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✸ LOSE IT! y a w g n i t n a b / F The LCH

all about

CALORIES

VOLUME

BESTSELLING BANTING MAG!

11

WE LOST 56KG IN 11 MONTHS! before

AND WHY WE DON’T COUNT THEM

after

WHAT TO DO ABOUT HAIR LOSS

CAN I USE ACTIVATED CHARCOAL TO DETOX?

AND 4 OTHER QUESTIONS FOR NUTRITIONIST SALLY-ANN CREED

MY TYPE 1 DIABETIC SON’S LIFE WAS TRANSFORMED Vickie de Beer, The Low Carb Solution for Diabetics JANUARY 2016 RSA R49 (R6.02 VAT INCL) OTHER COUNTRIES R42.98 (TAX EXCL) NAMIBIA N$49

9 772311 534000

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

FABULOUS THE BILTONG KING ZUMBA MOVES LUNCH BOXES Delivery to your door!

16011

’ 5 great moves For you & the kids you’ll love

BONE BROTH

45 RECIPES! brand new

including

EASY EXOTIC

EASTERN DISHES


contents

GET READY

to change your life! 3 4

6

8

14

17

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NEWS, VIEWS & REVIEWS ‘WE LOST 56KG TOGETHER IN 11 MONTHS!’ One delighted couple’s amazing success story BONE BROTH is making a comeback and we have 10 good reasons why you should cook up a batch! ‘MY TYPE 1 DIABETIC SON’S LIFE WAS TRANSFORMED’ Vickie de Beer shares her family’s experience with us, as well as some fabulously easy recipes from her new book The Low Carb Solution for Diabetics CALORIES AND WHY WE DON’T COUNT THEM Anyone trying to lose weight needs to know that all calories are not created equal LCHF NEWS – tips on making gravy, getting an affordable gym membership, and what the All Blacks are eating GETTING TO THE ROOT OF HAIR LOSS We explore the many possible causes of this upsetting problem and look at ways to prevent it ‘IS IT SAFE TO USE A MICROWAVE?’ Sally-Ann Creed advises on this and four other interesting issues raised by readers TWO BIG QUESTIONS – Dr Schoonbee explains familial hypercholesterolaemia and homocysteine in easy terms

29 READER’S RECIPE Elsi Meyer’s spiced chicken and cauli rice 30 RHYTHM NOT REQUIRED Get fit while you dance – at a fun Zumba workout 32 5 ZUMBA MOVES you can try at home 34 LUNCH BOX IDEAS for kids and adults that will brighten your day 36 THE BILTONG BOARD We chat to the Frenchman behind South Africa’s first biltong subscription business! 37 YOUR MONTHLY SHOPPING LIST 38 ARABIAN BITES A Middle Eastern feast of falafels, hummus, schwarmas, koftas – and more – to seduce your senses 52 MEDITERRANEAN MAGIC Favourite bright and summery Mediterranean dishes – banting style 62 A TASTE OF ASIA Spices, chillies, garlic and citrus combine to satisfy your yen for oriental flavours 70 EAT THIS NOT THAT! Whip up your own mayo to be sure you stick to LCHF 71 CHEF’S CHOICE Some great gadgets to add to your fun in the kitchen 76 RECIPE INDEX 80 WHAT CAN I EAT? 82 GREAT READS to help you think and live the banting lifestyle! 83 THE 10 RULES OF BANTING

COVER PHOTOGRAPHS: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE, CHRIS DE BEER, SUPPLIED


Lose It!

NEWS, VIEWS & REVIEWS Our expert panel NUTRITIONAL THERAPIST SALLY-ANN CREED – the foremost and most experienced LCHF practitioner in South Africa

PHOTOGRAPHS: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE, SUPPLIED. HAIR & MAKEUP: LIZ KAPLAN

DR GERHARD SCHOONBEE, GP, has over 40 years of medical experience, and personal experience of living the LCHF lifestyle. He also has a deep scientific and medical interest in the subject

Come and meet celebrity chef Pete Goffe-Wood at Gallagher Estate, Jhb, from 4–6 March 2016! Pete will prepare and cook all manner of delicious banting meals and goodies, and you’ll get to meet him and the LOSE IT! team.

Join us – we’d love to see you there! To pre-order issues of LOSE IT! email Julian Padua at julian.padua@media24.com or call him on (021) 408 1291. To download a digital version of LOSE IT! to your tablet or smartphone, go to www. mysubs.co.za/magazine/lose-it-the-lchf-way To subscribe to LOSE IT! call 087 740 1029 (office hours); email loseitsubs@media24.com; SMS the word LOSEIT to 32361 (SMSes cost R1).

Y

ou know how beach cottages always have at least one bookshelf filled with an odd selection of books that people have left there over the years? Well, it was in one of those, amongst the James Hadley Chases and Wilbur Smiths, that we discovered an old recipe book: Middle Eastern Cookery, by Arto der Haroutunian. Published in 1982, it looked just like a trashy paperback, had absolutely no photographs or illustrations – and was packed with original, unpretentious recipes for food from countries such as Afghanistan, Georgia, Egypt and Armenia. Paging through it, we realised most of the recipes were perfectly suited to eating LCHF: the emphasis was on simple preparation and slow-cooking, fresh veggies and salads, lovely homemade fullcream yoghurt and labne, and very few grains. We were so inspired that we decided to make Middle Eastern – and Eastern – food the focus of this issue, with delicious dishes that range in origin from Lebanon to Thailand, making a detour to Turkey, Greece and India on the way. As a result, we’ve had a succession of fabulously exotic and tasty dishes coming out of our test kitchen – we think they might even be our tastiest yet. Best of all, they’re really easy to prepare, and they don’t involve a ton of hard-to-find ingredients! Let us know what you think. Also in this issue is a story explaining why we don’t count calories on LCHF. This is often one of the most difficult things for people starting the banting lifestyle to come to terms with, and it’s something we need to keep reminding ourselves about. Mainstream nutrition pundits cling to the concept that all calories are created equal. We’re bombarded by that idea on a daily basis, so its helpful to see the problems inherent in it. We hope this issue launches you into 2016 as you mean to continue – armed with all the information and inspiration you need for a fabulously healthy, clear-headed, delicious and rewarding LCHF year ahead.

s!’

‘Let’s do thi Until next time

THE LOSE IT! TEAM Please share your success stories, recipes, banting restaurant reviews, tips, questions and concerns with us on info@loseit.co.za, @loseitmag (Twitter and Instagram) and facebook. com/Loseitmag. We look forward to hearing your insights and experiences!

SUBSCRIPTIONS, RENEWALS AND ENQUIRIES 087 740 1029

( (021) 065 0033 loseitsubs@media24.com LOSEIT to 32361 (SMSes cost R1) www.mysubs.co.za

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 3


inspiration

AS TOLD TO: JANA WESSELS

WE LOST 56KG TOGETHER

in 11 months! before

WILLIAM WEIGHED 133KG

WILLIAM AND ROELEEN KELLY KNEW THAT TO MAKE BANTING WORK, THEY HAD TO DO IT AS A TEAM. SO THEY DID! ROELEEN TELLS THEIR STORY.

A ‘

before

ROELEEN WEIGHED 90KG 4 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

t the beginning of 2015, I went to the doctor for a full medical. He told me my kidneys were working at only 50 percent capacity. Besides that, I was prediabetic and had to take a handful of medicines for cholesterol and high blood pressure. I weighed 90kg and was wearing size 40 pants. After outlining the seriousness of my health and weight situation, the doctor gave me some reading material on the LCHF diet. I gave the pamphlets to my husband – I’m not really interested in the science behind it; I just wanted it to work!

William was also overweight, tipping the scale at 133kg. He was also struggling with high blood pressure, which doctors believed was even starting to affect his eyesight. From the start, we decided to do it together as that would be more practical. William’s never been big on diets, but he truly wanted to support me in getting healthier and losing weight. He now admits that he had planned to give LCHF only two weeks! To get us started, my doctor gave me two or three recipes and a list of what’s allowed and what’s not. Our first step was to clean out the kitchen cupboards. We threw out everything that didn’t fit in with the LCHF diet, as we didn’t want any temptation. We look at it as a lifestyle change, though, rather than a diet. We enjoy cooking and have a good system going; William has taken it upon himself to look for new and interesting recipes, and I buy the ingredients and prepare the meals. He washes all the dishes, which really helps. Doing this together has definitely ensured our success. Before starting LCHF, we’d tried everything, from meal


after

WILLIAM LOST 36KG

after

ROELEEN LOST OVER 20KG

PHOTOGRAPHS: CHRIS DE BEER, SUPPLIED

‘We both have a lot more energy, we sleep better and our emotional and physical relationship has changed.’ replacement shakes to liquid diets, but we’d always end up starving and then quit. With banting, William struggled to give up his soda and fruit juices, but now he just drinks a little milk in the morning and that’s satisfying enough. I gave up my sweet wine, which I miss, but it has been worth it. In Low Carb is Lekker [by Inè Reynierse], I found a recipe for lemonade syrup, which we add to soda water when we don’t

want to drink plain water in a social situation. If we have friends over, we buy soda and juice, but to avoid temptation, we ask them to take home whatever is left. The most important factor for staying on track is planning. We never leave the house without breakfast and lunch, and we try to enjoy dinner as soon as possible after we get home in the evening. We plan for the whole week. When I go away, I plan ahead and

pack the fridge and freezer with meals for William. Before I lost weight, another issue I struggled with was swollen hands and feet at the end of every day. But I don’t have that problem any more. My kidney function, blood sugar and cholesterol are back to normal, and I take only one pill for my blood pressure. William didn’t notice the effect of his weight loss until he had to fix our pool. He called the pool services out because he thought he wouldn’t be up to doing it himself. They came to look at the problem once but never came back. In the end, William had to do it himself. He’d expected to almost pass out from exertion, so it took him completely by surprise when he didn’t! We both have a lot more energy now, we sleep better and our emotional and physical relationship has changed. Now, 11 months on, I’ve lost over 20kg and wear size 36 pants. William has lost 36kg and is also size 36. We have more self-confidence, both individually and as a couple, and we really can’t see ourselves ever going back to our old unhealthy ways!’ ■

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 5


BONE BROTH

M

Making homemade, nutrient-dense bone broth is a lost art. But this old-fashioned health remedy and flavour supplement is making a comeback – and is now available at trendy London and New York bone broth bars.

uch as it sounds like something that should be served up in a Dickensian orphanage, humble bone broth is an essential part of the LCHF diet. This mineral-rich infusion is made by boiling the bones of healthy, pasture-reared animals along with vegetables, herbs and spices. Besides providing a rich, flavourful base for soups, sauces and gravies, bone broth can also be used as a cooking medium for veggies, starches or scrambled eggs – or even just drunk on its own, as a health tonic. Nutritionally, it packs a real punch and it has a whole host of healing, soothing properties. As the bones are cooked, minerals, protein and other nutrients leach into the water, making it easy for the body to absorb them.

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best idea this month BY: LIESL ROBERTSON

HERE ARE 10 GREAT BENEFITS OF MAKING YOUR OWN BONE BROTH It’s cheap and easy to make. Use the leftover bones from dinner (or ask your butcher to put some aside for you), plop in some veggies and herbs and simmer on the stove (or in a slow cooker) for up to 12 hours.

1

Bone broth is a satisfying and nourishing snack on its own. Drink it straight from a mug as a cold weather cuppa – it’s much healthier than coffee and tea, and it helps curb hunger pangs.

2

It keeps your bones and teeth strong, as bone-building minerals like phosphorus, magnesium and calcium are released into the water during the cooking process.

3

It helps you shake off the flu. Studies have shown that chicken broth inhibits neutrophil (our most abundant white blood cell) migration, giving it an anti-inflammatory effect that helps soothe colds, flus and upper respiratory tract infections. PHOTOGRAPHS: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE. STYLING: JUSTINE KIGGEN

4

It aids digestion. Holistic nutrition coach Jill Grunewald says a cup a day helps ease chronic diarrhoea, constipation, and even some food intolerances. And it works miracles for leaky gut syndrome. It’s also a rich source of glycine, which helps the body detox, supports digestion and the secretion of gastric acids, and is used in the synthesis of haemoglobin and bile salts.

