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HOMECOMING INAUGURATION SUPPLEMENT

ELIZABETH GARRETT

2 THE CORNELL DAILY SUN

The Corne¬ Daily Sun Independent Since 1880 133RD EDITORIAL BOARD

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Editorial

A Leader for A Global University

“CORNELL HAS NOT BEEN content for the world to come to campus; it has also reached out to the world. Its land-grant mission has been writ large,” President Frank H. T. Rhodes asserted in his 1995 Reunion address shortly before he retired. Years later, Cornell’s expanded commitment to its landgrant mission could not be more clear. The university from a small Upstate city has asserted its influence around the world, and its next president will likely have more influence over Cornell’s land grant mission than many of her predecessors. David J. Skorton — who was inaugurated nine years ago following a turbulent period capstoned by the apparent ousting of Jeffrey S. Lehman ’77 — brought a greater sense of stability to the University. He dealt with crises prompting changes to how Cornell addresses public health and budgetary concerns. He furthered Cornell’s foothold in New York City by securing the University a bid to build a transformative graduate technology campus on Roosevelt Island. In June, Skorton departed the Hill after wrapping up Cornell’s global sesquicentennial celebrations, which culminated on Charter Day. Now approaching the tailend of Cornell’s celebratory sesquicentennial year, the University will inaugurate Elizabeth Garrett as its 13th president today. Previously the provost and a senior vice president from the University of Southern California, Garrett is a proven administrator and legal scholar. But equally as important, Garrett is the embodiment of the coeducational values instilled in this university since its beginning. As the first woman to serve as Cornell’s president, she represents the commitment to diversity and inclusion that has set Cornell apart from its peers for the past 150 years. Following in the footsteps of Skorton and her predecessors, Garrett will have the opportunity to further the breadth of Cornell’s academic and public engagement missions. As the plan for Cornell Tech unfolds over the next few decades — construction of the Roosevelt Island campus is not set to be completed until after 2040 — Garrett and her administration will play an enormous role in shaping not only the programs, but Cornell’s land grant mission at large. As the University expands its presence in New York City through Cornell Tech,

Senior Editor

TYLER ALICEA / SUN EDITOR IN CHIEF

Supplement Issue Staff Tyler Alicea ’16, Annie Bui ’16, Gabriella Lee ’16, Zach Praiss ’16, Noah Rankin ’16, Sloane Grinspoon ’17, Sofia Hu ’17, Michaela Brew ’18 COVER PHOTO: Cornell University Photography BACK COVER PHOTO: Cameron Pollack / Sun Staff Photographer COVER DESIGN: Zach Praiss ’16 and John Schroeder ’74

Visit 150.cornellsun.com for coverage of Elizabeth Garrett’s inauguration and Cornell’s sesquicentennial celebrations. INAUGURATION SUPPLEMENT

Friday, September 18, 2015

The new boss | President Elizabeth Garrett addresses attendees of her inaugural dinner Thursday evening.

Weill Cornell Medical College and the expansion of other undergraduate and graduate programs, Garrett will oversee and determine what a two-city university will look like. And with more students expected to travel abroad each year, Cornell’s influence on the world and the world’s influence on Cornell will be even more prominent under the Garrett administration. While she will need to build upon the commitments made by Skorton and his administration, Garrett will ultimately build her own legacy throughout her tenure. She intends to outline her specific agenda for the future of Cornell in her inauguration address today, although since taking office in July, Garrett has already tackled a variety of issues facing the University During the first days of the academic year, she announced several groundbreaking initiatives to increase support for graduate students. She spoke of the need to focus on academic priorities and to decrease bureaucratic inefficiencies throughout Cornell. In a speech given to attendees of Garrett’s inaugural dinner on Thursday evening, Skorton said he believes a single great leader does not make a university a successful institution. Rather, he argued that the passionate support of the institution from others — students, faculty, staff, alumni, friends and more — ensures its success. We believe no one understands this better than President Garrett. To guarantee Cornell’s success both on the Hill and around the world, a leader must be able to understand how to engage Cornellians to affect positive change in their communities. While Cornell’s obligation as a land-grant institution has been writ at large, it takes an entire community to enact change on a global scale. Luckily for C o r n e l l , Elizabeth Garrett is the leader who will inspire this campus and who will push our land-grant mission even further.


HOMECOMING INAUGURATION SUPPLEMENT

ELIZABETH GARRETT

Friday, September 18, 2015

THE CORNELL DAILY SUN 3

Corey Earle ’07 | Guest Room

A Sesquicentennial Inauguration I

n a year that included sesquicentennial celebrations around the world and a monumental Charter Day weekend in April, today’s inaugural ceremony might seem anticlimactic. The confetti cannons and “1-5-0” chants have transitioned to a more stately event, but that doesn’t make President Elizabeth Garrett’s inauguration any less important to the Cornell University community. In Cornell’s 150 years of existence, this is only the 13th presidential inauguration. Like the sesquicentennial, an inauguration is an opportunity to reflect on the past and look toward the future. But unlike the sesquicentennial, a new president has a significant impact on the functioning of the institution moving forward. Historian Carl Becker, when speaking at Charter Day on Cornell’s 75th birthday in 1940, noted that, “Universities are, after all, largely shaped by presidents and professors,” which certainly remains true. Each previous president has left an enduring legacy unique to his own vision and priorities. However, in Becker’s time, the role of the president was substantially different. Cornell was smaller and less global in scale, the administrative staff was nearly non-existent and most decision-making rested with the faculty. Speaking of university governance at the time of his hiring in 1917, Becker said, “The president, so far as I could judge, was an umpire rather than a captain.” Today we inaugurate both a captain and an umpire. President Garrett takes the helm at a time when university presidents are increasingly on the national and international stage. Competition for educational resources and support, both public and private, is fierce. Rising costs, soaring tuition, and burdensome student debt are pressing issues in higher education. And Cornell grows ever more decentralized and complex. A university president must be a captain and umpire, but also a general manager, pitcher, shortstop, hot dog ven-

dor and probably a pretty good juggler. (She’s in luck. In 1956, Cornell awarded the world’s first Ph.D. for a dissertation on baseball.) Inaugurations are a time when the Cornell community and broader academic community unite to cele-

Today we inaugurate both a captain and an umpire. President Garrett takes the helm at a time when university presidents are increasingly on the national and international stage. Competition for educational resources and support, both public and private, is fierce. brate an institution and its leader. The procession and installation ceremony today include distinguished delegates from academic institutions around the world, many of whom are Cornell alumni returning to campus. (Delegates are typically easy to spot in the colorful academic regalia of each institution.) Although the procession consists mostly of faculty, it also incorporates student and staff participants. The ceremony will include historic quotes from Cornell’s past along with President Garrett’s vision for Cornell’s future. Symbols of the university (the University Mace, the Great Seal and the University Charter) will be formally presented. The pomp and circumstance is followed by an informal picnic and an academic panel on inequality, giving Cornellians a chance to celebrate and to reflect on a global issue. And to make things uniquely Cornell,

there will be a special inaugural ice cream flavor, of course. If you’re reading this before the events have concluded, take advantage of the opportunity to be part of history. President Garrett will set the pace for Cornell’s next 150 years as we balance our role as the innovative “first American university” and as the far-researching land-grant university to the world. And if you miss inauguration, there are still plenty of historic events this weekend. Homecoming kicks off with Friday night’s fireworks and laserlight show. There will be a Saturday morning dedication of the new Touchdown the Bear statue, honoring the centennial of Cornell’s unofficial mascot. And yes, there will be a special ice cream flavor. As a member of the Class of 2007, I am part of the only four-year class in Cornell’s history to witness two presidential inaugurations as students. We welcomed Jeffrey Lehman ’77 at the start of our freshman year and David Skorton in fall of our senior year. I had the good fortune to participate in both inaugural ceremonies with the Cornell University Glee Club, and now find myself serving on the Inauguration Operations Committee nearly a decade later. While it’s exciting to participate in these important milestones, it’s even more exciting to see the new ideas and vision that each leader has brought to the university. Welcome to Cornell University, President Garrett. It’s an honor to have you join the Big Red family, and we look forward to a bright future under your leadership. We wish you luck as you tackle new challenges, and we hope you grow to love Cornell, flaws and all, as much as so many of us do. Corey Ryan Earle ’07 is the Associate Director of Student Programs in the Office of Alumni Affairs and teaches American Studies 2001: The First American University, a course about Cornell. He can be reached at cre8@cornell.edu.

Yamini Bhandari | Trustee Viewpoint

The ‘Any Person,Any Study’President T

here are few moments as momentous for Cornell as the inauguration of a new leader for our University. This inauguration is particularly special to me, as we welcome our first female president and move forward from our 150-year anniversary. I see the inauguration of President Garrett as Cornell truly embodying its motto of “any person, any study,” demonstrating a commitment to diversity in the highest ranks of leadership. This is an important milestone. Ushering in a new era calls for us to do a bit of reflection, as well as the opportunity to plan where we are headed. As a student trustee, the beginning of this semester has brought with it interesting leadership challenges. Over the past few weeks I’ve had the opportunity to get to meet both President Garrett and Vice President Ryan Lombardi. A hallmark of every meeting with them has been the fresh supply of cookies and lemonade provided to me. Beyond that, I have been impressed with the energy they both bring into their roles, as they’ve taken measures to understand and interact with graduate and undergraduate students alike. They have lined up their schedules with meetings with student groups, been spotted at various student events and really have begun integrating with the Cornell community. Students have been welcoming this new vitality with open arms, and even in the four weeks that we’ve been here there have been serious discussions with between stu-

dents and top administration on important topics across campus. In the few interactions I’ve had with President Garrett thus far, beyond her eagerness to engage with students, I see a MATT HINTSA / SUN FILE PHOTO

sharp wit and fresh take on university leadership. Professionally, President Garrett comes from a background in law, which is quite a step away from her physician predecessor. Her analysis of student issues has reflected this shift — she has a strong analytical take on issues and she places a n

emphasis on academics. President Garrett made it clear during her various interactions with students that her focus is on the academic aspects of the Cornell experience. She noted in her Freshman Convocation that she urges freshman Class of 2019 to “embark on an adventure of the mind.” This is a slight contrast from former President Skorton’s words of wisdom to the Class of 2018, he challenged students to “discover what excites you.” Both messages are important, but each highlight a different aspect of the Cornell. President Garrett has already set the tone of her term with her announcement of comprehensive changes to graduate student life during a Graduate Student and Professional Student Assembly meeting. I’m excited to see what new changes she has in store for undergraduate students. Being a part of this process as a student trustee has truly been an honor. I, along with many other student leaders, are hopeful for the future of Cornell under this new leadership that has begun embracing understanding student life as a core part of this university. There is such a strong and rich history that follows Cornell and I’m excited about the opportunity to set the tone with its newest president. Yamini Bhandari is a junior in the College of Industial and Labor Relations, and the undergraduate student-elected trustee. She can be reached at yb94@cornell.edu. Trustee Viewpoint normally appears on alternate Tuesdays this semester.


