when it comes to tackling the biggest crisis confronting our world – climate change

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THE GUIDE

IN BRIEF Penthouse or country cottage? If things were different there, my dream would be to live in a hacienda with horses and a garden in Nicaragua Green tea or wine? I’m a big green tea drinker (organic, hand-picked) and follow the Japanese tea ceremony Haute couture or country casuals? I love haute couture but these days I need to feel comfortable to work, so I have a lot of clothes that look a bit like pyjamas Country pub or Michelin star? Neither but I love Clarke’s on Kensington Church Street or tea at Japan House Dog or cat? If I didn’t travel so much I’d have a big dog, like a German Shepherd, as a companion and protector

ambassadors include Sir Richard Branson, Glenn Close, Richard Curtis and Michelle Yeoh. I say I was surprised not to see Bianca as Ambassador for Goal 05: Gender Equality, a role taken by Marta Vieira da Silva, but Bianca sees how broad Goal 13 is and has embraced it wholeheartedly. ‘Climate action is of particular concern to me because it directly affects human rights – it’s inextricably linked with them,’ she says. ‘If we don’t tackle climate change now, our efforts to improve all people’s lives will be to no avail. A grave mistake is the way climate change is being represented to the public, as if its catastrophic consequences are in the distance and far away. But they’re happening right here and now. This February was Britain’s hottest on record. In Britain we see migration as a threat but if we don’t tackle climate change, millions will be forced to flee their homes and migration will become an even more enormous issue. How can governments continue to deny that climate change is going to have a momentous impact on all of us?’ We start talking about British politics and then inexorably – given it’s nearing 29 March – we move on to chat about Brexit. As Bianca warms with earthy passion to her main theme, the failure of politicians to lead and act, any vestiges of chilliness melt as fast as the polar ice caps. ‘Policy propositions and agreements are inadequate and politicians continue to lie,’ she insists. ‘Some NGOs have gone along with policy so as not to be accused of being alarmist. But why haven’t we embarked upon a green energy revolution here? Thousands of jobs are being created in the renewable energy sector and it can only evolve and improve so why are we lagging so woefully behind in our support for it? How can the British government support fracking when we know the harm it does – to water sources, the environment, the air and our way of life?’ We turn briefly to Trump, whom she dismisses with magnificent contempt. She’s enraged but neither pompous nor hectoring, partly because she’s so aware of her own tiny hypocrisies. ‘Here I am going on about plastic and I’m guilty of buying make-up that comes in too much packaging or occasionally drinking out of plastic bottles,’ she grins ruefully. ‘But what to do? Look at places like Whole Foods that claim to be organic and support sustainability but they’re selling their juices in plastic bottles.

Why aren’t Evian and Vittel and others selling water in recyclable glass?’ Mainly Bianca genuinely walks the talk (a phrase she likes): she will never invest in a ‘dodgy’ share; she will always try to avoid using a plastic bag; she doesn’t own a car and uses public transport; she recycles religiously; she doesn’t eat meat or farmed fish and carries around little bags of seeds or nuts, ‘like a bird’. She bemoans the fact that it’s so difficult and expensive to find genuinely wild fish but adds, ‘it’s our fault. We’ve over-fished. We’ve used pesticides and grown GM crops. We only have one planet and until we all change the way we eat, we’ll destroy it.’ For all her gloom about what we’ve done, she remains positive about how we can all do our bit to change the world. ‘The possibilities are infinite but every one of us needs to act right now,’ she says. ‘Information is key and that’s why I like social media – it’s fast and effective and a way of engaging us all, and we all need to be engaged if we’re to avoid disaster.’ I ask her what we can all do from today as individuals, other than following her by recycling, watching what we eat, avoiding plastic and using public transport. ‘We have to be hands-on to find and support the right politicians to elect. People who don’t vote make me furious,’ she concludes. ‘We need to lobby and hold accountable supermarkets, brands, farmers and governments. We have to boycott big stores that use plastic and keep insisting that governments ban it. Thousands of kids took to the streets to march and pressurise governments about climate change. So why don’t we? Sometimes I wish that we thought like children – they have so much more courage.’ Bianca herself is childlike on one level because she lacks the cynicism of a battle-weary adult. She’s convincing and engaging because her ardour, commitment, certainty and courage are so obviously heartfelt. Perhaps most impressive of all is her wisdom that stems from her experience, facing down danger to make a stand for the oppressed in Nicaragua and elsewhere. Increasingly her voice has gained gravitas and global status. Would she consider politics? And that leads to another long and animated conversation.

‘CLIMATE ACTION IS OF PARTICULAR CONCERN TO ME. IF WE DON’T TACKLE IT NOW, OUR EFFORTS TO IMPROVE ALL PEOPLE’S LIVES WILL BE TO NO AVAIL’

2030 Now is available at Harvey Nichols. 2030now.com n

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Travelers Palm Wallpaper. Curtains in Travelers Palm. Cushions in Ischia. Fairhaven Sofa in Avery.

Tropics Collection: Wallpaper, Print and Woven Fabrics www.thibautdesign.com tel: 020 7737 6555

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Dress, Issey Miyake. Boots, Vivienne Westwood. Cardboard reused from deliveries and local businesses

Don’t Dress TO KILL

Statementmaking style Fashion director NICOLE SMALLWOOD Photographer VIVIENNE BALLA

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Swimsuit, Stella McCartney. Fishing nets from charity shop

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Dress, Vivienne Westwood. Vases and fish, stylist’s own

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Jeans and jacket, Katharine Hamnett. Sunglasses, Gucci at MatchesFashion.com. Shoes, Mother of Pearl

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Dress, belt and boots, Louis Vuitton

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Dress, Gabriela Hearst. Plastic re-used builders’ materials

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Jumpsuit and sandals, Stella McCartney. Bikini top, Solid and Striped. TVs, wires and monitors from local scrapyard TEAM Set Designer: Lee Flude Make-up: Nathalie Eleni using Esse Skincare and Davines haircare Hair: Jason Crozier at Stella Creative Artists using Davines Model: Nelida at First Fashion assistants: Clementina Jackson and Kerri Stolerman STOCKISTS: PAGE 122

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WE LOVE PRE-LOVED

Vestiaire Collective is the place to sell your investment pieces and find one-off fashion gems VIP CONCIERGE SELLER

CARMEN HAID...

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our beloved investment pieces need no longer gather dust in a wardrobe or be sold for less than their worth. Vestiaire Collective, the leading global destination for buying and selling authenticated pre-owned fashion and accessories, is a unique online platform to buy your favourite items and sell pre-loved fashion. Its VIP Concierge Service is managed by a dedicated team of experts who take the stress out of selling by managing the entire process, from courier collection to professional photography and storage, allowing more time to peruse what Vestiaire Collective has to offer.

Why do you sell on Vestiaire? I love the concept. It gives people access to contemporary and vintage wardrobes from across the world. I also like that it encourages people to shop more circularly rather than buying new. Plus, selling with the VIP Concierge service is so easy, they take care of everything for you. What have you got on sale at the moment? One particularly special piece I’m selling is the Yves Saint Laurent Mirror bag designed by Tom Ford. Another is a Céline belt, a timeless piece designed when Michael Kors was at the helm. There’s a sustainable aspect to selling pre-loved pieces – is this important to you? Absolutely. There’s too much production in this world and I try to stay away from fast fashion. We all have to start with ourselves to produce less waste and I think this comes from all elements of your lifestyle, from the clothes we wear to the foods we eat. Top tips for selling? Always be true to your style and be honest with yourself. If you know you no longer wear something, it’s probably time to let it go. Vestiaire Collective dream find? I have my eye on a couple of Alaïa dresses, they never go out of fashion and are the perfectlycrafted little black dresses.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHLOÉ BRUHAT

On creating a wardrobe that mixes vintage treasures with timeless staples and contemporary streetwear


PROMOTION

HOW TO SELL... Vestiaire Collective’s co-founder, Fanny Moizant’s top tips

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EDIT I have a very critical eye on what I wear and no longer wear. Most weeks, I pick out a piece I haven’t worn in a while, so I’ll remember to sell it over the weekend. I also like to do bigger edits every season to prepare for the season ahead. SET RULES I apply the one-in-one-out strategy; selling a piece to fund my next purchase. My second rule is that I have to be able to see my whole wardrobe in one go. It has to be super practical and efficient, so everything is tidy and organised by type of item and colour. That rule forces me to have a very edited closet, so if I don’t wear something, I have to make room for something better. DON’T GET SENTIMENTAL Don’t wait two years. Something you don’t wear today is unlikely to become your favourite piece in six or 12 months. SELL TO BUY I don’t believe in throwaway fashion, it’s such a waste. Because I refuse to waste and also don’t have an extensive fashion budget, I’m a big advocate for reselling. It’s just the best solution for us fashion lovers, and also for the planet. GET ORGANISED If you’re not quite sure how to start, use the hanger trick. At the beginning of the season, place all your hangers in the same direction. Each time you wear a piece, turn the hanger the other way. Very quickly you’ll see what you should sell and what you should keep. Women usually wear 40 to 60 per cent of their wardrobe. Sell the rest. n

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THE FA B F I V E WHETHER YOU’RE SEARCHING FOR OR SELLING ICONIC ONE-OFFS, LOOK OUT FOR THESE FIVE INVESTMENT PIECES

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHLOÉ BRUHAT

1 Pre-owned Cartier Tank watch 2 Pre-owned Chanel jacket 3 Pre-owned Celine Alphabet necklace 4 Pre-owned Gucci shoes 5 Pre-owned Hermès Birkin bag

NEED SPACE IN YOUR WARDROBE? Start selling and allow the VIP Concierge Service to take care of the entire process EMAIL: conciergelondon@ vestiairecollective. com and quote C&TH to book your collection

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Chimneypieces | Lighting | Furniture 020 7730 2122 | jamb.co.uk

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ECO COMES

OFAGE Livia Firth has been the poster girl for sustainable living since founding her business Eco-Age in 2009. She tells Lucy Cleland why it should all just be common sense

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conscious citizen. Ultimately though, the best navigation tool is to use your judgment when buying something: to ask whether a product harmed anything or anyone in its making and, fundamentally, ‘do I really need it?’. Who do you think is currently setting a good example of how to live in an environmentally-sound way? There are so many, it would be

hard to list them all. From a business perspective, there are more and more leaders who have been advocating for sustainable practices in their businesses and offering solutions, such as François Henri-Pinault (Kering), Stella McCartney, Paul Polman (former CEO of Unilever), Oskar Metsavaht (from brand Osklen), Giulio Bonazzi (producer of Econyl). The list goes on… Tell us about your journey to sustainability. Growing

up in Italy in the ’70s and ’80s prepared me for what today we call ‘sustainability’ but at the time was just common sense. Back then, consumerism hadn’t really started; we were eating local and seasonal food and wearing quality clothes that we saved money to buy and kept forever (I still have many of them!). In the last ten years of our consultancy Eco-Age I have learned so much about the environmental impact of everything we do daily and the social repercussions when we forget that we depend on other people constantly. Were any habits hard to break? I didn’t really have to change my habits as I am not a compulsive shopper, for example, or someone who naturally throws away a lot. Obviously, there are lots of things that I have learned over the years and have adapted as a result: I have stopped eating red meat and I try to avoid plastic like the plague. What lessons should we be passing down to the next generation about living ethically? It’s all about respect,

isn’t it? I don’t think we need to pass down any lessons – just look at the climate change student movement led by Swedish school girl Greta Thunberg. There’s so much misinformation out there, so many bandwagons to jump on. How do we navigate it all? This

is totally true – and it will get more and more confusing as more and more brands decide to ‘greenwash’, i.e. to jump on the sustainability trend. But we also have a big resource today in various platforms such as eco-age.com, where we cover daily products and solutions for the

The fashion industry is one of the worst culprits when it comes to an unsustainable industry. How do you shop and dress? I don’t shop

much at all. Also I am incapable of shopping online, so that saves me lots of temptations and I don’t have time to go to physical shops. I probably buy three or four pieces a year. My wardrobe is full of old clothes, which I have treasured over the years and I keep re-wearing. Some are clothes from my youth, some are my mum’s or sister’s and some are vintage finds. I have altered and amended and created new clothes out of old ones thanks to a wonderful seamstress in Italy. And when I am on a red carpet I am incredibly lucky to work with designers who are committed to doing it differently and it’s fun to be involved in the Green Carpet Challenge. What is your message to the fashion industry? If you want your business

to remain profitable in ten or 15 years just look at your impact and supply chain: how many raw materials are you using and for how long will they last? How are you treating your suppliers and are you paying a living wage so you will retain them in the years to come? Sustainability makes so much financial sense. Do you think there’s political will to change the way we live? I am

not sure if today there is political will on anything. Just look around you! Ultimately though, whether you are a politician, a business person, a shopkeeper or a farmer… we are all citizens. And the biggest obstacle in active citizenship is to think that, because the scenario is overwhelmingly bad, there is nothing we can do individually. Which is totally wrong.

PHOTOS: REX FEATURES

ABOVE: The fashion industry is waking up to its negative impact. Some garment factories located near the Buriganga River in Dhaka do not have sufficient facilities for workers, where salaries are low and generally not paid on time BELOW: Livia and her husband Colin Firth

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Mother of Pearl utilises low impact production methods and fully traceable organic fabrics

If you were the government’s Sustainability Tsar, what new laws would you impose? I was so

happy with the recent parliamentary inquiry on fashion and it gave me hope. If I was in government I would work to deepen the Modern Day Slavery Act and make it legally binding, imposing penalties (currently there are none) on companies that are found to use slave labour. I would ensure that all products carry a detailed list of provenance (like food labelling most of the time) and are rated according to environmental impact (like appliances, for example). I would also put huge sanctions on pollution (again, there are currently none) and work actively for cleaner cities. And I would certainly obstruct a third runway at Heathrow. If there was one person you could swing a meeting with for five minutes, who would it be and what would be your elevator pitch? I am so bad

at elevator pitches! I tried so many times and failed each time. I am very lucky that I have met incredible people in my life and found myself in the most astonishing situations. So if I had five minutes, I would probably ring my friend and take her out for coffee. What is the one single thing each person can do to make a difference? There is a beautiful

quote by Martin Luther King that says: ‘We die the day that we become silent about the things that matter to us’. So never be silent and you will make a huge difference. And remember also that each time you buy, you vote with your wallet. So vote wisely.