5

It protects your joints and ligaments. Bone broth contains glucosamine, which helps to alleviate joint pain, and chondroitin sulphate, which helps prevent osteoarthritis.

6

Gelatin, also found in broth, has shown promising results in the fight against degenerative joint disease, and broth is also high in the amino acids proline and glycine, essential for maintaining healthy connective tissue in joints, ligaments and the tissue surrounding organs. Bone broth is a potent beauty elixir. It’s a rich source of collagen and gelatin, which are essential for healthy hair, skin and nails. Plus, proline supports good skin health, especially when taken with vitamin C. Some studies even suggest that broth can help to eliminate cellulite.

7

It’s an immune-booster. Mark Sisson, author of The Primal Blueprint, calls it a ‘superfood’ due to its high concentration of minerals. Bone marrow can help strengthen your immune system, he says, and one Harvard study showed that it helps alleviate the symptoms of some autoimmune disorders.

8

Bone broth aids important processes in the body. Proline builds and strengthens cell structures, while glycine promotes healing and the release of growth hormones, ensures proper functioning of the nervous system and helps the body synthesise collagen, which improves the strength of vein walls.

9

Broth also has a soothing effect and can help you sleep better, as glycine modulates excitatory neurotransmitters in the brain. Glycine is also converted into the neurotransmitter serine, which makes you more alert, improves memory, boosts mood and reduces stress.

10

BONE BROTH RECIPE MAKES 1L

• 3 fresh bay leaves • 2g fresh thyme • 2g fresh sage • 1.5–2kg beef bones (such as marrow, shin etc), roasted • 2–3 onions, cut into quarters • 3 stalks celery, chopped • 1 tsp black peppercorns • 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar 1. First make a bouquet garni by placing the herbs in the centre of a small muslin cloth, which you then tie into a pouch with string. 2. Place the roasted bones in a pot with the vegetables, peppercorns and bouquet garni. 3. Add 2.5L water to the pot along with the apple cider vinegar. Bring to a boil, then simmer gently for up to 12 hours, refilling the pot with water when necessary. Remove any scum that rises to the surface by skimming it off with a ladle. 4. Drain the broth through a fine sieve set over a bowl, allow to cool, then refrigerate until ready to use. ■ VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 7


My type 1 diabetic son’s life was transformed by a low-carb, high-protein diet. We chat to Vickie de Beer, author of The Low Carb Solution for Diabetics, about her experience.

My

son Lucca’s diagnosis of type 1 diabetes six years ago, at the age of eight, was a huge shock for all of us. He’d been away on a camping trip with his dad and brothers. When they came home, my husband, Joe, commented that Lucca appeared to be constantly tired, had felt unwell, and had had an unquenchable thirst. That evening, as I helped Lucca into the bath, I noticed that his ribs seemed more prominent than I remembered. He had lost quite a bit of weight. I also smelled a sickly sweet odour on his breath and thought he might have a throat infection. The next morning I asked Joe to take him to the GP for a checkup. An hour or so later, I got the life-changing phone call. Lucca was in ICU on an insulin drip.

8 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

The news came as a massive shock, as there is no history of type 1 diabetes in our family. We didn’t have a clue how to care for him. The learning curve was very steep. It eventually sank in that this disease would be with my child for the rest of his life, every second of every day. Our medical professionals advised us to keep him off sugar and to follow a low-GI diet. We were instructed to count the carbs in each meal so that we would know how much insulin to administer. We were never told to limit his carb intake, so he continued to eat fruit, rice, pasta and bread. Even

though we were able to control his sugar sufficiently to keep him out of the danger zone, we weren’t able to stop the rollercoaster blood sugar spikes from happening throughout the day. These spikes made him feel tired, irritable and generally unwell.


health

PHOTOGRAPHS: CRPHOTOGRAPHIC, ROOIROSE

AS TOLD TO: NICKY PERKS

That all changed earlier this year when, thankfully, I was referred to the work of Dr Richard Bernstein, an American doctor who has been a type 1 diabetic for 69 years. I devoured his book Dr Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution in one weekend. I instinctively knew this was the information I had been looking for. Dr Bernstein advocates a low-carb diet with a fair amount of protein. We got Lucca started on the eating plan and it totally transformed his life. His sugar levels are now far more stable and he feels much better. His concentration and energy levels have improved. He is generally happier and more fun-loving (schoolboy pranks have definitely escalated in our household this year)! He often used to feel anxious, but that has completely disappeared in the past six months since being on a grain-free, low-carb diet. He has grown 36cm in a year and has remained at a normal healthy weight for a 14-year-old boy. A low-carb, high-protein diet works well for diabetics because protein converts to sugar in your body at a far slower rate than carbs do. So insulin requirements are fewer and blood sugar spikes and lows are reduced. By following this diet, Lucca has been able to almost halve the amount of insulin he needs in a day. When parties come around, I send him off with his own treats made using low-carb ingredients. I recently experimented with a brownie recipe, which is really delicious – gooey just like brownies should be. The secret is chia seeds!

MY TOP 6 TIPS FOR LOW-CARB FAMILY LIVING: Planning weekly menus and shopping lists is imperative. and baking 2 Cooking ahead makes it doable. is essential, so 3 Variety keep trying new recipes.  the whole family 4 Involve – teamwork makes it fun and far easier to achieve. Meals are for sharing 5 around a table. Make sure you always 6 have protein snacks in the house. 

1

To support his health, we give him supplements of omega 3 fish oil, zinc, a good probiotic, chromium, as well as a multivitamin that contains iron. Type 1 diabetics are often low in iron. However, now that he is eating more protein, this is less of a concern than before, so we’ve reduced his iron supplement a little. As parents we often underestimate children’s capacity for change. My advice is to ease into the new diet, step by step. Start by phasing out breakfast cereals, and replace them with eggs and bacon. Substitute the starch at supper time with a large variety of veggies and salad. Always include a protein source and healthy fats. The next step is to get baking and try out low-carb bread, rolls and cupcakes, which can go into lunch boxes. It’s essential to get organised. I plan meals a

week in advance and we do all the shopping, baking and cooking on a Saturday. Educating your support network (teachers, friends, family) is vital. Try to find a balance in terms of the information you share – too much can freak them out (and then your kid doesn’t get invited for play dates) and too little can be potentially dangerous. They should be able to recognise the warning signs that your child needs help and know how to react. Your endocrinologist may not be very familiar with, or supportive of, the low-carb, high-protein approach, but don’t let that deter you. Share what you can, then let the results persuade them. Our family’s journey is what inspired me to write The Low Carb Solution for Diabetics. Since Lucca’s diagnosis, we’ve had to do so much of our own research and experimentation. So I feel passionate about sharing what I have learnt with others. It was fantastic having paediatric nutritionist Kath Megaw co-author the book with me. She has a wealth of experience and scientific knowledge in this field. Being a chef, I contributed the tried-and-tested recipes, as well as the lessons I learnt as a parent caring for a type 1 diabetic child. Over the past six years we have learnt a great deal about health and nutrition. My husband and I have lost weight and feel fantastic, and my children are thriving. Low-carb living is definitely for the whole family, and it’s essential for anyone with type 1 diabetes. ■

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 9


Vickie shared some of her favourite recipes from The Low Carb Solution for Diabetics with us 3. Place the fish fillets in a single layer in a large ovenproof dish. Season with salt. Pour the sauce over and sprinkle the grated cheeses evenly on top. 4. Bake in the oven until golden, about 35 minutes. PER 100G: ENERGY: 123KCAL • PROTEIN: 9G • FAT: 9G • CARBS: 2G • RATIO: 0.8:1 ALLERGENS: DAIRY, FISH

BASIC TOMATO SAUCE EASY FISH BAKE SERVES 5

• 50g butter • 1 onion, finely chopped • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped • 250ml (1 cup) white wine • 375ml (1½ cups) cream • grated zest of 1 lemon • a small handful of parsley and chives, finely chopped • 3 large zucchinis, coarsely grated • 700–800g hake fillets, without skin • salt • 125g mozzarella, grated • 75g parmesan, grated 1. Preheat the oven to 200°C. Melt the butter in a mediumsized pan and fry the onion and garlic until soft. 2. Add the white wine and reduce for 5 minutes. Add the cream and simmer over a low heat for 5–10 minutes. Add the lemon zest, chopped parsley and chives and grated zucchini. 10 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

MAKES 750ML

• 30ml (2 tbsp) olive oil • 1 onion, chopped • 2 garlic cloves, minced • ½ celery stick, grated • 2 x 400g cans whole tomatoes • 30ml (2 tbsp) tomato paste • a handful of fresh basil, chopped 1. Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan over a medium-high heat. Fry the onion and garlic for 3–5 minutes until softened. 2. Add the celery and fry for another 2 minutes. Add the whole tomatoes and tomato paste; press the tomatoes to a finer consistency with a fork. 3. Simmer, stirring, for about 10 minutes or until the sauce becomes thick. Add the basil leaves at the end. PER 100G: ENERGY: 46KCAL • PROTEIN: 1G • FAT: 3G • CARBS: 4G • RATIO: 0.6:1 ALLERGENS: NONE

NACHOS MEXICANA WITH EVERYTHING! The boys love these, especially when they have friends coming over on Fridays.

MAKES 1 BATCH OF NACHO CHIPS NACHOS: • 375ml (1½ cups) almond flour • 125ml (½ cup) golden flaxseeds, finely ground in a spice grinder • 2 egg whites • ½ tsp salt • 10ml paprika • 125ml (½ cup) grated cheddar cheese • 125ml (½ cup) grated mozzarella cheese FRESH MEXICAN SALSA: • a handful of coriander leaves, chopped • a handful of cocktail tomatoes, chopped


• 1 avocado, peeled and cubed • ½ a red onion, finely chopped • salt • juice of 1 lemon or 1 lime FOR SERVING: • 125ml sour cream • guacamole • Mexican Salsa Sauce (see next recipe) 1. For the nachos: Preheat oven to 180°C. Combine the almond flour, flaxseeds, egg whites and seasoning in a food processor. Pulse until a dough forms. 2. Divide the dough into two halves, wrap and place in the fridge to rest for 30 minutes. 3. Roll each half out as thinly as possible between two layers of baking paper. Lift off the top piece of baking paper and place the other piece, with the dough, on a baking sheet. Cut into even-sized triangles. 4. Bake in the oven for 15 minutes until golden and crisp. Remove and cool. Repeat with the other half of the dough. 5. Place the cooled nachos on a large baking tray. Sprinkle the cheeses over and bake in the oven at 180°C until the topping has melted. 6. For the salsa: Combine all the ingredients for the salsa in a small bowl. Season with salt and drizzle the lemon or lime juice over the top. 7. Top the nachos with the Fresh Mexican Salsa and serve with sour cream, guacamole and Mexican Salsa Sauce. PER 100G: ENERGY: 419KCAL • PROTEIN: 22G • FAT: 33G • CARBS: 9G • RATIO: 1.1:1 ALLERGENS: DAIRY, EGG, TREE NUT

MEXICAN SALSA SAUCE

CHICKEN PARMIGIANO

• Basic Tomato Sauce (see opposite) • 1 green pepper, finely diced • 1 red chilli, seeds removed and finely chopped • handful fresh coriander, chopped

SERVES 8

MAKES 750ML

1. Follow the Basic Tomato Sauce recipe, adding green pepper and chilli when frying the onion and garlic. Cook until soft. 2. Continue with the recipe, adding the chopped fresh coriander at the end of cooking.

This is a bit of a palaver to make but a great way to satisfy lasagne cravings!

