Issuu on Google+

INDEPENDENT SINCE 1880

The Corne¬ Daily Sun Vol. 130, No. 29

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2013

!

ITHACA, NEW YORK

12 Pages – Free

News

Arts

Sports

Weather

Looking Back

Pound It

Hands Off

Storms HIGH: 73 LOW: 57

Patricia Nguyen, assistant dean of students, reflects on how she got into social activism. | Page 3

The Sun speaks to stand-up comedian and author Paula Poundstone.

As returning Ivy League champions, men’s soccer will kick off its Ivy season this weekend. | Page 12

| Page 8

Univ:Students Have Less Debt Than Peers By ALEXA DAVIS Sun Senior Writer

At more than $60,000 for a student in the endowed colleges, the annual cost of attending Cornell may seem daunting to many. Even so, Cornell students graduate with significantly less debt than their peers at lower-ranked institutions, administrators say. In 2012, the median debt for graduating students at Cornell was $14,592, and the average debt was $20,490. While the average debt of graduating students increased about $600 from 2011, last year’s numbers are an improvement on previous highs faced by Cornell students in 2007-08, when the average debt was $24,000, said Barbara Knuth, vice provost and dean of the Graduate School. By contrast, The Project on Student Debt, reports that in 2011, 67 percent of college students graduated with an average loan debt of $26,600 per borrower. To some, it may come as a shock that Cornell, which has a hefty price tag of about $55,000, fell short of this nationwide statistic by about $7,000 dollars. According to Thomas Keane, director of financial aid for scholarships and policy analysis, Cornell and other Ivy League schools are See DEBT page 5

CHRISTOPHER GREGORY / THE NEW YORK TIMES

Loan on me | Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) speaks to reporters prior to voting on a bill on student loan rates in July. Cornell students graduate with several thousand dollars less debt than students at lower-ranked institutions, administrators say.

“MOOCs facilitate the dissemination of knowledge to unprecedented numbers of people.”

Student Assembly Divided Over Proposal to Create Court

President David Skorton and Glenn Altschuler

Sun Staff Writer

By ANUSHKA MEHROTRA

MATT MUNSEY / SUN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

C.U.to Launch Four MOOCs

Administrators hail development, call it ‘exciting’ By AKANE OTANI Sun Managing Editor

Next spring, seven Cornell professors will reach beyond Ithaca to teach hundreds of thousands of students located anywhere in the world with an Internet connection. The professors will be teaching Cornell’s first four massive open online courses through edX, a Harvard and MIT-founded platform that offers university-level courses worldwide for free, the University announced Wednesday. The four MOOCs, which range in subject matter from the history of American capitalism to an exploration of modern surveillance, were selected out of 15 proposed courses. “I think it’s about time we got in the

game,” said Dean of Faculty Joe Burns Ph.D. ’66, astronomy. “It’s pretty clear that these courses are going to be an important part of the education landscape moving forward. Every university will need experts in MOOCs, so we’re excited to be offering our own MOOCs in that regard.” Administrators hailed the advent of Cornell’s first MOOCs, saying the University’s next step into the online education movement reflects its fundamental mission of giving back to the community. “Since Cornell University’s start nearly 150 years ago, the University has embraced its land-grant mission. Now, with the advent of MOOCs, Cornell See MOOCs page 5

Members of the Student Assembly clashed Thursday over a resolution that, if passed, would establish a University Student Court that could hear disputes raised by student organizations against the S.A. The resolution was proposed by S.A. President Ulysses Smith ’14 and Scott Seidenberger ’16 with the intent of providing an avenue for students, student organizations and student governing bodies to express their grievances against the S.A., according to Seidenberger. “Currently, there is no method for

students to contest an action of the S.A.,” Smith said. “This court allows student to do that. The court can evaluate whether or not an action of the S.A. causes harm to an organization … and keep it from being implemented.” Smith added that the court would not govern the everyday actions of the S.A. Rather, it would be “mediatory” in nature. Seidenberger echoed Smith’s sentiment, saying the court would help create a neutral environment in which conflicts could be resolved. See COURT page 4

Month-Long Investigation Culminates in Cocaine Arrest A 24-year-old man possessing three “8 balls” of cocaine was arrested by Ithaca Police after a month-long investigation. Jeremy Francis was arrested on the 600 block of South Meadow Street Tuesday, according to a press release from the Ithaca Police Depart-

ment. When Ithaca Police officers and the city’s SWAT team approached Francis, he had a 5.3 grams of cocaine on him that was packaged in a way “consistent with intent to sell,” IPD said. Police officers alerted residents of neighboring properties that they had served a warrant to alle-

viate their concerns, according to IPD. Francis was charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B Felony, and remanded to Tompkins County Jail. — Compiled by Akane Otani


2 THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, October 4, 2013

Today

DAYBOOK

Friday, October 4, 2013

Daybook

Quotes of the Week

Today Apple Harvest Festival Noon - 6 p.m., Downtown Ithaca Commons “Accelerating New Product Development in a Venture” Talk by Dr. Valerie Feldmann 12:20 p.m. - 1:10 p.m., B-17 Upson Hall Coffee Chat With Harris Rosen ’61, Cornell Entrepreneur of the Year 2011 10:30 a.m. - Noon, 141 Sage Hall

News, “President Skorton Addresses Faculty, Staff,” Wednesday Speaking about how communication between faculty and mangement can make Cornell better “It’s an ongoing process to make Cornell an even better employer. It will be ongoing everyday that this University is in session — hopefully for another 150 years — and that means we need to take a deep breath, talk honestly to each other, admit areas where we can be doing better, celebrate areas where we are doing well and continue to push, push, push to make them better.” President David Skorton News, “Mayor Svante Myrick ’09 Slams Cornell Over Contributions to Ithaca,” Wednesday Speaking about the amount of money Cornell contributes to Ithaca’s budget “I think it’s shameful that Cornell University contributes so little to the municipalities that host it. In terms of dollars spent per endowment and per resident, Cornell comes in dead last to all the schools that it compares itself to and competes with.”

Pioneers: Early Women Scientists at Cornell 8 a.m. - 6 p.m., Lobby, Mann Library

Ithaca Mayor Svante Myrick ’09

Tomorrow Apple Harvest Festival 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., Downtown Ithaca Commons Alumni Panel Discussion & Networking Reception 1 - 3:30 p.m., 105 Ives Hall Johnson Community Lunch: Hispanic Heritage Month 2 - 4 p.m., Edward A. Ten-Eyck Room, Nevin Welcome Center, Cornell Plantations Common Grounds Saturdays 6 -9 p.m., TV Lounge, Robert Purcell Community Center

SKYDIVE

TANDEM

Finger Lakes Skydivers

www.skydivefingerlakes.com 607-869-5601

The Corne¬ Daily Sun INDEPENDENT SINCE 1880 Editor in Chief

Rebecca Harris ‘14

ALL DEPARTMENTS

Business Manager

Hank Bao ‘14

(607) 273-3606

Business: For questions regarding advertising, classifieds, subscriptions or delivery problems, please call from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday. News: To report breaking news or story ideas, please call after 5 p.m., SundayThursday.

SEND A FAX VISIT THE OFFICE THE SUN ONLINE E-MAIL

(607) 273-0746 139 W. State Street, Ithaca, N.Y. www.cornellsun.com sunmailbox@cornellsun.com

Postal Information: The Cornell Daily Sun (USPS 132680 ISSN 1095-8169) is published by THE CORNELL DAILY SUN, a New York corporation, 139 W. State St., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850. The Sun is published Monday through Friday during the Cornell University academic year, with three special issues: one for seniors in May, one for alumni in June and one for incoming freshmen in July, for a total of 144 issues per year. Subscription rates are: $137.00 for fall term, $143.00 for spring term and $280.00 for both terms if paid in advance. First-class postage paid at Ithaca, New York. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Cornell Daily Sun, 139 W. State St., Ithaca, N.Y. 14850.

Opinion, “On Gannett’s Medical Excuse Policy,” Thursday Speaking about Gannett’s policy about not providing medical excuses “I would like to issue a request for Gannett’s new renovations. In addition to making the physical space more comfortable for students, consider making the medical excuse process a bit easier for students as well. This can come in the form of an automated system that tells professors of potential absences or just a simple policy change. From personal experience, I can say that this simple change would make the unfortunate eventuality of sickness on the Hill much easier to deal with.” David Fischer ’15 Opinion, “You Will Fail at Cornell,” Wednesday Speaking about Cornellians’ failure to reach out when they are stressed “However, out of all of our ‘failures,’ there is one way in which we have all genuinely failed; we have hesitated to reach out to others in times of emotional distress. Frankly, it can be very difficult to admit that we feel stressed when we are constantly surrounded by peers who seem so successful, and so put together. There is unfortunately a stigma surrounding the discussion of mental health, one that sometimes discourages us from being honest with our friends about how we are really doing.” Geoffrey Block ’14


THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, October 4, 2013 3

NEWS

Students to Don Condoms to Raise AIDS Awareness

Lost and found

By EMMA IANNI Sun Contributor

Models parading down a runway at Cornell December to help raise money for AIDS Awareness Week will be wearing something unusual: condoms. Student organizers say they will use more than a thousand condoms to dress the models in the show. Similar events have been held at other schools, including Harvard University, where a “condom” fashion show was organized last spring to help raise awareness about AIDS. Cornell students who are organizing the event say they hope it will not only catch people’s eye but also help educate the community about the global prevalence of AIDS. “Who doesn’t like a fashion show? It is really appealing, and the impact on the people is going to be great,” said Juliana Batista ’16, who is S.A. vice president for outreach and one of the organizers of the event. Sean Page ’14, co-chair of AIDS week, said he thinks the fashion show will help educate a wider swath of students than a more conventional event. “Events such as this fashion show and traditional sex education are both effective, but they target different demographics of people. I think that the fashion show would target people who are really into fashion or people that just want to do something fun on a Friday night, as opposed to more serious event — for example, our speaker series — that would more effectively target people who either have someone who was affected by AIDS or who are really just interested in AIDS,” he said. “We are trying to organize a lot of different events that attract a lot of different students.” Batista echoed Page’s sentiments, adding that the team organizing the show is very diverse and comprises of LGBTQ students, international students, women and men alike. “We wanted to fuse the diverse communities around campus under one cause,” Batista said. “AIDS awareness is a

NIKITA DUBNOV / SUN CONTRIBUTOR

New York City-based filmmaker Jem Cohen presents his observational short film, “Lost Book Found,” to students and community members at the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts on Thursday.

people issue. It is a big issue in every part of the planet, and the educational intent of the fashion show is useful for all kind of people.” Batista said that designing clothes from condoms is not without its challenges. She called it an “experimental and unique process,” explaining that designers begin with a muslin base but that many different directions can be taken from that point on. “The designer has autonomy to deconstruct the condoms, using the latex itself or cutting up the decorative wrappers. The latex can then be painted, torn, cut, crumpled or molded,” Batista said. “It is like working with a plastic material — it is really versatile, and today you can find condoms of all sorts of color and texture.” Caroline Donelan ’16, a fiber science and apparel design major and a designer for the show, said it is difficult trying to find the best way to attach all the condoms together while sticking to a desired design.

“Things usually don’t turn out as you first expect them to, but I hope to stay true to my design, whatever it may be. I'm thinking I want to put a lot of structure in my garment, but this will definitely be a challenge too because condoms are not a very stiff material,” she said. “This project requires a lot of trial and error to finalize your construction technique and final process.” Donelan added that most garments will be dresses, since “it is the most practical and conceptual piece of clothing when designing a garment made out of unconventional materials.” Each dress will likely take 300 condoms to be completed, she said. Batista said the show will be unique because of its unconventional clothing. This story continues online at cornellsun.com. Emma Ianni can be reached at ei54@cornell.edu.

Cornell Administrator Reflects on Roots of Social Activism By ZOE FERGUSON Sun Contributor

Patricia Nguyen, assistant dean of students, said her interest in social activism

stems from always being “made to feel different” when she was young. I would start “cringing when the teacher would say the roll call and come to my last name and just completely butcher it,”

Musical message

RULA SAEED / SUN CONTRIBUTOR

Prof. Anna Zayaruznaya, music, Princeton University, lectures at Lincoln Hall Thursday about the relationship between music and texts in the 14th and 15th centuries.

“If anyone had asked me in undergrad Nguyen recalled. Those experiences led Nguyen to develop whether I would have been a director like a passion for activism that, in 2009, brought this, I would have been like, ‘No way.’ You her to Cornell. Nguyen became the director actually really never know where you’re going of the Asian and Asian American Center at to end up,” Nguyen said. “That’s why I love the University that year and served in the working with college students, [because] you position until Oct. 1, when she left Cornell all are in that space — trying to figure out for the University of California at Los what your relationships are to your family, to your friends, to the world, to Angeles. your career.” Nguyen said there is a “vestige For Nguyen, the way to purof activism in my family,” somesue such activism came through thing she attributed to the fact that education. she is Vietnamese-American. “There are so many ways to When she went to college at the look at issues of power and privUniversity of California at Santa ilege and oppression. I just Barbara, she experienced more sitfound out for myself, education uations where she felt compelled to was the way I wanted to go,” she pursue social justice, Nguyen said. NGUYEN said. “I think education is a “There were a lot of instances around understanding gender and sexism social tool for change. Access to education and race that made me really rethink what I has always been something that’s big for me. was supposed to do,” Nguyen said. “I had … It’s okay to be open to learn. It’s okay to this moment where a bias incident actually be wrong. Otherwise, how else are you going hit my campus and it made me really rethink to really grow?” the role I wanted to play.” But Nguyen had not always planned to This story continues online at cornellsun.com. get involved with social activism. In fact, she said that as a college student, she planned to Zoe Ferguson can be reached at go to medical school. znf3@cornell.edu.

Burning Question If you were Mayor of the City of Ithaca, what would your first order of business be? “Reduce all rent in Collegetown by 50 percent.” — Coupon Cutter ’15

“Put a bouncy castle in my parking space.” — Child at Heart ’16

life would be complete. — Hungry for Burritos and Sweaters ’14

“Free Insomnia Cookies for all! Cookies! Cookies!” — Cookie Monster ’14

“Replace the Green Cafe with a joint Chipotle and J. Crew. My

“Make Scott Chiusano ’15 salsa dance.” — H.V. ’15

“Build an escalator that takes you from the Commons to Collegetown.” — Sore Legs ’16 — Compiled by Tyler Alicea


4 THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, October 4, 2013

NEWS

S.A. Debates Court Proposal COURT

the S.A., said he thinks the creation of the court is a conversation that concerns the entire campus. “The student court would be a fundamental “The court provides remedies for problems change to the way student groups interact with that exist between [student organizations] as well each other,” he said. as a system for people to seek justice,” Defending the resolution, Seidenberger said Seidenberger said. plans to create the court still have to undergo sevThe court’s structure was customized exten- eral more revision before they are complete. sively over the past year to fit Cornell’s judicial “It’s still in discussion mode. We’re still going system, Smith said. through the evolution of it, getting feedback and “It was first drafted in the summer of 2012 and amending the bylaws,” he said. “It’s not a finished went through markups by the [Judicial product yet.” Administrator], the Ombudsman, multiple S.A. He emphasized that the court, a separate enticommittees and even ty from other governing last year’s sitting assembodies on campus, “I’m concerned the S.A. is creating bly,” Smith said. would provide a way to another layer of bureaucracy that is check S.A power by However, at a meeting Thursday, many S.A. ensuring its actions are not needed and considering giving members said they within its charter and significant power to students who opposed the resolution, bylaws. with some saying they “A student can bring can arbitrarily wield it.” dislike the way the court a complaint to the stuGeoffrey Block ’14 is designed and others dent court and they will saying they are against determine if their claim the court’s creation. is valid,” he said. “I’m concerned the S.A. is creating another Smith said he was frustrated that so much of layer of bureaucracy that is not needed and con- the S.A’s discussion about the court was focused sidering giving significant power to students who on its ability to limit the assembly’s power. can arbitrarily wield it,” said Geoffrey Block ’14, “Unfortunately, I think much of the discussion vice president of finance for the S.A. by this year’s assembly seems to be on the ability Block urged members of the S.A. to vote for students to contest an S.A. action and for the against the resolution and seek alternatives. S.A. to no longer adjudicate its own matters,” he “I’m less against the broad idea of having an said. alternative resolution dispute body and am more Smith added that a separate judicial body is against this particular resolution,” he said. needed because he thinks the S.A currently has Juliana Batista ’16, S.A. vice president for out- too much autonomy over campus issues. reach, agreed with Block, saying she thinks the “As the person who has had to already adjudiresolution inappropriately gives the court power cate a few matters this year on the S.A., I think it to issue temporary restraining orders in disputes. is a huge conflict of interest for the S.A. to be the “I do not feel that the court has the underlying body that creates, enforces and adjudicates authority to enforce restraining orders and issues,” Smith said. injunctions; that should go to a different power,” she said. Anushka Mehrotra can be reached at Alfonse Muglia ’14, director of elections for amehrotra@cornellsun.com. Continued from page 1

www.cornellsun.com


THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, October 4, 2013 5

NEWS

Students Leave C.U.With Less Debt Than Peers DEBT

Conn., graduated with an average debt of $9,254. Keane said that other Ivies — namely Harvard, Princeton and Yale — can be very competitive with finanable to send graduates out into the world with less debt cial aid because their endowments, which are in the doubecause of their large endowments and strong alumni ble digits, are significantly larger than Cornell’s. support. These schools, which often have very successful “The advantage that these schools have over Cornell, is graduates, are able to use interest from their endowments that they are hundreds of years older than us. They have to cover costs associated with tuition, 200 years of having that endowment new buildings, professors and other “On the need-based keep on growing and growing — the expenses, he said. extra 200 years is huge,” Keane said. In comparison to financial aid financial aid side, we’re Princeton and Harvard have such support at other Ivy League schools, large endowments that capital for Keane estimated that Cornell ranks as competitive as scholarships rarely comes from tuition somewhere in the middle. On a anyone in the country.” revenue. While this allows them to national scale and “on the needoffer the option of no loans in any based financial aid side, we’re as com- Thomas Keane financial aid package, these schools petitive as anyone in the country,” he have difficult times when the stock said. market takes a dive because aid is so According to debt data from The Institute for College closely tied to investments, Keane added. Access & Success, Princeton University and Yale At Cornell, undergraduate financial aid is mostly University top the list of schools where students accumu- funded by tuition, philanthropy and other revenue late the lowest debt. In 2011, those who borrowed money sources. According to administrators, Cornell usually to pay for their education over four years at Princeton spends about $245 million in grant and scholarship aid University left campus with only $5,330 of debt. Students for students, of which roughly $190 million is funded who attended school 130 miles south in New Haven, through tuition revenue and $35 million is withdrawn Continued from page 1

Univ.to Launch MOOCs MOOCs

Continued from page 1

adds progression and more modernity to its mission to serve a broad, even global, community of learners,” said Laura Brown, senior vice provost for undergraduate education and chair of the University’s Distance Learning Committee, in a University press release. In addition to helping Cornell fulfill its mission of educating not only New York State but also the global community, MOOCs will help elevate Cornell’s profile among prospective students, Brown said. They will also present an opportunity for Cornell to be innovative in its teaching — refining online education in a way that will have “a wide potential impact within and beyond Cornell,” she said in the press release. Even as Cornell prepares to roll out its first MOOCs with optimism, skeptics of the online education movement are expressing concerns about MOOCs. A number of professors, education experts and even students around the U.S. have said that online courses, however well-structured, cannot permit the exchanges between peers or students and professors that traditional courses can. For one, the completion rates of MOOCs have been dismal. Although studies on MOOCs’ effectiveness are limited, a number of experts studying online education have estimated that less than 10 percent of students enrolled in a MOOC will finish the course. Some professors have also bashed MOOC providers’ claim that they are breaking down barriers to education worldwide by teaching courses online. Despite such criticisms, dozens of universities across the nation have launched MOOCs. edX, the nonprofit consortium Cornell has partnered with, has at least 29 institutions — including Georgetown University, the California Institute of Technology and MIT — to its name. It has also reached more than one million users since its founding in May 2012.