PHOTOS: REX FEATURES

Are you hopeful for the future or does the state of our world keep you awake at night? I was

with Dr Jane Goodall two days ago and we agreed that there is so much hope right now. Just look at the students – in her programme Roots & Shoots, for example, or at Greta Thunberg’s student movement. Not only is there hope, but we need to be hopeful in order to keep fighting.

FASHION CONSCIENCE Luxury and sustainability can be happy bedfellows, says Eco-Age’s Dolly Jones

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hopping ethically is rapidly becoming a barometer of the pleasure we continue to derive from fashion – as the industry becomes as famous for its damage to the environment and lack of ethics as it traditionally has been for superstar designers and their influence on our taste. Some brands are making morals central to their aesthetic, thereby leading the charge of potential success – both in terms of future-proofing their business and of giving their customers the freedom to enjoy their product.

MOTHER OF PEARL Proof that the East London hipster set is determined to lead the way for fashion’s sustainable revolution, Amy Powney – creative director of Mother of Pearl – is taking the label into new ethical realms via low impact production and fully traceable, organic fabrics that maintain its cutting-edge status. It’s ‘serious fashion not to be worn too seriously,’ says Powney, who dressed Sinéad Burke at last year’s British Fashion Awards, counts Jasmine Hemsley among her brand ambassadors, Gwyneth Paltrow as a fan and has recently branched into interiors as if to prove how much good can be done in raising the bar for the ethics of luxury. She’s also advising other designers trying to establish their sustainable credentials in an industry that doesn’t make it easy or cheap. motherofpearl.co.uk

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RONALD VAN DER KEMP

LEFT: Ronald van der Kemp buys leftover fabric from the big fashion houses

Ronald van der Kemp’s habit of buying leftover fabrics from big fashion houses to create entirely unique clothes caught the eye of the Fédération de la Couture, which invited him to show on schedule during the haute couture collections in January as ‘the world’s first sustainable couture label’ – and subsequently saw him win adulation from critics including Tim Blanks and Sarah Mower. Having worked on the design teams of Bill Blass and Guy Laroche, van der Kemp’s epiphany came when he compared the last-a-lifetime couture labels he discovered in vintage stores with the mountains of unneeded clothes being produced both by high street and high fashion brands. His label, founded in 2014, is crafted by artisans using highquality existing materials. ‘It’s always the highest quality but perhaps it wasn’t exactly the right shade for whomever first bought it,’ he says. ‘That doesn’t matter to me – I don’t design collections with a theme. Each piece is entirely unique. People get excited about the clothes and when they hear about the ethics, it’s a real plus.’ ronaldvanderkemp.com

MARA HOFFMAN Elegant, chic and colourful, Mara Hoffman’s designs are determinedly sustainable and ethical but maintain an aesthetic that focuses on her customer’s emotional reaction to the clothes – making them doubly desirable. Launched in 2000 because ‘starting my own business made more sense than searching for a corporate job in an industry I already felt I didn’t quite fit into,’ she relaunched it in 2015 with a new focus on transparency. ‘I realised that Mara Hoffman was one of the first to use fabric made from our manufacturing processes sustainably-sourced wood pulp were contributing to a mess that my son’s generation was going to inherit, which was a breaking point for me,’ she says. One of the first brands to use Refribra™, fabric made from sustainably-sourced wood pulp and pre-consumer cotton waste, she also designs swimwear using Econyl® regenerated nylon. marahoffman.com

STELLA MCCARTNEY To Stella McCartney there is no sustainability revolution, it simply always was that way. ‘The starting point is not design – the starting point is sustainability,’ she has said, and her brand of superbly luxurious modern femininity that determinedly ticks every possible ethical box has cut through the industry apparently against all odds, surrounded by naysayers who are all of a sudden hurriedly positioning themselves to follow in her wake. Having proved to the world that vegan fashion is not just possible but the essence of desirability, she is currently focused more than ever on discovery – a new partnership with technology innovator Bolt Threads promises as-yet-unknown fabrics that will change the face of fashion once again. She is genuinely fashion’s ‘agent of change’. stellamccartney.com

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MAGGIE MARILYN Having hit the global radar by dressing the Duchess of Sussex in a white tuxedo dress during the New Zealand royal tour, 24-year-old Maggie Marilyn continues to make waves in the upper echelons of the industry in spite of her young age. Since its inception in 2016, it has used only GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standard) certified fabrics, it’s created entirely by local manufacturers and its focus on innovation is already reaping rewards for customers by way of dresses made of silk originating from rose petals, among other revolutionary processes. ‘If we can build fashion from a linear economy into a circular one, like our beautiful living world’s circular model, there is so much opportunity for innovation and commercial prosperity,’ says the fiercely intelligent designer, who also made the grade for Livia Firth’s Green Carpet Challenge recently, when the founder of Eco-Age wore her label to the premiere of Mary Poppins Returns. maggiemarilyn.com

BETHANY WILLIAMS

Bethany Williams collaborates with humanitarian charities to develop sustainable fabrics

Maggie Marilyn only uses GOTS-certified fabrics

Once discovered, ethical fashion is difficult to give up because it’s impossible to ‘unsee’ the damage done by an unconscious attitude to consumerism once the facts are out – and Bethany Williams’ story is at the forefront of proving that the industry can change. Her intensely cool designs are conceived from all manner of sustainable fabrics and created in collaboration with humanitarian charities and initiatives focused on positive social change. Her recent autumn/winter 2019 show featured homeless models (paid the market rate), wearing a collection that was produced in collaboration with a women’s shelter in Liverpool, to which she will give 20 per cent of the profits. The embodiment of ‘fashion for good’, Williams was awarded this year’s Queen Elizabeth II Award by the Duchess of Cornwall in recognition of her ethical approach. bethany-williams.com

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CHOPARD Caroline Scheufele is leading the charge for sustainability in the luxury sector, having announced Chopard’s game-changing 100 per cent ethical gold supply chain last July, six years after pledging to transform the business in order ‘to know where every piece of our gold comes from’. Now focused on doing the same for Chopard’s gemstones, Scheufele was named Designer of the Year at ethical fashion retailer Maison de Mode’s second annual Sustainable Style Gala in LA in February. A true icon of the sustainable revolution, she has proved that to genuinely modernise an established business, the focus of its strategy must be on the people involved in creating it. It’s a lesson any and all businesses can benefit from. chopard.com LEFT: Chopard’s L.U.C collection is made with Fairmined gold BELOW: Earrings from Chopard’s Green Carpet collection

GABRIELA HEARST Gabriela Hearst’s high luxury reputation wields heavy influence with her global A-list following and she has thereby positioned herself as a purveyor of actionable change. From stores built without chemicals and plastic-free, minimalwaste fashion shows to circular production processes and a philanthropic status that has resulted in long-standing partnerships with Save The Children and Planned Parenthood, she has built her brand from the outset to epitomise what she calls ‘honest luxury’. The first label snapped up by the LVMH Luxury Ventures fund, launched to discover and build iconic brands of the future, Hearst’s is a label with serious clout – plus refined but directional cuts that are as irresistible as they are luxurious. gabrielahearst.com

WILLIAM VINTAGE

ABOVE & LEFT: Gabriela Hearst’s fashion shows are plastic-free with minimal waste

The leading light of the vintage fashion world, William Banks-Blaney founded William Vintage in 2009 and has since sourced dresses from all over the world for Hollywood greats and royalty (most recently dressing the Duchess of Sussex and her bump in Sixties Courrèges for her trip to New York). A visit to the Mayfair boutique promises the most personal treatment, since William and his team are as interested in the event you want to buy for as they are in your general attitude, enabling them to find the dress that will work for you while continuing its own narrative. With Marie Blanchet (formerly of Vestiaire Collective) now in place as CEO, it’s only going to get better. It is headline fashion with a lasting story. williamvintage.com Discover more brands leading the charge at eco-age.com n

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Charcoal burning with zebras, 2018

PHOTOS: © NICK BRANDT, COURTESY OF ATLAS GALLERY LONDON

CLARION CALL

Photographer Nick Brandt has dedicated the last 20 years to showing us what a world deprived of natural beauty could look like. The results are stark, says Lucy Cleland 82 | COUNTRYANDTOWNHOUSE.CO.UK | May 2019

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I PHOTOS: © NICK BRANDT, COURTESY OF ATLAS GALLERY LONDON

f ever you needed a compelling reason to change your behaviour and take the apocalyptic threat of global over-population a little more seriously, take a look at photographer Nick Brandt’s extraordinary images, which might just give you pause for thought. His latest project, entitled This Empty World – a series of seemingly impossible scenarios all set in Kenya in brooding halflight – is Brandt’s first body of work in colour and, for exhibition purposes, the photographic prints are vast – up to 11ft long. This is important because if you look at them on a computer screen you may well misread them. ‘I made them huge so you can see expressions on people’s faces,’ Nick explains. ‘Otherwise they can look like they’re the aggressors. The point of this work is to show that people are also victims of environmental degradation, with the rural poor being the worst affected. The people in the photographs are being swept along by the tide of progress. The real villains are off-screen.’ By which he means the politicians and the industrialists who, in his words, ‘put short-term financial gain ahead of the long-term economic benefit of protecting these areas, animals and people’.

River people with elephant at night, 2018

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FROM TOP: Petrol station with lion, 2018; Construction trench with jackal, 2018

PHOTOS: © NICK BRANDT, COURTESY OF ATLAS GALLERY LONDON

Nick first came to Africa in the 1990s, when he directed the video for Michael Jackson’s single, Earth Song. So disturbed was he by the devastation he found there that he later returned to capture this changing world with still photography rather than moving images. For This Empty World he spent two years on and off in Kenya, such was the intricacy and challenge of the production process. ‘We had ten cameras set up across the region – each positioned on a location that was pre-lit and connected via intranet back to where we were staying. The animals would come into frame [eventually] and motion sensors would set off the cameras which would shoot a panorama of three frames. Then, over the course of weeks and months, gradually and painfully, a series of photos were gathered of different species (but not enough) – no hippo, cheetah, leopard. Afterwards the set is built, the same lighting is set up and the people are cast and placed in position. The camera never moves.’ The results of this painstaking work show a world of the future that could all too easily be a reality – an elephant and her calf walking through a dusty, dry area where a bridge is being constructed, the workers sitting around on a break; a gazelle standing in the middle of a roundabout; a lion gingerly making its way through a concrete bus station – all drenched in this harrowing semi-darkness 84 | COUNTRYANDTOWNHOUSE.CO.UK | May 2019

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PHOTOS: © NICK BRANDT, COURTESY OF ATLAS GALLERY LONDON

FROM TOP: Bridge construction with elephants and workers by day, 2018; Highway bank construction with giraffe and workers, 2018

– as the animals only dare to come out at dusk. ‘In this unprotected and populated area where I photographed this series,’ continues Nick, ‘the land was already completely eroded from over-grazing livestock. If you then take away the [wild] animals that still live there [by continuous construction and building work], there’s very little for the local population to sustain them. The wild animals provide economic benefit through eco-tourism.’ Nick funded the entire project himself and ensured no trace of the epic sets were left to further blot the landscape. ‘Everything was recycled,’ he confirms. In 2010 he co-founded his non-profit, Big Life Foundation, which is now the biggest employer in the area. Working with local communities, it protects around 1.6m acres of land between Kenya and Tanzania and therefore

the animals that roam freely, unfettered by literal and geopolitical borders. Which is a reason for hope for this impassioned, determined and vocal photographer. ‘Anger is my motivation, but what I cannot also get into these pictures is my hope. Very importantly, I do feel there is hope. Otherwise I would not have started Big Life. My work is a clarion call. I want to show what is actually happening.’ So, let’s all heed that call and let’s make our voices heard. Sometimes populism can be a positive. After all, who wants to live in an empty world? See works from ‘This Empty World’ with Atlas Gallery at Photo London, 16–19 May (photolondon.org). To learn more about Nick’s non-profit, visit biglife.org or nickbrandt.com n May 2019 | COUNTRYANDTOWNHOUSE.CO.UK | 85

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The smaller, lesser-known African Forest Elephant has lost more than 60% of its entire population within less than two decades. They are suffering a fate far worse than their savannah elephant cousins.

Help us get boots on the ground The African Forest Elephant Foundation (AFEF) is fundraising for rangers and eco-guards that protect the Central African rainforests and the elephants that call it home. AFEF aims to provide new high quality boots and five pairs of durable socks to 500 rangers and eco-guards across Central Africa who work tirelessly out in the field to protect forest elephants and their habitat.