• 1 batch Basic Tomato Sauce (see opposite) • 3 large aubergines, thickly sliced • salt • 60ml (4 tbsp) olive or coconut oil, plus extra for drizzling • 6 chicken breast fillets, sliced through horizontally and bashed with a rolling pin to make thinner VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 11


oregano. Repeat the layers until you have used all the ingredients, ending with a layer of tomato sauce. 6. Sprinkle the mozzarella over and bake in the oven for 35–40 minutes until golden and bubbly.

PER 100G: ENERGY: 101KCAL • PROTEIN: 8G • FAT: 6G • CARBS: 4G • RATIO: 0.5:1 ALLERGENS: DAIRY

CREAMY CHEESECAKE MAKES 1 LARGE CHEESECAKE OR 6 SMALL ONES PASTRY: • 125g butter • 2 eggs • 40ml xylitol • 150ml coconut flour • 10ml baking powder CHEESECAKE FILLING: • 4 eggs • 250g full fat cream cheese • 5ml (1 tsp) vanilla extract • 20ml (4 tsp) xylitol • 250ml (1 cup) cream • zest of 1 lemon • 3 large handfuls freshly grated parmesan cheese • a little fresh oregano, leaves chopped • 150g mozzarella, grated, for the topping 1. Preheat the oven to 200°C. 2. Heat the tomato sauce in a small saucepan and keep warm. 3. Place the aubergine slices on a well-oiled baking sheet. Season with salt and drizzle with extra oil. Bake in the oven until just soft and light golden. 12 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

4. Heat the rest of the oil in a nonstick pan and season the chicken fillets with salt. Brown the chicken on both sides, in batches, in the pan over a medium heat. Set aside. 5. In a large, deep ovenproof baking dish (about 25x15cm) or casserole, begin to layer the parmigiano. Start with ladles of the tomato sauce, followed by a layer of cooked aubergine. Sprinkle a good layer of parmesan over this, followed by some chicken fillets and chopped

1. Preheat the oven to 150°C. Line 6 small 7cm loose-based cake tins, or one 20cm cake tin, with baking paper and grease with melted butter. 2. Melt the butter and allow to cool for 4–5 minutes. 3. In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs, cooled butter and xylitol together. 4. Sieve the coconut flour and baking powder into a small bowl. Stir into the egg mixture until a workable pastry forms. Allow to rest in the fridge while you make the filling.


5. Combine all the ingredients for the filling in a medium bowl. Do not overmix. Set aside. 6. Roll out the dough on a clean surface lightly dusted with coconut flour. Line the bottom and sides of your cake tin(s) with the pastry. Don’t worry if the pastry breaks or crumbles a little, just press it together with your fingers. 7. Pour the filling into the prepared pastry cases and bake in the oven for 30 minutes or until the filling is set. Serve with fresh mint and berries.

PER 100G: ENERGY: 338KCAL • PROTEIN: 7G • FAT: 31G • CARBS: 6G • RATIO: 2.3:1 ALLERGENS: DAIRY, EGG

RECIPES COURTESY OF: QUIVERTREE PUBLICATIONS. PHOTOGRAPHS: CRAIG FRASER

BEST LOW CARB FOCACCIA BREAD

This bread is delicious! It’s wonderful with soup but it’s also great for a braai or as bruschetta on a snack or cheese platter.

MAKES 15 SLICES • 60ml (¼ cup) flaxseeds, ground • 60ml (¼ cup) chia seeds, ground • 125ml (½ cup) milk • 15ml (1 tbsp) apple cider vinegar • 3 eggs • 3.75ml (¾ tsp) cream of tartar • 1ml (¼ tsp) bicarbonate of soda • 2.5ml (½ tsp) salt • 500ml (2 cups) almond flour • 125ml (½ cup) black olives, chopped • 2 sprigs rosemary, finely chopped • sea salt flakes, for sprinkling 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper. 2. In a small bowl mix together

the flaxseeds, chia seeds, milk, vinegar and eggs until well combined. Leave to stand for 5 minutes. 3. In a large bowl, combine the cream of tartar, bicarbonate of soda, salt and almond flour. Add the black olives, rosemary and chia mixture. Stir until it forms a ball. 4. Turn the ball of dough out onto the lined baking tray and form into an oblong shape. With

a serrated knife, score the bread 3 times. Sprinkle with sea salt flakes. 5. Bake for 40–45 minutes or until golden brown on top. Leave to cool for 10 minutes before slicing.

PER 100G: ENERGY: 287KCAL • PROTEIN: 12G • FAT: 23G • CARBS: 8G • RATIO: 1.2:1 ALLERGENS: DAIRY, EGG

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 13


CALORIES and why we don’t count them That Sugar Film, which was on the circuit recently, did an excellent job of proving that all calories are not created equal. It followed Damon Gameau as he put aside his healthy sugar-free diet for 60 days to consume 40 teaspoons of sugar a day – the intake of the average Australian – and he chose to consume this as ‘hidden’, rather than added, sugar. Before his experiment, Damon ate 2300 calories a day. And over the 60 days, he stuck to this – simply replacing some of the foods he usually ate with cereals, yoghurts and other ‘healthy’ foods with ‘hidden’ sugar. The outcome? He put on weight, developed fatty liver disease and felt really ill, proving it’s not the calories per se, but where they come from that matters. A calorie is the measurement for a unit of energy, but the way energy is used in the body is far more complex than the way calories are

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sound advice

BY: NUTRITIONAL THERAPIST SALLY-ANN CREED

‘CONVENTIONAL’ BREAKFAST

592 calories = 31.3 teaspoons sugar

calculated in a laboratory – so we can’t rely on calorie counting to pursue health or weight loss. To find out how many teaspoons of sugar you’re actually getting from a carbohydrate, quite apart from the calorie count, divide the carb count by four. So if you eat 20g of carbs, that’s the equivalent of five teaspoons of sugar! Just take a look at our comparison between a ‘conventional’ breakfast and a low-carb breakfast (right) where we show that two meals with exactly the same calorie count can have a vastly different carb content, and hence sugar content too.

592 calories = 3 teaspoons sugar

LOW-CARB BREAKFAST

Same number of calories but very different result: ‘CONVENTIONAL’ BREAKFAST

LOW-CARB BREAKFAST

• 60g helping of muesli – a supposedly ‘healthy’ brand (200 calories, 42g carbs = 10.5 tsp sugar) • sugar to sweeten (15 calories, 4g carbs = 1 tsp sugar) • 175g low-fat fruit yoghurt (118 calories, 23.75g carbs = 6 tsp sugar) • 200ml ‘fresh’ orange juice, boxed (120 calories, 26g carbs = 6.5 tsp sugar) • 1 x 40g slice bread, toasted (90 calories, 16g carbs = 4 tsp sugar) • marmalade (49 calories, 13.26g carbs = 3.3 tsp sugar)

• 2-egg omelette (126 calories, 0g carbs) • 3 rashers of bacon (87 calories, 2g carbs = 0.5 tsp sugar) • 4 cherry tomatoes (5 calories, 1g carbs = 0.25 tsp sugar) cooked in about a tablespoon of butter (102 calories, 0g carbs) • ¼ avocado (80 calories, 4g carbs = 1 tsp sugar) • coffee with pouring cream (192 calories, 5g carbs = 1.25 tsp sugar)

Total: 592 calories, 125g carbs = 31.3 teaspoons sugar

Total: 592 calories, 12g carbs = 3 teaspoons sugar VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 15


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The low-carb breakfast keeps you energised and full all day; it doesn’t spike blood sugar and insulin, cause cravings or promote fat storage.

the measure of the energy required to digest, absorb and metabolise nutrients from food. The thermic effect of fats is 2–3%; of carbs, 6–8%; and of protein, 25–30%. Meaning it takes more energy (calories) to burn protein than it does to burn either fats or carbs. Many people think that losing weight is about burning off the calories they’ve eaten by exercising. But we’ve already seen that logging calories doesn’t take complex metabolic processes into account, and the number of calories eaten and burned is often miscalculated. Plus, there’s the effect of increased appetite after exercise! Besides the problems we’ve shown with calorie counting, another reason to avoid checking the calories on food labels is that they may be a lie: margins of error of up to 20 percent are permitted, so you could be eating about a fifth more calories than you think you are. Dieters often restrict calories from ordinary food to indulge in junk food, which means that they miss out on vital nutrients. And imagine how problematic it is for a pregnant woman who is trying not to gain too much weight to work on calories alone. So forget the calories, and look at the quality and nutritional status of food. Even Weight Watchers now admits calorie counting is ‘unhelpful’; instead, they count carbs, protein and fats. Gary Taubes’ book on good and bad calories, The Diet Delusion, is an excellent read if you’d like to know more. Bottom line: Calorie counting can be misleading when it comes to weight loss – rather focus on following a low-carb lifestyle. ■

PHOTOGRAPHS: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE. STYLING: JUSTINE KIGGEN

The point is, which breakfast causes you to gain weight and feel sluggish a few hours after eating it? The ‘conventional’ one, of course! Supposedly ‘healthy’ convenience foods that are low in fat and calories are often high in sugar to make up for the lack of taste from the missing fat. And the body absorbs all forms of sugar quickly, raising blood sugar levels and causing insulin secretion. Then the level of inflammation may rise, belly fat will be stored and the appetite will be stimulated, so you’ll still feel hungry. The low-carb breakfast, by contrast, keeps you energised and full all day; it doesn’t spike blood sugar and insulin, cause cravings or promote fat storage. Generally, fatty foods from nature (eggs, liver, butter, meat, olives) are high in calories, but low in carbs. In fact, protein and carbs both contain four calories per gram, whereas fat contains nine. But even though fat has more calories per gram, it is burned more efficiently as fuel, and isn’t stored as body fat the way carbohydrates are. This is why calorie counting doesn’t work. Plus, it completely ignores our hormonal response. Leptin, the hormone that signals satiety, responds differently to different foods, as does ghrelin, the hormone that signals hunger. Protein, for example, is high on the satiety score. Calorie counting also ignores the influence on digestion of glucose and insulin levels, insulin resistance and diabetes, as well as stress, lack of sleep and other factors. It’s important to consider, too, the way food groups are used in the body. The ‘thermic effect’ is


health

BY: ANNA RICH

LCHF NEWS What people are talking about right now… Here’s how to make f lourless gravy, as advised by thebantwagon.com.

bring on the braai The great thing about a kettle braai – like the Justin Bonello Ketla 56cm Charcoal Kettle Braai at R699 from Game – is that you can easily collect all that delicious, nutritious, fatty juice from the meat you’re roasting to make great gravy. Place a rectangular foil dish between the coals on either side. Then when you take the meat off to rest, remove the tray of fatty juice (carefully – you don’t want to lose a single precious drop) and add it to your pan of ready-prepared onions and garlic to make gravy.

Collect the delicious fatty juice to make gravy!

• dash of extra virgin olive oil • 2 large onions, sliced (3 if you want the gravy to be thicker) • 1 tsp crushed garlic • 2 tsp balsamic vinegar • 1 tsp tomato paste • 2 cups meaty juices (if you don’t have that much, add stock or bone broth – see page 7) • 1 extra-large egg (optional) • himalayan salt and black pepper 1. Heat olive oil in a pot and sauté onions over medium heat for 10–15 minutes, or until browned. 2. Spoon in garlic, vinegar and tomato paste. 3. Add the meaty juices and bring to a boil. Then reduce the heat and simmer for 3–4 minutes. 4. Remove from the heat and use a stick blender to purée gravy. If you’d like to thicken it a little at this stage, whisk the egg, add it to the pot and blitz again. 5. Add salt and pepper to taste once you’re done.

In the RED?