HOMECOMING INAUGURATION SUPPLEMENT

4 THE CORNELL DAILY SUN

ELIZABETH GARRETT

Friday, September 18, 2015

Garrett Sets Forward Vision for Higher Education By SOFIA HU and GABRIELLA LEE Sun News Editors

Since stepping on campus, President Elizabeth Garrett has been busy. Among many things, she has challenged Day Hall leadership to cut inefficiencies, headed the search for a new provost, vowed to address graduate student diversity and workers’ compensation and even begun Instagramming as @CornellPresident. All this comes at a time when Cornell faces many uncertainties in its future. Colleges are still adjusting to a new University budget model implemented in 2014, the University continues its expansion in New York City with Cornell Tech and students have returned to campus after a semester filled with protests centered on rising costs of tuition and lack of administrative transparency. As the University moves forward in its next 150 years, many administrators, faculty and students are turning to Garrett to see how her vision will alter and change the course of Cornell. A Vision Centered On Students

Garrett, previously the provost at the University of Southern California, succeeded President Emeritus David J. Skorton on July 1. She holds faculty appointments in the law school, Department of Government in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Johnson Graduate School of Management. The 13th president and the first female president, she will be installed in a ceremony in the Arts Quad this morning, deliver-

ing an inaugural address outlining her vision for the University. That vision includes “enhancing the student experience” and “supporting our diverse population of graduate and professional studies,” Garrett wrote in an opinion column in The Sun on Aug. 25. “I hope to set the stage for a robust dis-

curriculum — and new technologies that enabled greater student engagement would be major focuses going forward. Garrett’s vision for higher education extends beyond Cornell, though, and in an Aug. 24 essay for The Washington Post’s higher education blog, she defended the freedom wielded by institutions of higher

COURTESY OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY

cussion of what students should learn, including the essential role of a broad liberal arts education and how to apply knowledge even as we assimilate and analyze it,” Garrett wrote. “A residential research university like ours allows students to learn in the classroom, laboratory and studio, of course, but also in residence halls and in local and global communities.” She continued that expanded study abroad opportunities, Engaged Cornell — the University’s 10 year initiative to incorporate community engagement into the

education by outlining the responsibilities she viewed universities had to its faculty, student and the public. “We must provide our faculty with an environment that encourages freedom of inquiry and thought, as well as with material support,” Garrett wrote. “All faculty must be able to pursue their best work — in teaching and research — unhampered by politics or prejudice.” Emphasizing the importance of a university’s students, Garrett wrote that higher education’s responsibility to its students

involved providing both an education of “specific facts and skills but also the tools to keep on learning.” If a university fulfilled this mission to its students, Garrett argued, that it also fulfilled its responsibility of sending engaged, thoughtful and humane graduates out into the world. A Legacy at USC

While serving as USC’s provost and previous to that as the university’s senior vice president for academic affairs, Garrett oversaw the school’s Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences as well as 17 other graduate and professional schools. Throughout her term at USC, Garrett directed efforts to hire new faculty from a broad range of academic disciplines, including cognitive bioscience, arts and the humanities as well as the quantitative social sciences. She also spearheaded the creation of several new postdoctoral programs, among them the Provost Postdoctoral Scholars Program in the Humanities and Provost Clinical Resident Fellows at USC. “Provost Garrett has helped maintain the university’s volume and quality of externally funded research and expanded the university’s postdoctoral programs, strategically focusing on priorities such as the humanities, diversity in the digital realm and clinical fellows,” said USC President C. L. Max Nikias in a letter to the USC community in Oct. 2014. Garrett began working at USC in 2003. See GARRETT on page 5 of regular issue.


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Cornell will face off against Bucknell Saturday in this year’s Homecoming game. | Page 12

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Students Helping Students Fund: Under the Microscope Since 1985, fund has assisted undergraduates with emergency expenses

BY THE NUMBERS

By ARIEL SEIDNER

the rising cost of tuition, books, and rent, food is often the first thing that students skimp on.” “The fact that [the SHS fund] has been vastly underThe Student Assembly will vote on a plan to finance utilized over the past several years is inefficient on a camthe proposed Anabel’s Grocery by withdrawing $360,000 pus where many students could be benefiting from the from the Students Helping Students fund at its meeting fund,” she said. next Thursday. However, some have questioned whether From 1985 until 2009, SHS received between $1 and this fund, usually reserved for emergencies, is an appropri- $5 annually per student from the required undergraduate ate source of revenue for the store. student activity fee, according to Ryan. According to staOriginally created by the S.A. in 1985, SHS is a fund tistics reported by the S.A., undergraduates w tion for the managed by the Student student activity fee in 2014. Assembly Financial Aid “In September 2009, the “High cost of living is one of the Review Committee. committee decided to forgo According to Gretchen Ryan reasons the [Student Helping Students byline funding [from the ’97, associate director of finanactivity fee] as the economy Fund] Exists in the first place.” cial aid and student employwas in a recession and the ment, SHS was created “to committee recognized that Matthew Stefanko ’16 assist registered Cornell underbyline funding was critical for graduate students with emerother organizations to surgency funding and funding for vive,” she said. summer internship expenses that they otherwise could not According to Ryan, the endowment had become large afford.” enough to sustain its annual emergency spending. Despite the criticism, Matthew Stefanko ’16, S.A. vice “The endowment balance at the end of August was president of finance and also co-founder of Anabel’s $1,500,358.73,” said Ryan. She added that SHS receives Grocery, said that food insecurity, which Anabel’s Grocery a monthly income of $6,001.97 in interest payout from is aiming to combat, is an example of what the SHS exists the endowment, and that nothing has been spent from the to fund. operating account thus far this fiscal year. “Food is the third highest expenditure of students after Despite receiving just over $70,000 per year in interest, tuition and rent,” Stefanko said. “High cost of living is in the past nine years SHS has had total annual expenses one of the reasons SHS exists in the first place.” in amounts not exceeding $32,000, with the exception of Emma Johnston ’16, executive vice president of the S.A. and co-founder of Anabel’s Grocery, said that “with See FUND page 4 Sun Staff Writer

$360,000

Amount of money from the Students Helping Students fund that Anabel’s Grocery has requested for start-up costs and initial funding.

$1,500,358.73

The endowment balance at the end of August, from which the SHS fund has received its monthly income of $6,001.97 since 2009.

1984

The year that the Student Helping Students fund was initially created by the Student Assembly to provide emergency funding for students.

April 2015

The month when the most recent large withdrawal from the SHS fund took place, to provide funds for students who suffered losses in the Chapter House fire.

Cornell Alumni Magazine Issues David Cohen ’85 Details Apology for Controversial Cover Journey From C.U. to CIA By ANDREW LORD Sun Staff Writer

Editors at the Cornell Alumni Magazine have issued

an apology following a controversial editorial decision to publish a graphic — which some have suggested is latently

CORNELL ALUMNI MAGAZINE

In hot water | The Cornell Alumni Magazine issued an apology to the community following the publishing of a controversial cover graphic.

racist — on the cover of its most recent issue. The magazine cover — which features on one side an old, black-and-white photograph of four Caucasian students and on the other side a colored photograph of four Asian students — is captioned “Collegetown is changing fast. Is that a good thing?” The cover story, however, in no way suggests anything about the topic of race or diversity at Cornell. Jenny Barnett, editor and publisher of the Cornell Alumni Magazine, said the magazine regrets “inadvertently [leaving] the image open to interpreta-

tions that we never intended.” “The cover story for our September / October issue looked at the changes in Collegetown buildings and student haunts over the years — those that have survived and those that have closed down — and the construction boom that is currently transforming the neighborhood,” Barnett said. She continued by describing the cover, which showed images of the 400 block of College Avenue, where Collegetown Bagels and Rulloff ’s is currently located. “To illustrate the article we showed See ALUMNI page 4

By STEPHANIE YAN

Sun Staff Writer

Cornellians packed into Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium Thursday to hear David Cohen ’85, deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency, discuss his path from Cornell to the CIA and the future of the agency. According to Cohen, his interactions with Cornell professors

were what first “sparked [his] interest” in foreign policy and national security. He spoke fondly of a course he took called “American Foreign Policy from 1914 to the Present,” taught by Prof. Emeritus Walter LaFeber, history — one of the professors after whom the lecture series was dedicated. See CIA page 4

BRITTNEY CHEW / SUN NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

A discussion on defense | David Cohen ’85, deputy director of the CIA, spoke on world conflict and human intelligence in Goldwin Smith Hall.


2 THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, September 18, 2015

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Friday, September 18, 2015

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The Inauguration of Elizabeth Garrett 10 a.m., Arts Quad Presidential Inauguration: Community Picnic Noon, Ag Quad

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News, “Cornell Modifies Sexual Assault Policy,” Monday Speaking about Cornell’s continued efforts to address sexual assault on campus “Our efforts to address sexual assault and violence on our campus will continue to evolve as we partner — faculty, students and staff — to create a safe and inclusive place to study, live and work.”

Jacob Rubashkin ’19

Tomorrow

News, “Grocery Store Founders Defend Business Plan,” Wednesday Speaking about the need for affordable food options on campus “We started a couple years ago with hearing anecdotal stories from administrators regarding food insecurity being a thing on campus.” Matthew Stefanko ’16

C.U. Music: Music of the Americas, Session 1 10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., 101 Lincoln Hall Cornell Maker Club Workshop Noon - 4 p.m., 238 Phillips Hall Family Pepper Party: A Judy’s Day Program 1 - 5 p.m., Brian C. Nevin Welcome Center, Cornell Plantations C.U. Music: Glee Club’s Homecoming Concert 8 - 10 p.m., Bailey Hall

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Opinion, “Trump Ain’t Ralph Though,” Tuesday Speaking about Kanye West’s intention to run for president in 2020 “After all, we accept Donald Trump and Ben Carson as legitimate candidates. Why not Mr. West? In fact, I believe that Kanye would be a better candidate and a better president than either the Donald or Dr. Carson.”

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Arts, “Basilica Soundscape: The AntiFestival,” Thursday Speaking about the eclectic art on display at Basilica Soundscape “While the lineup defies categorization, the acts — musical and otherwise — tended to approach a sense of nihilistic bliss. Anxiety, scattered political goals and a series of radical social critiques pervaded music throughout, but what attendees ultimately left with was the feeling of intense catharsis.” Sam Bromer ’16

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NEWS

EY Global Chair Talks Leadership Strategies Local

Meth Lab Discovered In Dryden A methamphetamine lab was uncovered by members of the New York State Police Community Narcotics Team, Troop “C” BCI and the Tompkins County Sheriff ’s office on Dryden Street Thursday, according to The Ithaca Voice. The meth lab was seized and a stolen watch and cell phone were also confiscated in the search. Tiffany Bailey, 27, the owner of the residence was charged with third-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance and petit larceny. The New York State Contaminated Crime Scene Emergency Response Team was an early responder and assisted the police with the clean up of the lab. Bailey was arraigned in Dryden Town Court and is scheduled to reappear in court at a later date, The Voice reported.

Around the Ivies Harvard Medical School Receives $20 Million Gift The Warren Alpert Foundation donated $20 million to Harvard Medical School this week, which will be used to fuel research in immunology, according to The Harvard Crimson. The donation will also fund the Department of Health Care Policy professorship and the Warren Alpert Foundation Dean Leadership Fund to dispense at the dean’s discretion, The Crimson reported.

National Potential Abortion Bills Cause Controversy Many Republicans in the senate pledged Thursday to push for legislation outlawing all abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy, according to The New York Times. The House has also voted to move forward a bill eliminating federal funding for Planned Parenthood, a hot topic in Wednesday’s Republican presidential debate. Many speculate that the intensifying fight over abortion could lead to a government shutdown at the end of the month. However, there is also evidence that congressional leaders are relying on a fallback plan to keep the government functioning at least temporarily at last year’s spending level, The Times reported. — Compiled by Phoebe Keller

Says executives must ‘lead for tomorrow’ in current economy By DIVYANSHA SEHGAL Sun Staff Writer

Mark Weinberger, the global chair and chief executive officer of professional services firm Ernst & Young, spoke Thursday in Statler Auditorium about the qualities that are necessary to a becoming a global business leader in today’s economy. Weinberger opened the talk by calling the current economy “remarkable,” saying the business landscape is rapidly evolving. “We have geopolitical uncertainties, we have technological revolutions, we have business model disruption and we have increased global connectivity like we have never seen,” he said. “All of this is going to have a profound effect on economy, society and on business models, and employment landscapes over the coming years.” President Elizabeth Garrett, who moderated the talk, asked Weinberger how Cornellians should prepare to face the unique conditions of today’s economy. “As you know, we also want to help form the leaders of tomorrow, and we want to help our students deal with such an ever-changing and unexpected world,” Garrett said. “What should we do as an institution of higher education to help train and prepare our students for the world you just described?” Weinberger specified four qualities he believes a global business leader should have today. The first trait Weinberger described was a leader who prioritizes “leading for tomorrow [and] not just for today.” He said that a leader has to be able to anticipate “mega-trends” and be prepared for them. “If you looked at the paper today … and you look at the emerging markets, [you see] that they are volatile, they are risky, there’s political upheaval, there are very low returns and terrible investments,” he said. “If you made that decision for the short-term, you won’t be around for the long-term.”