MOOCs proponents add that the massive scale of the courses allow universities to learn more about how students learn and how they can most effectively teach students. As for Cornell, Burns said the University is still early in its exploration of MOOCs. It is too soon to tell what role MOOCs will play in the Cornell education over the long term, he said. “This is really just a first foot in the water. We haven’t gotten deep enough to start swimming, and faculty are going to need to guide this effort and move it forward,” he said. As the seven professors forge forward and refine their MOOCs, the University is calling for faculty to propose their own ideas for online learning. Akane Otani can be reached at managing-editor@cornellsun.com.

from income produced by Cornell’s $5 billion endowment. When the average college endowment in the United States is $490 million, according to the National Association of College and University Business Officers, it can be very competitive to attend prestigious schools that have endowments capping off at billions of dollars. According to The New York Times, acceptance rates among Ivy League institutions fall between 6 and 15 percent. Schools that fall on the other side of the national student debt average tend to be much smaller in size with a lower total cost of attendance. According to Philip Elliott of The Huffington Post, Wheelock College has the highest student debt levels in the nation. About 82 percent of Wheelock graduates left campus with debt, at an average of $49,439. The second school with the highest student debt level is Anna Maria College, which graduated 86 percent of students who borrowed to pay for their education with $49,206 of debt. Alexa Davis can be reached at adavis@cornellsun.com.


OPINION

The Corne¬ Daily Sun

Ezra’s Oracle

Independent Since 1880 131ST EDITORIAL BOARD REBECCA HARRIS ’14 Editor in Chief

HANK BAO ’14

AKANE OTANI ’14

LIZ CAMUTI ’14

AUSTIN KANG ’15

Managing Editor

Business Manager

Advertising Manager

Associate Editor

HALEY VELASCO ’15

ANDY LEVINE ’14 Web Editor

Sports Editor

RACHEL ELLICOTT ’15

ALEX REHBERG ’16

Blogs Editor

Multimedia Editor

REBECCA COOMBES ’14

DAVID MARTEN ’14

Design Editor

Tech Editor

SHAILEE SHAH ’14

ZACHARY ZAHOS ’15

EMMA COURT ’15

LIANNE BORNFELD ’15

Associate Managing Editor

Photography Editor

News Editor

City Editor

JINJOO LEE ’14

CAROLINE FLAX ’15

News Editor

News Editor

ARIELLE CRUZ ’15

SAM BROMER ’16

Arts & Entertainment Editor

Arts & Entertainment Editor

SYDNEY RAMSDEN ’14

SARAH COHEN ’15

Dining Editor

Science Editor

EMILY BERMAN ’16

BRYAN CHAN ’15

Associate Multimedia Editor

Assistant Sports Editor

SCOTT CHIUSANO ’15

ARIEL COOPER ’15 Assistant Sports Editor

Assistant Sports Editor

HANNAH KIM ’14

MEGAN ZHOU ’15

Assistant Design Editor

Assistant Design Editor

LIZZIE POTOLSKY ’14

BRANDON ARAGON ’14

Outreach Coordinator

Assistant Web Editor

SID SHEKAR ’15

ANNA TSENTER ’14

Online Advertising Manager

Marketing Manager

LEO DING ’14

ERIKA G. WHITESTONE ’15

Human Resources Manager

Social Media Manager

KERRY CLOSE ’14

MANU RATHORE ’15

Senior Editor

Senior Editor

HANNAH McGOUGH ’15

MAGGIE HENRY ’14

Senior Editor

Senior Editor

SEOJIN LEE ’14 Senior Manager

WORKING ON TODAY ’S SUN DESIGN DESKERS PHOTO NIGHT EDITOR NEWS DESKERS SPORTS DESKER ARTS DESKERS

Zach Praiss ’15 Elizabeth Sowers ’15 Matt Munsey ’15 Dylan Clemens ’14 Emma Court ’15 Scott Chiusano ’15 Sam Bromer ’16

Then join the editorial writing board! Attend editorial office hours at The Sun, Sundays @ 6 p.m., where we discuss and debate editorial ideas and what stance to take. Submit any questions to associateeditor@cornellsun.com. All opinions and points of view welcome.

t State

es 139 W

Street

E

zra’s Oracle welcomes inquiries from members of the Cornell community about anything and everything related to the University. We seek out answers to campus mysteries, research rumors and investigate issues of relevance to Cornellians. Questions can be submitted via email to ezrasoracle@cornellsun.com. Q: How are the songs that play on the clocktower chosen? What are the most played songs? — Tower Lyfe ’15 A: Cornell’s elite team of chimesmasters are the ones who usually choose what songs gets played on the clocktower, but anyone who ventures up the 161 steps during a concert might have the opportunity to put in a request. Chimesmasters are selected by a 10-week audition process, and anyone from the Cornell community is welcome to compete. The library of chimes songs includes thousands of arrangements by generations of chimesmasters, and each concert’s playlist is uploaded to the Chimes website. Although there are policies to prevent songs from being repeated too often, the exceptions are the three traditional pieces played daily: The Jennie McGraw Rag (in the morning), the Alma Mater (at midday), and the Evening Song (in the evening). Q: What was Collegetown’s first bar? Which was Ezra’s favorite? Did Ezra drink? — Drinking in Moderation ’16 A: In Cornell’s early years, most students lived and caroused downtown, so the Collegetown area was considerably less developed. The most popular student bar was probably the Hotel Brunswick and Lager Bar downtown on N. Aurora St., owned and operated by Theodore Zinck from the late 1870s until his death in 1903. The bar was immortalized in song by “Give My Regards to Davy,” and most students simply called it Zinck’s. The oldest still operating Collegetown bar is probably the Chapter House, which opened in the mid-1920s as Jim’s Place and became the Chapter House in the mid-1960s. The Nines, Rulloff’s, and Dunbar’s all date to the 1970s. As a Quaker, Ezra Cornell likely avoided alcohol or consumed it only in moderation. However, he certainly knew how to party. A few months after Cornell University opened, Ezra held a grand celebration in Cascadilla Hall for his 62nd birthday. A group of local clergymen filed a formal complaint with the university faculty, alleging that young people were dancing at the party, which only exacerbated Cornell’s reputation as the “godless institution.” The faculty ignored the protest, and Ezra hired an orchestra to play dance music the next year. Ezra died in 1874, less than a decade after Cornell’s founding, so he never experienced much of the Collegetown bar scene. Q: Where did the idea come from that if a couple walks around Beebe Lake together then they’re likely to get married? — Desperate Senior Girl ’14

JOIN THE EDITORIAL WRITING BOARD

Do you have unique and well-formed opinions? Do you like to write?

S

A: The legend’s origin is difficult to pin down, but Cornellians have been repeating the myth for decades. It seems to be a little more recent than other legends though, with most references to it appearing in the last 20 years. At least a few If any alumni reading this remember the legend from their days on campus, send us an email! The legend isn’t included in a 1940 comic book about Cornell history and traditions titled “We Cornellians,” which instead has this marriage-related legend: “To go as far as making love to a girl on the stone bench behind the library is to renounce all hope of ever marrying anyone else. Q: Why did they stop publishing the Pig Books?