If you’re feeling a little out of pocket but determined to make this your year to get fit, then consider one of the new Virgin Active RED gyms. Membership could be as low as R179 per month for a 12-month contract. Costs are kept down because there are no saunas, swimming pools or food bars – just the training equipment. If you don’t use those extras, why pay for them? To date, there are three REDs in the Western Cape – in Brackenfell, Kraaifontein and Durbanville – and four in Gauteng – in Boksburg, Centurion, Roodepoort and Soweto. www.virginactive.co.za/red

World dominance

Everyone seems to agree that the best team won the Rugby World Cup last year. So what’s their secret? Dr Nic Gill, All Blacks strength and conditioning coach, says LCHF with a bit of intermittent fasting is ‘the best diet for me’. As for the team, ‘The movie That Sugar Film has influenced the players quite a lot,’ he says. ‘Most of the guys understand that we need to get the sugar out. That’s a big change. We now have nuts on the sideline after training, not lollies. I wouldn’t say we’ve made it all the way to high fat, but we have healthy fat on hand. We [the team] go through six or seven tins of coconut oil a week.’ Need we say more?

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 17


health

WITH: NUTRITIONAL THERAPIST SALLY-ANN CREED

getting to the root of

HAIR LOSS

W

It’s normal to lose about 50 to 100 hairs every day, but if you are losing more hair than this – before you become too alarmed – read on to find out what could be the cause.

e have between 120000 and 150000 hairs on our heads and, on average, we lose about 50 to 100 of them every single day. Hair is comprised of the strand and the root, with the latter being housed in the follicle. The root is the living part of the hair that receives food and oxygen, while the strand is in fact the ‘dead’ part of the hair. Hair growth goes through phases: growth at a steady pace for a few years, followed by a resting phase, the telogen phase, which can last for up to three months. A tenth of your hair is at rest at any time, while the other 90 percent is in a growth phase. If you’re on a low-carb diet, you may well have experienced increased hair loss. This isn’t

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restricted to low-carb diets, though – any significant dietary change can cause temporary hair loss, commonly referred to as telogen effluvium. This is not the norm, but it happens to about 10 to 15 percent of us. Changing the way you eat frequently results in hair loss for up to four to six months – but your hair will recover and will often become thicker and more lustrous, especially if the change is from processed foods to a healthy diet like LCHF. Hair loss seldom has just one cause, however, and in addition to hair follicle diseases and male pattern baldness (which we won’t go into here), many other factors can contribute to this:

1

Medication: Chemo-

therapy drugs, many prescription drugs – blood thinners, antidepressants, hypertensive (high blood pressure) medications – and birth control pills may all contribute to hair loss. Check the package insert of your medication to see if hair loss is listed. If it is, chat to your doctor about changing your prescription. Diet: Poor eating habits 2 result in compromised nutrition, which is reflected in our hair. Protein deficiency is a common cause of hair loss, and lack of vitamin B12 can affect the thickness of hair. Vegetarians and vegans are particularly susceptible, because B12 is found only in animal foods, not in plants. Iron is the most common deficiency in menstruating women, manifesting in lethargy, hair loss and other symptoms. If this describes you,

test your ferritin levels. It has been reported that eating too many vitamin A-rich foods such as liver, eggs, whole milk and other dairy products may also lead to hair thinning, especially if you neglect to eat vegetables. Balance is key. Anaemia: A commonly 3 overlooked reason for hair loss, anaemia can have a diverse range of causes, from parasitic infestation to too much dairy, stomach ulcers or blood loss from another source, or just not eating enough animal protein to provide the building blocks for iron. Too little vitamin C in the diet is another important factor, as it enhances iron uptake. Consider taking vitamin C with an iron-rich meal. Note: Never take an iron supplement without first having a blood test to confirm you need it. Too little fat: The 4 low-fat diet did nothing for our hair. With a higher-, healthyfat diet, even though you may see some hair loss initially, you should see a dramatic improvement in the texture, thickness and condition of your hair in about six to nine months. (Hair usually grows only a few millimetres a week, so be patient!)

5

Blood sugar and insulin levels: If you’re

eating a lot of carbs, your insulin and blood glucose will be unstable, resulting in inflammation and other complications. In fact, one of the best predictors of unstable glucose and insulin levels is hair loss, particularly if your insulin is very high. Take a fasting blood test so you have a point of reference. Stress: This can cause 6 temporary hair loss, which

can continue for as long as three months after the stress has passed. So learn to manage your stress, give yourself more ‘me’ time, and wait it out.

7

Illness/surgery:

9

Female hormones:

11

Endocrine system complications: An

Surgery, exceptionally high fevers, severe infections, chronic illness and autoimmune diseases often cause hair loss. It’s not 8 Childbirth: uncommon to experience hair loss two to three months after giving birth, but as your hormones return to normal, your hair should too. Many women also find as their hormones decline during their perimenopausal years, so does the thickness of their hair. But once their hormones calm down, most menopausal women find their hair recovers, even if it may not be quite as thick as it was before. Alopecia areata: This 10 refers to hair loss in certain areas, resulting in bald patches the size of a coin or larger. This is linked to an autoimmune condition, but don’t overlook the value of good nutrition, especially in the form of fat and protein.

overactive or underactive thyroid gland often manifests in hair loss. In some cases, thyroid medication helps; in others, it causes hair loss. The thyroid conditions Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can both trigger hair loss.

Adrenal dysfunction, menopause and any hormonal disruption

12

also fall into this category. The

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13

Autoimmune illness:

Conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Lou Gehrig’s disease, Crohn’s disease, scleroderma and ulcerative colitis commonly result in hair loss. In bowel disorders, too, the sufferer may have extremely thin hair. Have a look at 14 Genetics: your mother – did her hair thin at a certain age? If so, yours may follow suit. But remember, you also have your dad’s genes, so if he still has thick locks, you may hang on to all your hair too! Low stomach acid: If 15 you suffer from reflux and take acid-reducing measures, you may find your hair and nails getting thinner. The most common underlying cause is in fact too little stomach acid (HCl). You can rectify this by not taking anything to make yourself ‘alkaline’ (which is not possible, in any case!). HCl is vitally important to every bodily function, and your hair quality and quantity will improve dramatically if you have enough of it. Low HCl is a very common cause of thinning hair as it inhibits iron uptake from food – it can even make you anaemic – and, as mentioned, that can lead to thinner hair.

16

A diet too low in carbs: This has been

shown to cause temporary hair loss. Be aware that LCHF is a lowcarb programme, not a no-carb programme, and eat accordingly.

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Ringworm: This is a fungal infection that affects the scalp, causing small patches of scaly skin and a little hair loss. It’s easy to treat.

if you can. A man I know, who was balding in his thirties, did this daily and now, in his early eighties, he has one of the thickest heads of hair I’ve ever seen.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Have your ferritin levels tested. Low levels may be one of the reasons your hair is thinning. Ferritin is an iron-storing protein; if it’s low, it’s an early warning sign that you may be iron deficient. When you’re iron deficient, the body often draws on the iron in the hair for more important processes. Don’t be afraid of red meat – it’s healthy and it’s the only food source in which you’ll find plenty of iron. If you need to take an iron supplement, iron chelate is a good form as it doesn’t cause gastrointestinal distress.

17

Hair loss is most often a temporary condition, and your mane will usually return irrespective of the cause. Give it time, eat well and avoid processed food. More healthy (animal) fat in the diet often has a remarkable effect on the hair. Avoid all seed oils, as these are inflammatory and will not help your complaint at all. Make sure you eat enough protein. Animal protein is complete protein – it contains heme iron not found in the plant kingdom. Three servings a day of any animal product – meat, fish, eggs or poultry – will be helpful. And remember, you get vitamin B12 only from animal products. Eating a low-carb diet is always a good idea if it means staying away from grains and sugar. But try to eat a varied diet, rather than the same few foods – be adventurous and include vegetables and protein/fat you don’t usually eat. Don’t try to lose weight too quickly either – be patient, be sensible and lose it the healthy way. Massage with coconut oil. Don’t underestimate the power of regularly massaging your head with coconut oil. Do so with the tips of your fingers, gently moving the scalp back and forth. Don’t use your nails, and don’t be too rough. Do it for 15 minutes a day

Dump the processed food. It’s really doing you no favours – real food is the answer to all aspects of health, not least that of your hair. Add some supplements if you wish. The following are all known to promote hair growth: • methyl sulphonyl methane or MSM • N-acetyl cysteine or NAC • fish oil • biotin • silica or horsetail • B complex Give it time. If you recently embarked on this new way of eating and it is causing hair loss, be patient. It will take several months to see change, and up to a year to see complete regrowth. But isn’t it worth it for the new body and energy you are experiencing? It helps to view it as part of the process of becoming healthier. ■

PHOTOGRAPH: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE

adrenal glands are responsible for the production of cortisol and DHEA, and an imbalance in these important hormones can play havoc, particularly with skin, nails and hair. If you suspect this could be your problem, have your thyroid tested (ask for TSH, Free T3 and Free T4).


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Q&A WITH: NUTRITIONAL THERAPIST SALLY-ANN CREED

’ ? e v a w o r c i afe to use a m

‘ Is it s

AND 4 OTHER READER QUESTIONS FOR SALLY-ANN CREED

Q: Papaya contains enzymes that combat blood sugar spikes and aid digestion, so can a moderate portion fit in with the LCHF lifestyle?

A: Digestion and sugar spikes are two completely different processes that aren’t really related in this case. Depending on the database you use, papaya has 11–14g carbs/100g with 1.7–2g as fibre, putting it on our ‘Sometimes’ list of what to eat (see page 81). That’s very little fibre, and at around 59, its glycaemic index is on the higher end of the scale. That said, papaya does contain valuable enzymes – papain, chymopapain, caricain and glycyl endopeptidase – that help digest protein more efficiently. But most of these enzymes are found in the green fruit – ripe fruit is much higher in sugar. So eating some (preferably green) papaya with your lamb chop every so often would be fine. Q: Is activated charcoal good for detoxing? A: When someone swallows poison, they’re typically given activated charcoal as soon as possible after ingestion to bind to the poison for safe excretion, so the poison is not absorbed or, at worst, is minimally

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absorbed. It is a medical ‘sponge’ and is a routine part of some medical treatments for poisoning. Charcoal is wood heated to a very high temperature so that it oxidises, producing pure carbon, which has a huge surface area. This allows the charcoal to absorb an enormous amount of a chemical substance. Using it as part of a detoxification routine is completely misplaced, however. Not only is it ineffective in removing ‘toxins’ from the body from food eaten hours (or months) earlier, but it may bind with healthy food and remove nutrients from the body. I think it’s more of a fad than a health tool. Q: Is it safe to use a microwave oven? A: As we’re so pressed for time, popping food in the microwave is an undeniably speedy solution – though I do believe taste is compromised! But let’s take a quick look at how microwaves heat your food. Many molecules have a slight positive charge at one end, and a slight negative charge at the other. Your microwave oven emits an alternating electric field, so the water, fat and other molecules in the food keep rotating their poles to align themselves


Papaya contains valuable enzymes – papain, chymopapain, caricain and glycyl endopeptidase – that help digest protein more efficiently. VOLUME 10 2015 LOSE IT! | 23


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PHOTOGRAPHS: THINKSTOCK, ANÈL VAN DER MERWE. STYLIING: JUSTINE KIGGEN

Other research counters this. But until the results of with the electric field. While they’re rotating, they bump a body of research prove conclusively that microwaves into other molecules, which means that energy is creare safe, my advice would be to exercise caution. At ated – and that energy is heat. In this process, known the end of the day, the LCHF lifestyle promotes eating as ‘structural isomerism’, many people believe that high-quality food prepared using old-fashioned, safe molecules are damaged and the structure of food is methods of cooking. altered or ‘forcefully deformed’. A study by Spanish researchers, published in the Q: Can coconut oil pulling really improve my Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, showed that microwaving broccoli causes a 97 percent loss in dental hygiene? its flavonoid content, while the figure for boiling was A: I’ve never heard first-hand of anyone who has 66 percent and for steaming, 11 percent. In other found long-term help from oil pulling, but if internet words, microwaving broccoli basically wipes out its reports are anything to go by, it does seem to whiten health benefits. teeth, and has an antibacterial effect on the gums. And it’s been shown that microwaving seriously However, you have to slosh the oil around in your affects the anti-infective factors in human breast milk. mouth for 15–20 minutes before spitting it out. It is (Mothers who express milk to save it for later, take very important not to swallow this oil because it is likely note.) According to research published in Pediatrics, to be full of bacteria from your teeth. The gums are the official journal of the American Academy of Pedihighly absorbent, so use only organic oil. atrics, microwaving human milk is not advised at high temperatures, and questions regarding its safety exist Q: I feel quite dehydrated since going on LCHF. even at low temperatures. The researchers reached this Is it okay to drink bottled water and, if so, conclusion because the addition of bacteria to human are plastic bottles okay? I’ve read some scary milk after being microwaved at various temperatures stuff about them online. showed that, at 98ºC or more, E. coli growth was 18 A: You can definitely become dehydrated when first times higher than for human milk that hadn’t been embarking on the LCHF lifestyle. This means that you microwaved. Even at 20–25ºC, E. coli growth was up may need to increase your water intake. Water helps to five times higher than in to facilitate the removal of toxins previously unmicrowaved milk. held in the fat stores; as the Water in glass bottles body burns fat, the toxins is preferable, as some plastics are released. You will feel much better if you’re well leach toxins into the water. hydrated, as the toxins will be removed faster and will be less concentrated.  Water in glass bottles is preferable, as some plastics leach toxins into the water. Have you ever had water from a plastic bottle and been able to taste the plastic? Often the bottles stand in the sun on the back of a lorry for many hours and the heat causes the plastic to leach chemicals into the water. So it’s probably healthier to drink water from glass than plastic. Of course, if you have no choice, take whatever you can get to remain hydrated. ■


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Q&A WITH: DR SCHOONBEE

TWO BIG QUESTIONS: on earth is homocysteine, 1 What and should I worry about it? – please explain 2 And familial hypercholesterolaemia in layman’s terms!