Weinberger said that even when long-term issues are clear, business leaders “find it hard to think in the long term.” He added that they are often under extreme pressure to execute solutions in a timely manner. “Information is instant and people judge us instantly,” he said. “There are analysts who look at us every quarter and determine whether we’re doing good or bad. They are forcing us to think more short-term and influencing business judgement.” Weinberger also emphasized leading with a “power of purpose.” “It cannot be about what you do — it has to be about the value that you add to the world,” Weinberger said. “If you have a purpose beyond profit, you will be more successful.” He used EY to illustrate a group that is not merely self-interested, but is composed of talented people working together to create a better world. “This is especially important to the millennials out there ...They absolutely want to do good as well as doing well,” he said. “And so we focus a lot at EY on our purpose — building a better working world. And if our people don’t think of it like that, they’re not going to work the long hours.” He then spoke on the importance of communicating with all stakeholders. “My company is so successful because I am focused on my stakeholders, not my shareholders,” Weinberger said, quoting Mark Benioff, chief executive officer of salesforce.com. “What he’s recognizing is that the shareholder return is not necessarily as important as how happy your employees are,” he said. “It is about the commitment and the sustainability you have in your communities [and] the role that you play in the world.” Finally, he emphasized the importance of “building a diverse team for a diverse world.” “If you don’t have the right people around the table asking the right questions, you will get the wrong answers,” he said.

BRITTNEY CHEW / SUN NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Creating a better world | Mark Weinberger, CEO of EY, speaks in Statler Auditorium Thursday.

Weinberger also emphasized that to understand, serve and trade with different countries, one should have people from those countries on his or her team. “Diversity is no longer nice and just moral; it is a business imperative,” he said. “You have to develop a culture of diversity, not an initiative. And it takes time and energy and effort because there is a lot of unconscious bias out there.” He ended his talk by stressing the importance of universities like Cornell in developing the talent and character of its students. “What you get from a university like this is the ability to learn how you learn, how to have integrity, how to [work in] teams,” he said. “[You take away] things that are life skills and are beyond what you learn in the classroom.” Divyansha Sehgal can be reached at dsehgal@cornellsun.com.

Panel Weighs Implications of Iran Agreement By YUN SOO KIM Sun Staff Writer

Three Cornell professors spoke about the foreign policy implications and historical basis for the controversial Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, an international agreement on Iran’s nuclear program in Malott Hall Thursday. Prof. M. Elizabeth Sanders, government, said that because of the United States’ interventionist role in shaping the Iranian government, we “owe Iran” a chance to participate in the international community. “In 1953, a coup by the Eisenhower administration over-

turned the first and only secular democracy that Iran has ever had, and we installed a brutal dictator,” she said. “Iran as it is today [is] very a much a product of the United States’ thoughtless intervention, and if anybody owes bringing them back into the international community and giving them another chance, it’s us.” Prof. Iago Gocheleishvili, Near Eastern studies, emphasized how this agreement marks a turning point in Iran’s diplomatic policies. “I think Iran is very eager to open up the country and start a better relationship with the United States … if the deal goes through, it will be the start of something greater, something

RULA SAEED / SUN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Talking politics | A panel of three professors weighs the pros and cons of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action in Malott Hall Thursday.

broader, not only with the west, [but also with Europe],” he said. The deal is a compromise but also a gain for both countries, according to Prof. Sarah Kreps, government and law. “It fulfills both sides’ goals — the United States has a goal of reducing or minimizing the number of countries that develop nuclear weapons especially in the Middle East, and Iran has been under the weight of crippling international sanctions and it will gradually be lifted from those burdens as well,” Kreps said. “I think each side gave up something in this deal, but I think they’re both gaining in the middle as well.” Gocheleishvili, however, said there are two major weaknesses to the deal from the perspective of the United States. “The first one is the fact that the deal does not cover military sites … the agreement only covers facilities and sites that are under the authority of Iran’s ministry of energy,” he said. “So, theoretically, Iranians could move engineering parts to military sites [and] away from the eyes of the inspectors.” He said the second issue is that the deal is simply an agreement, not a treaty. “It’s an international agreement between the Islamic Republic of Iran and some countries,” Gocheleishvili said. “So, in case one of the parties … aban-

dons the deal, we will not be able to effectively use any international tribunals of court to pressure them to come back to the table of negotiations.” Gocheleishvili also celebrated the fact that Iran’s civilians will now cease to suffer from the imposed sanctions. “The sanctions are not really targeting the average Iranian, but the government,” Gocheleishvili said. “It’s usually very difficult to implement targeted sanctions on Supreme leader of Iran, [and] if anyone suffers it’s the regular Iranian.” Gocheleishvili explained that Iran’s long term associations with Syria are not by choice. “There is no one else who wants to be their ally. They’re cornered. They’re alone. The only country that continuously supports Iran, even during the IranIraq war, when everyone else supported Saddam Hussein, was Syria. That’s where the loyalties lie,” he said. He emphasized that Iran has been isolated and is seeking alliances, as all countries should. “They don’t have any choice — they’ve been excluded from the international community for 35 years, and to survive, they can’t be alone in the region,” Gocheleishvili said. “No one can. We all need allies.” Yun Soo Kim can be reached at ykim@cornellsun.com.


4 THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, September 18, 2015

NEWS

CIA Deputy Director S.A. Grocery Store Plans to Draw Describes Evolution From Student Assistance Fund Request for $360,000 to kickstart Anabel’s Grocery sparks Of CIA Technology debate; critics say withdrawal will ‘jeopardize’ programs CIA

Continued from page 1

“I still have my notes from that class,” Cohen said. “I was looking them over just a few days ago, and I couldn’t believe that I once knew all those things.” Cohen began his talk by stressing the importance of the CIA in “a world that is more unstable than it has been for several decades.” He mentioned areas of conflict such as the Middle East and South China Sea, as well as challenges to U.S. security from countries like China and Russia. “The human toll of the conflicts in these countries is reflected in the front pages of our papers,” he said. “The number of refugees and internally displaced persons in the world today is the highest it has been since the end of World War II.” Cohen also explained the importance of human intelligence in handling these conflicts. He emphasized the difficult nature of a CIA officer’s job, calling the process of developing a foreign asset “difficult and often dangerous work.” “Our case officers can’t just sit in their offices and wait for sources to fall into their laps,” he said. “[An officer] needs to find a way to meet them, build a relationship with them, earn their trust, [and] persuade them to help our government. ... Every meeting with a source is fraught with uncertainty.” According to Cohen, a major change in the CIA’s future operations is the addition of its first new directorate since 1963 — the Directorate of Digital Invasion, which will begin running last October. The DDI’s responsibilities will involve adapting CIA operations to the digital domain — from defense against cyber attacks to making acquired “We need a workforce that can bring to data easier to use, bear a range of perspectives on the according challenges that we face.” to Cohen. “Given David Cohen ’85 the variety, complexity and volume of the data that we take in, this calls for some of the most sophisticated and cutting-edge programming and big data analysis being performed anywhere today,” he said. One of the problems inherent in this process is keeping digital information secure, according to Cohen. “We only recently figured out how to allow some personnel to takes notes in a meeting on a laptop, instead of with a pen and paper,” Cohen said. The availability of open-source information on the internet, on the contrary, may be helpful, Cohen said. He gave the example of the Islamic State’s Twitter account. “ISIL’s tweets and other social media messages publicizing their activities often produce information that — especially in the aggregate — provides real intelligence value,” he said. Cohen also mentioned initiatives to increase diversity within the agency — especially in the higher ranks, where only one in ten officers is a minority. According to Cohen, these initiatives have practical benefits besides better representing the U.S. population. “We need officers who are comfortable with operating in foreign environments,” he said. “We [also] need a workforce that can bring to bear a range of perspectives on the challenges that we face.” When asked what students interest in joining the CIA should do, Cohen told Cornellians to “stay engaged [and] get engaged with the world around you.” “You’ve got four years ahead of you here, where you can take fantastic classes from fantastic professors,” he said. “Learn about the world and maintain your interest in what the United States is doing.” Stephanie Yan can be reached at syan@cornellsun.com.

FUND

“A grocery store is expensive. In order to fund the immense start up costs … the proponents of the store thought it wise to raid the ‘Students in amounts not exceeding $32,000, with the Help Students’ fund of $360,000 or roughly 25 exception of the 2014 fiscal year, during which percent of its principal,” reads a Sept. 12 editorial time the SAFARC rekindled the internship published by The Progressive. “The fund also helps financially needy stuexpense program and spent approximately dents in emergency situations, such as financing $47,000, Ryan said. Ben Bacharach ’18, current chair of the relocations last year after a fire burnt down stuSAFARC, said that the SHS is typically used to dent apartments, or to pay for airfare for a stufund student emergencies and internships. The dent to fly to a family member’s funeral. most recent large drawing from the fund was in Depleting the principal by such an amount is April following the Chapter House fire in likely to jeopardize these important programs.” Franklin Yang ’17, former Collegetown when the fund chair of the SAFARC, said that divvied out on average over “[The SHS fund] has last year, the resolution for the $1,000 per student who suffered losses, according to been vastly underutilized grocery store came before the SAFARC and was approved. If Bacharach. in the past several the S.A. approves the resolution In order to ensure proper use years.” to fund Anabel’s Grocery next of the SHS fund, the SAFARC week, the store will not need to has an application process for Emma Johnston ’16 receive approval from the those seeking access, according SAFARC again. to Bacharach and Ryan. “We had some reservations that we put into “As a part of the SHS application [for funding], the student gives written consent for the the resolution,” Yang said. This included the proOffice of Financial Aid and Student Employment vision that ‘In order for the money to be given to contact the provider to confirm the expense,” out, they must have a comprehensive business council that is approved by 4C and President Ryan said. In response to criticism and skepticism regard- Garrett’s office,’” he added. “We’ll be working to be ready to present to the ing the usage of SHS to fund the grocery store, Johnston said that even if money is drawn from 4C committee in November, so we hope to solicit SHS for the store, “the fund will still be able to approval from the Student Assembly before provide internship stipends to students and will then,” Johnston said. She said that if the proposal still be accessible for students seeking funding for is approved by the S.A., President Garrett will then need to give her final approval. other emergency situations.” Still, publications on campus that include The Cornell Review and The Cornell Progressive Ariel Seidner can be reached at aseidner@cornellsun.com. oppose the funding of the grocery store. Continued from page 1

Editors of Alumni Magazine Apologize After Publishing Questionable Graphic ALUMNI

Continued from page 1

images of the same street taken decades apart,” Barnett said. “The cover text referred to the conversation around this construction. However, we realize, upon reflection, that because we were so close to the story and its subject matter, we didn’t make it clear on the cover that the changes we were discussing were about buildings and businesses.” J o e l Malina, vice president for university relations, said in a statement that while he did not think the offense was intentional, he was disappointed by the editorial decision. “While we have no reason to believe the design of the September / October edition was intentionally offensive, we are dismayed by the lack of sensitivity displayed in the selection of the cover image and feature headline,” Malina said.

Sophie Sidhu, associate dean and director Asian and Asian American Center, also expressed disappointment with the cover and its latent disparage towards the Asian community. “I am quite disturbed by the choice of contrasting images and text on the recent cover of Cornell Alumni Magazine,” she said. “While I believe that this was a poor editorial choice

Cornell Alumni Magazine for my story on the development in Collegetown,” said Stein, who is a former managing editor of The Sun and the current editor of The Ithaca Voice. “It’s not the cover I would have chosen,” he added. Barnett said she regrets the misunderstanding and that the editors have rewritten the cover text to more accurately reflect the story content. The new text on the “We have no reason to believe the design cover now r e a d s , of the September / October edition was “Amid a intentionally offensive, we are dismayed building by the lack of sensitivity displayed in the b o o m , which old selection of the cover image.” h a u n t s remain?” Joel Malina “We sincerely apologize to any and not intentionally racist or members of the Cornell commalicious, it inadvertently munity who were offended by sends a hurtful message that is the cover,” Barnett said. “We neither accepted nor support- will make sure to be more careed by Cornell.” ful and sensitive to such issues Jeff Stein ’13, who wrote going forward. We have rewritthe cover story for the maga- ten the cover text to more zine, said he was not involved closely reflect the story conin the decisions behind the tent, and will be replacing it graphic that was attached to on all digital media.” his article. “I had no knowledge of or Andrew Lord can be reached at role in the cover chosen by the dlord@cornellsun.com.


THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, September 18, 2015 5

NEWS

Garrett’s Journey to Ithaca Reflects C.U. Egalitarian Ideals GARRETT

Continued from page 4 of the supplement

Before becoming provost and senior vice president for academic affairs in October 2010, she served as vice provost and vice president for academic planning and budget at USC. In 2005, she was appointed by President George W. Bush to serve on the nine-member bipartisan Tax Reform Panel, according to her biography. Garrett was also nominated by President Barack Obama to serve as assistant treasury secretary for tax policy in 2009, but declined the position for personal reasons. A Life in Law

Garrett first entered the world of academia through law. She graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a bachelor’s degree in history in 1985, subsequently receiving her J.D. from the University of

Virginia School of Law. Garrett went on to clerk for Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshal from 1989 to 1990 — who she said was the “greatest litigator of the last century.” This experience “was one of the most special experiences of my life,” Garrett said, outlining her thoughts about her time working for Marshall during a lecture she delivered at USC on Sept. 7, 2011. Marshall, who served as a Supreme Court justice from 1967 to 1991 and was the first black justice on the court, is best known for his role as a lawyer in the landmark victory of Brown v. Board of Education, a decision that desegregated public schools in the United States. Marshall’s vision of equality for all also made a difference for Garrett while she worked for him, she said. “It’s important to understand that Justice Marshall’s vision for America for equality was not one limited to the realm of racial [and]

ethnic equality. It was a capacious view of equality for all Americans to participate,” Garrett said. Her clerking experience continues to influence her academic and administrative career, Garrett said. “My own research is informed a lot by my background,” she said. “I clerked for … Justice Thurgood Marshall and then I worked in the United States Senate working with [former] Senator David Boren from Oklahoma, where I served as his legislative director in his tax and budget council.” Garrett also served as a professor of law at the University of Chicago, where she acted as deputy dean for academic affairs. She has also been a visiting professor at several academic institutions, including Harvard Law School, the University of Virginia School of Law, Central European University in Budapest and the Interdisciplinary Center Law School in Israel.

The Next 150 Years

Garrett steps into the presidency of an institution that heralds its motto, “any person, any study” — a revolutionary concept during the time of Cornell’s inception. In an interview with The Sun on Sept. 1, Garrett stressed that moving forward the University’s academic mission should always remain the first priority. “Our mission is to train the next generation of leaders, and to produce creative scholarship and work that moves us closer in the search for truth. We not only perform discovery-driven research, but we also work to bring that out into the world and have it make a difference,” Garrett said. “Our ambitions exceed our resources, which is good. But one of my jobs as president is to bring as many resources to that academic mission as I can.” The Sun’s News Department can be reached at news@cornellsun.com.

Garrett Talks Student,Faculty Priorities in Interview INTERVIEW

Continued from page 5 of the supplement

Cornell because of our founding and dedication to principles of diversity, though not always perfectly implemented. I think we can do many things to support our minority students. First is that we’re an academic institution that produces some of the very best research in the world about challenges facing minority communities and about challenges facing groups of students in higher education, and I think we ought to take advantage of our own research as we think about how to move forward. We have a tremendous number of programs that support our students from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. We have programs that aim to increase dialogue between these groups and to learn about differences. I just toured with Ryan Lombardi some of those facilities, such as the program houses. I’m very proud of what we do, and we look forward to continuing to support those students. As you know, we have a terrific diversity initiative called Toward New Destinations, and each year we pick a different emphasis. This year is ‘The Lived Experience of Diversity.’ And by that I think we want to learn more about what it means to live in this diverse community. What are the great benefits we see — not only in our research and teaching — but also in our personal lives and growth as human beings? And we also want to think about the challenges of that. What are challenges to having people from a lot of different perspectives and backgrounds? THE SUN: In light of the student activism that took place on campus earlier this year, what do you believe is the appropriate relationship between students, faculty, the administration and Cornell’s trustees? GARRETT: So I should first say that I’m very proud to be at an institution where students are engaged. When I was a student I was in student government, and I participated in events and activities on issues that I thought were of great importance politically for the university and for the state and the

nation. So I actually celebrate that, and I think Cornell has long celebrated that. And I think the Board of Trustees, many of whom are Cornell alumni and have had the same experience as students that you all have, also celebrate that process of engagement. And I know it is our hope to provide more opportunities for students to interact with the trustees. Our trustees and alumni in general are enormously supportive of the institution, and from my experience, they derive a great sense of pleasure in getting to know the students, hearing about their views and providing advice from their own experiences. And many of our faculty members have the same background as engaged students. As university president, part of my role is to ensure that we have an environment where people can freely and fully express their views, where we have robust freedom of expression and dialogue and discourse. But we also recognize that our mission is to teach and to do research and creative work. So while we ought to have very robust First Amendment freedom, we also have to acknowledge that there is teaching and research and scholarship going on that can’t be disrupted. So there are some rules of engagement, I think, that we have acknowledge and live by. And we also have to listen to one another. Part of the University is thinking about probing other peoples’ arguments, and aggressively questioning arguments that we disagree with, but we are dedicated to a process of rational discourse and taking reason and science and probing for strengths and weaknesses to move toward understanding what’s right and what’s true. THE SUN: What do you see is the relationship between Cornell and New York City, given that we have our medical campus there and the soon-to-be Cornell Tech? GARRETT: Cornell is on every continent of the world. Domestically, however, we do have this amazing opportunity in that we are the only research university in the United States that has a significant presence in this amazing college town, Ithaca. And now we have this amazing presence in one of the world’s greatest international

cities. If you think of all the wonderful places your friends are going, they’re in one or the other. There’s nobody that has both. And I think that is the opportunity for Cornell — to take this duality and make sure that what we do with it is to create this institution of higher education for the 21st century, and to ensure that what we do in New York City is for the benefit of Ithaca and that what we do in Ithaca enhances what we do in New York City. Ithaca is our

home, but the ability to take some of what we’re learning here to NYC is a unique opportunity. And then to think about some of the things we’re learning there — whether it’s tech transfer, training public officials in a metropolis as the ILR school does, or thinking about architecture as our AAP school does. Taking those lessons and bringing them back to Ithaca is really exciting. So my role as president is to ensure that we make the most of this opportunity. I also

like the fact that our campus on Roosevelt Island is in some ways another aspect of our land-grant mission. It is a land grant from a government that has asked us to play a role in shaping how technology affects the future — just as we were asked 150 years ago to think about how a University can take its knowledge to the world, to shape how the world reacts to problems. The Sun’s News Department can be reached at news@cornellsun.com.

Attention Student Groups! Did you know that you could have Ads courtesy of SAFC?

In the beginning of the semester, student groups can apply for two Corne¬ Daily Sun print advertisements for general recruitment when filling out the SAFC application. Additionally, every event funded by SAFC can also be promoted with two print advertisements (these do not have to be applied for in the application at the beginning of the semester). This shaded box is the exact size of all SAFC ads.

Your Ad Here!

To place an advertisement: 1) Fill out the "Daily Sun Advertisement Authorization" form located on the SAFC website; turn in form to Terry Ector in 520 Willard Straight Hall. 2) Send an electronic file of the ad to advertising@cornellsun.com. 3) Form and file must be turned in at least 3 business days prior to the issue date you want your ad to run. 4) Ads should be 3.75 inches wide by 5 inches high and include "Funded by SAFC" at the bottom. Ads that promote events can say "Funded in part by the SAFC" if the organization has received funding from elsewhere and not just the SAFC.


A&E

6 | The Corne¬ Daily Sun | Friday, September 18, 2015

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Of Montreal: A Bizarre Celebration at the Haunt BY KATIE O’BRIEN Sun Staff Writer

Pre-concert, I’d have described myself as having a casual familiarity with Of Montreal’s music: I’ve listened to a couple of their albums once or twice, and there are a few songs I listen to more frequently. But seeing them live on Tuesday at The Haunt piqued my interest in the band to a whole new level: their show was just as much a theatrical performance and psychedelic experience as a concert, adding a whole new layer to my perception of them as artists. The night started with opener Surface to Air Missive, a Tallahassee-based southern rock band whose sound was pleasant and uplifting. Their crystal clear, sunshiney riffs and high vocals created a very 70s-era sound reminiscent of the Altman Brothers and the Byrds. Their collective appearance as a band was a just-rolled-out-of-bed-in-mypolo look — a casual simplicity which created all the more of a contrast once Of Montreal took the stage. Of Montreal’s set began as un-casually as possible: A man in a spandex bodysuit of human muscles opened the show with a hilariously sincere and impassioned monologue about how we should all be more like fish. (So we can be free!) I’m fairly sure this was David Barnes, broth-

COURTESY OF STEREO GUM

er of the band’s frontman, COURTESY OF KATIE O’BRIEN and the artist who has designed most of of Montreal’s psychedelic album art. Barnes skulked off the stage and the Of Montreal founder, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Kevin Barnes hopped on. Barnes performs in a Bowie-like androgynous glam persona — he was sporting glittery turquoise eyeshadow, a red Michael Jackson-esque suit over a shiny red halter top and his signature asymmetrical haircut. His movement on the stage and facial expressions were all very theatrical and exaggerated, and his stage presence was my favorite part of the show. Of Montreal’s sound is like a modern, alt-pop revival of 60s psychedelic music. Their songs are an upbeat menagerie of synths, melodic keyboards, groovy bass and distorted guitars, complete with Barnes’ unique vocals. I thought his voice had more depth and emotion live than it does when recorded, as he transitioned effortlessly between a soothing, nasally mid-tone, impossibly pure and clear high-notes and rattling screams. A defining part of the performance was its continual, eye-popping visuals: Every song featured a different projector-screen lightshow of violently bright, pulsating colors, shapes and collages of images — some political, most purely for visual effect, that flashed across the stage, the band members and the crowd. It was like literally stepping inside of one of their music videos. The performance was also hugely surreal: Driven not just by the lights but also by an array of strange characters that would join the band onstage to dance during songs and interact with the members, changing costumes between songs. Costumes included towering, cape-wearing skull-heads, wide-eyed poodles

Halsey Badlands Mute Records

“stripping” out of their body suits, tan plastic masked faces with scraggly blonde wigs, a sexy Abraham Lincoln, an Animal Farm-looking pig mask and many more. Throughout the entire show I was hoping they would play a song of theirs that frequently makes it onto my playlists: “The Past Is A Grotesque Animal.” And they played it as the last song of their encore, which obviously made the night for me. While Of Montreal is known for lyrics addressing dark subject matter put to upbeat instrumentals, this song stands out from their repertoire because it is a dark song that sounds exactly how it makes you feel, with lyrics like “It’s so embarrassing to need someone like I do you,” “At least I author my own disaster” and “We want our film to be beautiful, not realistic.” Musically it is a relentlessly tense song, creating a sense of agitation and anxiety with its quick staccato riff that carries you through the entire twelve minutes — picking up pace, but never quite coming to the instrumental release you are expecting. After a show full of more upbeat, dancing songs and hilarious farcical moments (like Donald Trump’s sneering face flashing on the stage and disappearing just as quickly), it was the perfect song to both showcase their musical power and bring the crowd back down to reality. Katie O’Brien is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences. She can be reached at kobrien@cornellsun.com.