— Facebook Stalker ’15

A: The “Pig Book” was Cornell’s original “Facebook,” first published in fall of 1953 for the Class of 1957. Officially called the Freshmen Register (later renamed the New Student Register), it included photos of entering students to help classmates identify each other. The book was published by Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity for decades, but dwindled in popularity as the Internet made it obsolete. Cornell began offering class websites for entering students, which included the ability to make a profile and upload a picture. In spring 2004, Facebook opened up to Cornell students, and the “Pig Book” vanished in the next few years. Q: What’s the real history behind women’s enrollment at Cornell? I’ve heard that although Cornell was among the first universities to admit women, they weren’t actually allowed in some programs. — Feminine Investigator ’14 A: There’s no doubt that Cornell was a leader in terms of coeducation, accepting women long before its Ivy League peers and serving as a model for other schools. Both of the cofounders felt strongly about accessibility of a college education, regardless of gender, race, or religion. The first woman registered at Cornell in 1870, and the trustees formally voted to accept women in 1872. But they were not welcomed by everyone — Professor Goldwin Smith, for example, worried that the academic workload and exams might make women unmarriageable. Although women weren’t officially barred from certain fields of study, some male-dominated fields like engineering were slower to welcome gender diversity. Kate Gleason enrolled in 1884 as the first woman in engineering, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s granddaughter, Nora Stanton Blatch, became America’s first female civil engineering graduate in 1905. It wasn’t until 1972 that women represented at least 10 percent of undergraduate engineers at Cornell. On the other hand, the College of Human Ecology (formerly Home Economics) was at least 90 percent women until 1973. When Cornell’s medical school opened in New York City in 1898, women were required to take their first two years in Ithaca, while men could choose between Ithaca or New York. It would be decades before women-only rules like curfews were abolished. According to enrollment data, women undergraduates finally outnumbered men at Cornell in 2012. Curious about Cornelliana? Looking for Cornell lore behind a legend? Submit your questions to ezrasoracle@cornellsun.com. Ezra’s Oracle appears alternate Fridays this semester.


THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, October 3, 2013 7

OPINION

Nikhita Parandekar | Hoof in Mouth

Skydiving Through Vet School

A

s the door to the 50-year-old Cessna opened 10,000 feet above the ground, air rushed into the plane. I put my foot outside and had a very brief moment to contemplate the nature of fear. Then the adrenaline kicked in and I was falling. It was a phenomenal experience. I was telling a friend about skydiving a few days later and mentioned that it wasn’t the first time I had felt that kind of rush, which surprised him. Admittedly, I am probably more into random almost-but-not-really-dangerous activities than the average person, but it did make me realize that finding a way to deal with fear is an essential part of the veterinary profession. Evolutionarily, fear is healthy. Our early ancestors were afraid of predators and dangerous situations. This fear forced them to make an effort to avoid danger and helped them survive. Theoretically, those who were crippled by fear did not survive because they could not remove themselves from frightening conditions. Likewise, those who were fearless did not survive because they put themselves into dangerous situations. So what role does fear play in our lives now? As veterinary students we are, for the most part, relatively sheltered

So, what role does fear play in our lives now? from the life and death aspects of our future careers. In clinics at school, there will be interns, residents and clinicians overseeing most of what we do and, with the exception of a few of us who have more extensive experience, when we are at other practices (for externships or jobs) we are not regularly put in charge of animals’ lives. However, we are still currently dealing with the concept of fear in different ways. The fear of failure is the primary one we have to contend with. We have worked our whole lives to get to where we are, and the idea of failing academically right now is almost incomprehensible. This is one of the (many) factors that motivates us to do well, especially because we don’t want to disappoint all of the people who have supported us thus far. This brings me back to the notion that fear is healthy — we are motivated by it right now, and very soon, when we have patients’ lives on our hands on a daily basis, we will know how to use fear as motivation for providing the best quality of care. This is vital because if we did not have to deal with fear now and learn how to use it to succeed, we would be crippled by it in real life. We would burn out quickly with anxiety, or would put our patients’ lives in danger by being too reckless. I am sure that many people in completely unrelated professions also fear failure, but what I think sets us apart is that we are aware that in the future, our failures can have catastrophic impacts on the lives of animals and their people. So, when I told my friend that the rush from skydiving wasn’t foreign to me, I mostly meant it in the sense that the idea of having other lives in my hands is more intense for me than jumping out of a plane. I pay much more attention in class when we learn about treatment side effects than I do when reading the side effects of any human medication I have to take — I am fairly certain that over the counter medication is not going to kill me, but I could kill someone’s best friend if I do not know what I am doing. The purpose of each stage of veterinary school, and of our careers in general, is to allow us to develop mechanisms to cope with the responsibility of being doctors, and the fear and uncertainty that comes with treating patients. In a few years, hopefully I’ll be able to revisit this topic with more tangible stories under my belt. Until then, there’s always skydiving. Nikhita Parandekar graduated from Cornell in 2011 and is a third-year veterinary student in the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine. She may be reached at nparandekar@cornellsun.com. Hoof in Mouth appears alternate Fridays this semester.

Web

Comment of the day “I disagree that sexual displays cause misogyny. In some Muslim countries, where women are forced to be covered from head-to-toe, women complain of sexual harassment being the norm when they go out in public. Lack of sexual displays in those cultures isn’t protecting these women from mistreatment. Yet, in the U.S., where these displays are common, few women experience harassment while engaging in day-to-day activities. We can’t let ignorant people who use online anonymity to be jerks control how we behave, especially when sexual conservatism isn’t even protective of women.” Cec1000 Re: “RAINIS | Ke$ha: ‘A Weird, Benign STD’” Arts, published October 3, 2013

Debbie Tseng |

What’s Up Doc?

The New Normal A

little more than a year ago, I wrote about how a breast cancer scare changed my perspective about my health and gave me a greater understanding of the reality of the disease. After my surgery, I thought I could rest and heal; then everything would return to normal. But nothing ever really went back to the way it was. Healing was a difficult journey. I returned to the bench as soon as I could, since I was in the middle of a rotation and wanted to complete my project with positive results. However, my incision did not close properly and one afternoon I stumbled to the surgeon’s office with blood-stained gauze, a little lightheaded and a lot more terrified. The on-duty nurse kindly reassured me that, though open, the cut was uninfected and that I had to be careful not to strain myself in the lab. “What good is a scientist without the capability to vigorously pipette or make up liters of buffer?” I thought to myself. Nevertheless, I slept motionlessly on my back and attempted to pipette with my left hand. The mental block was a little harder to deal with. Research had always been the straight and narrow path; I was trained in rigorous science and expected to continue on the road to academia. But it became very true, very fast, that my heart was not on this track anymore. Going through my breast cancer scare made me thankful for the days I had and also made me reevaluate what I wanted in my life. I always knew that I had a love for writing, and now there was an even deeper sense of conveying the hope of science to others affected by disease. It felt

as if I had run into a brick wall. Some of these bricks were literal, physical entities. Job internships are hard to come by as a graduate student; obtaining one is almost as difficult as making the time for it between productive hours at the bench. Career centers at academic institutions have less support for non-traditional career paths. There are student loans that will need to be paid soon after you leave school. Other bricks are emotional and mental hurdles. Both of my parents were the first in their respective families to attend college and immigrate out of their home country. After finishing his Master’s degree at Syracuse, my father drove

pointment to the people who had supported me so far and to the ones I cared most about in life. I struggled long and hard with these nightmares and every possible permutation of “what if” scenarios. What if I stayed and constantly regretted the decision not to go? Is the grass greener on the other side? What if this is the other side? The first hurdle is the most challenging to jump over; you can spend months philosophizing about what to do and what not to do, but there is no substitute for finding out what is right for you other than jumping head in and actively reaching out toward your goals. I found scientists who had transitioned out of research

What if I stayed and constantly regretted the decision not to go? Is the grass greener on the other side? What if this is the other side? from New York to California while my pregnant mother flew across the country to meet him there. At that time, my father did not have a job offer in hand. They did not have things we now consider necessities, such as air conditioning in their second-hand car, their own place to live or health insurance. When I first heard their story, I thought it was crazy. But as it turns out, they just had a lot of faith. And thus, I grew up with traditional values, an emphasis on the importance of higher education and the strong will to accomplish whatever you put your mind to. The thought of leaving without my Ph.D. went against every principle I believed in. I felt I would be a disap-

after graduate school, set up informational interviews and started applying to jobs with reckless abandon. I also spent my late afternoons at the patent office to learn about commercialization and intellectual property work at a university. Through this, I gained both an understanding mentor and an appreciation for science at a different level. I knew a few things when I started reaching out into the unknown. I knew I did not want to leave science behind just yet. I wanted to write in some capacity. I wanted to interact and communicate with various groups of people, whether it be the general public, researchers, funding sources or clinicians and their patients. I wanted to

be involved at a place that firmly believes in using science to make a difference in the world. I wanted to make my own happiness . . . I suppose those were more than just a few things. Most responses to my proposal were calculated and realistically sobering. Sometimes a job is just a job. Your dream job is just that — a dream. The first job is always a stepping stone. But sometimes life, as entropic as it is, will surprise you greatly with how well certain pieces fall into place. Now I am entrenched on the other side, working in communications for a company that actively uses science and technology to understand the complexity of cancer and develop comprehensive therapies for patients. I am still surrounded, just in a different capacity, by deeply intellectual, generous and passionate people who strive to accomplish great things with great science. And as much as I wanted to, I didn’t get to leave my pipettes behind immediately. My immersion project involved a few weeks at the bench with the discovery and innovation group, learning how an idea develops from a pod to a blossoming novel therapy. I look back on my years in graduate school and see it as a blessing — both in how it trained me as a scientist, and for the personal experience which gave me a new perspective on life and led me to where I am today. Debbie Tseng ’13 graduated with a Master’s degree in biomedical science from Weill Cornell Medical College and now works in scientific communications at Merrimack Pharmaceuticals. She may be reached at dtseng@merrimackpharma.com.