Visit our website to donate: www.forestelephants.org/bootsontheground

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SAVING THE EARTH To wild or not to wild, that is the question. For author Isabella Tree and her husband, Charles Burrell, the answer is clear – we should all heed nature’s desperate cry. By Charlotte Metcalf

PHOTOS: © CHARLIE BURRELL; © ANTHONY CULLEN; © TOM BUNNING

RIGHT & BELOW: Isabella Tree and her husband Charles Burrell believe that environmental care has to come from the ground up. Their pioneering rewilding project at Knepp Castle in West Sussex leads the way forward

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am sitting across the table from one of Britain’s most controversial heroines. If anyone can be described as a Marmite environmentalist it’s Isabella Tree because, for all her ardent followers, she also faces vociferous opposition. Last year she wrote an article in The Guardian saying that veganism was not the answer to saving the planet, which received over 2.5m hits. Isabella was roundly trolled. We’re drinking tea in the kitchen of Knepp Castle in West Sussex, where Isabella lives with her husband Charles Burrell and their son and daughter, currently at university. I confess a personal interest. In the Seventies, my parents rented part of the castle and I spent a glorious childhood summer there. Back then, the estate was functioning as a farm and I have photographs showing acres of golden wheat stretching down to the lake. Today, Knepp has been reconquered by nature in one of Britain’s boldest environmental experiments, of which the softly-spoken, bookish Isabella is the reluctant figurehead, ever since her book Wilding, about the Knepp experiment, was published last May. Wilding has already been shortlisted for awards and been through over ten reprints, thrusting Isabella rather than Charlie into the limelight, though she insists her husband is the driving force behind Knepp’s wilding. The day we meet, she’s due at Sussex University to take part in another debate on whether veganism can change the world. Undaunted by the trolls, Isabella’s answer is, in a word, ‘No’. ‘My daughter’s friends have watched those YouTube films about the May 2019 | COUNTRYANDTOWNHOUSE.CO.UK | 87

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Wilding meant leaving dead trees where they were and Isabella would like the law changed so that animal carcasses can be left to rot down too, even if that might offend the ramblers and dog walkers using the right of way through Knepp’s land. ‘Letting carcasses rot into the ground is an important part of the nutrient cycle of microbes, bacteria and so on. People who were angry with us for giving up farming don’t realise that rewilding might be one of the solutions we desperately need – for climate change, water resources, biodiversity and the soil.’ ‘The threats to our health are terrifying if we do nothing,’ insists Isabella. ‘The next big plague will come from industrial farming, where animals breed diseases and antibiotics are in constant use and the pathogens are becoming resistant to those antibiotics. If we only focused on the soil, we’d realise it’s a living, complex organism. The soil itself is full of potential antibiotics. Everything comes full circle back to the soil in the end but we’re only beginning to start thinking about it properly. Before the war, as a farmer you’d smell, taste and touch your soil – but now tractors have air-conditioned, sealed cabins, so we’ve lost touch with it. Soil has so much to teach us, yet we know so little about it. We need to connect humus with humility and start to respect it again. The good news is how quickly soil seems to restore itself, given the opportunity. At Knepp our soil is full of life again after only a generation.’ When the Burrells started Wilding, Isabella described Knepp as ‘a voice in the wilderness’. Isabella and Charlie are now working on The Wilding Handbook, due for publication in 2021, and the wilderness that is Knepp has attained a metaphorical voice that is being heard loud and clear. Thousands have visited Knepp, including countless landowners. ‘Six hundred thousand people have walked through the door – people wanting to see if they can do something like this themselves,’ says Isabella. ‘We tell them rewilding doesn’t have to be forever. You could rewild for 25 years, provide habitats for wildlife, clean your water, store carbon and restore your soils – then turn the land back to sustainable agriculture. You could do rewilding in rotation, across the country, so it works hand in hand with food production. You only have to wild for 25 years and you’ll have clean water and no-dig sustainable tilth to grow food and provide habitat for all the species that complete the cycle.’ Isabella’s feet are firmly on the ground, and that’s exactly where we all need to be focusing: on the soil beneath us. Talk about saving the earth – Isabella and Charlie have been doing it for years. n Wilding is published by Picador, £9.99. For events where Isabella will be talking about her book and the project, see isabellatree.com/events. Catch her talk at Hay Festival (23 May. hayfestival.com). To stay in a luxury tent, shepherd’s hut or tree house in the Knepp Wildland, or to camp or attend a guided wildlife safari, visit kneppsafaris.co.uk

PHOTOS: © CHARLIE BURRELL; © ANTHONY CULLEN; © TOM BUNNING

dreadful conditions of industrial meat and dairy production and of course they’re angry,’ she says. ‘I don’t blame them for becoming vegans. But animal farming needn’t be evil. Vegans don’t realise that alternatives to dairy, like almond or soya milk, can be terrible for the environment. Almond trees need so much water and they’re constantly fogged with chemicals to get rid of insects, while soya is often grown on deforested areas and that involves carbon and soil loss.’ So what is the answer? It’s all in Wilding, a beautifullywritten masterpiece of persuasion that represents a monument to Isabella’s obsession with soil. After reading it, I am in no doubt about the serious threat our poor beleaguered planet is facing if we neglect it. Soil degradation is so drastic that, globally, we only have 60 harvests left (places like the Fens, where the peaty soils are rapidly desiccating, might have as few as 15). After that there’ll be no more topsoil and we won’t be able to grow food. ‘We’ve taken so much magnesium, calcium, potassium and all other minerals out of the land and those nutrients are not going back into the soil again but go out through our bodies into the sewage systems and into the sea,’ explains Isabella. ‘For every one carrot or tomato we ate in the Sixties, we have to eat ten today to get anything like the same trace elements and nutrients.’ The way forward is to involve animals. ‘Plants need animals as much as animals need plants,’ she continues. ‘The way cows chomp grass stimulates the roots, creating more growth underground so the blades can grow faster. The key thing is stocking levels, because you shouldn’t overgraze, but you can’t restore topsoil with vegetable compost alone – it needs bacteria, dung beetles, insects and so much more.’ The arguments are long and complicated but nothing like as tortuous as her and Charlie’s journey, which began 17 years ago when Charlie, who had inherited the family estate, realised a farm with claggy clay soil could no longer make money. ‘Charlie carried on and on trying, out of loyalty to his farm manager and workers, but even with all the subsidies he hit a wall,’ says Isabella. The Burrells made the momentous decision to return Knepp to nature, outraging their neighbours who were appalled by the unsightly nettles, thistles, ragwort and brambles that grew tall, vigorous and fast. Nearly 20 years on they still have plenty of detractors, but the Burrells’ experiment has also been globally applauded. Knepp has an advisory committee that reads like the Who’s Who of the international environmental movement and the ‘wilded’ land is now home to a plethora of rare species like nightingales, turtle doves, peregrine falcons, owls, purple emperor butterflies, scarce chaser dragonflies, bats, beavers and hundreds of other insects, plants and fungi – some of which had not been seen in Sussex for decades.

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PHOTOS: © CHARLIE BURRELL; © ANTHONY CULLEN; © TOM BUNNING

‘BEFORE THE WAR, AS A FARMER YOU’D SMELL, TASTE AND TOUCH YOUR SOIL – BUT NOW TRACTORS HAVE AIR-CONDITIONED, SEALED CABINS, SO WE’VE LOST TOUCH WITH IT.’

When Charlie inherited a farm, he realised it could no longer make money because the soil quality was so poor. It was the beginning of a long rewilding process for him and Isabella, allowing nature to rediscover its own balance

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AVAILABLE NATIONWIDE IN WAITROSE, MAJESTIC, 31DOVER.COM AND UK DUTY FREE Silent Pool.indd 1

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

PHOTO: © TOM MOGGACH

What we put on our plates affects the planet. Food waste campaigner Tristram Stuart is rewiring our broken food system, one pint at a time, says Anastasia Bernhardt

Food waste campaigner Tristram Stuart found a delicious way to use up waste bread by taking inspiration from ancient cultures that brewed leftover grains into beer

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dots between bread crusts, the explosion of local craft breweries and the global movement against waste, for Tristram it presented a business opportunity. Instead of brewing the bread in one location for export, he decided to brew local waste bread at local breweries to make beer for local drinkers – with all profits going to his charity Feedback or to local charities tackling the problem of food waste at source. Jamie Oliver drank the very first bottle of Toast Ale. He thought it was ‘blooming lovely’. Expert beer sommeliers are also in agreement: Toast Ale is now brewed in seven countries and has won international beer awards based purely on blind taste testing. ‘We’ve just brewed our millionth slice of bread. If you stacked it up, it would reach 1.5 times the height of Mount Everest. But we are just at the beginning; hypothetically, if you took all of the bread that gets wasted in the UK, you could brew all of the beer being drunk in the UK.’ Most of the bread for the beer comes from sandwich manufacturers based close to the breweries, who deliver it for free because they are keen to do something better with their waste. But there’s another, arguably more compelling reason that the industry is waking up to: it makes financial sense. Before he knew about brewing beer, Tristram used to persuade factories to send their waste bread to livestock, which is far more efficient than sending it for anaerobic digestion. This was the idea behind The Pig Idea campaign he ran with Thomasina Miers and pig farmer Tim Finney. ‘I pointed out that there was a cattle farmer a few miles down the road from the sandwich factory. Instead of paying for it to be turned into gas, the company sold it for £20 a tonne to the local

BOTH: Toast Ale addresses the problem of waste bread and funnels profits into charities fighting food waste

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PHOTOS: © TOM MOGGACH; REX FEATURES; GETTY IMAGES

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here is certainly nothing hair-shirted about Tristram Stuart’s attitude to food. The food waste campaigner orders a litre of thick hot chocolate and a buttery croissant as we sit down to talk about two decades of activism. He believes that food is something that brings joy and connection, so it shouldn’t be about ‘finger-wagging or self-flagellation’. His is ‘a hedonistic approach to saving the planet’. He’s been shouting about the urgent need to redress our outdated, inefficient and inherently wasteful food system since long before veganism went mainstream, back when milk only came from cows. Instead of shaming people into changing their habits, Feedback, the charity he co-founded with Niki Charalampopoulou in 2013, has turned something as unsexy as leftovers into a jubilant celebration of ingredients. Among some of his better-known projects, Tristram has achieved the almost biblical feat of feeding 5,000 Londoners in Trafalgar Square using ‘flawed’ fruit and veg that’s deemed unworthy to eat by supermarkets, and has thrown a massive Mexican feast with Wahaca founder Thomasina Miers, using pigs reared in London on food waste. Although he has now taken a step back from Feedback, Tristram continues his involvement by brewing beer. What exactly, you may ask, does ale have to do with the fight against food waste (other than assisting you in hoovering up the contents of the fridge on your return from the pub)? To answer that we have to return to 2008, when Tristram was poking around sandwich factories – bread being one of the most wasted foodstuffs because sandwich-makers can’t use the end slices. ‘It’s not mouldy bread that’s being thrown away,’ says Tristram. ‘This bread is fresher than the food you get in the shops.’ Just one of these factories wastes up to 13,000 slices every single day. It wasn’t until a serendipitous meeting with a brewer from the Brussels Beer Project that he found the solution: ‘He told me that beer was originally made to use up grains that would otherwise be wasted. The ancient Mesopotamians made beer for that purpose because fermentation is essentially a preservation process.’ While most people wouldn’t have connected the


SECOND HELPINGS Breathing life into leftovers

SPINNING MILK Sunad’s shirts are made from a mix of modal and milk protein (casein), taken from milk that is thrown away due to overproduction. sunad.es

PHOTOS: © TOM MOGGACH; REX FEATURES; GETTY IMAGES

ABOVE: The next generation are taking climate change seriously, as seen at the School Strike for Climate Change earlier this year

cattle farmer. They saved around £100,000 and avoided waste disposal costs annually.’ Tristram is now focused on a more systemic solution to the food waste problem. ‘The real hope is to wake people up. We are in the middle of the mass species extinction event number six and we’re the ones causing it,’ he says, citing food waste as the biggest contributor to the problem, over and above transport and industry. The food system is the largest consumer of fresh water, the largest cause of deforestation and the single biggest cause of greenhouse gas emissions. In Tristram’s words, ‘We’re not cooking food anymore. Food, as a system, is about to start cooking us.’ The answer, he says, is to rewire the system: to draw carbon out of the atmosphere and put it into the soil, to put water into the water table and to create natural habitats. How, I wonder, will Brexit impact our ability to contribute to the global problem? ‘Of course, Britain’s independence will allow Britain a freer hand, but the significance of anything we do will be vastly smaller and basically irrelevant.’ And there I was thinking he might offer a sliver of hope… ‘There is a silver lining,’ he promises. ‘It took me about two weeks after the Brexit vote to realise that this is the biggest opportunity the country has ever had to start a new movement.’ He cites the recent School Strike for Climate as such an example, when he got together with local children

and parents in his area to pick up litter and make a giant heart out of it. ‘Grown-ups are still daring to tell their children to tidy up their bedrooms. Look at the mess the kids are going to have to clear up after us. I think these kids have an absolute right to rebel.’ If you want to get involved, he invites you to join the next strike on 12th April. We couldn’t discuss the impact of food on climate change without discussing the two V-words. When I ask how much meat I should be cutting out, his answer is thankfully non-judgmental. ‘If you start saying that everyone has to go vegan tomorrow, people are going to get put off. The more vegans the better, of course, but I think it’s better to avoid the V-word and encourage people to just do what they can. ‘That being said, veganism for me is not the ultimate diet. A roadkill deer would be better. I think we should be arming our teenagers with air rifles to go out and shoot grey squirrels and roast them over the fire. spatchcock squirrel is fantastic with a bit of piri piri sauce. ‘I think we’re going to win this fight when we throw better parties than the organisations that are destroying the environment. Tell people there’s a better party down the road, with better beer, sexier people and people will join your movement.’ I for one will be dusting off my dancing shoes – made from waste apple peels (see right) – to join the party. n

SCRAPS & SCHNAPPS Forget banana bread, Clifford’s on Fetter Lane has a better idea for your banged-up nanas. Blend with Amalfi lemons, vodka and crémant. cliffords restaurant.co.uk

SHARING’S CARING Chef Tommy Banks turns leftovers into staff teas at blackswanoldstead.co.uk while Adam Handling’s Bean & Wheat serves his restaurant’s surplus. beanandwheat.co.uk

BURNT BEANS Bio-beans’ carbon neutral logs are made from the recycled coffee grounds of 25 cups of coffee. Burns 20 per cent hotter than kiln-dried wood, too. bio-bean.com

CORE BLIMEY Heels made from old apple peels. Looks better than it sounds. veerah.com

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ULTIMATE ECO DESTINATION

The Resort Villa considers its footprint carefully, so all that’s left for you to do is sit back, relax and enjoy the Thai sunshine

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nvironmental conservation is of global concern. And while travel is enriching on so many levels – not to mention necessary for sanity levels – it doesn’t always come with the cleanest footprint. That’s not to say that all future holidays are cancelled, but that we can all make better choices about where we choose to splash our cash to encourage best practice. One such shining example is The Resort Villa

in Rayong, Thailand, which takes the issue very seriously while proving that a green choice doesn’t have to be at the expense of life’s little luxuries. The resort believes that it is possible to experience the finer things in life while being environmentally aware. By setting high standards, The Resort Villa has set an example to inspire nearby communities and surrounding areas to become cleaner and more mindful. At 14,000 sq/m, a property of this size requires a lot of energy. However in Rayong, Thailand, there is no shortage of sun – so why not harness the most powerful energy source in the solar system? The resort has built a solar farm just 300m away from the property, with a 206kW system that generates all the power that The Resort Villa requires during daytime, including for air conditioning, the pools and the aquarium, which is home to over 50 tropical fish. All utilities (except the aquarium) are turned off at night to further conserve energy consumption and regulate the amount of power needed on a daily basis.