TE S T S P I N S new and notable O music in review OO O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

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Sundas Wiqas With her cropped electric blue hair and melancholic popelectric sound, it would be easy to write off twenty-year old Halsey as a washed up combination of Lana Del Rey and Lorde, a product of her generation’s obsession with romanticizing sadness and showing a disdain for the ordinary. However, to do so would be a mistake, as Halsey brings something much more unique to the table: A raw understanding about the troubles and joys of adolescence. Halsey has made no secret of the fact that she’s had her fair share of struggles, ranging from homelessness and drugs to the trials of being “tri-bi,” meaning biracial, bisexual and bipolar. It comes as no surprise, then, that the album, titled Badlands, is described by Halsey as a metaphor for her mental state. “Even if the badlands are all you’ve ever known,” she explained on her Twitter, “you can find solace outside them.” The album listens like a novel reads: Each song a chapter leaving you wondering what will happen next. The opening track, “Castle,” is dark and electrically heavy, giving the listener an insight in Halsey’s current state of mind. Through her blunt lyrics such as “I’m heading straight for the castle / they wanna make me their queen / but there’s old man sitting on my throne and saying that I probably shouldn’t be so mean,” Halsey effectively conveys her conflicting feelings of simultaneous confidence and doubt. The next track, “Hold Me Down,” delves deeper into the badlands. Halsey sings of selling her soul to a man, likened

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to the devil. The man, referred to only as a “three-piece,” constantly criticizes her, deepening her self-doubt. However, in the end it is she who wins, as she insists that criticism is what she lives for and only motivates her to prove others wrong. From there, Badlands takes a break from storytelling and instead transitions with “New Americana.” This track is without a doubt the most radio ready song of Badlands. A generational anthem, it explains the ways in which Gen Y is more open than previous generations; a result of being exposed to different types of people through media and pop culture. It’s the type of song that makes you want to forget about your troubles, wrap yourself in an American flag and tell off anyone who criticizes your generation for being obsessed with technology. The positivity of “New Americana” is brought down once again by “Drive:” a smooth and slow track, employing sounds you might hear on an actual drive, pulling the listener in and bringing the story to life. On “Drive” and the subsequent track “Hurricane,” Halsey truly begins to take notice of the dysfunctional relationships she’s drawn to and warns her partner of her self-destructiveness. Here, Halsey begins to show contempt for the badlands she’s in and longs to leave. She manages to do just that with “Roman Holiday,” a light and happy track in which she and her lover escape the badlands and embark on an adventure. “Roman Holiday” is

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Halsey at her happiest and is the turning point of the album. She has left the badlands with no intention of returning. To finish off the story, the following “Chapters,” explains her decision to finally let go of the flawed relationships she has held on to and assert her control and independence. As she croons her final lyric, the listener is left with a sense of peace, knowing that she has managed to escape. Badlands is everything a concept album should be. It brilliantly traces the ups and downs of the singer’s life and relationships, creating a clear picture in the listener’s head without boring her with repetition. It is, in essence, an audial movie. Halsey’s novel use of synth and electric noise distinguish her among her contemporaries. You would think an album dealing with so many heavy and disturbing topics would be depressing. However, the catchy choruses and addicting hooks save Badlands from being too melancholy. Instead, Badlands is the type of album that makes you want to drive down an empty road late at night with your windows down, singing at the top of your lungs. Halsey, it is clear, is determined to carve out her own space in the pop arena — and she has succeeded in doing just this. So, if you’re reading this, take a trip through the Badlands. You won’t regret it. Sundas Wiqas is a freshman in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations. She can be reached at swiqas21@cornell.edu.


A&E

Friday, September 18, 2015 | The Corne¬ Daily Sun | 7

The Libertines Anthems for A Doomed Youth Virgin EMI

Jack Jones

Long ago, the Libertines released two of the absolute best rock records of the last decade: 2002’s near-flawless Up the Bracket and 2004’s messy but brilliant The Libertines. Since the band’s breakup, equal-part frontmen Pete Doherty and Carl Barât have each explored subsequent careers as the frontmen of Babyshambles and Dirty Pretty Things, respectively. However, while both of these projects have produced some excellent music, neither came close to equalling the brilliant, calamitous poetry of those two Libertines records. Anthems for a Doomed Youth, which has arrived over ten years after the last Libertines album, is a hugely exciting prospect for the cult of Libertines fans — but anyone hoping for an equal of those two absolutely vital records should lower their expectations. While it’s pleasant in and of itself to hear Barât and Doherty alternating verses and harmonizing again, Anthems is a decidedly more lowkey affair than the Libertines’ past work. It feels unmistakably like the work of an older band than the one that made rabid, sloppy and supremely tuneful songs like “What a Waster” and “Up the Bracket.” The problem that the Libertines face is that a key aspect of their two great records was the

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strangely invigorating sense that the entire operation could collapse at any moment. Their name was almost too fitting; Wild self-destructive tendencies seemed to fuel the urgency of their music and simultaneously eat away at the band itself. Barât and Doherty share a relationship that is almost lover-like in its intensity and capacity for bitterness and jealousy (which is explored on The Libertines in depth, on songs like “Can’t Stand Me Now”). Furthermore, Doherty’s spiralling drug addiction seemed to suck away his ability to make music as he became an increasing fixture in British tabloidsm because of escapades like showing up to court for heroin charges and then dropping a bag of heroin from his pocket onto the floor. Especially on The Libertines, the fragile waywardness bled into the music, with tracks that seemed not far beyond sketches punctuated by fierce attacks of distortion, alternating with fully realized, gorgeously melodic songs. The Libertines are in the awkward position of returning to a legacy of messy, youthful abandon as men in their mid-30s. While the inconsistency of their second album made it far from flawless, nothing on Anthems rivals those great songs. Tempos are nearly universally slower on Anthems,

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whether they’re pretty but slight ballads like “You’re My Waterloo” or reggae-rock like the single “Gunga Din,” which is yet another ode to selfdestruction. There are many sweet moments, but none that succeed in fusing aching beauty with a savage aura of danger like the Libertines once did. Mostly, Anthems just kind of happens. Most of the songs have a melody that seems potent enough while it’s playing, but doesn’t stick after the song ends. I have a hard time imagining anyone walking around with “Fury of Chonburi” or “Glasgow Coma Scale Blues” stuck in their head. Of course, earworm melodies are not necessarily essential in great music, but since that is a huge part of what made the Libertines stand out originally, it does feel that something is missing on Anthems. In fact, the record’s best moments are those that don’t attempt anything like the raucous, intricate melodies of the past, and settle for a somber, leisurely simplicity, like the lovely title track and the final song, “Dead For Love.” On the former, Barât sings, “We’re going nowhere, but nowhere’s on our way.” This could be the motif of the record, and of the Libertines’ reunion as a whole: aimless, a bit optimistic and a bit melancholy.

Jack Jones is a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences. He can be reached at jjones@cornellsun.com.

On the Question of Artistically Motivated Suicide

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ur culture and media emit a twofaced discourse about suicide. On the one hand, suicide demonstrates stupidity, weakness and mental illness; so for the sake of our dignity we should never consider it. That's it. End of question. On the other hand, we make it out to symbolize the climax of a particular kind of lived experience in which a person has a disastrous yet beautiful temperament of both brilliant intelligence and emotional sensitivity. Disastrous because this duality, when we consider the inherent self-hate and self-abuse our society quietly allows, reads like the recipe for a cold and brutal life; Beautiful because of the honest and tragic sense of ourselves and the world around us, that these personalities display. It is impossible to claim that David Foster Wallace's popularity would be as ubiquitous as it is now if we detached this second narrative from the overall story of his life. I make this argument as a cultural truth, not as an attempt to decry Wallace’s work. Infinite Jest is a great novel at some points, an unsurpass-

able one at others. I am sure the best years of its fandom are still ahead of it. When we talk about the actual person David Foster Wallace, however, unforgiving criticism and excessive idolatry draw parallel lines in the discussion of a man who apparently embodies in full, the dangerous relationship between sinner and saint. The frankenstein of conversations and debates revolves around a persona that none of us have the right to speak for, yet we somehow all feel entitled to do so. But this kind of thing didn't start with Wallace. The trope of the tortured artist — an archetype swollen with a perverse romanticism — has survived in our cultural memory for what seems like a very long time. Wallace's suicide seems only to have been the most recent manifestation of this gross stereotype, which we've begun to call the "Kurt Cobain Effect.” Idealizations of Sylvia Plath or Van Gogh carry with them a similar odor, and a step away from suicides brings us into a discussion of the fetishization of suffering as just a subcateCOURTESY OF BRAIN PICKINGS gory for the fetishization of “creatives” in general. We not only love art; We also love artists. We view them as the avatar of whatever we find so exemplary about their work. In the case of Wallace or Cobain, our culture constructs a story of idealists, whose work and

death functioned as both the means and the end. Their smart, sympathetic, fragile personalities became entangled with the dark corners of the human condition, and only their art manages to provide a relief from pain. However, when the art fails, either through its “sellingout” or through its distortion, the artist fails. And in our pathetic world of “talkthe-talk” and “walk-the-walk”, the trope of the tortured artist, who is now also a

Stephen Meisel Appearances failure at the only thing that kept him or her going, realizes his or her own teleology: to end that thing which has failed the art. To end yourself. We know Wallace is “for real” because he fulfilled this story. He knew something true and esoteric about depression or killing himself because he actually tried, and eventually succeeded, to kill himself. And so upon this tragic event, his writings instantly obtain a brandnew validity they never had before, because we believe someone to have brushed up against a harsh, unrelenting type of knowledge, or maybe because he dealt with a way of living with which many of us are familiar, but unlike Wallace we (and I do not mean the royal “we” here; I include myself ) do not have the bravery to confront and banish it from our psyches. The fact that we can predict suicide as

a terminus to a life-story should cause us to reexamine the nature of our society’s fascination with these kinds of artists, and with suicide in general. I don’t necessarily understand the cultural effect of Wallace’s sainthood. I’ll venture to say that our intense focus on someone who wrote pretty often about suicide and suicidal people has at least a little to do with that person’s own suicide. We will consume good stories wherever we can find them. All the better if they “actually” happened. All the better if the story of the artist is just as painful as the work itself. All the better if we know there is someone as illustrious as Wallace who shares our struggle. God forbid that we examine the grotesque patterns of the stories we devour, or that we change the way we view artists so that their suicide does not mark their merit. God forbid that we forget who Wallace was so that we do not take comfort in identifying or falling in love with a man we don’t actually know. God forbid we separate the artist from the art so that the truth we find inside the work doesn’t translate into a cultural obsession about killing oneself. David Foster Wallace gave many of us a common vocabulary for our depression, our guilt and our suicidal thoughts. He made many of his readers understand that their feelings did not signify inadequacy or abnormality. But I hope we can divorce that from his life and its sadness, which was never the story we were intended to read. Stephen Meisel is a sophomore in the College of arts and Sciences. He can be reached at smeisel@cornellsun.com. Appearances runs alternate Fridays this semester.

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OPINION

Ruth Weissmann | A Word to the Weiss

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the berry patch

SKORTON SPOTTED ON CAMPUS! President Emeritus David Skorton was spotted yesterday on the Ithaca campus. Why was our former fearless leader spotted lurking in Day Hall, peering around ferns and skulking up and down staircases? Our berry patch reporters have compiled a list of hypothetical reasons for Skorton’s return to campus. The Stiller Effect: Skorton finally saw critically acclaimed film Night at the Museum and was fired from the Smithsonian for camping out in the various exhibits — hoping for the dinosaurs to come alive. He is looking for a new job, nothing fancy, just something — but preferably in Day Hall and in his old office. The Garrett Feud: Skorton heard Garrett has been talking trash and has returned to seek revenge. Skorton has been playing a series of petty pranks on Garrett, such as filling her office with hundreds of thousands of ping pong balls, giving out quarter cards her personal contact information, filling her car with sand and writing DAVID WAZ HERE in chalk on the clock tower. Inauguration: We’re told that inauguration is today, but we can’t really be sure. There have been a number of suspicious happenings around campus, such as the red banners placed on the sidewalks and the chairs set up on the arts quad — though those chairs could also just be for a FWS that wanted to host class outside.