A&E

8 | The Corne¬ Daily Sun | Friday, October 4, 2013

The Rhetorical Question As a regular presence on NPR’s Wait Wait ... Don’t Tell Me, a best-selling author and a veteran stand-up comedian, industry legend Paula Poundstone knows more than her fair share about comedy. The Sun spoke to Ms. Poundstone about her career, her mistakes and what it takes to become a successful stand-up. THE SUN: What has it been like to be a weekly panelist on Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me? How does it differ from you work as a standup comedian? PAULA POUNDSTONE: It’s really really been fun. I work with really great people ... if they didn’t cheat it would be the perfect job — no one ever talks about the seedy back-story ... the steroids. I have no idea why they ever first called me up to doWait Wait but my family should celebrate the day they did as a holy holiday because we have benefited immensely in many ways. For example, I often use the news of the weird to entertain my son when I’m trying to calm him down, which is many, many, many times a week. As a stand-up comedian, I love talking to the audience — it’s my favorite part of the night, hands down. It makes for a wonderful night, but it’s a really different kind of performing. For one, I don’t carry the show on Wait Wait; I’m just there as one of the worker bees and I’m not responsible for the content. Not that I’m activist, I’m one of the lazy people who will bring the country down. I’m glad I get to do both. Briefly, I had my own show, years ago, but even during that time, I never gave up my job as a stand-up comedian because that would be an empty life. The audience is my best friend. Now to answer a question I know everyone’s wondering about: Yes, I do eat Pop-Tarts. Right now I’m putting into my suitcase 4 plastic pop tart carriers. They are made to look like Pop-

Tart, complete with plastic icing and plastic sprinkles. I am enclosing four of those in my suitcase right now which I will use to replenish the two Pop-Tart containers in my purse. I’m going be out for three nights and I don’t like to panic that I have none. Being on the road means a lot of retreating to my hotel room late at night with no access to food, which probably means I shouldn’t eat but that’s not how I see it. SUN: Between being a member of Wait Wait, a stand-up comedian and an author, which one of these three things is your favorite? P.P.: Stand-up. It’s maybe just because I’ve done it for so many years, but it’s how I look at the world. Everything that happens, [I ask myself] how will I tell that to the audience. That being said, I like writing when it’s going well and I love Wait Wait in the way that Ben Franklin said that he was … Oh, I’ve forgotten . . . He wrote his own epithets . . . A printer! I may be a table-buser first, but at least second I’m a stand-up comedian. SUN: You’re known for your spontaneity with the audience. Has the spontaneity ever gotten you in trouble? P.P.: In trouble wouldn’t be the right term, but I did find myself just saying what felt like the wrong thing one time. I was talking to this family that was in the crowd, and I generally figure when someone has their kids in the crowd, they’re well aware of what I do. But, somehow, this one time, I got every assumption I made about them wrong and I kept trying to back track. There was a girl child and I mistook her for a boy. She was young and I just did, what can I say? I should know better though — I get mistaken for a guy all the time. It’s not good, I know what that feels like. Then, I skipped over from that kid to the brother who’s very tall, he’s a young man, it’s very clear that he’s a boy. I ask him questions about thing he does, ask him what he was like as a baby, if his

one t s d n u o P a l u ft. Pa

mother struggled in birth and it turns out he was adopted. All three of my kids are adopted so that was just plain stupid — I don’t know why I would assume that. It just went from bad to worse. I finally turned to them and said they’re ruining my show — obviously I was kidding. Everything I said seemed to not fit. After the show we took pictures, hugged, chatted, finally turned to them and said they’re ruining my show, but it was a paper outfit and everywhere I turned there was a rip. The audience thought it was funny, but I just felt like I wasn’t on my game. SUN: What are you most looking forward to about performing in Ithaca? P.P.: I’ve been to New York before. I don’t remember anything specific except don’t you guys have a lot of waterfalls? I didn’t see them — all I saw was whatever was between the airport and where I had to go. So I’m really just looking forward to a night of laughter. I consider myself a proud member of the endorphin production industry. SUN: In the early 90’s you were the first woman to win the cable ACE for Best Standup Comedy Special and the first woman to perform standup at the prestigious White House Correspondents dinner … how has being a woman comedian changed since then, if at all? P.P.: Every now and then, for lack of having anything more clever to say about me, my publicists emphasize the fact that I’m a woman. Honestly, it has nothing to do with being funny or not. Every now and then, some idiot “celebrity” will say, for lack of anything intelligent to say, that women aren’t funny. It’s just not divided by gender.

It’s sort of like the Academy Awards: the more categories you have, the more awards you can give out. This year, I’m up for “Funniest Female Comic Who Parts Her Hair On The Left.” Keep your fingers crossed. SUN: What would you’re advice be to a college student interested in becoming a comedian? P.P.: My first piece of advice to a college student who wants to be a comedian would be, so long as you’re in college, soak up every bit of that education. First of all, who knows if you’ll become a comedian or not. Who knows what the world will bring. We need educated, informed people to protect our democracy, more than we need comedians. Also, if you do become a comedian, the more you know, the more you can talk about. You need a head full of ideas and experiences. Performing stand-up comedy is not hard, if there are venues around where you can get stage time. I started out doing “open mic nights” in Boston. Anyone who wanted to could do five minutes. So, you write your five minutes. Put it on stage, then drink some water or juice without added sugars, and reflect on what you learned. Repeat. Liz Camuti is a senior in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. She can be reached at associate-editor@cornellsun.com.

The National Film Registry: A Love Story The Amazing Shadows is a film buffet: there’s a little sample of everything. Drawn from the nostalgic imagery of old films juxtaposed with an omnipresent narrator, the documentary dives into the history and importance of the National Film Registry. Disappointingly, this 88-minute documentary does not give enough credit to the film industry and the Registry; however, its audience should still be thankful to have such a powerful insight into the mysterious world of classic film. For most of the world, the National Film Registry is important merely for a column published in the arts pages once a year, which lists an annual selection of new additions to the registry. Paul Mariano and Kurt Norton’s inspiring documentary makes a case for this crucial institution. Their documentary shows the world that the National Film Registry acts as America’s time capsule. Impressively, they put together a piece of work that allows the films to speak for themselves, presenting straightforward information to its audience in an elegant, engaging manner. These Amazing Shadows serves as a means not only to appreciate film, but also to get to know its history. The film educates its audience on the origins of the committee and its historical process of picking the variety of films each year. As it eloquently explains, the National Film Registry works to preserve the art of film and, more importantly, to protect these works of art from harm. Mariano and Norton argue that the Registry is so worthwhile a cause that it should be funded by both the government and private citizens. A primary draw of the film is its array of interviews with well-known Hollywood-types. Mariano and Norton con-

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL FILM REGISTRY

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

sult with different directors, actors and movie-making professions, in addition to board members, including filmmakers like Christopher Nolan, John Waters and Barbara Kopple. They also converse with film critics like Mick LaSalle and Jay Carr. One of the most engaging interviews occurs with Gregory Peck’s son, a Vietnam veteran, who exposes the horrors of that war and how many films have captured it. These conversations give insight into the decision-making process, as well as how these films make the filmmakers feel. Focusing far beyond obviously classic movies — namely, Gone with the Wind and Casablanca — the documentary examines all genres of film, including avant-garde, Hollywood classics, newsreels, silent films, documentaries, and more. The discussion of the variety of film presented justifies the claim that films inform people of the culture at specific points in time. For example, Mariano and Norton included Birth of a Nation not to illustrate racism, but because it is historically significant. Other films such as U.S.A. do not show America at its best, but at its most real. Mariano and Norton also explore the art of film preservation, discovering uncensored versions of movies that were edited under the Production Code. They follow preservation specialists, giving the audience an understanding of their job and the rewarding experience it entails. In particular, the film features a segment that scrutinizes two different versions of Barbara Stanwyck’s 1933 film Baby Face. Someone had two copies of the movie — one, he noticed, was slightly longer than the other. They discover that one version was unedited while the other must have been censored. Mariano and Norton put the versions side-by-side, resulting in an informative and comedic segment. Although this film is the perfect documentary for all of the film nerds in the world, and for anyone else, the 88minutes seem to go by quickly without giving enough attention and depth to each film. The structure of the film also leaves much to be desired: Its broadness becomes a strain on the cohesiveness of the film, leaving the audience with many unanswered questions. The documentary also seems to be advertising the National Film Registry, which seems a tad unethical even if, by the end, the committee

proves worthy of celebration. Nevertheless, these problems do not undermine the obvious amount of hard work and love put into the film. Overall, despite their film’s flaws, Mariano and Norton are able to capture well the American cinematic treasures that reflect the diversity of film. Like many great films, this documentary acts as a love letter to film itself. It presents the ways America cherishes the medium, its history and the hard work that goes into making extraorCornell dinary movies. These Amazing grasps the American experiCinema Shadows ence as a whole, revealing much about our culture, but more importantly, about us. The movie is summarized when board member Robert Rosen asks, “Why would you want to save movies? I would ask, Why do we save family pictures?” The importance of film is unspoken — film transforms us in a way that no other medium is capable of doing. At the very least, this documentary gives its audience a whole new repertoire of movies on their must-see list.

Jacqueline Glasner

Jacqueline Glasner is a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences. She can be reached at jglasner@cornellsun.com.


THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, October 4, 2013 9

A&E

I Am a God:

In defense of Kanye

G

o ahead and jizz over the Breaking Bad finale, but if it’s real drama you’re looking for, please divert your attention to the slow crash and burn that is the one-man spectacle of Kanye West’s interview with BBC Radio 1. Despite its release nearly two weeks ago, the epic long-form rant is still making headlines after Jimmy Kimmel’s (adorable) spoof on Late Night provoked Kanye into his typical M.O.: an all-caps Twitter tirade against an innocuous target. Of the interview, Kanye calls it (as only Kanye would), “the first piece of honest media in years” — um, okay. Prone to speaking in nonsensical superlatives, especially in the interview with BBC’s Zane Lowe, he says a number of seriously obnoxious things, mostly in third person, about information we probably already know and information we were probably better off not knowing. Memorable moments include Kanye’s impassioned claim to have invented the leather jogging pant—apparently the impractical worldwide trend we are all sporting — and Kanye’s fervent proclamation that fashion is in his DNA, that it is coded in him just as racing is coded in the glitch in Wreck-It Ralph (“Vanellope Von Schweetz, they broke her car!” he cries twice). Overall, it was an hour-long masturbatory piece — of Kanye getting off on himself, of Kanye saying insufferable things like, “I’m postmodernist, at best, as a career. I’m a futurist, mentally.” In the aftermath of the interview, little else has spawned besides the Kimmel spoof, a few quote-heavy Buzzfeed articles, and the typical meme-tastic reactionary pieces to Kanye’s now commonplace vanity. As Kimmel says, “Does Kanye know you don’t Profanity have to be your Prayers own hype man?” It’s true that Kanye has his regular routine of doing generally ridiculous things in the name of selfaggrandizement, which is, of course, tiring. But also true is the fact that the public and the media are no better, regurgitating his lines and slapping them with the umbrella label of “vanity,” which is also, actually, really tiring. If Kanye is The Boy Who Cried Wolf, having said too much to be heard anymore, is our dismissal of him any less egotistical than the artist’s own egotism? If you only see Kanye a crazy narcissist, you’ve taken away his right to be a multidimensional human being with fear and compassion and vulnerabilities. And he has all these things, which he expresses earnestly over and over again to the public, who over and over again fail to listen. As the man who produced and sang (horribly, as he admits in genuine NIHAL MARIWALA / SUN STAFF ILLUSTRATOR modesty) an entire album of heartbreak, Kanye has made a career of putting his true self on the line as an artist, which is why we see as many good parts as we see bad. We see the raw shit and the progressive shit, the gone-too-far experimental shit and, every once in a while, the really good shit. I mean, “Mercy” is still playing on every major station more than a year later, and My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy scored a 10 by Pitchfork, as the first non-reissue album to receive a perfect score since 2002. All that sincerity is still there, obscured at times under the weight of his ego, but Kanye’s bravado and self-reflection have culminated in work that is both radio-friendly but complex. We forget that a lot. We forget that his tracks are catchy, are New Age, are layered in sonic embellishments, because he titles them “I Am a God” and suddenly all we can do is boringly mock him for his vanity. As Vulture’s Jody Rosen explains, “Anyone who gets riled up about ‘I Am a God,’ or about the album’s title [Yeezus], is missing the joke — or rather, taking the bait. More than ever, West is aiming to provoke.” In the end, you can’t separate Kanye the artist from Kanye the person, because his music is born from his arrogance — truly. He uses his extreme selflove as an act of warfare, as a defense mechanism for his own self-preservation, and as the fuel for all his creativity. He can be a god, or a fashion designer, or a rapper, or a narcissist, or Jay Z’s best friend, or the asshat that impregnates Kim Kardashian, but you have to accept him altogether. And in all that white noise of his BBC interview, buried under all his brash bullshit, there are strokes of small genius too. If you listen hard enough, you may actually hear some stuff that matters, like this: “We got this new thing called classism. It’s racism’s cousin. This is what we do to hold people back. This is what we do. And we got this other thing that’s also been working for a long time when you don’t have to be racist anymore. It’s called self-hate. It works on itself. It’s like real estate of racism. Where just like that, when someone comes up and says something like, ‘I am a god,’ everybody says ‘Who does he think he is?’ I just told you who I thought I was! A god! I just told you. That’s who I think I am. Would it have been better if I had a song that said ‘I am a n****a?’ Or if I had a song that said ‘I am a gangster?’ Or if I had a song that said ‘I am a pimp?’ All those colors and patinas fit better on a person like me, right? But to say you are a god, especially when you got shipped over to the country that you’re in, and your last name is a slave owner’s. How could you say that? How could you have that mentality?”

Alice Wang

Alice Wang is a junior in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences. She can be reached at awang@cornellsun.com. Profanity Prayers appears alternate Fridays.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ads are accepted at The Sun‘s office at 139 W. State Street downtown, by phone or e-mail. Deadline: 3:30 p.m. at The Sun‘s office on the day preceding publication. Monday’s deadline: Friday, 3:30 p.m. at The Sun office.

Standard Rate: $3.40 per day for first 15

words, 32 cents per day per word thereafter. 5 or more consecutive insertions, $3.15 per day for first 15 words, 30 cents per day per word thereafter.

Commercial Rate: $5.20 per day for first 15 words, 33 cents per day per word thereafter. 5 or more consecutive insertions, $5.00 per day for first 15 words, 31 cents per day per word thereafter.

The Sun is responsible for only one day make good on ads.

273-3606 classifieds@cornelldailysun.com

4 S ERVICES COLONIAL CLEANERS welcomes you back. Call us for

FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY of your drycleaning, shirt laundry and wash n fold laundry. Fast reliable service for over 60 years. Charge accounts can be arranged for your convenience. Call for full information 273-7121 ask for Candi or Glenn.

IT’S OKAY IF YOU DIE BIKRAM’S YOGA IS HOTTEST! 10 DAYS IN A ROW FOR $20. SEMESTER SPECIAL $600. CAN YOU BELIEVE IT? CALL COW-YOGA (269-9642) www.bikramithaca.com

10 F OR R ENT 2 Bedroom Mobile Home available in a quite park located about 1/4 mile from the Cornell Vet School $750.00 plus utilities. Security deposit, credit check required, no pets. Call 607-564-9057 for details.

17 H ELP WANTED Part-time barn chores on horse farm. Must have horse handling exp. Weekends required. Trumansburg, 607-387-8557

23 PARKING COLLEGETOWN 607-272-3389 AVRAMISRENTALS@AOL.COM Parking spots still available prime Collegetown locations. Certified Properties of TC Inc 273-1669

PARKING

Central Collegetown Available Now and 2014-2015 www.ithacarenting.com 607-272-3000 Office at 119 Dryden Road

PARKING RIGHT BY CORNELL 227-0557 OR 273-6864

26 A PARTMENT FOR R ENT **************************** **************************** **************************** PJ APARTMENTS See our New Website

www.pjapts.com Weekend tours Noon-4pm Weekdays 11am-7pm pjapartments@gmail.com 607-277-0910

**************************** **************************** **************************** 1 and 2 furnished bedrooms

COLLEGE AVENUE

avramisrentals@aol.com www.avramisrealestate.com 607-272-3389 before 7pm and

NORTH CAMPUS

1 and 2 furnished bedrooms

26 A PARTMENT FOR R ENT

26 A PARTMENT FOR R ENT

**************************** **************************** **************************** 3 BR Apartment

Collegetown Terrace Apartments 1 and 2 Bedroom/2 Bath Apartments Available now and for Spring Semester! 2 bedroom apartments also available to share. Heat, hot water and high speed wireless internet included. Free State of the Art Fitness Center Stackable washer and dryer in apartments. Covered parking available for a fee. Novarr-Mackesey Property Management www.ithacastudentapartments.com office@ithacastudentapartments.com 607-277-1234

New Renovation Top of Williams Street $895 pp

2 BR Apartment Includes Parking & All Utilities $750 pp Weekend Tours Noon-4pm Weekdays 11am-7pm See our new website

www.pjapts.com 607-277-0910

***************************** ***************************** ***************************** 1 bedroom apartments. Collegetown. Available immediately. Starting at $900. 1 to 5 minute walk to campus. Close to Law School. www.urbanithaca.com info@urbanithaca.com 607-330-2442

113 COLLEGE AVE 5 bedroom penthouse apartment parking-laundry 607-227-2873 pbcassociates@twcny.rr.com

113 COLLEGE AVE 8 bedroom new kitchen and bath laundry - Huge Rooms - parking 607-227-2873 pbcassociates@twcny.rr.com

2 or 3 Bedrooms on Blair St. 607-339-1137 COLLEGETOWN 2014-2015 1 - 3 BR All New Furnished Apartments Laundry. Gas Fireplaces. 315-254-1717 607-272-3160 www.cpstudentproperties.com 2014-15 Collegetown 317 Upper Eddy Street Large one bedroom apartment available to one person or two related people. Combination living room/bedroom. Furnished. All utilities paid except electric. 10-month lease. Laundry next door. Located one block from Cornell. Reputable owner. Call 227-0924

312 College Ave Collegetown’s Best Address Beautifully Furnished Studio, 1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom & 3 Bedroom units. Office Open M-F 9-9; Sat 10-5; Sun 11-4. 273-9777 or 312collegeave.com

College Ave, Blair St, Cook St 5 & 6 Bedroom Houses & Apts. Free Laundry & Parking 2014-2015 1,2,3, Bedroom apts. Starting at $800/person including ALL utilities. Call/Text Mark 279-8080

College Ave. 4 & 5 Bedroom Fully furnished. Large bedrooms with walk in closets. Laundry & parking.