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PROMOTION

With the growing demand for organic food – and the advantage of having rich soil and optimal weather conditions – The Resort Villa grows over 30 different varieties of vegetables and more than 30 types of fruit tree. The orchards are maintained by a team of specialists using a specially designed hydroponics system. As such, the guests at The Resort Villa enjoy the freshest organic herbs, fruit and vegetables in every meal. Want to learn more? Ask a member of staff to take you on a garden tour. The Resort Villa also boasts its very own farm with a solar-powered irrigation system that allows a variety of crops such as sweetcorn, watermelon, chili, bananas, lemongrass, peppers and mint to grow and has a specially dedicated mushroom house. The farmers are more than happy to share ways of making your own natural fertiliser or growing your own greens. You can even plant seeds so you can harvest the crop the next time you visit. Boats that dock at the harbour and drop anchor can destroy the coral reefs that are so vital to the delicate underwater ecosystem in the region. As the resort has its own private 60ft motor yacht, which often requires anchoring, the General Manager took the initiative to invest in an underwater drill to install anchoring points to reduce

damage. These screws have been drilled three meters deep into the seabed to anchor buoys, also offering a more sustainable option for local dive boats and fishermen to moor to. Thanks to the efforts of resort staff and local dive volunteers, these buoys can hold super yachts and will last for many years to come. The Resort Villa may be one of the most spoiling properties you can find in Thailand, but what truly sets it apart further is its collective principles of environmental awareness and nurturing the surrounding landscape. There is no Planet B – and The Resort Villa’s goal is to co-exist with and protect its surrounding environment in the hopes that the resort’s guests can enjoy fantastic snorkelling and diving experiences for years to come. theresortvilla.com

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The

HOUSE GUEST

New to Country & Town House, The House Guest podcast – exclusive interviews with the biggest names from the world of design and decoration THE

I N A S S O C I AT I O N W I T H

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@countryandtown /countryandtownhousemagazine /countryandtownhouse countryandtownhouse.co.uk

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LIVING INTERIORS DESIGN

THE INSIDER

GROW AS ONE Finding natural form Adam Williams’ steel console flows organically, like the roots of a tree. It is hand-cut using a laser and finished with silver leaf. Montrose console, £5,031. adamwilliamsdesign.co.uk

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THE INSIDER Banbayu Fairtrade interiors made with ecologically sustainable materials and manufactured ethically. Prices from £27.99. banbayu.com

Luke Irwin Sustainable and organic rugs made from undyed wool. Rug-in-Rug collection, £600 per sq/m. lukeirwin.com The Edition 94 Buying vintage is better than buying new. 1950s Italian chandelier, £910. theedition94.com Ecosophy Silk throw made from upcycled matka, a by-product of silk production. Matka throw, £150. ecosophy.co.uk

T R E N D

GOOD WILL HUNTING Green living starts at home

Weaver Green Textiles made entirely from recycled plastic bottles. Nomad Taurus ottoman, from £585. weavergreen.com Ted Todd Reclaimed pine wood cladding. Woodworks Capitol, £100.74 sq/m. tedtodd.co.uk

Rockett St George Table lamp made from Molding Pulp, a bioplastic material of recycled paper, vegetable flour and plaster of Paris. Recycled lamp, £495. rockettstgeorge.co.uk Sep Jordan Hand-embroidered homewares by Jordanian refugees and dyed without harmful chemicals. Alhambra linen towel, £131. sepjordan.com

Nisi Living Outdoor cushions made from 100 per cent recycled plastic. Links cushion, £70. nisiliving.co.uk

Urban Collective Duvet made from naturally sustainable bamboo and recycled wool. Raul Magdaleno bedding, from £113.99. urbancollective.com

Everhot The most energy efficient heat storage cookers on the market. Everhot 90, £6,575. everhot.co.uk

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THE LIMITED EDITION

E L I Z A B E T H BY V I S P R I N G E XC L U S I V E T O A N D S O T O B E D

Bridport ︱ Bristol ︱ Bury St Edmunds ︱ Chelmsford ︱ Cheltenham ︱ Glasgow ︱ Handcross ︱ Harrogate ︱ Hartley Wintney London, Chelsea ︱ London, Richmond ︱London, West End ︱ Manchester ︱ Nottingham ︱ Oxford ︱ Tunbridge Wells ︱ Weybridge And so to Bed .indd 1

06/03/2019 17:49


THE INSIDER SLEEPY HEAD Button & Sprung beds are 100 per cent recyclable, and chemical free. The company picks up and responsibly disposes of your old mattress on delivery. Eliza double bedstead, from £695. buttonandsprung.com

WELL SERVED

After studying design at Central Saint Martins, Reiko Kaneko discovered the joy of working with ceramicists in The Potteries, Stoke-on-Trent. She designs bespoke pieces often decorated using Japanese brush strokes. From £17. reikokaneko.co.uk

I N T E R I O R S

DESIGN NOTES

Homeware with both style and substance. By Carole Annett

SIMPLE, SUSTAINABLE STYLE

Canvas Home joined forces with potter Linda Bloomfield for this collection inspired by the beauty of hand-crafted objects. From £11.50. canvashomestore.co.uk

NICE WEAVE Lisbon, from Designers Guild, is woven from 90 per cent recycled yarns from the fashion industry. £45 a metre. designersguild.com

ART OF GLASS At Cox London, furniture and lighting is made to order in its London foundry and workshop. This chandelier, inspired by fungus, was a special commission for Collect art fair. £POA. coxlondon.com

SLENDER STYLE

Ochre designs emphasise the beauty and imperfection of natural materials. Sable bench with leather clad frame, llama and merino wool felt cushion, £2,970. ochre.net

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SECON D TIME A ROU N D AFFECTIONATELY YOURS

Love Welcomes works with Syrian refugees in Greece to help them build a better future through income generation. Pillow, woven from an old life vest, available in stone, sapphire or rose, £35. lovewelcomes.org

REUSE, RE-INSTATE

Jamb has established a worldwide reputation for top notch antique fireplaces, predominantly from the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. From £12,000. jamb.co.uk

ON POINTE I love the graceful balance of this design. Torii stool, from £1,748, at Porada. porada.it

GREEN CRUSH

More commonly used for walls or floors, Joyce Wang Studio brings a new dimension to terrazzo – chips of marble sealed in cement. Flint collection by Joyce Wang, tables from £4,725, at Artemest. artemest.com

1 Zomi large glass vase, £35. kalinko.com 2 Hanging planter, £23. oggetto.com 3 Green bowl, £17.50. therecycledglasswarecompany.co.uk 4 Blue glass jug by Traidcraft, £18. ethicalshop.org 5 Pale green lip vase, £35. moderncountrystyleinteriors.co.uk

IN THE SWING The Oak and Rope Company use only sustainable oak, creating firewood briquettes from the workshop sawdust and selling them for charity. Personalised round swing, from £215. theoakandrope company.co.uk

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THE INSIDER F O C U S

PAINT IT GREEN

Natural paints contain plant oils and tree resins instead of petrochemicals and fillers used in plastic paints. A friendlier option for walls that need to breathe

1 Little Greene manufactures both water-based and vegetable oilbased paints. Portland stone and Atomic red, from £22.50 for a litre. littlegreene.com 2 Isabella, a heathery hue from Edward Bulmer’s nursery collection, is made with natural ingredients and covers in just two coats. £45 for 2.5 litre emulsion. edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk 3 Claypaint in Delilah from Earthborn – free from acrylics, oils and vinyls. £43 for 2.5 litres. earthbornpaints.co.uk 4 Walls painted in Metropolitan, cabinets in Hale Navy, both Natura paint by Benjamin Moore, certified as asthma and allergy friendly. From £26.50 for 0.94 litres, flat or semi-gloss finish. benjaminmoorepaint.co.uk

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D E S I G N

LIT T L E BL ACK BOOK

Q & A

NANCY JOHNSTON The founder of Tengri on the importance of provenance

KNICKKNACKS Secrets of Green. secretsof green.com

FABRICS Tengri’s Khangai Noble Fabrics. tengri.co.uk

GLASSWARE Nude, Chill collection. nudeglass.com

Unsung design hero? The late great architect, Louis Kahn. He was known for his modernist architecture and for being a bit of an oddball and brick whisperer. He believed that materials had a stubborn sense of their final form and his legacy of work continues to transform and inspire people.

What was your most recent find? A beautifully crafted 1930s tapestry bag that I found in a vintage shop while hiking in the Yorkshire Dales. I purchased it from the original owner and fell in love with the pattern design and its history. House warming present? Some plant life from Petersham Nurseries. You can’t go wrong with plants, they have a calming effect.

Where do you find inspiration? Nature, nomadic

culture and architecture. What’s the last piece of art you bought? Sunrise by

Adam Blencowe (below). It was a piece I commissioned for Tengri’s Sky exhibition using Khangai Yak noble fibres. What gadget could you not live without?

My mobile phone. If it weren’t for this little bit of technology, I don’t think I would be able to handle the many relationships I have with people dotted all over the world with whom I’ve built a transparent and global supply chain for Tengri.

What should never have seen the light of day? Artex! It’s

What would you never throw away? Old notebooks and

a nightmare to get rid of and the use of asbestos to create it makes it a toxic nightmare to dispose of.

sketches. It’s always interesting to look back at them.

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

Most extravagant thing you’ve bought for your home? The two things you spend most of your life on are your feet and your bed, so I invested in a hand-crafted Savoir Bed and a pair of handmade Joseph Cheaney shoes.

CUSHIONS The Good Shepherd. thenewcrafstmen.com

GIFT Sustainable Home by Christine Liu. anthropologie.com

Whose home would you most like to have a nose around?

Bethan Gray. I love her furniture and find her designs and background intriguing. Which designers do you have your eye on? I work with so

many brilliant emerging designers as part of Tengri’s social enterprise model, but I’m currently obsessed with the work of textile artist Pamela Wiley. What do you collect? Fabrics. Being a tactile and visual person, I find an emotional connection with them. What’s beside your bed? A bottle of essential lavender oil and a philosophical book on wisdom. How can we live more self-sufficiently? Reduce, reuse, repair and shop for desirable, well-designed and quality goods. It’s so important to have an awareness of how things are made and the provenance of materials. tengri.co.uk n

LITTLE LUXURIES Mongolian yak’s milk soap. lhamouraustralia.com

ETHICAL HOMEWARE Ecosophy. ecosophy.co.uk

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LOOKING FOR YOUR PERFECT FRAGRANCE?

Speak to a Fragrance Foundation Specialist in store wearing our pin to ďŹ nd the ideal fragrance for you. fragrancefoundationuk

@FragranceFDN_UK

FragranceFoundationUK

FragranceFoundationUK

www.fragrancefoundation.org.uk

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EAT DRINK ESCAPE

E C O

FOOD & TRAVEL

T R A V E L

THE GREEN ROOM Thank goodness high-end hotels are driving the environmental agenda, says Juliet Kinsman, and with more than mere lip service Alila Villas Uluwatu in Bali has installed a filtration and bottling system, making the resort plastic free

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I

magine you’re given the choice between two beautiful luxury hotels – both suit your budget, promise comfortable experiences in stylish surroundings and are in ideal locations. Yet one of your potential hosts seems to care that bit more about having a positive impact on the world. How do you know? There’s a section on their website listing the wonderful ways in which they consider their energy consumption, plus they pay their staff a living wage and only use ethical suppliers. Maybe you notice the EarthCheck accreditation? And it’s been recommended by a sustainability enthusiast you trust (see boxout). By contrast, the other hotel doesn’t reference any corporate social responsibility, even in the small print. So which hotel do you choose? For increasing numbers of us, it’s a no-brainer. The sustainable one.

Alila Villas Uluwatu in Bali is the island’s first zero-waste hotel

We’re all finally waking up to the need for hotels to be greener. Because that’s what we hotel lovers are looking for – as long as the do-gooding doesn’t come at a higher cost or compromise our comfort. Surveys say we’re choosing hospitality that’s kinder and more considerate. But is it responsible management of energy, carbon, water and waste that gets us clicking that ‘booking’ button? Sure – when the ethical option also involves treating ourselves to the finer things like sumptuous bed linens, delicious food, drink and interior design, that are worth Instagramming about. I think we all know why hotels should be more sustainable – I don’t need to dazzle/disturb you with statistics that evoke images of landfills spilling over, underpaid foreign staff or dolphins choking on straws. Nor do I need to paint a picture of how much nicer it is to stay somewhere that has a spirit of positivity and kindness. What we’re grasping is the need to change the way we talk about all things eco – we need to language all that boring, geeky back-of-house operational stuff in a way that makes it interesting. When Alila hotels announced they were the first zero-waste hotel on the island, they did exactly that. So when I was at awardwinning, architecturally arresting Alila Uluwatu in Bali, I left the selfie brigade posing by the infinity pool to go and nerd out with a peek at the island’s first zerowaste hotel filtration and bottling system, which enables them to be plastic-free – and honestly, it was fascinating. It’s up to all of us to contribute to the sustainability conversation at a deeper level and ask how we really know who’s doing good and how. Which hotels are really

PHOTO: © ALILA HOTELS & RESORTS; © ALEX FRADKIN

Alila Villas Uluwatu in Bali practise what they preach when it comes to sustainability

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FOOD & TRAVEL

Canada’s Fogo Island Inn is a place-making triumph

HOTELS ARE FRANTICALLY TRYING TO BE SEEN POLISHING THEIR HALOS – SO IT’S BECOMING HARDER TO TELL WHO THE TRUE HEROES ARE

PHOTO: © ALILA HOTELS & RESORTS; © ALEX FRADKIN

ABOVE & BELOW: Award-winning Fogo Island Inn in Canada was designed to boost the local economy

BOOK IT Alila Uluwatu From £547 per night per room. alilahotels.com Fogo Island Inn Rooms from $1,975 CAD. fogoislandinn.ca

striving to have a positive social, environmental and economic impact? It comes down to transparency. The tourism industry is swimming in greenwash. Hotels are frantically trying to be seen polishing their halos – so it’s becoming harder to tell who the true heroes are. Whose responsibility is it to ensure hotels walk their talk of having a conscience? Is it up to the government to legislate and regulate? Is it up to the hotel to prove responsibility when it comes to their sustainability? Or is it simply in the hands of the consumer making the purchasing decisions to scrutinise and challenge? It’s all of the above. For me, the poster star for the new generation of sustainable design-led hotels is Fogo Island Inn in Canada. This award-winning 29-suite hotel was created by the visionary and iconoclast, Zita Cobb, who devised the place as part of a forward-thinking business model to create an economic engine for a dwindling fishing-reliant community. In the process, the ethical entrepreneur made an unlikely tourist destination out of an outlying North American isle in the Atlantic. Yes, it was born from her initial philanthropy, which launched the project through an arts foundation, but having a purpose higher up their agenda meant profit soon followed. There was investment in excellent design and true integrity shown through the highest-quality, hand-crafted furniture. Cobb’s approach to rebuilding an economy affected by embargos on cod fishing resulted in a placemaking triumph. It’s not just altruistic independent hotels that deserve to take a bow. Some of the big chains are demonstrating they’re – well – nicer. If you call yourself an eco-warrior, Hilton might not be the first accommodation provider to spring to mind. Yet the hotel and resort behemoth has long since had a sense of ethical purpose. One of the first to banish plastic straws, you can’t accuse them of greenwashing when anyone can track the environmental impact of their 570 hotels around the world through their dedicated corporate responsibility performance measurement platform, LightStay. Transparency, honesty and intelligent discourse is what we need from everyone. May 2019 | COUNTRYANDTOWNHOUSE.CO.UK | 107

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FOOD & TRAVEL

SO WHO SHOULD YOU TRUST?