It’s complicated, as they say. So we asked Dr Schoonbee to explain.

Q: So the bottom line is,

we need it, but too much is a bad thing? A: Yes, that’s right.

Q: What causes raised

homocysteine?

Q: What is homocysteine, and

do we need it?

A: Yes, we do. One of the amino acids in meat, fish and dairy is metabolised first to become homocysteine, and then something called cysteine. This is a good thing – cysteine plays an important role in maintaining the shape and strength of cell walls, and it also helps to metabolise metals like iron, zinc and copper, plus it has antioxidant properties. Excess homocysteine is later converted back to methionine. Vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid all play an important role in the body’s metabolism of homocysteine.

Q: Are raised homocysteine levels a problem?

A: They seem to be, yes. Studies show that a high level of homo-

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Our expert: Dr Gerhard Schoonbee is a GP with personal experience of living the LCHF lifestyle.

cysteine can cause ischaemic heart disease, because it damages blood vessel walls, which in turn makes it easier for plaque and clots to form. This can lead to heart attacks, strokes or deep-vein thrombosis. A high level has also been associated with osteoporosis.

A: Well, there are several causes: • It can be genetic, although that’s rare: Homocystinuria is a condition where a child has a very high level of homocysteine in the blood, and large amounts can also be detected in his or her urine. What happens then is that plaque is formed in the blood vessels, which can cause the conditions outlined above. • Dietary: If you don’t take in enough vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid (which all help to metabolise homocysteine), then you will be at risk of having too much homocysteine in your system, and not enough cysteine. This means that strict vegans and vegetarians, in particular, may be at risk.


eat FOODS RICH IN B VITAMINS (INCLUDING B6, B12 AND FOLIC ACID) LIKE

eggs

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now, on to familial ia (FH) hypercholesterolaem

Q: Are levels routinely tested? A: No, this is not a routine test, although cardiologists will check the levels in patients who have had a heart attack without any other known risk factors like diabetes, hypertension or smoking, or in patients with a family history of heart disease. Q: Right. So how can I keep my

homocysteine levels low?

A: The easiest way is to eat healthy foods that are rich in B vitamins (including B6, B12 and folic acid) like meat and eggs, and green vegetables like broccoli and spinach. And avoid anything that interferes with the absorption and metabolism of these vitamins. People who do have problems absorbing these vitamins might need regular vitamin B12 injections.

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Q: Firstly, what is it? A: FH is a genetic disorder. People who suffer from it have abnormally high LDL-cholesterol readings because their body is unable to control its cholesterol levels (mainly LDL-cholesterol). Q: So it isn’t caused by diet? A: No. Normally, your body regulates the levels of LDL-cholesterol by removing excess LDL-C (the C is for cholesterol) from your blood, but with FH, this doesn’t happen. Q: Are there different kinds of

familial hypercholesterolaemia?

A: There are two main types, and the symptoms present in varying degrees of severity: • Heterozygous FH often comes with a family history of heart attacks or strokes before the age of 55 (in men) or 60 (in women). • Homozygous FH usually comes with a family history of death from heart attacks and strokes at a very young age – younger than 40. Also, because of the high levels of cholesterol, there may be cholesterol deposits in the Achilles tendons and in the tendons on top of the hands, and on the knees and elbows, causing thickening of these tendons (these deposits are called xanthomata).

Q: How common is FH? A: Worldwide, the incidence of heterozygous FH is 1:500, but in some population groups in SA, specifically some Afrikaans, Indian and Jewish families, it’s 1:100. Homozygous FH is more rare. Globally, it affects one in a million

people, but unfortunately it’s found in one in 30 000 people here. Q: Can you test for FH? A: Yes, you can. Methods range from fasting blood tests to CT scans, ultrasound and genetic or DNA analysis. You may have heard of one of these tests – the Doppler ultrasound, which is a non-invasive technique used to detect narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Q: What can I do if I suspect I

have FH?

A: The first thing to do is consult your doctor and arrange to be tested. If you do have FH, your GP will decide how best to manage your particular case. It’s important to treat each person individually, because other risk factors need to be taken into consideration, such as diabetes, hypertension or obesity, or if you smoke or have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Serious cases should be treated at specialist lipid clinics. Q: Is LCHF good for FH? A: Yes, with a few conditions. There are various genetic mutations of FH, and people who have it may react in different ways to the LCHF lifestyle: some may experience a high increase in LDL or triglycerides, and will have to adjust their diet and take medication to lower these levels. It also depends on whether any other risk factors are present. You will definitely need to consult your doctor about how to manage your FH if you want to eat LCHF. ■

PHOTOGRAPHS: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE

• Lifestyle: Smoking and high intake of alcohol and coffee can raise your homocysteine levels. • Diseases: High levels of homocysteine are also associated with diabetes, Crohn’s disease, an underactive thyroid and rheumatoid arthritis. • Medication: Some drugs, such as methotrexate, fibrates, nicotinic acid, metformin and steroids, can interfere with the absorption of the B vitamins. And, as we have already seen, this can then result in higher homocysteine levels in the body, since the B vitamins are vital for homocysteine metabolism. • Gender and age: Higher levels of homocysteine are more common in men than in women, and they seem to rise with age.


reader’s recipe ELSI MEYER’S SPICED CHICKEN AND CAULI RICE

Calling all readers: Submit your favourite LCHF recipes to info@loseit.co.za – they could be featured in the next issue!

SERVES 4

PHOTOGRAPH: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE. JUNIOR FOOD EDITOR: PIA-ALEXA DUARTE. STYLING: JUSTINE KIGGEN

• ½ tsp mild curry powder • ¼ tsp each ground ginger and cinnamon • ¼ tsp each ground cardamom, turmeric and coriander • 1 tsp xylitol • 1 x 400ml can coconut milk • 600g free range chicken fillets or deboned thighs • 12 cherry tomatoes • 10g fresh basil • himalayan salt and milled black pepper, to taste FOR THE CAULI RICE • 1 cauliflower • 2 leeks • 1 tbsp coconut oil or butter • ½ red pepper, thinly sliced 1. Mix all the spices, the xylitol and the coconut milk together in a saucepan over medium heat. 2. Cut the chicken into strips, add to the pan and cook for 20 minutes, or until done. 3. Add the tomatoes and basil and cook for another 2 minutes. Season to taste. 4. For the cauli rice: Chop the cauliflower and leeks in a food processor. 5. Melt the coconut oil in a pan and sauté the red pepper until tender. Add the cauliflower and leek mixture, season with salt and pepper, then cook for another 2 minutes. 6. Turn down the heat, cover the pan and allow to steam until the cauli rice can be fluffed up. 7. To serve: Serve chicken in a bowl with cauli rice on the side. ■

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 12g Carbs 13g Protein 39g

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RHYTHM NOT required

Looking for interval and resistance training with a twist? Zumba® will get your heart pumping and the sweat dripping – and you might also learn a move or two that you can bust out next time you’re on the dance floor. 30 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 9 2015


exercise

BY: JANA WESSELS

PHOTOGRAPH: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE

W

hether you’ve got rhythm or not, Zumba gets you shimmying, shaking and cha-chaing for a full 60 minutes. ‘I like to think of it as exercise in disguise,’ says Lucas Mthenjane, Zumba education specialist for Africa and Asia. ‘It’s an all-in-one body workout – it gets you to move your body in a way you never thought you would. It also pushes cardiovascular endurance and improves coordination. It’s a fun workout that delivers results in a non-intimidating environment.’ The Latin-inspired fitness craze was started accidentally in the late 1980s when Alberto (Beto) Pérez forgot his regular aerobics music for the class he was teaching in Cali, Colombia. Luckily he had some Latin music with him, so he used that instead. The class went down so well that he did it again and again and again… In 2001, two years after the fitness class was introduced to the US, it was trademarked as Zumba, and 15 million people in 180 countries around the world now learn the basic moves of dances like the salsa, merengue, samba, bachata, flamenco, cha-cha, cumbia, hip hop and reggaeton. Lucas trained with Beto himself and has been teaching Zumba since 2007. He met Colombian Marianela Ramirez, who holds degrees in business and finance but has a passion for dancing, at an instructor’s convention. She moved to Cape Town last year and she and Lucas have worked together ever since.

Lucas and Marianela on… GROUP DYNAMICS ‘When you do Zumba in a group rather than doing it alone at home from a DVD, you really feel like you’re in a club and that you’re having a good time with friends,’ says Lucas. ‘The music sets it apart from other fitness classes; it’s fun and it gets people moving.’ Marianela agrees: ‘It lifts your mood. As you go on, you let go of your insecurities and enjoy the spontaneity, and you walk out feeling relaxed.’

THE BENEFITS Do Zumba about two to three times a week, and you’ll start seeing a difference in your body

sessions for a discounted price. People find it less restrictive because they don’t necessarily have to sign up to a fixed and binding contract to enjoy Zumba.’

ON RHYTHM You don’t need to have rhythm to attend a Zumba class, says Marianela. ‘Just be willing to have fun. Even if you feel that you have two left feet, the instructor will help you move your hips and feel the rhythm. You’ll get there with time. The thing is to enjoy it.’ The first Zumba class might be a bit confusing to a newcomer, Lucas admits. ‘But I find that they always come back. Even if they can’t do all the moves, there are always one or two dances that they do understand. It’s like learning a new language.’

You’ll learn the basic moves of dances like the salsa, merengue, samba, bachata, f lamenco, cha-cha, cumbia, hip hop and reggaeton. – and you’ll lose weight within six months, Lucas assures us. ‘Besides that, we see people’s self-confidence improve. And there’s a real sense of community, and of a shared goal. A good instructor motivates the class and keeps the energy up.’ Marianela says the payment system at most Zumba studios is an added advantage. ‘A lot of the studios are pay as you go: members pay per class or have the option of buying small bundled

ZUMBA IS FOR EVERYONE Lucas and Marianela say there’s a class for everyone: ‘Basic Zumba will get you moving, while the new Zumba Step incorporates step aerobics and helps tone the legs. Zumba Sentao combines strength and resistance training with innovative dance moves, and Aqua Zumba puts the “party” into pool party.’ Zumba isn’t just for the young and hip, either. There’s Zumba Gold for active older adults, as well as Zumba Kids. ■

FOR MORE INFO, FIND LUCAS AND MARIANELA AT 36 STEPS ON MAIN IN WOODSTOCK, CAPE TOWN, OR EMAIL lucas.mthenjane@zumbamail.com

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 31


exercise

5 ZUMBA MOVES BY: JANA WESSELS

GET READY TO DANCE! WE ASKED LUCAS MTHENJANE AND MARIANELA RAMIREZ TO SHARE FIVE BASIC ZUMBA MOVES TO START YOU OFF. THEY’LL DEFINITELY PUT A SMILE ON YOUR FACE!