607-339-1137

COLLEGETOWN APARTMENT, PARKING 2014-2015 STUDIO, 1, 6 & 8 BEDROOM. FURNISHED. HUGE. CALL 607-272-0781, 908-334-3665, 908-635-8009 FOR DETAILS. Eddygate Heart of Collegetown

7, 6 and 5 Bedroom with 2 baths Fiber Optic internet Big screen TV Laundry on site kworden@travishyde.com 607 273-1654

HOUSES, APTS, PARKING 1 to 11 Bedroom Collegetown - College Ave, Cook St, Linden Ave, Dryden Rd, Bryant Ave. 607-330-2442 Office at 307 College Ave. info@urbanithaca.com www.urbanithaca.com Ithaca Renting Apartments, Houses, Parking Central Collegetown Superb Panoramic Views Modern Elevator Buildings Collegetown Plaza: New Fitness Room Studio, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 BRs Collegetown Center: Concierge Service, quiet building Studio, 1, 2 BRs Collegetown Court: Super convenient, exceptional Value Studio, 1, 3, 5 BRs Other Central Collegetown Locations: Aces Apartments: 3, 4, 6 BRs Buffalo St and Dryden Rd: 2, 3, 6, 10 BRs Whole houses for 8 or 14 people Rent Smart. Live Well. 607-272-3000 Visit our office at: 119 Dryden Road www.ithacarenting.com

Newly Renovated Apartments 3 Houses 12, 12 & 9 100 Ft. from main gates of Cornell Starting at $795 includes all utilities Call 273-1650 Ask for Peter or George at The Souvlaki House

Now Renting 2014-2015 Apartments/Houses 1-10 Bedrooms Call Today Certified Properties of TC Inc 273-1669 certifiedpropertiesinc.com Now Renting for 2014-2015 4 Bedroom Apartments Eddy Street 402-404 Call 272-1585 or 227-6045 NOW renting. Apartments without hassle. Hudson Heights Apartments are located on South Hill, 8 minutes from Cornell. Prices start at $660/month. Rent includes: all utilities, parking, garbage and recycling. There are two laundry facilities on the premises and the bus route is on the block. Contact Tony for an appointment: 607-280-7660 or email renting@ithacaLS.com.

QUALITY, AFFORDABLE, CONVENIENT! 1 - 10 Bedroom Apartments & Houses In Collegetown PARKING, LAUNDRY, UTILITIES! (607) 273-7368 www.IthacaApartmentRental.com


10 THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, October 4, 2013

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

27 H OUSE FOR R ENT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!! 9 BR HOUSE Prime Location! $795 pp includes all utilities and laundry 3 floors and 4 bathrooms See our new website www.pjapts.com 607-277-0910

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!! ***************************** ***************************** ***************************** HUGE HOUSE! Humongous 3 floors and Full basement Enormous Bedrooms $695 pp for 10 people Great front porch and yard Free Parking Photos on our new website www.pjapts.com 607-277-0910

***************************** ***************************** ***************************** 2014-2015 College Ave. 5 BR House. Furnished. Laundry. Parking. Call 607-273-8576 or 607-319-6416 407 College Ave

ACROSS 1 Place for una familia 7 Xerox insert: Abbr. 11 Advanced math deg., in Canada 14 With 15-Across, verifies in advance, literally 15 See 14-Across 16 Suffix with Capri 17 Clubs with balls 18 Yellow butterflies, to Brits 20 Two-note keyboard effect 22 Most fit to serve 23 “Pinocchio” whale 26 With 32-Across, warm apparel, literally 28 Barcelona gold 29 Kiosk 32 See 26-Across 33 Fam. tree member 35 Old cutter 36 Sign of cold feet? 37 See 39-Across 39 With 37- and 40Across, nosh, literally 40 See 39-Across 42 Progressive Insurance spokeswoman 43 B.C. law group 45 Starr-struck one? 47 See 51-Across 48 __ music 50 Fire 51 With 47-Across, former “American Idol” winner, literally 53 Con artist 55 Years in Claudius’ reign 56 Certain cracker 59 Guides in the direction of 61 Jason of “Harry Potter” films 65 Fancy marble 66 See 67-Across 67 With 66-Across, 1975 Best Picture nominee, literally 68 People people: Abbr.

31 Prisoner’s 49 Attaches, in a demand way 34 Pepsi One’s one 51 Class 38 California wine 52 Pelé’s first name town near 54 Some grenades, DOWN Stockton briefly 1 Common HDTV 41 Posh 57 Bertie Wooster’s feature alma mater 2 Sushi-grade tuna 44 Ellington standard whose 58 Road crew item 3 These, in Toulouse title is Spanish for 60 Genetic stuff “lost” 62 Stand buy 4 Bank listing: Abbr. 63 Jazz lover 5 Culottes kin 46 Nice view 47 Opening lines? 64 GPS part: Abbr. 6 Declares 7 Overmuch ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE: 8 Fidel’s successor 9 Just starting to roll, perhaps 10 Econ. yardstick 11 Image on the Armenian coat of arms 12 Haight or Ashbury 13 “Dog Whisperer” Millan 19 Accepted, as a gift card 21 Bellyachers 23 Like platform shoes in the ’60s 24 Utah city on I-15 25 Journalist’s asset 27 SALT topic 30 Percolate 10/04/13 xwordeditor@aol.com 69 Celebrity chef Burrell 70 Initial stages

By David Poole (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

Sun Sudoku

COMICS AND PUZZLES

Puzzle #31: Apples to Apples

Fill in the empty cells, one number in each, so that each column, row, and region contains the numbers 1-9 exactly once. Each number in the solution therefore occurs only once in each of the three “directions,” hence the “single numbers” implied by the puzzle’s name. (Rules from wikipedia.org/wiki /Sudoku)

The Lawn

by Liz Popolo ’08

10/04/13

Heart of Collegetown

8 Bedroom

with 3 baths Heat, hot water, and A/C Fiber Optic internet Big screen TV Laundry on site kworden@travishyde.com 607 273-1654

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

6 Bedroom Blair St 2 kitchens, 3 bathrooms, 2 living rooms, 2 dining rooms, 6 large bedrooms. Fully furnished. Laundry & Parking on premises. 607-339-1137

COLLEGE AVE 13 bedroom house 3 baths - 2 kitchens - laundry- parking 607-227-2873 pbcassociates@twcny.rr.com

COLLEGETOWN 2014-2015 1-6 BR All New Furnished Houses Gas fireplaces, laundry. 315-254-1717 607-272-3160 www.cpstudentproperties.com

Mr. Gnu

Up to My Nipples

We’re up all night to bring you the news in the morning…

The Corne¬ Daily Sun

KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH

NEWS • SPORTS • ENTERTAINMENT WWW.CORNELLSUN.COM

Travis Dandro

by William Moore ’12 and Jesse Simons grad


THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, October 4, 2013 11

SPORTS ROUND

3

REBECCA SCOTT SHAILEE HARRIS CHIUSANO SHAH

AKANE OTANI

CAMUTI

LIZ

ARIEL COOPER

MILY SCHROEDER BEERMAN

ANDY LEVINE

HALEY VELASCO

CORNELL V. COLGATE

CORNELL

CORNELL

CORNELL

COLGATE

CORNELL

CORNELL

CORNELL

CORNELL

CORNELL

CORNELL

BROWN V. RHODE ISLAND

RI

BROWN

BROWN

BROWN

BROWN

BROWN

BROWN

BROWN

BROWN

BROWN

HARVARD V. HOLY CROSS

HARVARD

HARVARD

HARVARD

HARVARD

HARVARD

HARVARD

HARVARD

HARVARD

HARVARD

HARVARD

PRINCETON V. COLUMBIA

PRINCETON

PRINCETON

COLUMBIA

PRINCETON

PRINCETON

PRINCETON

PRINCETON

PRINCETON

PRINCETON

COLUMBIA

YALE V. CAL POLY

CAL POLY

CAL POLY

YALE

CAL POLY

YALE

YALE

CAL POLY

YALE

YALE

CAL POLY

MARYLAND V. FLORIDA ST.

FLORIDA ST.

FLOIRIDA ST.

FLORIDA ST.

FLORIDA ST.

FLORIDA ST.

FLORIDA ST.

FLORIDA ST.

FLORIDA ST.

FLORIDA ST.

FLORIDA ST.

OHIO ST. V. NORTHWESTERN

OHIO STATE

OHIO STATE

OHIO STATE

OHIO STATE

OHIO STATE

OHIO STATE

OHIO STATE

OHIO STATE

OHIO STATE

OHIO STATE

PACKERS V. LIONS

PACKERS

LIONS

PACKERS

PACKERS

PACKERS

PACKERS

PACKERS

LIONS

LIONS

PACKERS

GIANTS V. EAGLES

GIANTS

GIANTS

EAGLES

EAGLES

EAGLES

GIANTS

EAGLES

GIANTS

GIANTS

GIANTS

TEXANS V. 49ERS

49ERS

49ERS

49ERS

49ERS

49ERS

49ERS

49ERS

49ERS

49ERS

49ERS

LAST WEEK

7-3

6-4

3-7

3-7

5-5

2-8

6-4

6-4

5-5

4-6

TOTAL

9-11

9-11

6-14

6-14

11-9

7-13

13-7

12-8

12-8

9-11

Mathews Eyes Ivy Co-Captains Lead Red Into Ivy Play Passing Record M. SOCCER

Continued from page 12

FOOTBALL

Continued from page 12

tain him.” The Raiders 0-4 record is also deceptive in that they have been pitted against some challenging opponents, including the Air Force Academy and the No. 18 ranked team in the FCS — New Hampshire. The Raiders have also had to battle through some injuries. McCarney was out for the 53-23 loss to New Hampshire, and with their starting linebacker sidelined, Colgate has turned to a sophomore in Demetrius Russell to lead the running game. According to Minor, though, Colgate’s depth will make up for these injuries. “They had their starting running back out and now they’re going to their second string running back, and I think he’s pretty good, I’ve watched a good bit of film on him as well,” Minor said. “So we’ll have to stop the run first and foremost, but that’s always the premise of the defense.” Coming off a season where he broke the school “I’m just happy for Jeff; record for yards of total offense, McCarney was it’s a big milestone for named a preseason candidate on the Walter Payton Award him and he’s worked Watch List for the FCS hard and he’s earned it.” National Player of the Year. However, the Red has its own Chris Lenz candidate for the same award to combat him, in senior quarterback Jeff Mathews. Mathews only needs 342 more passing yards to overtake Brown’s James Perry as the Ivy League’s all-time leader in that category. He became Cornell’s all-time leader in touchdown passes last weekend after connecting with sophomore wide receiver Chris Lenz for a 22yard pass that Lenz dove for and corralled in the end zone. “I didn’t even know about it until after, but I was glad I could make a play for the team at that point,” Lenz said. “And I’m just happy for Jeff; it’s a big milestone for him and he’s worked hard and he’s earned it.” After putting on an offensive show in homecoming two weeks ago against Bucknell, the Red hopes to fill the Crescent again this weekend and remain undefeated at home. “It’s always great to play at Schoellkopf,” Archer said. “But really I don’t talk about anything but that next day, it’s something I’m really trying to harp on. The next play, the next day.” Scott Chiusano can be reached at schiusano@cornellsun.com.