THE LONG RUN A collection of some of the world’s most committed conservationists, lodges, retreats and parks, The Long Run is guided by the four Cs – Culture, Community, Conservation and Commerce. Director Delphine MalleretKing loves the Wolwedans luxury camps in southern Namibia (above), whose aim is to support NamibRand Nature Reserve – over 400,000 acres of undisturbed nature, making it one of Southern Africa’s largest private reserves and also one of the most unspoilt places on the planet. Lapa Rios (below), is a 1,000acre private nature reserve and ecolodge in Costa Rica, owned by John and Karen Lewis. ‘No matter how you slice it, a rainforest left standing is worth more than it is cut down,’ they say. Quite right. Just above the point where Golfo Dulce meets the wild Pacific Ocean, the Osa Peninsula contains 2.5 per cent of the world’s biodiversity.

BOUTECO Pardon the flagrant selfpromotion of my eco-venture, Bouteco, but it recommends hotels I know to have big hearts, as well as great taste in interiors and design. I love ecolodge Kasbahdu Toubkal in Morocco for its work empowering the local Berber community, the Datai in Malaysia for its permaculture gardens, Mashpi Lodge in Ecuador for its scientific research centre, Bankside in south London for its artists-in-residence and Shinta Mani in Cambodia for its anti-poaching work and hospitality school.

PEBBLE MAGAZINE This digital lifestyle magazine is dedicated to making you live a greener life, from organic homeware to ethical skincare. Creator and editor Georgina Wilson-Powell’s hotel picks include The Scarlet Hotel in Cornwall, which ‘feels too luxurious to be good for the planet’, proving sustainable doesn’t always have to mean quirky, thanks to a reedfiltered natural pool and every measure taken to cut carbon emissions and waste. Plus The Gallivant, in Rye, East Sussex, for its award-winning commitment to local fare.

CONSIDERATE HOTELIERS

NOW FORCE FOR GOOD ALLIANCE

Xenia zu Hohenlohe, founding partner of Considerate Hoteliers, recommends Heckfield Place, Hampshire, with its composting system, biomass centre powering water and central heating, and anaerobic digester. She notes that Oetker Collection’s The Lanesborough in London upholds over 25 Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Standards plus the UN Global Compact. Their Green Pearl team recognises CSR staff work, while the Library Bar staff won an award for salvaging the peel from fruit for cocktail garnishes.

NOW curates a collection of hotels showing genuine commitment to sustainability, raising the bar on accountability and transparency. Co-founder Alexa Poortier says, ‘The Soneva brand is an inspiring leader on sustainable luxury but I also love Genghis Khan Retreat in Mongolia, where 100 per cent of revenue supports the nomad community and young people, in helping them get an education in a place where the indigenous culture is at risk of disappearing due to climate change.’

REGENERATIVE RESORTS These boutique eco-hotels and resorts are committed to environmental and social impact, which encourages people and places to coexist in harmony. Amanda Ho, co-founder, recommends Reserva do Ibitipoca in Brazil (above) for its organic agriculture and historic preservation. Larger than the state park that borders it, there’s also an 18th-century farmhouse and a stable of Mangalarga horses. Bio Habitat in Colombia (above right), invites you to get lost in its natural beauty and revel in biodiversity. n

Bon Voyage Boutique Hotels For The Conscious Traveller is a coffeetable book published by Gestalten that showcases new generation green-but-glam getaways.

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TIME TO CHANGE YOUR VIEWS Come on a JC Journey

PILGRIMAGES SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA HOLY LAND ROME & ASSISI PATMOS ST PAUL IN CORINTH ST BENEDICT IN ROME MEDJUGORJE NORTHERN LIGHTS GOZO & MALTA FAITH THROUGH ART, ST PETERSBURG AND MANY MORE…

BATTLEFIELDS WATERLOO SOMME MONTE CASSINO ANZIO NORMANDY PALESTINE BOSNIA ARNHEM OP MARKET GARDEN AND MANY MORE…

VILLAS HOTELS CHALETS WINTER SUN

01886 812862 www.jcjourneys.com JC Journeys.indd 1

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FOOD & TRAVEL

TEN REASONS WHY I LOVE...

TARRY IN TAROUDANT

Known as Mini Marrakech, this old Souss Valley trading town makes a gentle alternative. Like Marrakech it offers medina, souks and central squares, but has a much quieter and more relaxed vibe. Stroll to the souks, pause for coffee in one of the two main squares, then ride home in a horse-drawn calèche. Lunch at Dar al Hossoun or Dar Zitoune, pedal bicycles round the ramparts and take a car to Tioute for a donkey ride. On the way, you are almost bound to spot goats climbing Argan trees, a marvellous sight.

RIAD DAR LOUISA, TAROUDANT

1

Right on trend: a homely, ecominded private house with hotel service that relies on local materials, produce, staff and traditions.

2 T R A V E L

N E W S

THE HOTEL WIZARD Taroudant is the new Marrakech, says Fiona Duncan

The owner, Louise, a true oneoff, as creative and generous as her Moroccan home. You may not meet her, but you’ll feel her warmheartedness.

3

Tucked down a back street, the unexpected size and elegant contemporary design, by renowned duo Eric Ossart and Arnaud Maurières, of the traditionally built, rammed earth house and its verdant inner courtyard with central pool.

4 5 6 7

The two sun-trap roof terraces…

… and the peace, broken only by birdsong.

THREE TAROUDANT HOTELS Rooms that offer so much more than a view

Dar al Hossoun (1) On the outskirts of town, a luxury eco-lodge with spa set in wonderful gardens, also designed by Ossart and Maurières; excellent food. alhossoun.com. Dar Zitoune (2) A boutique hotel with lovely gardens and a huge heated swimming pool. Choose from villa suites or ‘Berber tents’ set round a smaller pool. darzitoune.com. La Maison Anglaise (3) English-owned, sustainably-run guest house offering cultural holidays that connect guests with local people and the environment. cecu.co.uk

The books, pictures, hangings (the lining of a Berber tent decorates the dining room) and sense of being at home.

8

Fatima, the fabulous cook (everything so prettily and wittily presented), who is also an expert masseuse and presides over the inhouse wood-fired hammam…

9

… and Mohammed, who looks after the house with smiles and charm and takes guests to the souq for inthe-know shopping.

10

That generosity: look at the price! ‘I want to share what I have,’ says Louise.

ON TH E T R AV EL R A DA R

Sleeps up to ten but, however many in the party, the whole house is yours for £85 per person, including breakfast, lunch, dinner, full service and laundry. 07710 313755. darlouisa.com

GOING AU NATUREL Natural products from small English houses, such as AS Apothecary and Therapi, mind-and-body treatments and a resident naturopath are all on the menu at the sustainable, holistic Coach House Spa at Beaverbrook near Leatherhead. The spa itself has been designed by leading stained-glass artist Brian Clarke. beaverbrook.co.uk

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

PLASTIC NOT SO FANTASTIC Leading the way for conscious travellers: Barbados, which has banned the importation, retail, sale and use of petrobased single-use plastic. And Kenya, which banned plastic bags in August 2017. Nearly two years on, the fines remain draconian but the clean-up is changing lives.

The cosy, firelit sitting room for cool evenings.

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FOOD & TRAVEL PORTUGAL

LESS IS MORE Anastasia Bernhardt travels to a lesser-known part of Portugal

Grab a bike from the reception of São Lourenço do Barrocal for a self-guided tour around the estate

P

PHOTOS: © NELSON GARRIDO; SANDRA PAGAIMO

eople from Alentejo in southern Portugal are notoriously laid-back. It probably has something to do with the mercury hitting 40˚C in summer. I’m sat on a slab of ancient granite with local archaeologist Manuel Calado, who tells me a joke to illustrate the point: ‘A man goes into the barber, his head drowsily bowed to his chest. The barber asks, “Beard or hair?”. Without lifting his head, the man replies, “Beard”. The barber tells him to lift his chin... “In which case, you’d better trim my hair.”’ While the builders of Stonehenge rolled the famous bluestone 140 miles from Pembrokeshire, Calado guessed that his ancestors wouldn’t have Rooms and apartments are a home away from home

bothered to source the megalithic monument we are sat beneath from such great distances. He was right. We walk 150 metres to see the rockface it was cleaved from. Calado is an expert in prehistoric megaliths and was approached by entrepreneur José António Uva (formerly an investment banker in London) to preserve the ancient landscape of São Lourenço do Barrocal, his family’s 19th-century farming village, as it was converted into a high-end hotel. It is a masterclass in stripped back simplicity. Portuguese architect Eduardo Souto de Moura (best-known in the UK for the Serpentine Gallery pavilion) won a Golden Lion at the Venice Architecture Biennale last year for his non-interventionist approach. This lesser-known part of Portugal is a far cry from the overdeveloped Algarve and Lisbon (just two hours away). It is one of the few places where Tour the estate with megalith expert Manuel Calado you can connect with the ‘real’ Portugal and Uva clearly feels a responsibility to preserve the area’s authenticity. As such, he has developed a sustainable model that gives back to the community. The 780-hectare estate remains as a working farm with most staff coming from nearby. There is a vast organic vegetable garden, which feeds two farm-to-table restaurants, a small-scale winery, estate-made olive oil and a spa by Susanne Kaufmann, the doyenne of sustainable beauty. Once plans to build a photovoltaic plant are realised, the estate will be entirely self-sufficient. There are also plots available for private homes, with strict guidelines to protect the land, which has Guests dine on fresh produce hardly changed in the 7,000 years since prehistoric man from the hotel’s organic garden erected the megalith in the hotel’s grounds. These rocks can’t be moved, and are instead ingeniously integrated into the designs, such as the property proposed by British designer John Pawson which will wrap around a huge boulder. At a time when we crave simplicity in all aspects of life, hoteliers take note – this is how to nail sustainable luxury. BOOK IT: Doubles from £172 a night, including breakfast,

through Mr & Mrs Smith. 0330 100 3180. mrandmrssmith.com n May 2019 | COUNTRYANDTOWNHOUSE.CO.UK | 111

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SRI LANK A

Luxury meets sustainability at these four eco-minded hotels, says Phillip Lionel

▲ BEST FOR YOGA AND SURF

Talalla Retreat, Talalla

This Sri Lankan resort instils a unique feeling of bliss and meaning that truly needs to be experienced. The friendly staff and genuine love put into the place is infectious, which is why guests keep coming back to one of the longest-standing resorts in Sri Lanka. Opened in 2005, following the disastrous tsunami, Talalla Retreat helped local villagers with community programmes and hired a large percentage of them to make up the resort’s employee base. The ten acres of lush green grounds are now scattered with endemic

plants and animals. Playful monkeys swing from the palm trees as guests work on their tan by the pool and monitor lizards lumber past the yoga shalas during morning vinyasa class. For an extra special treat, help the local fishermen bring in their nets at sunrise and join in the excitement as they celebrate their catch. You can also expect worldclass wellness, yoga and surf retreats, though you can come just to unwind on the mellow shores – regular beach cleans where staff and guests get their hands dirty while doing their bit for the environment ensure the surroundings retain their beauty. Indeed, the resort takes a strong stance on being eco-conscious and utilises a closed-loop waste management system which is the first of its kind to be used in the tropics. Bravo! BOOK IT: Seaview villas, from £116. talallaretreat.com

▲ BEST FOR FAMILIES

Cape Weligama, Weligama

Perched on a cliff face 40 metres above the Indian Ocean, this vast resort contains majestic villas and suites only a second's walk from magnificent panoramic views (especially spectacular at sunrise and sunset). The snazzy surroundings might distract momentarily from a number of environmental strategies, including recycling water, energy efficiency systems (including solar power) and a desire to encourage guests to build awareness around sustainability. This is also a perfect family holiday destination thanks to a dedicated children's activity centre, babysitting on tap, and a child-friendly restaurant. Dive into snorkelling, experience surf lessons at the local beach, or cycle through the village to get a feel for the local culture. The resort features a range of restaurants, each with its own unique twist. For a Sri Lankan breakfast like no other, order a selection of delicious traditional foods in the on-side restaurant including the likes of egg hoppers and dhal curry. After breakfast, stroll up the hill and lay down by the shimmering signature moon pool complete with scenic infinity views of the bay. For the premium experience, remember to order the tantalising tuna tartare by the poolside. Epic. BOOK IT: Doubles from £385 B&B. resplendentceylon.com/capeweligama

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PHOTOS: © TOM PARKER

SUGAR, SPICE AND ALL THINGS NICE


FOOD & TRAVEL

▲ BEST FOR AYURVEDA

PHOTOS: © TOM PARKER

Santani, Kandy

‘Luxurious tranquility’ perfectly sums up the wonders that await at this peaceful spa haven. Enjoy pure serenity and idyllic fivestar surroundings, all just a monkey swing away from the world heritage Knuckles Mountain Range. The chirping of jungle birds is the only sound to be heard from the balcony of one of 20 stylish modern villas set in a peaceful valley. The food is also a draw, with both perfectly spiced Sri Lankan curries and delicious Western meals – all can be enjoyed as your eyes feast on the 360-degree mountain views, best enjoyed at sunset with a chilled glass of chardonnay. In true eco-friendly style, 80 per cent of the produce is sourced locally. Santani also runs a replanting program, growing over 1,000 plants to date. And, for an exploration into traditional Sri Lankan medicine, Santani offers superlative Ayurvedic consultations, with a doctor available for one-on-ones and highly recommended, rejuvenating treatments. The spa features chic, minimalistic architecture, which won the 2016/17 Geoffrey Bawa Award for Excellence in Architecture. Daily yoga and meditation classes are also offered for zen-seekers. BOOK IT: Doubles from £295. santani.lk

▲ BEST FOR TEA DRINKERS

Ceylon Tea Trails, Hatton

The world’s first tea bungalow resort lies in the enchanting Golden Valley of Ceylon Tea. Dotted around a calm turquoise lake are five luxurious bungalows that originally served as tea planters’ accommodation in the colonial era but have now been beautifully transformed to feel like your very own characterful home. Unlike at home, however, round-the-clock butler service means you can request a refreshing cup of single-origin Ceylon tea or indulge in a pampering green tea bath, scattered with aromatic flower petals, at the touch of a buzzer. The surrounding region contains thousands of acres of tea fields, perfect for exploring on a romantic stroll – or, for a spot of healthy competition, challenge your

loved one to a Pimm's-fuelled round of croquet or team up for a romantic tandem kayak around the glassy lake at sunset. Don’t miss a guided tour of the Dunkeld Tea Factory. Here, you will not only learn the entire process of tea production, but they also provide the freshest tea tasting possible – direct from the fields that are within view from the factory windows. This commitment to the environment is evident throughout, with mountain spring fed swimming pools and organic toiletries made from ingredients grown in the local hills. BOOK IT: Bungalows from £740. resplendentceylon.com/teatrails n

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FOOD & TRAVEL

Q & A

THE BUCKET LIST

Gary Barlow taps into his inner Bond in Jamaica. By Holly Rubenstein

Ibiza’s charming Old Town

What destination most reminds you of childhood holidays? Ibiza. I was about seven when we started going there, and that was our first holiday abroad.