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hen I was 16, I was bumped whatever variation they guess at. There to first class on a layover in are a few dozen people on campus who Detroit. I was flying alone know me as Rosie, thanks to an espeand fully amenable to the idea of being cially loud shindig freshman year. served Nabisco cookies from a leisurely Although it’s a timesaver, I do feel a window seat. There were five or six peo- little bad when I don’t champion my ple bumped with me — all over the age name. Names have power over us. Kurt of 65. When pressed, the flight atten- Vonnegut is quoted as saying, “be caredant admitted that the airline often ful what you pretend to be because you leaned towards upgrading older people are what you pretend to be.” in an attempt to make them more comI think our names determine what we fortable. Apparently, Delta had seen at pretend to be, at least a little bit. We all my name on the flight list. Despite have associations with our name, being a teenager without the particular whether we share it with a celebrity or comfort needs of the elderly, I wasn’t we have an idea in our head about how surprised — I’m used to the trials and someone with our name is supposed to tribulations of having what I affection- act. Maybe you’ve found an amazingly ately call “an old person name.” punny username for your name. Maybe My full name — the name on the it’s an old family tradition that you’re passport — is Ruth Agnes. I’ve been proud to carry on. Maybe you have a called Ruthie all my life, and growing common name and wish you didn’t. Or up I had a very simple way of dealing maybe you have an embarrassing childwith those who chose to call me Ruth: I hood nickname you wish had disapdidn’t speak to them. peared when your My mother named me belief in Santa did. after a cute little girl you My full name — the haveNevertheless, she met while pregnant a story behind name on the passport your name that has (I have since pointed out that naming me probably changed after someone cute did- — is Ruth Agnes. I’ve your personality. n’t necessarily make me been called Ruthie all Had you been any more aesthetically named something my life, and growing else, you might have pleasing). My middle name, been a slightly difup, I had a very Agnes, comes from the ferent person. You church my [nonreli- simple way of dealing might be acting a gious] parents were little differently. married in. The with those who chose There are many monikers by themfamous examples to call me Ruth: I selves are fine, but where people truly joined together they didn’t speak to them. live up to their create the illusion, at names — one being least on paper, that I Usain Bolt, am elderly, collecting Jamaican sprinter Medicaid and possibly wearing den- widely regarded as one of the fastest tures. people alive. I think in the end, it’s not It doesn’t help that some of my per- what we think of our name that matters, sonality quirks lend themselves to the but whether we choose to let it define older image. I still send handwritten let- us. ters across the country, I’m a horror at Last week, I attended a stage reading picking up on pop culture references of the play Anne of Green Gables downand I have been known to embroider on town, and upon arrival realized I was occasion. I prefer tea to coffee. I take going to be the only person under the long, hilly Ithaca walks during which I age of 60. Because I’m really just waitlisten to radio podcasts on the invention ing to be a few decades older (hello, of everyday objects. I have an affinity valid excuse to go to bed at 8:00), I for reading the newspaper (in particular, stayed to hang out with my people. This the word jumble) and for doing puzzles backfired when several older women over white wine. I love those foil- tried to set me up with their grandsons, wrapped butterscotch candies. Basically, but the event itself was great. I think I am mentally prepared to peak at 90. I’ve finally given up my childhood cruAs anyone with an unconventional or sade — I’m not sure if my name steered unique name can tell you, the explana- me towards acting older or I am fulfilltion process gets tiring. I hate to intro- ing some imaginary destiny I laid out duce myself; People always have a follow for myself. Either way, I’ve since softup question, and it’s usually a request to ened towards being called Ruth. Who repeat myself. But unlike people with cares if the hairdresser lays out the oldtruly unheard of names, I have some lady rollers when I make an appointflexibility. Many times, people interpret ment? I’m growing into it. the introduction as Lucy or Ruby, and I let it slide if I won’t see that person again (e.g. the Starbuck barista). At par- Ruth Weissmann is a junior in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. She can be reached at raw287@corties, my standard operating procedure is nell.edu. A Word to the Weiss appears alternate to say my name once, and then go with Thursdays this semester. CORRECTION A Sept. 17 news story, “Lambda Chi Alpha House Reopens After $2.8 Million Renovation,” incorrectly stated that M&T Bank and Welliver Construction Co. contributed to the fundraising campaign for the project. In fact, M&T aided with the financing of the project, while Welliver performed the construction.


THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, September 2,, 2015 9

OPINION

Xiang Li | What’s Up, Doc?

Finding a Doctor Overseas W

hen we want a more thorough answer to our medical concerns, we seek a second opinion from another doctor, maybe in another hospital or another town. But what about another continent? Zhen Cao, a Ph.D. student at Weill Cornell, is making it possible for patients in China to seek for help from physicians here in the U.S., through an online “second opinion platform” that he and his team of volunteers developed. “I was shocked by how many people in China wait for months just to be able to get a second opinion for an accurate diagnosis.” said Cao. Through his medical training in China, he realized that the demand for second opinions for Chinese patients comes from a series of complex issues. According to Zhen’s research, 90 percent of best physicians are concentrated in the 19 major cities of China, which is less than 3 percent of all the cities in the country. For less developed cities, rural areas and even isolated regions, most patients are stuck with their local, low-rated clinics. The rate of misdiagnosis in some of these clinics could be as high as 40 percent. For a more reliable diagnosis, a lot of patients need to travel to the major cities to see a better physician. This can be a heavy financial burden for them. Moreover, the time spent seeking care delays effective treatment. Major hospitals are burdened by an enormous amount of both local and non-local patients, too. For instance, Xiehe Hospital, a prestigious hospital in Beijing, takes in an average of 6,220 clinical visits every single day. This leads to an unimaginably heavy workload for the clinicians. Compared to clinicians in the U.S., they have to see 10 times as many patients per day, while still meeting the demand for appointments. Zhen decided to address the issue with a simple but efficient concept. He realized that most patients seeking a second opinion already have a rather complete set of medical examination records from their local clinics. “The examination tools and procedures are usually well-standardized, such as blood test, histology sections and CAT scans.” He said, “These medical records could serve as the basis for a doctor to make a diagnosis. That is why an online platform is an efficient way to connect patients and physicians.” As a Ph.D. student in Weill Cornell, Zhen and his team are using their connections in hospitals such as the New York Presbyterian Hospital and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center to building up a network of physician volunteers to participate in this non-profit project. Using the online platform he developed, patients could easily use a “symptom checker” system to search for general categories of diseases in order to find hospitals/physicians with the matching expertise. Then, they could build up an online profile, upload medical history, blood test result, histology images, CAT or MRI scans. The matching physician will also be able to communicate with the patients directly online. Zhen’s team is also trying to collaborate with non-profit health service organizations. For many of the isolated, poverty-stricken regions of China, medical examination stations with standard equipment and technicians could be set up to generate test results for patients to upload to the platform. This will be especially helpful for people with rare or complicated diseases. Zhen said:“We know that there is a limitation of lack of in-person examination using this online method for diagnosis. That is why it is only a ‘second opinion.’ But it helps to increase the chance to save a life.” This platform will bring potential educational opportunities, too. Physicians in the U.S. could obtain first-hand information about Chinese patients and collect valuable data for both clinical and research purposes. Zhen also mentioned another potential population of patients for whom this platform could benefit. “Instead of waiting for months for a doctor’s appointment, there are also many patients in China who could afford to come to the U.S. for diagnosis and even treatment. If our platform could help them contact U.S. hospitals, it will open up so [many] more options for them. At the same time, this will alleviate the burden of our local hospitals.” The platform is also seeking to help people outside of China, such as patients in Africa and other regions in need. At the same time, the team is recruiting more physician volunteers from the U.S., Japan and Europe. “The world is flat, made possible by the Internet and advanced communication tools.” Zhen said, “But the medical world is not ‘flat’ enough yet. A small bridge like our platform could help promote the concept of sharing medical resources within our global village.” Xiang Li is a Ph.D. candidate at Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences. Comments may be sent to associate-editor@cornellsun.com. What’s Up, Doc? appears alternate Fridays this semester.

Web

Comment of the day “Were those students who skipped meals doing so because they couldn’t afford them? Students skip meals because they are running late to class, etc. Also, wouldn’t it just be easier to extend financial aid in the form of meal plans to food insecure students rather than create and manage an additional food outlet?” Crowdfinder Re: “Grocery Store Founders Defend Business Plan,” News published September 16, 2015

Akshay Jain | College Stuff

The Endurance of Islamaphobia B

y now, most people are However, this is not one of and I as “suspicious.” While my parents and I largely shrugged probably familiar with them. Islamaphobia has existed in off the incident at that time to the story of Ahmed Mohamed. A freshman at America for decades, but there’s avoid any trouble, it seems MacArthur High School in really no denying the increase in today that maybe that wasn’t Texas and budding STEM stu- Islamaphobia following the ter- the right choice. Obviously times are differdent, Ahmed was arrested rible September 11th terrorist ent. In my case, the parent was Monday afternoon after show- attacks. At the time of the attacks, I probably influenced by posting his teacher a clock he had made out of a pencil case. The was a six-year-old first grader. I 9/11 fears of Islamic radicalism. teacher assumed the clock was a understood what had happened, I definitely harbor no ill feelthreat or hoax bomb, and the but obviously lacked the matu- ings toward the parent that rity to really comprehend the reported me. However, it does school called the police. bother me that Charges have t h i s since been I was asked where I was from and how Is l a m a p h o b i a dropped and the Irving School long I had been living in America. I was even continues over 14 years later. District has mainasked what my parents did for a living. The In my case, tained that it was I’m not even simply attempting questions and manner of questioning got Muslim, but I to “… take the necessary precau- increasingly hostile and intrusive. As a bit of do fit the bill. For Ahmed, his tions to protect a sycophant, I wasn’t used to being in only real crime [their] students and keep [the] trouble and answered their questions with was his name and his physical school communitears rolling down my cheeks. appearance. It ty as safe as possiwas reported ble.” that the officer Ahmed, an aspiring engineer, has since received significance of the event. To me, that arrested Ahmed even an overwhelming outpouring of it was a terrible occurrence, but claimed, “Yup. That’s who I support from people all over I didn’t understand the ramifi- thought it was” upon taking him out of class. world, including celebrities and cations that it would carry. The question remains, why One day at school around politicians alike. President Obama has even invited him October 2001, I was called into does Islamaphobia persist? and his clock to the White the principal’s office. As a gen- Many are quick to jump on the House. However, even with this erally well meaning and benign media and Hollywood for their remarkable support, it is appar- kid, I had never been called to depictions of Muslims all over ent the US still has a consider- the principal’s office before. I the world, however this arguable problem with figured it was no big deal and ment loses steam when considwent. I was greeted by the both ering the increasing number of Islamaphobia. It seems like every Muslim the assistant and head princi- Muslim or Muslim-appearing American, and even non- pals, as well as my older brother celebrities in America such as Muslim Americans that fit the who had been called in before Fareed Zakaria and Kumail Nanjiani. visual Islamic stereotype, have me. Islamaphobia is the persisI sat down and was quesexperienced some form of discrimination or prejudice. In tioned for about twenty min- tent prejudice that manifests as support of Ahmed and all those utes. I was asked where I was an irrational fear of one’s own facing similar forms of discrim- from and how long I had been neighbor. While Ahmed has ination, I thought I would share living in America. I was even emerged as an overnight asked what my parents did for a celebrity due to this situation, my own story. I’ve never completely identi- living. The questions and man- not all victims of Islamaphobia fied as American. I was born in ner of questioning got increas- are so lucky. Irving School District has yet Australia and lived in Canada ingly hostile and intrusive. As a for a bit before immigrating to bit of a sycophant, I wasn’t used to apologize to Ahmed or his America with my family. We to being in trouble and family. settled in Springfield, Illinois answered their questions with by the time I was five years old. tears rolling down my cheeks. Jain is a student in the College of I would later learn from my Akshay A fairly rural city, Springfield Arts and Sciences. College Stuff appears remains the setting of many of parents that another child’s par- alternate Fridays this semester. He may be my favorite memories. ent had reported my brother reached at aj265@cornell.edu..


10 THE CORNELL DAILY SUN | Friday, September 18, 2015

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

ACROSS 1 *Dejected 5 *Sledding spot 10 *Waterloo 14 Enclosed in 15 Electrical component 16 Seaman’s direction 17 9-Down sensors 18 Midwestern tribe 19 Show appreciation, in a way 20 “You shall hear more __ morning”: “Measure for Measure” 21 Shows a preference 22 Amethyst source 23 Prognosticate 25 Struggling engine sound 27 Me.-to-Fla. highway 28 Freudian subject 30 ’60s radical gp. 31 *Data transfer 32 Crockett’s Waterloo 34 Annoyed moviegoer’s shout ... or what’s needed to make sense of the answers to starred clues 39 Onetime Silly String maker 40 *Faster way to fly 43 Seafarer 46 Bygone dentifrice 48 “Twelfth Night” servant 49 Deserve credit, perhaps 51 “Yes” 53 Ancient Iranians 54 Thing on a bob 55 “__ guy walks into ... “ 56 Actress Russell 57 Dinnertime attraction 59 __ stick: incense 60 Rare blood type, briefly 61 Memento 62 Fifi’s BFF 63 *1964 Grammywinning rock ’n’ roll song 64 *Decrease 65 *Musical starting point

DOWN 1 “Watch out!” 2 Spanish sherry 3 Rush hour timesaver, hopefully 4 QB’s stats 5 Feel one’s way 6 Took it easy 7 “Fate is so cruel!” 8 Peer of Trygve and Kofi 9 Looker? 10 Aspect 11 Metes out 12 Bygone pump word 13 Middle Ages colony residents 21 Sugar suffix 22 Marx of lesser repute 24 Provide, as with talent 25 Lifestyle magazine 26 Host noted for a 1960 on-air resignation 29 Was loquacious 33 Classic military text by Carl von Clausewitz 35 Legislative VIPs

36 Touristy viticultural valley 37 Indecisive comment 38 Hardly fascinating 41 Capital of Cyprus 42 Statistical matrix, e.g. 43 Cruise partnership nickname 44 L’Oréal competitor

45 Altered, as a map 47 Mental wherewithal 48 GI grub 50 Wield power 52 Endangered Sumatran 54 Mythical troublemaker 57 Compact Cadillac sedan 58 Dustup 59 Hook relative