to be a battle, that they’re going to come in very intense,” said senior co-captain and defenseman Patrick Slogic. “We know it’s very important to overcome that intensity and to be sharp in every play of the game, defensively and offensively, to make sure we don’t give up any opportunities for them and that we put away all of the chances that we have.” Proven by the Red’s success so far this year, the captains have shown their ability to be leaders both off and on the field. All three captains have contributed more than once to the Red’s overall 10 goals this season, and have shown their team members the

importance of teamwork and dedication to the squad. Though the team agrees that this will be a tough season, the Red is preparing with intense practices, hard work and determination to maintain its title as Ivy League Champions. According to Williams, the Red’s difficult non-conference schedule has prepared the team well for the ever-important start of Ivy League play. “Building up all of our positives from out of conference play and trying to put everything together will help us get results,” Williams said. Elani Cohen can be reached at sports@cornellsun.com.

Gridiron Gang Tries to Iron Out Kinks SPRINT

Continued from page 12

practices just as much as any other team on campus. “Six days of team activities — five weekly practices and one game,” said freshman wide receiver Logan Stevenson. “This week we spent some extra time working on defense, and the wide receivers did extra catching drills because that’s something we’ve had trouble with lately.” The team also gathered together to review its scouting report on Army. The Red gets film of every game from every

team in the sprint football league and reviews it prior to the matchups. “In practice we play scout offense and scout defense. This week we’ve tried to run Army’s plays against our offense and defense,” Stevenson said. Additional review of the Army tapes has led the Red to a viable strategy on offense for Friday’s game. The tapes revealed that Army tends to keep linebackers in and on the line. The Red hopes to be able to implement tight screen plays or quick passes to take advantage of the defense. Furthermore, the Red

acknowledged some of Army’s peculiar sets on offense. “Army tends to run quadwide receiver and sweep offenses. We know how to recognize that after all our practice,” Stevenson said. Cornell will take on Army at Schoellkopf Field tonight at 7:00pm. The Red hopes that the efficient scouting of the opponent and fewer breakdowns on both sides of the field will lead to its much-needed first victory of the season. Nikita DuBnov can be reached at sports@cornellsun.com.


The Corne¬ Daily Sun

Sports

FRIDAY OCTOBER 4, 2013

12

FOOTBALL

Red Hosts Instate Rival Colgate David Archer ’05 looks to bounce back from first loss as head coach

what we can do and one loss is just one loss,” he said. Though the Raiders are searching for their first win of the season, the reigning Patriot League champions After Yale handed head coach David Archer ’05 and will not go down easy this weekend. “They’re going to be really competitive, they’re going the Red (1-1) their first loss last weekend, the squad was back at it in practice on Tuesday, preparing to host cen- to play really hard,” Archer said. “They have a great tral New York rival Colgate (0-4) on Saturday at 12:30 option offense, they’re very athletic on defense and they love coming to Cornell to play. I expect to see a really p.m. The 38-23 loss to the Bulldogs was the first of good team.” The Raiders also fell to Yale, 39-22, two weeks ago at Archer’s head coaching career, and came largely at the hands of Yale wide receiver Deon Randall, who scored home. They return 13 starters to a squad that was undefeated in Patriot League play last season. four straight touchdowns to open the second half. “Colgate’s a great team,” Minor “Yale is a very good team. … They said. “Like coach Archer’s been saying, made plays when we didn’t,” said “It’s just little small every team is a copycat league — senior captain and defensive lineman Tre’ Minor. “It’s just little small things things that we’re going to Patriot league, Ivy League. … So we’re probably going to see some bubble that we’re going to work on and we’re work on.” screens that we have some plays on.” going to get better at, and we’re going Tre’ Minor At the helm of Colgate’s offense is to try to improve it and put on a better reigning Patriot League Player of the show for the Big Red fans.” According to Archer, Tuesday’s practice was an year and starting quarterback Gavin McCarney. A important one for the Red, as it allowed the squad to mobile quarterback, McCarney has totaled 266 yards on the ground with one touchdown so far this season. He leave the disappointing loss to Yale behind. “Ultimately everyone’s been chomping at the bit to has also thrown for 586 yards and three touchdowns, get out here and practice, because that’s your next with only one interception. “McCarney is a great player. He’s going to be able to opportunity to play and to get some of that ill feeling run the ball, he’s going to be able to throw the ball,” from Saturday out and to move on,” Archer said. Going into the matchup with Colgate, Minor said Minor said. “We’re just trying to make sure we can conthe team is holding its head high. “We’ve still got the swagger because we still know See FOOTBALL page 11

By SCOTT CHIUSANO

Sun Assistant Sports Editor

XIAOYUE GUO / SUN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A bitter rivalry | The matchup between Cornell and Colgate ranks 17th among the most played in college football. Saturday will be their 95th meeting.

SPRINT FOOTBALL

Put it away |

Still Searching for First Win, Sprint Takes On Army at Home By NIKITA DUBNOV Sun Contributor

As of Thursday afternoon, the sprint football team was still unaware of whether its Friday night game against Army would be played. Due to the government shutdown, Army had to decide whether or not it had the funds to travel to Ithaca to face the Red. Sprint football has one of the shortest seasons of any Cornell team, playing only seven games in its yearly campaign, which means that playing one less game would impact the program in significant ways. The 0-3 record to start the season is not a good sign for the club, and every game left gives the Red a chance to turn the season around. After speaking on the phone with the Army program heads in the late afternoon, the Cornell coaches informed the players that the game would in fact be played, and they have since begun to prepare for the weekend's contest. The Red has not won a game against Army since the 2010 season. With the early losses this year, the team needs any chance to change the course of play towards success on the field. There has not been a concrete issue with the team so far this year, according to co-head

coach Bart Guccia. “It’s a matter of correcting our mistakes. That’s what hurts us. It’s not something you can put a finger on,” Guccia — who is in his ninth year with the sprint football team — said. “In different circumstances we did different things wrong, like not scoring in the red zone and giving up big plays on special teams. We’ve had breakdowns.” In its previous game against the University of Pennsylvania, the Red was unable to score until the final minutes of the fourth quarter. Additionally, Cornell gave up huge plays which clearly swung the momentum in the direction of the Quakers. The Red gave up a 39-yard “Hail Mary” pass for a

touchdown to Penn at the very end of the half. These are the sorts of breakdowns that the coaching staff is trying to limit in future contests. However, there were moments of triumph for the Red against Penn as well. Two closing minute touchdowns put Cornell on the board, eventually leading to a final score of 2814. Additionally, senior running back Nick Perez came up with a 79-yard kick return that got the crowd on its feet. The Red is working hard at practice to limit the mistakes and to change the momentum of the season so far. The sprint football team See SPRINT page 11

ABHISHEK SHAH / SUN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Quick turnaround | With only four games left in the season, the Red will need a win against Army to turn its luck.

Senior midfielder Stephen Reisert scored the game-winner in a 3-2 win over Penn last year.

MEN’S SOCCER

CONNOR ARCHARD / SUN SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Reigning Ivy Champs Begin Defense of Title

By ELANI COHEN Sun Contributor

After a tough loss against the Niagra Purple Eagles this past weekend, the Red’s first loss in a non-conference regular season game since September 2011 and its first loss of the season, the Cornell men’s soccer team is keeping its spirits high and is preparing for its upcoming game against the Penn Quakers. The game will be played at Penn’s Rhodes Field on Saturday at 7:00 p.m. Though the Red is coming off a disappointing loss, it is ready to begin Ivy League play on a positive note. Led by senior captains Jake Rinow, Patrick Slogic and Ben Williams, the team has high expectations heading into

Ancient Eight play. “Well we’re looking to start the Ivy League strong. Conference play is really important to us,” said senior co-captain and midfielder Ben Williams. In a 3-2 win over Penn last season, the Red fell behind early, but scored three straight goals, capped off by a strike by senior midfielder Stephen Reisert, which would end up being the game-winner. . Up until last game, the Red had still not lost a game with a record of 6-1-2.The Quakers are coming in with a record of 3-6-0. Despite Penn’s recent struggles, the Red knows that the game will be demanding nevertheless. “We’re expecting a really challenging game. We know it’s going See M. SOCCER page 11


10 04 13 entire issue lo res