1 SALSA FRONT BACK Start with your feet together, hips and shoulders relaxed. Step forward on your left foot, then take it back in line with your right foot. Step backwards on your right foot and then take it back to meet your left foot. Keep going with these steps, moving your hips, shoulders and arms in a relaxed way to add rhythm to your movements. REPEAT: 15–20 times

2 REGGAETON STOMP TIP: Engage the muscles in your legs with every stomp.

Stand with your feet together, shoulders relaxed, core engaged. Lift your left knee, stomp that foot forward then return to your starting position. Repeat with your right leg. Repeat once on each leg, then lift your knee and tap twice in a row on each leg, in a single-single-double sequence. This move requires a lot of attitude; use your arms to emphasise the movement by pretending to pull something down with each stomp. REPEAT: 15–20 times

32 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016


3 CUMBIA Keep your core engaged, hips and legs relaxed. Step out to the right with your right arm bent upwards from the elbow, left hand on your hip. Pop your left hip and drag your left foot towards your right. Repeat on the right, then do the same move twice towards the left. Emphasise that ‘pop’ of the hips before dragging one foot to meet the other. REPEAT: 15–20 times

TIP: Put effort into your arms to maximise calorie burn.

4 MERENGUE Adopt a slight squat in a wide stance. Lift your bent arms out to the sides, keeping your core engaged and your shoulders relaxed. Turn your left palm down and hold your right palm up with your elbow bent, then slide your hands together in front of your chest as if you’re spreading butter, and take your right palm down and your left palm up to the side. Repeat in a single-singledouble sequence. With every hand move, squeeze your obliques (the muscles that run up and down your sides).

PHOTOGRAPHS: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE

REPEAT: 15–20 times

TIP: Go into a lower squat to increase muscle engagement.

5 SALSA RIGHT-LEFT Keep your core engaged, shoulders and hips relaxed, and stand with your feet together. Start off by putting your left foot out to the side, then bring it back. Then put your right foot out to the side and bring it back. Move your arms, shoulders and hips with every sidestep to add rhythm and flow. REPEAT: 15–20 times

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 33


what to pack KEEP ON TRACK

JUSTINE KIGGEN

PER SERVING Fat 20g Carbs 19g Protein 44g

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 44g Carbs 17g Protein 43g

3 kid’s

LUNCH BOXES HAM, CHEESE AND TOMATO MUFFINS WITH BERRIES AND BILTONG: Preheat oven to 180ºC. Oil a 6-hole muffin tin and line each hole with a slice of ham. Top with chopped baby tomatoes and grated cheese. Whisk together 4 eggs and 3 /4 cup milk, and pour over other ingredients. Bake until firm to the touch. Put 2 muffins in a lunch box and add biltong and fresh seasonal berries, like blueberries.

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 85g Carbs 59g Protein 50g

34 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

CHICKEN MAYO ROLL-UPS WITH A MINI SALAD: Whisk together 4 eggs and 2 tbsp water and add a pinch of salt. Heat a little coconut oil in a small frying pan, add half the egg mixture and swirl to cover the pan; flip when firm. Repeat with remaining egg mixture. Combine 2 cooked chicken breast fillets, chopped, and 2–3 tbsp homemade mayonnaise (see our recipe on page 70). Place crêpes on a surface, cover with lettuce leaves and chicken mayo, roll up tightly and slice into sections. This is enough for 2 lunch boxes, with some baby carrots and mini tomatoes.

BANTING CHEESE AND TOMATO SANDWICHES WITH SALAD KEBABS: Place 4 slices banting bread, crusts removed, on a surface. Spread with homemade mayonnaise or cream cheese, top with cheese and tomato, sandwich together and cut in half lengthways to make finger sandwiches. Make mini salad kebabs with sliced cucumber and cherry tomatoes and pop in a green apple and some strawberries.


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 25g Carbs 21g Protein 26g

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING

3 adult

Fat 50g Carbs 16g Protein 40g

PHOTOGRAPHS: DER MERWE. FOOD ASSISTANT: PIA-ALEXA DUARTE PHOTOGRAPH:ANÈL ANÈLVAN VAN DER MERWE. JUNIOR FOOD EDITOR: PIA-ALEXA DUARTE

LUNCH BOXES

HAM AND CHEESE ZOODLES WITH TOMATOES AND SEASONAL BERRIES: Toss together 1½ cups blanched and cooled courgette noodles, ½ cup crumbled ricotta cheese, 30g shredded parma ham and some fresh coriander. Season well. Just before eating, drizzle with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Include vine tomatoes and some seasonal berries. SALMON NORI ROLLS WITH MACADAMIA SALAD: Fill 2 nori seaweed sheets with 70g sliced, cooked salmon or trout, slices of sweet red pepper and fresh coriander leaves. Roll into cones and serve with homemade mayo spiced up with a dash of wasabi. Toss macadamia nuts with baby tomatoes, cucumber and radish, and drizzle with lemon juice and olive oil.

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 58g Carbs 19g Protein 22g

CHICKEN AND COCONUT STRIPS WITH PICKLED SALAD: Dip 5–6 chicken strips in beaten egg, coat in desiccated coconut, season well and fry in hot coconut oil until golden and cooked through. For the pickled salad, place ½ cup blanched cauliflower florets, ½ sweet red pepper, sliced, 2 baby cucumbers, sliced, and a few fresh coriander leaves in a bowl. Whisk together 2 tsp xylitol, 1 tsp apple cider vinegar and 2 tbsp water, and pour over the veg. Season and toss to combine.

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 35


just the bizz

BY: JANA WESSELS

THE BILTONG BOARD

36 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

were monopolised by a few big retail outlets. This makes it really difficult for smaller biltong producers to enter the market and the consumer is forced to pay an inflated price for a product of less than optimal quality. I wanted to find a way around this. ‘I travelled a lot to meet farmers, butchers and suppliers in person and to sample their products. It took a lot of research, but after two years I was able to put together a list of quality biltong producers and suppliers. It was only then that I realised I might have a business on my hands.’ Even though the subscription business model is fairly new to SA and is mostly limited to magazines, Max thought it would be the best way to introduce new biltong suppliers to customers. So every month, subscribers receive a different selection of four biltong products (both beef and game), as well as droëwors, snapsticks and chips, with an insert introducing them to each product and its origin. The goal of

The Biltong Board is to establish a win-win relationship between consumer and producer. ‘I want people to enjoy a variety of good quality cured meats from all over South Africa. This country is privileged to have so many wonderful biltong producers; I want consumers to get to know them.’ Max concedes that what constitutes good biltong is a matter of personal preference, but he has certain standards that producers need to meet in order to be listed on The Biltong Board. ‘We expect our suppliers to be reliable and to meet orders. The biltong may not be frozen or vacuum-packed and should be unsliced. We also expect deliveries from producers to our headquarters to take no longer than two days, to ensure quality and freshness. ‘My aim is for people to enjoy great biltong in the same way they enjoy good wine,’ he says. For LOSE IT! readers, that won’t be much of a leap; biltong – fatty biltong, in particular – is one of the best banting snacks around! ■

FOR MORE INFO, go to biltongboard.com or Biltong Board on Facebook.

PHOTOGRAPH: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE

B

esides a good braai, you don’t get anything more South African than biltong. But if you were expecting the brains behind South Africa’s first biltong subscription box to be a 40-something man with a bulging belly, khakis and a robust Afrikaans accent, you couldn’t be more wrong. Maxime Eon just happens to be French! Max first visited SA in 2010, intending to stay for 10 months. Like so many others, he fell in love with the country and planned to return once he’d finished his master’s in marketing. When the time came, he did, and worked on various brands, gaining valuable insights into the SA market. Why biltong? ‘The first time I tried it, I loved it,’ says Max. ‘We have something similar in France so the concept was not completely strange to me. Now I eat biltong at least every second day.’ The idea for The Biltong Board was sparked by a visit to a slow food market a few years ago. Max and his girlfriend were wandering from stall to stall when he tried some biltong that was among the best he’d tasted since living here. ‘I thought it was a shame that such good quality biltong was only accessible at a market. I started researching the industry and spoke to industry leaders, and discovered that biltong sales

MAXIME EON’S NEW BUSINESS WILL MAKE SURE THAT THE BEST BILTONG SA HAS TO OFFER IS DELIVERED RIGHT TO YOUR DOOR.


shopping list COMPILED BY: JUSTINE KIGGEN

store cupboard Almond flour Almond nut butter Almonds, ground, whole, flaked and chopped Artichokes, canned Baking powder Banting wraps Black olives Coconut cream Coconut flour Gelatin leaves Harissa paste (homemade if possible) Hazelnuts Macadamia nuts Pine nuts Pistachio nuts Preserved lemons Rosewater essence Sesame seeds Tahini paste (homemade if possible) Tomatoes, canned crushed Tomato paste Vine leaves in brine Walnuts Wine, dry white Xylitol

spices & dried herbs Black peppercorns Cardamom pods Cinnamon, ground and sticks Cloves, ground Coriander, ground and seeds Cumin, ground and seeds Curry powder Dried chilli flakes, crushed Garam masala Ginger, ground Himalayan salt Lime leaves, dried Oregano, dried Paprika, ordinary and smoked Rosemary, dried Saffron threads Thyme, dried Turmeric, ground

fresh fruit, s veg & herb Asparagus Baby gem lettuce Basil Bay leaves Broccoli Cauliflower Chillies, red and green Coriander Courgettes Dill Eggplant Garlic Ginger Homemade vegetable stock Kale Leeks Lemon Lemongrass Limes Micro herbs Mint Mushrooms, exotic Onions, red and white Oregano Parsley Pomegranate rubies Pomegranates Pumpkin Radish Rosemary Spinach Sweet peppers, red, yellow and orange Swiss chard Thyme Tomatoes, slicing, vine, roma, rosa and cherry

oils, sauces & vinegars Coconut oil Extra virgin olive oil Vinegar

meat, poultry &

f ish

MEAT

Lamb Homemade lamb stock Lamb loin chops Lamb mince Lamb shanks Leg of lamb, deboned and butterflied Shoulder of lamb with knuckle bone Pork Pork fillet Prosciutto Salami

dairy

Beef Beef fillet Beef mince Homemade beef stock Steaks

POULTRY

Chicken breast fillets Chicken mince Chicken pieces, on the bone Chicken thighs, boneless Eggs Homemade chicken stock Whole chicken

Butter Cream Cream cheese Crème fraiche Double cream yoghurt Ghee Goat’s cheese Halloumi Labne Mozzarella Parmesan

FISH

Anchovy fillets Calamari tubes Firm fish fillets Homemade fish stock Smoked peppered mackerel Prawn meat Trout Yellowtail

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 37


FOOD EDITOR • JUSTINE KIGGEN PHOTOGRAPHS • ANÈL VAN DER MERWE KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 20g Carbs 11g Protein 6g

MOUTABELSTYLE EGGPLANT DIP RECIPE ON PAGE 40

ARABIAN

bites

Banting-style falafels, hummus, schwarmas, koftas, tahini – and more – come together in a Middle Eastern feast that will seduce your senses. 38 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 28g Carbs 3g Protein 70g

GAMMON WITH RASPBERRY GLAZE RECIPE ON PAGE 54

KEEP ON TRACK TAGINE OF LAMB SHANKS RECIPE ON PAGE 48

PER SERVING Fat 40g Carbs 19g Protein 99g

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 39


into a food processor with remaining ingredients and blitz until fairly smooth. 3. To serve: Top with rubies and serve with fresh dipping vegetables such as radishes, spring onions and cucumber.