Can you recommend us a hidden gem? One of the most beautiful places I’ve ever visited is Montauk, in the Hamptons, right at the end of Long Island. It’s particularly pretty offseason. If you get a lovely blustery sort of day out there it’s just magnificent. The whole of the US east coast – Maine, even as far north as Nova Scotia – I’ve done all that and it’s amazing.

The Galápagos Islands are top of his bucket list

Portland Head Light in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

The Galápagos Islands, because the last time I went to the Maldives, I felt like I was in Disneyland. I feel like they’ve sculpted it so much now that it’s almost from a movie. In the Galápagos you’re getting an absolute history of nature and I’d love to see it.

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

WHAT’S AT THE TOP OF YOUR BUCKET LIST?

The untouched Bartolomé Island

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Byron Bay is etched in Gary’s memory

You’ve toured the world many times over. Where was the most memorable? Australia last year. There was a place called Wategos Beach, in Byron Bay, where we had the most unbelievable four-hour lunch, after which we surfed, and finished off with a long walk. When you need to unwind where do you escape to? The Cotswolds. We live out there. It’s so beautiful and a real tempo change from the city. It’s all about eating local food, walking the dogs and, of course, hitting the pub.

Ian Fleming penned some of the Bond stories at GoldenEye

What is your favourite hotel? San Ysidro Ranch in Santa Barbara, California. Oh my God, it’s just uber romantic – perfect for a honeymoon and the food is like nothing you’ve ever tasted.

At GoldenEye you can swim from your room to the spa

What is your favourite city? Berlin. Just drive around it. There are so many little interesting areas to explore alongside the big sights like the Brandenburg Gate and the Wall.

If you had to recommend one place for us to visit, which would it be? GoldenEye in Jamaica. Ian Fleming wrote some of the Bond stories there, and his house still stands. Jamaica is an incredible island and the hotel’s setting means the sea runs into a lagoon behind the hotel rooms. I remember swimming from my room to the spa – it was unbelievable.

Where do you always eat well? New York has the best food in the world. I go to The Spotted Pig, Peter Luger’s for steak, Nobu for Japanese... I could go on. And, New York is the only place I eat pizza.

Early bird catches the best powder

Where have you learned something new about yourself? Los Angeles.

Where do you keep going back to? The French Alps to ski – I love Courchevel and Val d’Isere. I’m up early and ski until they shut the slopes with a long lunch in the middle. It’s the best holiday.

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

Syndey is particularly magical at Christmas

I did a little escape there in the early 2000s when our son was about six months old. No one knows me there, so I could just spend time thinking. It’s a creative town, so you feel its energy and, ultimately, it led me back to music. I felt good and unafraid about being creative.

LA never fails to inspire creativity

WHERE WAS YOUR HAPPIEST HOLIDAY? SYDNEY AT CHRISTMAS. AS A FAMILY, WE HUNG OUT AT THE BEACH, CLIMBED OVER THE HARBOUR BRIDGE AND WATCHED THE NEW YEAR’S EVE FIREWORKS FROM A BOAT ON THE WATER. A Better Me by Gary Barlow (Blink Publishing) is available now in audio, print and ebook. May 2019 | COUNTRYANDTOWNHOUSE.CO.UK | 115

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C&TH ONLINE

THIS MONTH

by COUNTRY & TOWN HOUSE This April you’ll find a whole month of sustainability focused content online, from zero-waste food guides to daily eco-fashion and beauty buys on the Luxury List. Here’s a taste of what’s in store…

Four eco-travel destinations getting it right 1

2

1

Dharana at Shillim, India This eco-retreat and spa is located in the heart of a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the Sahyadris mountain range in southern India. Guests are encouraged to take nature walks through the rice fields, bamboo plantations and organic gardens at Dharana at Shillim Estate, where everything is focused toward environmental sustainability and Ayurvedic wellness principles. Visitors will learn the philosophy of ‘Dharana’, promoting wellbeing in line with the forces of nature. shillim.in

2

The Scarlet, UK If you want to stay closer to home for a more, well, eco eco-escape, head to The Scarlet in North Cornwall, with its solar panels, biomass boilers, and upcycling towel programmes. They even have a comprehensive list of 101 ways they are making themselves more sustainable. Perched on a cliff top with breathtaking views, there are few places better positioned to consider the importance of protecting our planet. scarlethotel.co.uk

Read the rest of this article at bit.ly/eco_travel

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Villa Lena, Italy Re-opening this May, Villa Lena in Tuscany has been completely redesigned with a drive toward carbon neutrality. Largely powered by solar energy, a new light and rain pavilion will host a water recycling plant and collection system, re-using water and contributing to its sustainability. The villa also features a farm-to-table organic restaurant which benefits from the estate’s biodynamic agriculture programme. villa-lena.it

4

4

Kyambura Gorge Eco-tourism Project, Uganda The Kyambura Gorge Eco-tourism Project, in partnership with Uganda Wildlife Authority and Volcanoes Safaris, has been safeguarding the gorge’s fragile ecosystem for a decade. Known as the ‘Valley of the Apes’, this Ugandan wildlife hotspot is home to chimpanzees, red tailed monkeys, and black and white colobus monkeys. Guests can experience a new series of walks for 2019, in the eco buffer zone and the wetland. volcanoessafaris.com

countryandtownhouse.co.uk

27/03/2019 14:52


FOOD & TRAVEL

THIS MON TH

SNACK ON THAT

Over half of caught seafood is discarded as offcuts. Swap your usual potato packet for (often disposed-of) salmon skin crisps. High in protein, collagen and omega 3, they’re as good for you as they are for the planet. sea-chips.co.uk

N E W S

GASTRO GOSSIP

WASTE NOT D&D London has rolled out a Waste Not, Want More initiative across its restaurants in association with The Felix Project to tackle food waste. Hotspots including Sartoria and Bluebird Café have introduced upcycled dishes made from scraps, while Quaglino’s takes the ticket for most sustainable cocktail – even the cup is edible. danddlondon.com

Fish crisps, anyone? By Clementina Jackson

STOCK UP On conscious condiments, made from ingredients that would otherwise go to waste. rubiesintherubble.com WATCH The contents of your fridge – literally. Less food waste and smarter spending. Smarter FridgeCam, £149.99. store. smarter.am

DOWN TO EARTH

Love eating out but worried about the impact? One Planet Plate is the restaurant movement putting sustainability on the menu in over 1,000 eateries, with chefs worldwide devising dishes to show how they’re contributing to a better food future – whether by repurposing would-be food waste or guaranteeing a low carbon footprint. Tuck in, guiltfree. oneplanetplate.org

INTO THE WILD A new wave of souped-up sustainable supper clubs is here. Eco-retreat Loveland Farm’s wild food weekender is for foraging, farm-to-fork masterclasses and eco pods (26-28 April, loveland.farm), while Nomadic’s hidden woodland feasts (think wild, foraged ingredients and open-flame cooking) are a night to remember. experiencenomadic.com

CARRY A bamboo eating set on your person at all times for plastic-free on-the-go meals. £24. formahouse. co.uk

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

BUY France’s favourite sea salt, harvested naturally and sustainably. La Baleine is now available at ocado.com

SEAFOOD REVOLUTION

Pesky Fish is making waves by buying seafood directly from boats that catch it sustainably and delivering it to London addresses that same day. Top restaurants are already signed up, so why aren’t you? A tasty way to mend a broken supply chain. peskyfish.co.uk May 2019 | COUNTRYANDTOWNHOUSE.CO.UK | 117

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FOOD & TRAVEL R E C I P E

SHELL OUT

FOODIE TA L ES

Chef Mikkel Karstad urges you to turn your attention to sustainable and under-fished species. This crab salad is just the ticket

T

METHOD Place the crab claws in a saucepan and cover with water. Then add 1 tbsp. sea salt, two lemon slices, whole peppercorns and dill sprigs. Bring the claws to the boil for 5–7 minutes. Turn off the heat and leave in the brine for around 20 minutes. Once the claws are cool, bash them lightly with a hammer and remove the meat with a fork. Snap off the ends of the asparagus and rinse in cold water. Then slice them finely and place them in a bowl with the fresh crabmeat. Top and tail the radishes and rinse in cold water before slicing them finely. Add them to the bowl with crabmeat and asparagus. Add olive oil, lemon zest and juice, salt and freshly ground pepper to taste and toss well. Chop the dill and sprinkle on top. Add more lemon, salt and freshly ground pepper if needed. Serve the salad with toasted rye bread as a small lunch dish or a light summer meal. Recipe extracted from Gøne Fishing, published by Clearview Books, £35 n

CRAB SALAD WITH ASPARAGUS, DILL, RADISH & TOASTED RYE BREAD INGREDIENTS SERVES FOUR » 300g crabmeat (approx 1kg crab claws, boiled as instructed) » 10 green asparagus » 1 bunch radishes » 3–4 tbsp. olive oil » 1 unwaxed lemon » Salt and freshly ground pepper » 1 bunch dill

SNACKING ON SEAL LIVER AND EATING STALKS What’s your food philosophy? I use lots of vegetables, taking advantage of how they change in taste and texture throughout the year. For example, a carrot that comes out of the earth in June is crispy, delicate and fresh, so it should be eaten raw, but three to four months later, and after a little ‘beating’ from the weather, it has a totally different flavour. Most vivid childhood food memory? Holidays spent with my grandmother, eating delicious homemade meals, made using home-grown vegetables, fish and game caught by my uncle. Favourite ingredient currently in season? Wild herbs like ramps, goutweed, garlic mustard and spruce. In just a month they’ll be gone, and we’ll have to wait another year for them. They’re great for pesto, soups, fresh salads or as a garnish. Top tip for reusing products that would otherwise go to waste? Don’t throw out herb stalks, they are very good chopped and used to marinate meat or fish that will be grilled or baked in the oven. The stalks from broccoli or cauliflower are also great if you peel and thinly slice into a salad. Their delicate nutty taste and horseradish-like sharpness works well. Most memorable meal out? Sailing between huge icebergs in Disko Bay in Greenland, in minus ten degrees. We saw a local hunter lug a seal he had shot onto the ice, where he skinned and cleaned it. He took out its liver and offered it to us, which was a big gesture as usually they save it for themselves. Seasoned only with salt, I ate slices of raw seal liver for the first time in the middle of the breathtaking, unspoilt nature. When you’re not in the kitchen, where are you? With my family and preferably outdoors; I enjoy being out in nature, gathering edible things, and cooking in the wild. What’s in your fridge right now? Eggs from my hens, Parmesan and fresh vegetables, so that I can always whip up a good, simple meal.

© MIKKEL KARSTAD & CLEARVIEW BOOKS. PHOTOS: © ANDERS SCHØNNEMANN

he waters of the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean are full of delicious seafood, and yet we tend to only ever eat five different types of fish. This leads to overfishing and the depletion of marine life, and it also means that people miss out on tasting some of the utterly delicious seafood that’s simply lesser known – which local fishmongers have plenty of access to, just not enough demand. Crab is one of my favourites – it’s highly sustainable as it’s caught in pots, which is a low-level and humane way of fishing, and keeps numbers up. Crab is in season in the UK from April to November. It’s asparagus and radish season right now too, so buy local for the freshest salad of the moment.