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

Sun Sudoku Fill in the empty cells, one number in each, so that each column, row, and region contains the numbers 1-9 exactly once. Each number in the solution therefore occurs only once in each of the three “directions,” hence the “single numbers” implied by the puzzle’s name. (Rules from wikipedia.org/wiki /Sudoku)

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Cornell to Host C.U.Inaria Cup, Will Face Duquesne, Air Force By ZACH MANDELL Sun Contributor

During the Cornell men’s soccer game against Oregon State on Sunday, junior midfielder Madison Hack saw an opportunity just when his team needed one. “The ball was played across the box, bouncing to me on the top of the 18 [yard line] on the left side,” Hack said. Instead of shooting from the top of the box, Hack sent an arcing pass to other side of the field in hope of connecting with a teammate. “But my cross wasn’t good enough,” Hack said. In a match that was closer than the final score would suggest, the Red (0-5-0) lost to Oregon State, 2-0. Tuesday night’s 1-0 loss to next-door rival Binghamton (4-2-0) was similarly dramatic and agonizingly close. Hack, a self-critical upperclassman leader, took blame for another crucial missed opportunity that could have tied the score late in the game. On a free-kick opportunity, instead of playing one of his teammates, Hack did what he had wished to do against Oregon State — he went for the goal. “I missed it far,” Hack said. “We will not get back that chance to tie up the game.” Such has been the story for Cornell men’s soccer so far this season. The low scoring nature of soccer more generally comes with an emphasis on timely capitalization. Because opportunities in soccer are so hard to come by, one botched finish is often a fatal mistake. “We need to execute better,” said head coach Jaro Zawislan. “We’ve been creating opportunities and playing well but games have been decided by one key play or a few key plays.” However, Zawislan is not focused on the past. Rather, he is focused on his own team’s improvements. Zawislan would also like to see in this year’s squad the defensive dominance that characterized Cornell last year. In 2014, the Red recorded 11 shutouts, the highest season total in program history.

Zawislan says matter of factly, “Every game, our goal is to get a shutout and we haven’t done that yet.” Even with an 0-5 record, the team has not lowered its aspirations at all. “Our goal is still to win an Ivy League Title and get an NCAA Tournament bid,” Zawislan said. With Ivy League play yet to start, these dreams are still very achievable — especially if the team makes the improvements that Zawislan has in mind. “We need to be more clinical with our finishes,” Zawislan said. Hack added, “The team has learned that we need to plug up a few holes and play more as a unit.” Despite frustration, the team’s attitude remains positive and goal-oriented. “After this start, the team could not have any more drive and hunger to turn things around,” said junior midfielder and forward Jack Ferguson. “The record we have right now is not representative of the talent we have on this team and we couldn’t be more eager to prove that.” This weekend, the team will get a chance to show what it’s got. Cornell will host the C.U. Inaria Cup at Berman Field, where the Red will face Duquesne at 7 p.m. on tonight, and Air Force at 1 p.m. on Sunday. “This weekend, we expect nothing less than two tallies in the win column,” Ferguson said. Zach Mandell can be reached at zjm8@cornell.edu.

CONNOR SMITH / SUN CONTRIBUTOR

Hope in the air | Although the men’s soccer team dropped its last two games, head coach Jaro Zawislan has hope for the team’s upcoming matches.

Red to Open Season Against Bucknell Starts 2015 season on Schoellkopf Field with homecoming game FOOTBALL

Continued from page 12

two weeks since most college football teams’ seasons began. All this waiting around has the team anxious and, with Homecoming on the first game of the season, emotions are running high for Cornell. “It’s just an awesome experience to have everyone here and all the different events that are going on for the crowd, and they get all in it,” Hagy said. “Our first game is Homecoming so it makes it that much more special.” Norris, another one of the captains of the team, said that despite the emotions and the excitement, he’s going to try to keep a level head going into the game. “It’s the same game we’ve been playing since we were four or five years old,” Norris said. “It’s at a high level — that’s something you can’t take for granted — but at the end of the day, the coaches do a good job of putting us where we need to be, so it’s about relaxing and playing.”

Archer stresses a “character edge” every week during the season to get the team to focus on a particularly facet of the game. Archer said this week’s edge is details. “[When] all those big things happen, you really have to focus in on the small things,” Archer said about the multitude of Homecoming events throughout the weekend. “So in our preparation, we want to be really detail focused. On Saturday, [we want to] let that emotion play and use it our advantage, but not let it overcome us.” Last year, Cornell fell victim to nerves when the Red welcomed Lehigh to Ithaca for Homecoming. There were early mistakes on both sides of the ball and Cornell found itself in a 17-0 hole after 10 minutes of play. The loss would be one of nine losses the Red would experience last year and, despite topping Columbia, Cornell was picked to finish last in the Ivy League in a preseason poll a couple of weeks ago. Hagy said the team uses that

as fuel to prove people wrong. “There’s a lot of people saying we’re going to finish eighth,” Hagy said. “But they don’t necessarily know what’s going on here. We’ve been putting in a lot of hard work and I think that we’ve taken great steps as an offense and as a team in general.” Bucknell (1-1) comes to town on Saturday looking to repeat last year’s victory over the Red. In its 2014 game, Cornell was tied up with the Bison after one quarter, but Bucknell scored 13 unanswered to win its fourth straight. The Bison would go on to finish the season at 8-2, narrowly missing out on winning the Patriot League. Despite the challenge that Bucknell will bring, Archer said he’s excited for the opening game. “It’s like it’s Christmas Day,” Archer said. “This is the best time of year. Training camp is finally behind you. You have an opponent, you’re gonna play. The kick is coming at 3 p.m. on Saturday, and we’re ready to go.” Adam Bronfin can be reached at abronfin@cornellsun.com.


Sports

The Corne¬ Daily Sun

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 18, 2015

12

FOOTBALL

Cornell Hopes to Rebound at Homecoming

New Cornell squad to face a well prepared Bucknell under third-year head coach David Archer’05 By ADAM BRONFIN Sun Assistant Sports Editor

Year one was the transition year. Year two was the implementation year. Year three? It all starts tomorrow. This season marks Cornell football’s third season with head coach David Archer ’05 at the helm. Last season was the first chance Archer had to really begin implementing his vision for the team. A year later, everything is starting to come together. “Our first two years [were for] preparation and installation of things we wanted to do on each side of the ball and the kicking game,” Archer said. “Now “[Somborn] is fun to it’s time to translate that to making compete against, and I plays, winning can’t wait to compete those plays in the game and that will with him on Sunday.” add up to a win on Miles Norris Saturday. From November to now, we’ve become a much better football team and I’m excited to see what [it] translates to against our opponents in a very, very tough schedule.” The team is coming off of a 1-9 record, with the sole victory coming against winless Columbia in the second to last game of the season. In 2014, Cornell struggled to find the endzone and similarly struggled to keep opponents from scoring. The Red was outscored by an average score of 3416 last year and finished last or second to last in most offensive and defensive categories. “It was a learning year last year,” said senior running back Luke Hagy. “I think everybody is just playing with more confidence this year.” Hagy, one of the team’s four captains, is the only player in Cornell history to have at least 1,000 rushing yards and 1,000 receiving yards. He led the Red in rushing yards last season with 734 yards and was the only player above 100 yards on the ground. Archer said he expects another huge

MICHAELA BREW / SUN SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Golden boy Hagy | Senior captain and running back Luke Hagy is the only player in Red history to have at least 1,000 rushing and receiving yards. He led the Red with 734 rushing yards last season.

year out of the senior. “This is the first time in Luke Hagy’s career that the offense didn’t change during the offseason,” Archer said. “Take a kid with his talent and give him an entire 18 to 24 months to learn something and be able to check things, it makes a world of difference offensively.” Also adding to the turbulence of last season was the quarterback situation. Due to injuries and inconsistent play, four different quarterbacks saw play time last year. This season, after a position battle throughout the offseason, junior Robert Somborn has emerged as the definitive starting quarterback. “[Somborn] got about 60 percent of the snaps during

training camp and he did nothing but continue to grow and flourish,” Archer said. “He’s earned the starting job.” Somborn’s teammates have been similarly impressed by him. “He does a great job,” said junior linebacker Miles Norris. “He’s fun to compete against, and I can’t wait to compete with him on Saturday.” Somborn played in five games last year, passing for 1000 yards and nine touchdowns. He had two 300 yard passing games and finished the year with just three interceptions. Saturday will mark a week since the NFL kicked off and See FOOTBALL page 11

ROUND

1

ANNA FASMAN

JOON LEE

CORNELL V. BUCKNELL

CORNELL

CORNELL

CORNELL

CONNECTICUT V. MISSOURI

MISSOURI

MISSOURI

GEORGIA STATE V. OREGON

OREGON

AUBURN V. LSU

TYLER ALICEA

ANNIE SLOANE BUI GRINSPOON

JAYNE ZUREK

BUCKNELL

BUCKNELL

CORNELL

BUCKNELL

CORNELL

CORNELL

BUCKNELL

BUCKNELL

MISSOURI

MISSOURI

MISSOURI

MISSOURI

MISSOURI

MISSOURI

CONNECTICUT

MISSOURI

MISSOURI

OREGON

OREGON

OREGON

OREGON

OREGON

GEORGIA

OREGON

OREGON

OREGON

OREGON

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

RUTGERS V. PENN STATE

PENN STATE

PENN STATE

RUTGERS

RUTGERS

PENN STATE

PENN STATE

PENN STATE

PENN STATE

RUTGERS

PENN STATE

PENN STATE

STEELERS V. 49ERS

STEELERS

STEELERS

STEELERS

STEELERS

STEELERS

STEELERS

STEELERS

49ERS

49ERS

STEELERS

STEELERS

PATRIOTS V. BILLS

PATRIOTS

PATRIOTS

BILLS

BILLS

BILLS

BILLS

PATRIOTS

BILLS

PATRIOTS

PATRIOTS

PATRIOTS

COWBOYS V. EAGLES

COWBOYS

COWBOYS

EAGLES

EAGLES

EAGLES

EAGLES

COWBOYS

EAGLES

COWBOYS

EAGLES

COWBOYS

GIANTS V. FALCONS

GIANTS

FALCONS

FALCONS

FALCONS

GIANTS

GIANTS

GIANTS

FALCONS

GIANTS

GIANTS

FALCONS

PACKERS V. SEAHAWKS

SEAHAWKS

SEAHAWKS

SEAHAWKS

PACKERS

SEAHAWKS

SEAHAWKS

SEAHAWKS

PACKERS

SEAHAWKS

SEAHAWKS

PACKERS

TOTAL

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

ADAM SHANE BRONFIN LEWIS

PHOTO ARTS EDITORS EDITORS SCHROEDER


HOMECOMING INAUGURATION SUPPLEMENT

ELIZABETH GARRETT Friday, September 18, 2015

THE CORNELL DAILY SUN 5

President Addresses Issues Facing C.U. By SUN STAFF

THE SUN: What issues do you see facing Cornell right now, how do you and your administration plan to address those issues, and why do you think they are priorities? GARRETT: Our priorities are faculty and students. Cornell is a spectacular institution, and what we want to do is continue its trajectory so it continues to lead the world in higher education in this century. Faculty, of course, are the great foundation of a university. Faculty give the university its academic values, and are the strength of a university. And we have terrific faculty to support, but we also need to bring more great faculty to Cornell. The provost and I will be working with the deans and the faculty to identify great faculty to bring here, to support our faculty who are here and to raise money to support those faculty. The second priority is our student experience, which can always be improved. With respect to the graduate residential experience, we’ll be working with students to ensure that it is the best experience possible in the 21st century. We will think about how Engaged Cornell is going to shape the undergraduate experience and about how we will encourage students to move across schools and disciplines to tackle problems of importance. We’re also focused on making sure that the experience for professional and graduate students is among the best in the country. THE SUN: How do you believe your experiences as a lawyer will inform your decisions and viewpoints as an administrator dealing with issues facing Cornell, ranging from sexual assault and hazing to academic diversity and student discourse? GARRETT: I suppose my background as a lawyer affects everything I do. But I will say that with those issues that you mentioned, I first MICHELLE FELDMAN / SUN FILE PHOTO

react to them as a university professor. When I think about issues relating to sexual assault and hazing, I think my first reaction is that of someone who is part of an academic community, where that behavior is not tolerated nor acceptable. And I always want to project in the very strongest terms that our community does not tolerate sexual violence, assault, hazing or other kinds of behavior like that. I think that we as an institution must always focus on education and make sure that people know what behavior is what unacceptable and under what conditions unacceptable behavior tends to occur. We also need to very robustly support bystander education. I think of us as part of a community, which means that we take care of each other. And if we see one of our community in danger and in a vulnerable position, we need to intervene and protect that person. When unacceptable behavior occurs, that behavior needs to be punished. And we need to make sure that we have processes in place to find out what happened and then to levy the appropriate discipline. You also talked about academic diversity and discourse. I believe that diversity is one of the strengths of American higher education and one of the great strengths of Cornell. We want to continue to encourage diversity in all its manifestations, backgrounds, race, ethnicity, perspectives, ideologies and geographic backgrounds. What we do at a University is study and try to solve some of the world’s hardest problems. And you do that better when you bring people from diverse experiences, perspectives and backgrounds together. THE SUN: What do you believe the University can do to address the needs of minority student groups, and does Cornell have anything planned to do so? GARRETT: I think that diversity is the strength of higher education and a particular strength of See INTERVIEW on page 5 of regular issue.