BROCCOLI AND CAULIFLOWER FALAFELS SERVES 4–6

FOR THE FALAFELS • 100g broccoli rice • 280g cauli rice • 1 small red onion, sliced • 2 cloves garlic, chopped • 130g walnuts, toasted and chopped • 2 tsp ground cumin • 7g fresh parsley, chopped • 5g fresh mint, chopped • 1 large egg • 2 tsp baking powder • himalayan salt and black pepper, to taste

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 55g Carbs 18g Protein 14g

CAULI-NUT HUMMUS RECIPE ON PAGE 42

Meze MOUTABEL-STYLE EGGPLANT DIP SERVES 4–6

• 2 large eggplants • 1 clove garlic, crushed • 1 tsp each cumin seeds, paprika and ground coriander, toasted • 2g fresh basil • 2g fresh mint • 1 green chilli, chopped • 3 tbsp tahini paste • 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 40 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

• juice of ½ lemon • ½ cup double cream yoghurt • himalayan salt and black pepper, to taste • pomegranate rubies, to serve 1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC. Place the eggplants on an oven tray, prick all over and roast until soft, about 30–40 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. 2. Halve the eggplants, remove the flesh, place in a sieve over a bowl and press out as much liquid as possible. Then spoon

• coconut oil, for deep-frying FOR THE SAUCE • 2 tsp lemon juice • 1 cup double cream yoghurt • 5g each fresh mint and dill, finely chopped • paprika, to sprinkle • sesame seeds, to scatter 1. For the falafels: Heat a pan over medium heat, add the broccoli and cauli rice and cook for 3–4 minutes to remove all excess moisture, then set aside


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 34g Carbs 18g Protein 12g

BROCCOLI AND CAULIFLOWER FALAFELS

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 41


and allow to cool. Place in a food processor, add remaining falafel ingredients and blitz to combine. Then form into small balls. 2. Heat the oil to 180ºC, fry the balls until golden and crispy, then drain on paper towel. 3. For the sauce: Whisk the lemon juice, yoghurt and herbs together and sprinkle paprika on top. 4. To serve: Serve falafels hot, with sesame seeds scattered over the top, and with dipping sauce on the side.

CAULI-NUT HUMMUS SERVES 4–6

• 1 small head cauliflower, steamed and chopped • 200g mixed macadamias, almonds and hazelnuts, toasted • 2 tbsp almond nut butter • 1 clove garlic, crushed • 2 tbsp tahini paste • juice of ½ lemon • 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil • 5g fresh coriander, chopped • himalayan salt and black pepper, to taste • sesame seeds, toasted, to sprinkle • pomegranate rubies, to garnish 1. Place the steamed cauliflower in a tea towel and twist to squeeze out any excess moisture. Place it and remaining ingredients in a food processor and blend until fairly smooth, but still with a little texture. 2. To serve: Place in a bowl and serve at room temperature, sprinkled with toasted sesame seeds and rubies, with fresh dipping vegetables such as fennel and chicory. 42 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

Mains ROAST CHERMOULA FISH WITH PEPPERS

KEEP ON TRACK

ROAST CHERMOULA FISH WITH PEPPERS

PER SERVING Fat 38g Carbs 11g Protein 60g

SERVES 4

FOR THE CHERMOULA • 20g fresh coriander • 1 clove garlic, peeled • ½ tsp each ground cumin, coriander and paprika • 1 tsp vinegar • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil • himalayan salt and black pepper, to taste • 1kg yellowtail fillet • 4 roma tomatoes, halved • 3 small red and orange sweet peppers, halved and seeded • 3 tbsp coconut oil • lime quarters, to serve • fresh coriander, to garnish 1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC. Place all the ingredients for the chermoula in a blender and blitz to combine. 2. Spread the chermoula onto the fish. 3. Place the tomatoes and peppers in an ovenproof pan, dot with coconut oil and season well. 4. Top with the fish and bake for 30 minutes. 5. To serve: Serve fish warm with lime quarters and garnish with coriander.

• 6 tbsp almond flour • 1 tbsp baking powder • 1 tbsp dried oregano • 2 cloves garlic, minced • himalayan salt and black pepper, to taste FOR THE SPICED BEEF • 500g beef mince • pinch dried chilli flakes • 50g tomato paste FOR THE YOGHURT SAUCE • 5g fresh mint, chopped • ¾ cup double cream yoghurt

SPICED BEEF FLATBREADS SERVES 4

TO SERVE • ½ cup crème fraiche • ½ red onion, sliced • 50g pomegranate rubies, to scatter • fresh oregano, to garnish

FOR THE FLATBREADS • 6 eggs, separated • 75g cream cheese

1. For the flatbreads: Preheat the oven to 200ºC. Whisk all ingredients together,


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING

CHICKEN WITH SAFFRON YOGHURT

Fat 32g Carbs 20g Protein 58g

• himalayan salt and black pepper • big pinch of saffron in a little hot water • 1 cup double cream yoghurt • 1 tbsp fresh thyme, chopped • 2 tbsp butter, melted • 200g rosa tomatoes • 1 x 400g can artichokes, drained

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 44g Carbs 15g Protein 42g

SPICED BEEF FLATBREADS

except for the egg whites. Whisk egg whites with a pinch of salt until stiff, then fold into the yolk and cheese mixture. 2. Line 2 baking trays with baking paper, divide the mixture between the 2 trays to make 2 flatbreads, spreading it out and shaping it into oval shapes. Bake for 15 minutes, remove from the oven and allow to cool a little, then flip over and bake for a further 10 minutes. 3. For the spiced beef: Heat a pan, dry-fry the beef until browned, stir in the chilli flakes and tomato paste and cook for

another 5 minutes, then season well and set aside. 4. For the yoghurt sauce: Blitz the ingredients in a blender. 5. To serve: Spread crème fraiche on both flatbreads, then a layer of beef, then scatter onion, pomegranate rubies and oregano on top, and serve with yoghurt sauce.

CHICKEN WITH SAFFRON YOGHURT SERVES 4

• 8 chicken pieces

• broccoli rice, to serve 1. Place the chicken pieces in a non-metallic ovenproof dish and season well. Mix together the saffron, yoghurt, thyme and butter, pour over the chicken, cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. 2. Preheat the oven to 180ºC. Place the tomatoes and artichokes around the chicken and bake for 35–40 minutes, or until golden and cooked through. 3. To serve: Serve chicken, tomatoes and artichokes with broccoli rice. VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 43


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 76g Carbs 20g Protein 16g

LABNE AND SPINACH BAKE

KEEP ON TRACK

LABNE AND SPINACH BAKE SERVES 4

PER SERVING

FISH WITH TAHINI SAUCE AND FRESH PARSLEY

FISH WITH TAHINI SAUCE AND FRESH PARSLEY SERVES 4

• 850g firm fish fillets (such as hake), cut into pieces • himalayan salt and black pepper • 1 tbsp ghee FOR THE SAUCE • 3 tbsp tahini paste • juice of 1 lemon • ½ cup double cream yoghurt • 1 clove garlic, minced TO SERVE • 10g fresh parsley, chopped • 50g pine nuts or flaked almonds, toasted 44 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

Fat 48g Carbs 12g Protein 43g

• 30g pomegranate rubies • creamed spinach 1. Put the fish on a board and season well. Place a pan over moderate-high heat, add ghee and cook the fish until cooked through and lightly golden. Set aside and keep warm. 2. For the sauce: Place the tahini, lemon juice, yoghurt and garlic in a bowl, whisk to combine, add 2–3 tbsp warm water to thin the sauce, then season. 3. To serve: Place fish on a serving plate, cover with sauce, top with herbs, almonds or pine nuts and pomegranate rubies. Serve with creamed spinach.

• 1 tbsp coconut oil • 1 onion, finely sliced • 3 cloves garlic, chopped • 500g swiss chard, blanched and chopped • 2 tbsp butter, melted • himalayan salt and black pepper • 1 cup cream • 2 small sweet peppers, halved and seeded • 4 labne (strained yoghurt) balls, rolled in herbs • 4 large eggs • paprika, for sprinkling • fresh oregano, to garnish • double cream yoghurt, to serve 1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC. In an ovenproof pan heat the coconut oil, add the onion and garlic and sauté until soft and golden. 2. Mix together the swiss chard


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING

LAMB LOIN CHOPS WITH RED PEPPER AND WALNUT DIP RECIPE ON PAGE 46

Fat 36g Carbs 14g Protein 51g

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 45


• 1 tsp each ground cumin, coriander and paprika • juice of ½ lemon • pinch dried chilli flakes • 1–2 tbsp xylitol • 2 tbsp butter, melted • 1 tbsp double cream yoghurt FOR THE SALAD • 50g pomegranate rubies • 3 courgettes, sliced into thin strips • ½ red onion, cut into wedges • extra virgin olive oil, to drizzle • 1 tsp lemon juice

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 64g Carbs 14g Protein 71g

ROAST DUKKAH CHICKEN

and butter, season well and add to the pan, along with the cream. Cook for 2–3 minutes, or until reduced and thickened, then remove from the heat and allow to cool slightly. 3. Press the pepper halves into the spinach mixture, open-side up, then put a labne ball and crack an egg into each half. 4. Bake for 10–15 minutes or until the eggs are firm. 5. To serve: Sprinkle with paprika and chopped oregano, and serve with yoghurt. 46 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 6 2016

LAMB LOIN CHOPS WITH RED PEPPER AND WALNUT DIP SERVES 4

FOR THE LAMB CHOPS • 8 lamb loin chops • 2 tsp dried thyme • himalayan salt and black pepper FOR THE DIP • 2 red peppers, roasted and peeled • 1 small clove garlic, crushed • ¼ onion, finely chopped • 70g walnuts, toasted and chopped

1. For the lamb chops: Preheat the oven grill or a griddle pan. Place the lamb chops on a board, sprinkle with thyme and season well, then thread onto skewers and grill until done to your liking. Set aside. 2. For the dip: Place all the ingredients, except for the yoghurt, in a food processor and blitz well to combine. Place in a bowl, season and top with yoghurt. 3. For the salad: Toss together salad ingredients, place on a platter and drizzle with olive oil and lemon juice. 4. To serve: Serve the lamb hot with the dip and salad.

ROAST DUKKAH CHICKEN SERVES 4

FOR THE DUKKAH • 1 tbsp each dried thyme and oregano • 1 tbsp ground cumin • grated zest of 1 lemon • 1½ tbsp sesame seeds • 2 tsp himalayan salt FOR THE CHICKEN • 1.2kg whole chicken


LAMB SCHWARMA WITH YOGHURT, TOMATO AND PINE NUTS KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 87g Carbs 28g Protein 91g

• 2 tbsp ghee, softened • 2 lemons, cut into quarters • 2 heads garlic, halved • 1½ cups homemade chicken stock • fresh bay leaves, to garnish 1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC. 2. For the dukkah: Mix all the ingredients together. 3. For the chicken: Place the chicken in a roasting dish, rub with ghee and sprinkle the dukkah over the skin. 4. Place 2 lemon quarters in the chicken cavity and the rest around the chicken with the garlic heads. 5. Add the stock and roast for 1 hour 15 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through. 6. To serve: Serve chicken hot, garnished with bay leaves, with cauli purée on the side.