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FOOD & TRAVEL COUNTRY

R E S T A U R A N T

R E V I E W S

FORK & FIELD Chefs consider their footprint as standard, says Clementina Jackson

HECKFIELD PLACE, Hampshire

A stroll around 400 acres of Heckfield’s countryside will help you catch glimpses of the hotel’s biodynamic principles in action. The name to know is culinary director Skye Gyngell, who you’ll be familiar with from her work at Spring, Somerset House. Her seed-to-plate philosophy goes further than any other, with almost nothing going to waste, and menus changing with the seasons and the biodynamic farm’s output – but choose from the likes of carpaccio of River Test trout or roasted wild sea bass with borlotti beans and slowcooked courgettes. Vegetarians are well looked after with the unmatched quality of the seasonal leaves and buttered greens – they really are good enough to eat on their own. Mains from £23. heckfieldplace.com

THE GR E AT ESCA PE RESTAURANTS WORTH PLANNING YOUR WEEKEND EXODUS AROUND

THE SMALL HOLDING, KENT Will Devlin knows what the new generation want: sustainable, hyperlocal and seasonal are the lay of the land at his recently opened restaurant. The farm-to-fork journey rarely exceeds ten-feet and features 200 varieties of fruit and veg as well as rarebreed pigs and poultry. Weekly foraging trips mean you can get your hands dirty too. thesmallholding.restaurant

TOWN

NATIVE, SE1

With so many chefs hot on the trail of ‘sustainability’ as the buzzword du jour, it’s reassuring to know that people like Ivan Tisdall-Downes and Imogen Davis have been doing it for years – and for the right reasons. The game served at Native is shot in Yorkshire, herbs are foraged locally and the nose-to-tail philosophy extends to the veg, not because it’s cool, but because it’s best – both for flavour and the environment. And since upping sticks to near Borough Market, they’ve taken things up a notch. Meals start with brilliant snacks whipped up from leftovers and ‘waste’ products, my espresso Martini was made from coffee liqueur of dehydrated coffee grounds (the cup too) and last month they even put grey squirrel lasagne on the menu (it’s one of the most sustainable proteins apparently). Mains from £17. eatnative.co.uk

VIRGINIA PARK LODGE, CO. CAVAN IRELAND With acres of Cavan countryside, growing your own is a no-brainer – but being entirely self-sufficient takes great dedication. Richard Corrigan was adamant that everything served at his Lodge be local, fresh and seasonal, so hard graft in the kitchen gardens and myriad poly-tunnels began – and today, they produce enough food for the house as well as his London restaurants. virginiaparklodge.com

T H I S MON T H I’M ...

1 Finally sinking my teeth into Gizzi Erskine’s legendary plant-based burger. instagram.com/filthfoods 2 Discovering brilliant biodynamic wines alongside my blow dry. bladesoho.co.uk 3 Obsessed with the nose-to-tail pig nuggets at Tom Griffiths’ Flank markethalls.co.uk

ALCHEMILLA, NOTTINGHAM Just a few years ago, largely plantbased fine dining would’ve been almost unimaginable. Now, Alex Bond has been awarded three AA Rosettes for his cooking at Alchemilla, where vegetables reign supreme and meat settles into a supporting role. alchemillarestaurant.uk

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FOOD & DRINK

D R I N K

A DR IN K W ITH...

HAPPY HOUR

Alice Lascelles picks three (almost) guilt-free tipples

O

BOX FRESH

h the guilt. Not only do you have to tot up your units every time you have a drink these days – you have to calculate your carbon footprint too. But take heart. Drinks companies are increasingly doing their bit for the environment. The little guys may be the heroes of the piece, but big brands can be sustainable too: the Absolut distillery in Sweden is carbon neutral and aiming for zero emissions by 2040. Pick your battles with care. Here are three drinks to please the eco-warrior within:

Eco-friendly box wine is making a comeback – but this time it’s in a much more stylish guise. The Rogue is a range of no-nonsense, quaffable wines sourced from small, low-intervention producers. New for the summer will be a herbaceous sauvignon blanc and a fruity pinot noir from the Loire. So that’s all your picnic and festival drinks solved. £30 for three litres. morewine.eu

FRUITY LITTLE NUMBER

ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM

Even if the finer points of biodynamic winemaking are lost on you (just think: organic winemaking with bells on) you can’t fail to be charmed by this gorgeous blanc de noirs from the Aube, which marries uplifting freshness with mouth-watering notes of apricot and damson. A steal at £36. Fleury Blanc de Noirs champagne. bbr.com

Fifteen per cent of all profits from Elephant Gin goes towards supporting elephant charities Big Life Foundation and Space for Elephants. To date they’ve raised over £500,000. As luck would have it, the liquid is excellent too, with a hint of wormwood bitterness that makes a very sophisticated Martini. £29.15. 31dover.com

GILES COREN FOOD CRITIC AND TV PRESENTER

1

What are you drinking? Beer, vodka, gin – I’m trying to avoid wine as I fear it is the devil’s work.

2 3

Who are you drinking it with? My wife, Esther.

Favourite food and drink match? Caviar with Bollinger Grande Année or a pint of Pride with a ham sandwich.

4

What’s the most you’ve spent on a bottle of wine? £600 on a bottle of vintage Krug for a friend’s wedding anniversary at Claridge’s.

5

Hangover cure? The only cure for a hangover is a time machine to go back to last night and not drink.

6

If you could buy a drink for one person? I guess a non-alcoholic cocktail full of cyanide for Hitler in about 1922.

THE LAUGHING HEART

The wine list is 100 per cent organic, but there’s nothing hair-shirted about this slick little bar and kitchen on Hackney Road, which also boasts an offy in the basement. Sip crémant de Limoux by Etienne Fort with a plate of Morecambe Bay Oysters, or chow down on Saddleback pork chops and capers with a bottle of Sicilian red. thelaughingheartlondon.com

STAYING IN

NEGRONITA » 25ml Maestro Dobel Blanco Tequila » 25ml Martini Riserva Rubato » 25ml Campari » Stir over ice » Garnish with a lime wedge

7 8 9

Favourite bar? Ladies and Gents in Kentish Town. Lay down or drink now? I think I’ll lay down, please.

What was the last great bar you visited, and what did you have? Concorde Lounge at T5. Manhattan on the rocks, perfect, with three cherries.

10

What would you drink if it was your last night on earth? A toast to my children’s future. Truth, Love & Clean Cutlery, a guide to sustainable restaurants by Giles Coren & Jules Mercer (Blackwell & Ruth)

INSTAGRAM @ALICELASCELLES

GOING OUT

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UP FRONT

SPIRITED AWAY Bohemian blossoms Spring has technically sprung, but as we eagerly await that first breath of warmth, let whimsical, flowy Victoriana florals whisk you forward to the first garden party of the season. loveshackfancy.com

March 2019 | COUNTRYANDTOWNHOUSE.CO.UK | 27

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arty style, smarty prices decorative lighting from pooky.com

STOCKISTS GABRIELA HEARST gabrielahearst.com

LOUIS VUITTON louisvuitton.com

GUCCI @ matchesfashion.com

MOTHER OF PEARL motherofpearl.com

ISSEY MIYAKE isseymiyake.com KATHARINE HAMNETT katharinehamnett.com LARK & BERRY larkandberry.com

SOLID AND STRIPED solidandstriped.com STELLA MCCARTNEY stellamccartney.com VIVIENNE WESTWOOD viviennewestwood.com

Design Centre Chelsea Harbour samuel-heath.com Made in England

Country & Town House Qtr page 129.5x95.5.indd 1

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29/03/2019 16:27


EDITED BY A N NA T Y Z ACK

HOUSE OF THE MONTH Sell it to us in a sentence… A converted corn mill close to the spectacular north Cornish coast.

PROPERTY

Blowinghouse Mill, Near St. Agnes, Cornwall

What was the inspiration? To create a beautiful family home from a piece of industrial history.

Price: £1.5m

In what style has it been decorated? Modern and minimalist, with an obsessive attention to detail.

5 bedrooms 5 bathrooms About 2.5 acres

What are its eco credentials? The boiler is powered by a ground-source heat pump. The building has been super-insulated and has passive solar properties too, such as the hot water in the cottage, which is run from PV/solar panels. Knockout feature? The rebuilt waterwheel, which turns when the water pump is switched on. It was digitally patterned from the original pieces discovered in the floor beneath it. What would summers be like here? The valley has its own sub-tropical microclimate, so there’s lots of sun and shelter, and the amazing coast is close by. Best place to unwind? By the woodburner on a winter’s day, or on a picnic blanket in the orchard come summer. What is the garden like? Prior to the current owner, the mill belonged to a nursery gardener, who planted a great variety of sub-tropical trees and shrubs. This has resulted in a mature, lush wooded landscape. The current owner says… ‘I have really enjoyed creating this home. It sits in its surroundings beautifully, and I am very proud to leave this legacy and hope the new owners thoroughly enjoy it.’ 01326 617447. jonathancunliffe.co.uk n

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Brighton’s seafront location is one of many draws

WHEN IN BRIGHTON...

M O V E

T O

BRIGHTON

Anna Tyzack discovers why Londoners are seeking sanctuary in the seaside town

B

MP Caroline Lucas

righton is the antithesis of a faded and lacklustre British seaside town. Its pebble beaches, twisting alleys and Regency crescents are drawing in such a hip crowd that Soho House is opening a new private beach club on the seafront next year. ‘Brighton has become a mini-London by the sea,’ explains Tom Hamilton of estate agency Mishon Mackay. ‘There’s a vibrant café culture, all the best shops and restaurants and a lot going on in the evenings. It’s got all the buzz of London without being so hectic.’ Hamilton is one of countless Londoners who have moved to Brighton for a better quality of life, close to the rolling South Downs and within a short amble of the sea. ‘One in four of the people here have moved down from the capital,’ he explains. ‘I was living in Highbury but at the weekends often found myself in Brighton – eventually I decided to make the move permanently.’ Peter Phillips of Lextons estate agency agrees that the town offers such high quality amenities that it seems crazy not to choose it over the capital. ‘Every area in Brighton has a selection of independent shops, restaurants and pubs and you’re never far from an amazing park,’ he says. In Brighton, Londoners find an accepting, friendly community, great theatre and beautiful walks. ‘There are excellent golf courses, tennis, sailing and leisure clubs, all within easy access, and a great selection of properties,’ says Paul Taggart of Hamptons International in Brighton.

The Royal Pavilion has a colourful history

‘Plus there is a real move towards sustainable living, which I like,’ Hamilton adds. ‘In Brighton people adopt the “buy better, buy once” approach.’ Indeed, Caroline Lucas, MP for Brighton Pavilion, is a member of the Green Party, which is an indicator of where the town’s priorities lie. There is also a popular cycle hire scheme and food innovators such as zero-waste restaurant, Silo, and Bagelman, which recycles surplus bread into beer. Brighton is just close enough to London for commuters (around an hour on the train to Victoria) and offers many of the same boutiques and restaurants. ‘Brands such as Silo launched in Brighton and then opened in London – the influence works both ways,’ says Hamilton. For families, though, it is Brighton’s array of excellent schools that makes the area so desirable. There are Ofsted-outstanding primary and secondary schools, plus a range of soughtafter independent schools including The Drive, Brighton and Hove High School and Brighton College, which has a reputation for being one of Britain’s most progressive public schools. Roedean, a girls’ day and boarding school on the cliffs, has recently undergone a multimillion-pound redevelopment. Also nearby

Shopping trip walk Explore the narrow alleys of the Lanes and discover the boutiques in the newly-renovated arches on the seafront. End up at the Ginger Pig for lunch. thegingerpig pub.com Dinner out with friends Steven Edwards’ Etch is tipped to become Brighton’s first Michelin-starred restaurant. etchfood.co.uk A seafood Sunday lunch The Salt Room on the seafront serves some of the most beautiful seafood on the South Coast. saltroomrestaurant.co.uk A night away Artist Residence Brighton has 24 quirky art-filled rooms with eye-popping sea views over Brighton seafront and the iconic West Pier. artistresidence. co.uk

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES; REX FEATURES

L E T ’ S

A decent cup of coffee For the past ten years, Small Batch Coffee has been roasting its own beans in various locations around Brighton. smallbatchcoffee. co.uk

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PROPERTY

FOR SA L E

Get to know the area better with a weekend at the Artist Residence

is the prep school Windlesham and public schools Eastbourne College, Lancing College, Hurstpierpoint College and Ardingly. Despite the uncertainty, the property market in the Brighton and Hove area has enjoyed a strong start to the year, according to Charlie Foreman of estate agency Foster & Co, who has handled several high-level transactions in Hove. House price data from Rightmove suggests the market is stable, with the overall average price for Brighton currently standing at £405,747. According to Foreman, a five-bedroom house will cost from £800,000 up to £3m. The liveliest place to live is near Brighton station and the Lanes, the maze of narrow streets where many of the town’s best shops and restaurants are based. One of the most exclusive addresses here is Clifton Terrace, a Regency terrace where houses sell for more than £2m. Larger houses with smaller price tags can be found a little further out in suburbs such as Withdean, which has easy links towards London and Gatwick, yet is within striking distance of the city centre. Hove Park is also popular with families due to its proximity to open parkland and the sea front, as are Poets Corner and Pembroke in

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES; REX FEATURES

Brighton College is one of many excellent local schools

Hove. Meanwhile Roedean is popular with parents sending their daughters to the school – houses on Roedean Crescent sell for more than £2.5m – and Rottingdean suits those with their sights on Brighton College. Preston Park is another popular location for families due to the 60-acre park and homes with large gardens. Foreman recommends Henfield, which has one of the oldest cricket clubs in the world, and Hurstpierpoint, which has a dog- friendly gastro pub, the New Inn, along with the aforementioned school. Phillips adds Lewes, Ditchling, Bolney and Steyning to the list. While the large Regency houses are a major draw, many end up opting for newer, more eco-friendly homes. Developers, Hamilton says, are responding to buyers’ green wish lists and creating homes with air source heat pumps, biomass boilers, photovoltaic panels and electric car-charging points. ‘They are designed to outperform conventional buildings,’ he says. ‘Small-scale and individual developments are really pushing the boundaries of eco design.’ Smock Mill Place, for example, a development of nine family homes on the outskirts of Rottingdean village, features solar panels and electric car-charging facilities, as does Vizion, a development of two 2,800 sq/ft new-build houses in leafy Withdean. When Hamilton first moved to the south coast, he returned to London once a week to see friends. Now he visits the capital just twice a month, preferring to socialise, exercise and relax in Brighton. Foreman, who spent five years in London before returning to Hove, believes the sea air encourages a healthier way of life. ‘In London, I’d be in the pub after work,’ he explains. ‘But now, three or four times a week, you’ll find me on the golf course.’ n

BRIGHTON, £2.35M This Regency property on Clifton Terrace, one of Brighton’s most fashionable addresses, was built in 1846 by the Thomas Kemp family, and was the show house whilst the remainder of the terrace was under construction. The house is double-fronted with three reception rooms, five bedrooms with sea views and private communal gardens. The shops and restaurants of the Lanes are a short walk away. fosterandcoestateagents.co.uk

PORTSLADE, £2.995M Four Western Esplanade is one of 12 exclusive Malibu-style houses with their own tranche of coastline, accessed via a private road. The living space has been cleverly zoned to provide separate areas for the family, with floor-to-ceiling windows providing uninterrupted beach views. There are four bedrooms and a wide terrace, with plunge pool and steps down to the beach. hamptons.co.uk

WITHDEAN, £1.495M Set back from the road within a private and mature setting, Vizion is a development of two luxury detached houses with striking, contemporary architecture. The accommodation is arranged over four floors with light entertaining spaces with high ceilings and four bedrooms; there are also sizeable gardens. Eco features include PV panels and electric car charging points. mishonmackay.com

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PROPERTY

HOM ES SW EET HOM ES THE STARTER HOME

Your idea of the perfect garden? In today’s world it has to be a calm sanctuary with a proper ecosystem to benefit the environment around it. The garden I’m working on with Savills at this year’s Chelsea Flower Show is designed to be the filtering lungs of the city.