HOMECOMING INAUGURATION SUPPLEMENT

6 THE CORNELL DAILY SUN

ELIZABETH GARRETT

Friday, September 18, 2015

Presidential Treats: A Dairy Bar Tradition By ZOE FERGUSON Sun Senior Writer

Two new ice cream flavors are coming to Cornell Dairy for Homecoming Weekend, in honor of President Elizabeth Garrett’s official inauguration and Touchdown the unofficial mascot. Cornell Dairy hosted a studentvoted contest online and on campus this September to choose a name for the new flavor dedicated to Garrett’s inauguration. The contest yielded “24 Garrett Swirl” as the winner, beating out rivals “Garrett’s Chocolate Bar Association” and “Cornelle Chocolate Chunk.” The flavor will be revealed today at the Cornell Community Picnic taking place on the Ag

Quad from noon to 2 p.m., immediately following the 10 a.m. inauguration ceremony. Samples will be available to the public. In addition to 24 Garrett Swirl, Homecoming attendees will be able to sample a new Touchdownthemed flavor on Saturday morning at Teagle Hall, when President Garrett reveals the new Class of 1915 plaza and Touchdown statue. Corey Earle ’07, associate director for student and young alumni programs, said Cornell Dairy ice cream is one part of campus life that brings Cornellians together. “Ice cream is one of those aspects of the Cornell experience that unites generations of Cornellians, so I think there’s a nostalgia factor,” Earle said. “When alumni return to campus,

BRITTNEY CHEW / SUN NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Ice cream showdown | In a vote put to students last week to name Cornell Dairy’s new ice cream flavor, “24 Garrett Swirl” ultimately triumphed over “Garrett’s Chocolate Bar Association” and “Cornelle Chocolate Chunk.”

the Dairy Bar is often on their schedule. A new ice cream flavor is just one way that Cornell uniquely celebrates momentous occasions,

and it’s no surprise that people get excited about ice cream.” Special flavors have entered the Dairy Bar’s menu over the years to

commemorate historic events and figures at the University, including Clocktower Pumpkin, a pumpkinflavored ice cream named after the 1997 clocktower pumpkin prank. According to Earle, the flavor became “a seasonal favorite for many years.” As an unofficial mascot, Touchdown is not alone in his namesake ice cream flavor either: Cornelia, the Dairy Bar’s mascot, has been immortalized as a “mainstay” in Cornelia’s Dark Secret. Most recently, Cornell Dairy made news when it revealed a new flavor named Sweet CORNell, dedicated to the University’s sesquicentennial, which included sweet corn kernels and salted caramel. The flavor was designed by a group of undergraduate students in Food Science 1101: Science and Technology of Foods that “wanted to connect with Cornell’s history, according to Earle. “Corn is a unity crop that connects with Cornell's national and global presence while also tying with Cornell’s agricultural history and Nobel Prize-winning work by Barbara McClintock ’23 M.A. ’25 Ph.D. ’27 on corn genetics,” Earle said. Garrett is only the newest in a series of Cornell presidents to be honored by inaugural ice cream flavors. According to Earle, when President Emeritus Jeffrey Lehman ’77 took office in 2003, the Dairy Bar served a flavor called “Ezra and Andrew’s World View” to honor Cornell’s global presence. The special flavor incorporated an espresso ice cream with fudge swirl, vanilla and cinnamon, hazelnuts and pralines, according to the University. In 2006, the Dairy Bar also unveiled “Banana-Berry Skorton” in honor of President Emeritus David Skorton’s inauguration. The ice cream featured banana and raspberry swirls in a chocolate ice cream base. Deanna Simons, quality manager and academic programs coordinator for Cornell Dairy, said 24 Garrett Swirl required full attention for two days to produce and prepare. Simons said the University expects up to 5,000 guests on the Ag Quad for the Cornell Community Picnic. Zoe Ferguson can be reached at zferguson@cornellsun.com.


HOMECOMING INAUGURATION SUPPLEMENT

ELIZABETH GARRETT

Friday, September 18, 2015

THE CORNELL DAILY SUN 7

Andrew Dickson White 1865 - 1885

Charles Kendall Adams 1885 - 1892

Jacob Gould Schurman 1892 - 1920

Livingston Farrand 1920 - 1937

Edmund Ezra Day 1937 - 1949

Deane Waldo Malott 1951 - 1963

James A. Perkins 1963 - 1969

Dale R. Corson 1969 - 1977

Frank H. T. Rhodes 1977 - 1995

Hunter R. Rawlings III 1995 - 2003

Jeffrey S. Lehman ’77 2003 - 2005

David J. Skorton 2006 - 2015

A Brief History of Cornell’s Past Presidents By SUN STAFF

“I am sure,” wrote Deane W. Malott, Cornell’s president in 1951, “[that] it is perfectly possible to have an entirely adequate affair without delegates from all over creation, bored visiting presidents and a general ruckus.” Malott, though not inclined to have a large ceremony, correctly surmised the need for an inauguration. “I suspect [the inauguration] is a peg for some rallying of Cornell spirit,” Malott wrote. Inauguration ceremonies have widely varied in Cornell’s history, from activities on the Slope for Malott to ceremonies at commencement for Dale R. Corson. “I don’t think they even had a regular guest list,” former University archivist Elaine Engst said of early inaugurations. Andrew Dickson White, Cornell’s first president, was inaugurated in a smaller ceremony on October 7, 1868. White recruited many of the University’s professors, served as minister to Prussia and later to Russia, donated his entire library in 1891 and nobly refused the University’s offer to be made a trustee for life upon his resignation in 1885. His inaugural speech laid out the ideals behind Ezra Cornell’s university: to “combine practical with liberal education.” The chief sponsor of the Morrill Land Act, Justin S. Morrill, attended Cornell’s second inauguration, that of Charles Kendall Adams. The Old Armory, which stood at the current site of the Engineering Quad, was the endpoint of a procession similar to today’s. Over three hours of speeches followed, as Adams outlined the need for expansion. True to his word, Adams’ tenure saw Barnes, Lincoln, Morse and Boardman Halls built, as well as Uris Library. Jacob Gould Schurman had the longest tenure of any Cornell president, from 1892 to 1920. Like White, Schurman had a diplomatic career, helping to rebuild the University of Heidelberg after the First World War. In his inaugural address, Schurman argued for financial support for the University from the State of New York, noting that in other states “the university is the beneficiary of the state; here the state is the beneficiary of the university.” Schurman also vowed that the University would keep housing relatively inexpensive and would generally “see to it that Cornell never ceases to be the poor man’s university.” In his 1921 inaugural address, Livingston Farrand urged the University to take responsibility in the “life-and-death struggle to save our democratic ideals [from] the destruction of material, mental and moral values by the war and the economic, political and social

confusion that has ensued.” among numerous others. After more than a Farrand’s inauguration was also the first at year, a promising lead came from the Cornell to have delegates from other institu- Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths’ Hall, tions. The University of North Carolina, London. Cornell then elected to place its Harvard, Michigan and Stanford faith, and a sizable monetary sum, in Eric Universities represented colleges from the Clements, who had never designed a mace. East, South, Midwest and West, according to Graham Hughes, the art director for the program. Goldsmiths’ Hall, assured Hucker that a Edmund Ezra Day, like presidents White, modern design, rather than a copy of antique Adams and Lehman, was once a professor at maces, would best serve as “the embodiment the University of Michigan. of the whole rambling strucHis address harkened back to ture, organization and idea of White’s inaugural speech, the university.” noting the need for the James A. Perkins’ 1963 University to keep its intelinaugural speech argued that lectual and practical blend in a modern university must turbulent times. choose among paths for Malott came to Cornell research, with an eye toward with business and academic driving societal change rather experience as a former vice than being “merely a spinpresident of the Hawaiian ning gear.” Pineapple Company and Perkins oversaw the crechancellor of the University ation of departments of comof Kansas. Malott’s 1951 puter science and biology and Elizabeth Garrett address warned against the establishment of the 2015 - Present allowing the system of govSociety for the Humanities, ernment to “sink slowly from the free repub- as well as the Committee on Special lic of decentralized government, to the wel- Educational Projects, which greatly increased fare state, to the handout state, to the police the number of students of color on campus. state.” Perkins resigned following the Straight Cornell’s ceremonial mace — a crowned Takeover. javelin-shaped ornament made of silver and Dale R. Corson rose from physics profesgold — also dates back to the Malott era. sor to president, taking the reins during a Malott directed two professors, George tumultuous time for the University. Corson’s Healey and George Hucker, to research the tenure saw the completion of the Herbert R. current state of mace-making. Hucker sent Johnson Museum of Art, as well as the establetters to the city of Norfolk, Virginia, the lishment of medieval and women’s studies provost of Yale, the Brooklyn Museum and programs. London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, According to a memo from Corson’s

SUN FILE PHOTO

The senior sing | The graduating class gathers on the Arts Quad to celebrate and sing Cornell songs, sometime after the 1915 addition to the quad of the A. D. White sculpture.

office, there was no formal inaugural ceremony “due primarily to the problems of the time period in which he moved from being Acting President to President.” Instead, Corson was inaugurated at the commencement ceremonies in 1970. Nonetheless, protests disrupted the presidential ceremony as two students attempted to speak at the podium. The two students were taken away by the police, but not before being struck by the ceremonial mace, wielded by University historian Morris Bishop 1914. The mace has been slightly bent since then, according to Engst. “The mace is made of silver, a relatively soft metal — it’s not meant to whack people,” she said. The inauguration of Frank H. T. Rhodes, in 1977, was a calmer ceremony than that of his predecessor. The day before, Prof. Carl Sagan, the Duncan Professor of Astronomy and Space Sciences, moderated a panel entitled “Spaceflight and the Future.” Rhodes outlined his view of the University as “the great reservoir on which the fulfillment of all hopes ... must draw [and] humankind’s best hope against the stark alternatives of the future.” Rhodes’ presidency strengthened faculty recruitment, broadened research links with industry and government, and brought about the Center for Theatre Arts and the Carl A. Kroch Library. The inauguration of Hunter R. Rawlings III featured a symposium preceding the procession and an evening of student performances. Rawlings encouraged Cornellians to pursue the University’s “fundamental reason for being,” that of “the cultivation of the human mind for the sake of the individual, together with its moral improvement for the sake of society.” The trip Jeffrey S. Lehman ’77 took to the Tompkins County Public Library on the morning of his inauguration was a nod to White’s ceremony, which took place in Ezra Cornell’s gift to Ithaca, the Cornell Library, which was demolished in 1960. The inauguration of the first president to have attended Cornell, with proceedings in Qatar and New York City as well as the Ithaca campus, continued the legacy of the University’s inaugural tradition. After the controversy surrounding Lehman’s sudden resignation in 2005, David Skorton’s inauguration was more conservative in scale, with an academic symposium the day prior and reception after the ceremony. Near the tail end of Cornell’s sesquicentennial year, Elizabeth Garrett will be inaugurated today during Homecoming weekend as the 13th and first female president of Cornell.


President Elizabeth Garrett will moderate an academic panel on inequality and democracy in Bailey Hall at 3 p.m.

The ceremony will be followed by a community picnic on the Ag Quad from noon to 2 p.m.

The inauguration of Cornell’s 13th president begins at 10 a.m. on the Arts Quad. Guests should be seated by 9:45 a.m.


09 18 15 frosh entire issue hi res