S E C R E T S

Little Tew, Oxfordshire, £2.5m Quarry Barn is a rare opportunity to create your own modern and contemporary 8,000 sq/ft family ecohome between Soho Farmhouse and Daylesford Organic Farmshop. It has full planning permission for a residential dwelling, surrounded by 31 acres of gardens, paddocks and woodland. knightfrank.com

DAVID HARBER The sculptor has had a sleepover at Jeremy Irons’ castle Where was your first home? It was a Sixties

bungalow in Blewbury in Oxfordshire, which I demolished in order to build a Grand Designsstyle green oak timber frame house. Fondest memories? I loved watching the construction. The living accommodation was on the first floor, up a vast flight of stairs and you could see the entire oak frame laid out in front of you. As a maker of things, it was very pleasing. Where do you live now? My wife got itchy feet, so we moved a quarter of a mile to a 15th-century mill house, which had nothing much done to it for hundreds of years – except for a 1940s kitchen. Favourite room? The living room. It’s modest in size with beautiful leaded windows, a brick floor and a low ceiling. It feels as if you’re in the back of a galleon. Any grand plans for it? We’re bringing it up to date with a big, contemporary extension, geothermal heating, power generated by the mill wheel and a glass link to the existing house. We are aiming to be carbon neutral.

In a dream world, where would you buy? An apartment in New York. I love the energy of the city, so long as I can dip in and out of it.

THE FOREVER HOME

Most extravagant purchase? I’m very mean and tend to fill my house with prototypes of things I’m making. I do have a decent sound system, though, and we once haggled for a rug in Tangiers – then we had to work out how to get it home.

Do you have a second home? Twelve years ago, we bought a bucolic lemon pressing mill in Sicily. The area felt very raw and undiscovered at the time. Even now it is unsullied by mass tourism and the locals are very friendly. Favourite London neighbourhood? Notting Hill. I lived there when I was 20 and again when I met my wife – we lived above a shop on Portobello Road. Whose home would you most like to see inside? Jeremy Irons, a client,

has a castle in Southern Ireland, which I loved staying in. It is a mind-boggling place and he has renovated it with taste. Any tips for first-time buyers? The sooner you make something your own, the better – it will be your base and your emotional stability. The bottom rungs of the ladder are broken, though, so you’ll need a stepladder! David Harber is collaborating with Savills to sponsor a sustainable garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019. davidharber.com n

Faringdon, Oxfordshire, £2m Manor Farm is a 17th-century Yeoman House near Faringdon, in about ten acres, with ancillary accommodation, stabling, dovecote and barns with development potential. The property is full of character and has some stunning period features, large reception rooms and six bedrooms. jackson-stops.co.uk THE SECOND HOME

Sicily, £7.325m Baglio San Vincenzo is a magnificent Sicilian wine estate with a renovated Baglio (fortified manor house) surrounded by Greek temples, the sea, olive groves and rolling hills. The house is vast with loggias, a wine cellar and 13 bedrooms. Outside is a swimming pool with outdoor kitchen and the gardens are exquisite. italy-sothebysrealty.com

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES

H O U S E

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PROPERTY F I V E

O F

T H E

B E S T

ECO HOMES

Properties with renewable energy systems are cheaper to run and cleaner for the environment. Anna Tyzack picks the best sustainable homes on the market KENT

A stunning six-bedroom house on a plot of 7.5 acres on the edge of Langton Green, a popular village near Tunbridge Wells. Set over three levels connected by elegant staircases and a lift, the house has flexible accommodation and views over the surrounding countryside, as well as a cinema, pool and extensive gardens. Eco features include a rainwater harvesting system, biomass boiler and roof-mounted solar panels, which generate £1,400 of income annually. There is also a full alarm system, heated driveway and music system, all of which can be controlled via an app. £2.5m. fineandcountry.com

EAST SUSSEX

Barelands Farm is a small, sustainable shooting estate of more than 160 acres in an idyllic position in the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Tunbridge Wells is close by, as is the mainline station of Frant, with trains to London from 52 minutes. The house has several large entertaining spaces with good ceiling heights and eight bedrooms. A converted brick and timber barn contains a leisure room with cinema, sauna, steam room and gym, and has doors opening on to an outdoor pool. In another barn is a biomass energy system, which uses wood cup processed on site from the farm’s woodland and generates £12,000 per year. £4m. savills.com

CARMARTHENSHIRE This stately Georgian house has five spacious ensuite bedrooms and is surrounded by 45 acres of landscaped gardens and paddocks. There is a pool, plus a walled garden with tennis court, a summer house and equestrian facilities and outbuildings. It has been adapted to contemporary living with new plumbing, wiring, underfloor heating and an economical biomass boiler. Solar panels and PV tubes generate electricity for two cottages and the heated pool. £1.495m. fineandcountry.com

CORNWALL A detached one-bedroom eco cottage, close to Stithians and Redruth and south Cornish amenities with a garden and parking area. The house is in a delightful, rural location, in a former farmstead with just four other properties. It was renovated to high standards in 2010 with exceptional levels of insulation and energy efficiency, natural materials and environmentally friendly services. Accommodation is bright and contemporary and would appeal to an owner-occupier or a holiday maker. £175,000. laskowskiandcompany.co.uk

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE Built on the site of a former blacksmith’s workshop in the historic village of Mentmore, The Forge is a luxury modern home with cutting-edge architectural and eco design, constructed using natural materials. Light floods in to the house, which comprises a drawing room, dining/family room, bespoke kitchen and four spacious bedrooms. An outdoor air source heat pump provides hot water and fuels the underfloor heating, while the individual room thermostats can be operated by smartphone. £1.6m. michaelgraham.co.uk

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A grand split-level apartment in a prime location.

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Bolton Gardens, London SW5 This apartment is laid out over two floors and comprises bright, double reception room which spans 54 ft with spectacular views over the private gardens. • • • •

Giles Barrett looks forward to helping you. giles.barrett@knightfrank.com 020 3641 6173

In excess of 4 metre high ceilings Great entertaining space Excellent opportunity to modernise the space Approximately 3,454 sq ft (320.8 sq m)

Guide price

£7,500,000

Share of freehold knightfrank.co.uk Connecting people & property, perfectly.

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The house with spectacular views.

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Court Lane Gardens, Dulwich Village SE21 Court Lane Gardens is one of the most prestigious addresses in Dulwich Village, set back behind private gardens and with wonderful views to the rear over Dulwich Park. • • • •

Beautiful garden Potential to add a basement STTC Master en suite Aprroximately 2,831 Sq Ft

Christopher Burton looks forward to helping you. chris.burton@knightfrank.com 020 3544 0534

Guide price

£2,500,000 knightfrank.co.uk Connecting people & property, perfectly.

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Victorian property overlooking Regent's Canal.

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Lyme Terrace, Regent's Park NW1 Lyme Terrace is ideally located overlooking Regent's Canal and is close to a number of amenities and green open spaces. Caledonian Park is less than half a mile from the property and Regent's Park is just over a mile away.

Keir Waddell looks forward to helping you. keir.waddell@knightfrank.com 020 3764 8914

• Roof terrace • Private garden • Fantastic views over Regent's Canal. • Period home Guide price

£2,000,000 knightfrank.co.uk Connecting people & property, perfectly.

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An impressive mews house located near Hyde Park.

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Rainsford Street, Paddington W2 A wonderful newly built mews house offering stylish living throughout set on a private cobbled street located near the open spaces of Hyde Park. • • • •

Tim Perks looks forward to helping you. tim.perks@knightfrank.com 020 3544 2488

An abundance of natural light throughout Finished to a very high standard Benefitting from great transport links across London Approximately 1,151 sq ft (106.9 sq m)

Guide price

£1,550,000

Freehold knightfrank.co.uk Connecting people & property, perfectly.

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SUPERIOR HOMES FOR A S P I R I N G L I F E S T LY E S Designed and built by premier luxury housebuilder Octagon, Broadoaks Park is soon to launch its magnificent mix of family homes set in approximately 25 acres of green space. Connecting city and country lifestyles, this unique and exclusive development will offer a range of beautiful homes, from stylish apartments to spacious detached family houses. Centred around a Grade II Listed mansion alongside original lodges, a coach house and ornamental gardens, Broadoaks Park offers a blend of heritage and modernity to create a one-of-a-kind community.

R E G I S T E R YO U R I N T E R E S T T O DAY B R O A D O A K S PA R K . C O . U K

020 8481 7500 | OCTAGON.CO.UK

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Grantchester – Station 4 Miles £1,800,000 A substantial detached residence with generous accommodation extending to about 2,025 sq. ft., standing comfortably within its own established grounds of about 1.04 acres, located at the end of a no-through road leading into the heart of one of Cambridgeshire’s most eagerly sought after picturesque villages, surrounded by the beautiful Grantchester Meadows. Accommodation comprising: Reception hall, cloakroom, kitchen/breakfast room, utility room, 4 reception rooms. First floor: 4 bedrooms, bathroom. Outside: driveway parking, double garage, surrounding gardens. EER: D Contact: Lauren Blake | Cambridge Office: 01223 214214 | lauren.blake@cheffins.co.uk

Great Shelford – Station 0.5 Miles £1,300,000 A substantial single storey detached residence of about 2,700 sq. ft., offering beautifully presented accommodation, in this most wonderful location at the end of a private road in this thriving south Cambridgeshire village with railway station and cycle path to the Addenbrookes campus. Accommodation comprising: Reception hallway, cloakroom, 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, utility room, family room/study, 5 bedrooms (2 with en suites), family bathroom. Outside: driveway parking, double garage, landscaped enclosed gardens. EER: C Contact: Richard Freshwater | Cambridge Office: 01223 214214 | richard.freshwater@cheffins.co.uk

cheffins.co.uk 01223 214214

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Cambridge | Saffron Walden | Newmarket | Ely | Haverhill | London

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Fryerning Essex Woodend Lane, Ongar CM5 Fryerning Essex

Guide Price £3,850,000 Guide Price £3,850,000 Guide price £995,000 Astriking striking five double bedroom, reception Grade II five double bedroom, fourfour reception II AnAabsolutely stunning and impressive Grade II Grade listed property thought to date back 500 years. quintessential English character cottage set in listedperiod period property thought to date back 500 years. This residence is originally thought to beto 3 be 3 landscaped gardens in a much after semi-rural Thischarming charming residence issought originally thought cottages, providing a fantastic flow of interesting location. Thenow grounds are surrounded by glorious cottages, now providing a fantastic flow of interesting countryside and paddock land to the rear, intwo a tranquil and family living space over two floors. The The andextensive extensive family living space over floors. and beautiful setting. EPC formal exempt 7.5 acre plot comprises grounds mixed 7.5 acre plot comprises formal grounds mixed sympathetically with paddocks (benefitting fromfrom a sympathetically with paddocks (benefitting a second separate access), ponds and a substantial lake. second separate access), ponds and a substantial lake. Numerous outbuildings, tennis court, double garage Numerous outbuildings, tennis court, double garage and detached one bedroom annexe. Equestrian and detached one bedroom annexe. Equestrian potential. EPC Exempt potential. EPC Exempt Country && Village ce 01245 Country VillageOffi Office 01245397475 397475

Country & Village Office 01245 397475

Fryerning Essex Little Braxted, Essex CM8 Guide Price £3,850,000

Guide priceEssex £775,000 Fryerning A striking five double bedroom, four reception Grade II

CHAIN FREE this beautifully restored Grade II listed, Guide Price £3,850,000 listed period property thought to date back 500 years. four bedroom cottage sits in a dream countryside

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setting the most amazing degreeGrade II A striking fivewith double bedroom, four360 reception cottages, now providing a fantastic flow of interesting views. Stunning secluded 0.5 acre back plot (stls) with listedand period property thought to date 500 years. extensive family living space over two floors. The established gardens. Easy access to Witham, This charming residence is originally thought to beMaldon 3 7.5 acre plot comprises formal grounds mixed and Chelmsford offering some of the best schools in cottages, now providing apaddocks fantastic(benefitting flow of interesting sympathetically with from a Essex. EPC Exempt. and extensive family living space over two floors. Thelake. second separate access), ponds and a substantial 7.5 acre plot comprises formal grounds Numerous outbuildings, tennis court,mixed double garage sympathetically with paddocks from a and detached one bedroom(benefitting annexe. Equestrian potential. EPCaccess), Exemptponds and a substantial lake. second separate Numerous outbuildings, tennis court, double garage and detached bedroom annexe. Equestrian Countryone Village Offi ce01245 01245 397475 Country &&Village Office 397475 potential. EPC Exempt

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hamptons.co.uk

Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire

A glorious five-bedroom family home with annexe and a large southerly facing garden, 0.3 miles from Beaconsfield mainline station and 23 minutes to London Marylebone. EPC: C

£2,995,000 Freehold • • • • •

Fantastic wine cellar High standard of décor throughout Recently added orangery Period property Heathrow Airport – 14 miles

Hamptons Beaconsfield Sales. 01494 355 532 | beaconsfield@hamptons-int.com

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Celebrating 150 years of shared moments

020 3369 4829 | sales@hamptons-int.com | hamptons150.co.uk

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Profile for Country & Town House Magazine

Country and Town House - May 2019  

May - Sustainability Issue Lucy Cleland sits down with Livia Firth, who’s been at the vanguard of the sustainable movement for years, to fi...

Country and Town House - May 2019  

May - Sustainability Issue Lucy Cleland sits down with Livia Firth, who’s been at the vanguard of the sustainable movement for years, to fi...