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 58g Carbs 19g Protein 33g

LAMB KOFTAS WITH HARISSA YOGHURT RECIPE ON PAGE 48

LAMB SCHWARMA WITH YOGHURT, TOMATO AND PINE NUTS

FOR THE MARINADE • 3 cloves garlic, chopped • 1 cup double cream yoghurt • juice of 2 lemons • 1 tsp ground cumin • 1 tsp ground cinnamon • 1 tsp coriander seeds • ½ tsp ground cloves • 1 red or green chilli, chopped • himalayan salt and black pepper, to taste

• 1.3 kg deboned leg of lamb, butterflied

FOR THE SALAD • 3 tomatoes, cut into wedges • 100g pine nuts, toasted

SERVES 4–6

• 10g fresh mint • 1 small red onion, sliced • 6 radishes, sliced • extra virgin olive oil, to drizzle • double cream yoghurt and banting wraps, to serve 1. For the lamb: Place the lamb in a shallow dish, mix together the marinade ingredients and pour over the lamb, cover and refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight. 2. Preheat the oven to 170ºC, VOLUME 6 2016 LOSE IT! | 47


place the lamb and marinade in an ovenproof dish, roast for 2½ hours, turning the lamb halfway through roasting. Allow to rest for 15 minutes, then tear into chunks or shred. 3. For the salad: Assemble all the ingredients on a platter and drizzle with olive oil. 4. To serve: Serve the lamb, with yoghurt, banting wraps and salad.

LAMB KOFTAS WITH HARISSA YOGHURT SERVES 4

• 700g lamb mince • ½ red onion, grated • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 1 tsp ground coriander • 1 tsp ground cinnamon • himalayan salt and black pepper • 2 red onions, cut into quarters HARISSA YOGHURT • 2 tsp harissa paste • ¾ cup double cream yoghurt • 1 tsp xylitol • 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil • 4–6 tomatoes, sliced • extra virgin olive oil, for drizzling • toasted sesame seeds, to serve • fresh parsley, to garnish 1. Preheat the oven grill. 2. Place the lamb, onion, garlic and spices in a bowl, season well and shape into sausages. Thread 2–3 of these onto skewers along with onion wedges. Cook koftas under the grill until browned on all sides and cooked through. 3. For the harissa yoghurt: Mix together all the ingredients. 4. Arrange tomato slices on a platter, drizzle with olive oil and 48 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

season to taste. 5. To serve: Serve koftas on tomato slices, with a dollop of harissa yoghurt and a sprinkling of sesame seeds, garnished with fresh parsley.

TAGINE OF LAMB SHANKS SERVES 6

• 6 lamb shanks • himalayan salt and black pepper • coconut oil or lamb tallow, for frying • 2 onions, sliced • 2 cloves garlic, chopped • 3 sticks cinnamon • 1 tsp ground ginger • 100g almonds, chopped • big pinch saffron in a little hot water • 2 wedges preserved lemon (pith removed), chopped • 2 tbsp xylitol • 3–4 cups lamb or beef stock • 500g pumpkin, cubed • cauli rice, to serve 1. Place the lamb on a board and season well with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a large, deep pot and brown lamb on all sides, then remove from the pot. 2. Toss in the onion, garlic and dry spices and sauté until golden, then add the almonds and sauté until just browned. Return the lamb shanks to the pot and add the remaining ingredients (except for the pumpkin). Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours, adding more stock if necessary. 3. Half an hour before the end of cooking time, add the pumpkin and season to taste. 4. To serve: Serve shanks hot with cauli rice.

Sweet TURKISH DELIGHT JELLIES SERVES 10–12

• 20g gelatin leaves • 150g xylitol • 2 tsp rosewater essence • 2 tbsp pure pomegranate juice* (to colour mixture pink) TO SERVE • 10g pomegranate rubies • 20g pistachio nuts, chopped • lime wedges, to garnish 1. Oil a 20x25cm dish. Place the gelatin leaves in a shallow bowl, cover with cold water and allow to soften, about 3 minutes. 2. Place the xylitol, 1 litre water and the rosewater in a pot, add the gelatin, stir to dissolve over moderate heat, then bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Stir in the pomegranate juice. 3. Pour mixture into the oiled dish, allow to cool, then refrigerate until set. 4. To serve: Cut into squares and serve topped with pomegranate rubies and pistachio nuts. Garnish with lime wedges. * For the pomegranate juice, place a sieve over a bowl, cut a whole pomegranate in half over the sieve, remove the seeds (or rubies), and press them into the sieve with the back of a wooden spoon to release as much juice as possible (2 tbsp should be enough to colour the mixture). If you can’t find whole pomegranates, use pomegranate rubies, or puréed and strained raspberries. ■


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 1g Carbs 2g Protein 2g

TURKISH DELIGHT JELLIES

VOLUME 6 2016 LOSE IT! | 49


Asian meatball salad & Spend time with your guests, not in your kitchen! These pork dishes are perfect for entertaining – they’re delicious and easy to prepare in advance.

FOR THE DRESSING • ½ cup coconut milk • 2 tsp almond nut butter • juice of ½ lime • ½ tsp xylitol • splash of fish sauce • chopped red chilli and toasted sesame seeds, to garnish

ASIAN PORK MEATBALL SALAD SERVES 4

FOR THE MEATBALLS • 600g pork mince • 1 clove garlic, minced • 2 tsp grated fresh ginger • 1 lemongrass stalk, finely chopped • 5g fresh coriander, finely chopped • 2g fresh mint, finely chopped • 1 spring onion, finely chopped • 2 tsp sesame seeds, toasted • coconut oil, for frying • himalayan salt and milled black pepper FOR THE SALAD • 1 english cucumber, cut into ribbons • 2 baby gem lettuces, leaves separated

1. For the meatballs: In a bowl, mix together all the ingredients, roll into small balls and set aside. 2. Heat the coconut oil in a pan and shallow-fry the meatballs until cooked through. Drain on paper towel. Season to taste. 3. For the salad: Arrange all the ingredients on a platter or in a bowl and top with the meatballs. 4. For the dressing: Blitz all the ingredients in a blender to combine. 5. To serve: Drizzle the dressing over the salad and garnish with red chilli and sesame seeds.

FESTIVE PORK FILLET SERVES 8

• 800g (approx 2) pork fillets FOR THE STUFFING • 2 tsp coconut oil • 2 onions, finely chopped • 2 cloves garlic, chopped • 10g fresh sage, finely chopped • 100g mixed almonds, macadamias and

hazelnuts, toasted and roughly chopped • 5g flat-leaf parsley, chopped • 2 tsp dijon mustard • 300g pork mince • himalayan salt and black pepper • 400g streaky bacon • coconut oil, for frying • roasted sweet peppers • fresh sage, to garnish 1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC. 2. For the stuffing: Heat the coconut oil, add the onion and garlic and sauté until golden. Remove from the heat and transfer to a bowl. Add the remaining stuffing ingredients, season well and stir to combine. 3. Cut a slit down the centre of each pork fillet without cutting all the way through. Place a piece of muslin cloth under and over the butterflied fillets, then pound with a mallet until the fillets are completely flat. Remove muslin and season meat well. Divide stuffing into two and roll into a sausage shape. Place one in the centre of each fillet, then roll up the meat to enclose the stuffing. 4. Lay half the streaky bacon rashers on a surface so they overlap one another to form a solid shape the same length as one fillet. Top with a fillet and roll up so that the bacon completely covers it. Secure the bacon with toothpicks. Repeat with remaining fillet and bacon. 5. Heat the coconut oil in a pan and fry fillets until golden on all sides, then roast in the oven for 50–60 minutes, or until cooked through.

STYLING: FOOD EDITOR JUSTINE KIGGEN, PHOTOGRAPHS: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE

• 5 radishes, finely sliced • ¼ red onion, finely sliced • 100g fine green beans, blanched


advertorial

stuffed pork fillet To serve: Remove toothpicks, garnish with sage and serve with roasted sweet peppers.


MEDITERRANEAN magic

Celebrate summer with a warm, bright and very tempting spread of delicious Mediterranean dishes.

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 49g Carbs 8g Protein 31g

FOOD EDITOR • JUSTINE KIGGEN PHOTOGRAPHS • ANÈL VAN DER MERWE

MACKEREL COURGETTE SPIRALS RECIPE ON PAGE 60


LAMB SHOULDER WITH GARLIC AND LEMON RECIPE ON PAGE 60

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 61g Carbs 16g Protein 89g

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 53


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 25g Carbs 16g Protein 17g

HALLOUMI CHEESE WRAPPED IN VINE LEAVES

5 minutes, then drain and refresh under cold running water. 2. Place a vine leaf flat on the surface, top with a slice of halloumi, brush with coconut oil, add a stem of fresh thyme, season with chilli flakes, salt and pepper, and wrap the leaf around the cheese. Repeat with remaining ingredients. 3. Heat a griddle pan, and cook the wrapped halloumi on both sides until golden and slightly charred. 4. To serve: Serve warm with a tomato and onion salad.

MOZZARELLA CHICKEN SERVES 4

• 4 chicken breast fillets, butterflied • himalayan salt and black pepper • 2 tbsp coconut oil • 1 onion, finely chopped • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 2 x 400g cans crushed tomatoes • 50g black olives, drained • ¼ tsp smoked paprika • 2 tsp xylitol • 2–3 fresh mozzarella balls, torn • 100g sliced salami • extra virgin olive oil, to drizzle • fresh basil, to garnish

HALLOUMI CHEESE WRAPPED IN VINE LEAVES

• melted coconut oil, for brushing • 10g fresh thyme • pinch dried chilli flakes • himalayan salt and black pepper

• 125g (about 12) vine leaves in brine, well rinsed • 300g halloumi cheese, sliced into strips

• tomato and onion salad, to serve

SERVES 4

54 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

1. Put the vine leaves in a pot, add water to cover, simmer for

1. Season the chicken breasts well, heat 1 tbsp coconut oil in an ovenproof pan, brown the chicken on both sides until golden, then remove from the pan and set aside. 2. Add remaining oil to the pan, sauté onion and garlic until soft, then add tomatoes and olives and cook for 3 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper,


KEEP ON TRACK MOZZARELLA CHICKEN

PER SERVING Fat 33g Carbs 14g Protein 45g

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 55


STEAK WITH SWEET PEPPER BUTTER

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 66g Carbs 7g Protein 62g

FOR THE STEAK • 4 x 250g steaks • coconut oil, melted • 2 tsp dried crushed rosemary • himalayan salt and black pepper • blanched asparagus and fresh vine tomatoes, to serve 1. For the butter: Place all the ingredients in a blender and blitz until smooth, then put in the fridge until firm. 2. For the steaks: Place the steaks on a board and allow to come to room temperature. 3. Brush with coconut oil and sprinkle with rosemary, salt and pepper. 4. Heat a griddle pan and cook on both sides until done to your liking, set aside and keep warm. 5. To serve: Serve steaks with a dollop of sweet pepper butter, with asparagus and vine tomatoes on the side.

KALE PIZZA WITH GOAT’S CHEESE

MAKES 1 LARGE PIZZA; SERVES 2

and stir in the smoked paprika and xylitol. 3. Preheat the oven to 190ºC. Return the chicken to the pan, along with the mozzarella and salami. Bake for 20 minutes or until chicken is cooked through and golden. 4. To serve: Drizzle with olive oil and serve hot, garnished with fresh basil. 56 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

STEAK WITH SWEET PEPPER BUTTER SERVES 4

FOR THE SWEET PEPPER BUTTER • 1 red pepper, roasted and skin removed • 70g butter, softened • 1 clove garlic, minced • 2 tsp lemon juice

FOR THE BASE • 400g kale, chopped and cooked, all water removed • 5 eggs, separated • 100g mozzarella cheese, grated • 100g parmesan cheese, grated • 3 tbsp coconut flour • 1 tsp baking powder FOR THE TOPPING • 70g sliced prosciutto • 300g vine tomatoes • 100g goat’s cheese, sliced


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 72g Carbs 33g Protein 96g

KALE PIZZA WITH GOAT’S CHEESE

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 57


with prosciutto, tomatoes and goat’s cheese and return to the oven for 5 minutes. 4. To serve: Serve immediately, drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled with micro herbs.

ANCHOVY AND COURGETTE FRITTERS WITH BASIL CREAM SAUCE SERVES 4–6

FOR THE FRITTERS • 700g courgettes, grated • 7 anchovy fillets, mashed • 5g fresh parsley, finely chopped • 2 eggs, beaten • 3 tbsp coconut flour • 2 tsp baking powder • himalayan salt and black pepper, to taste • coconut oil, for frying FOR THE CREAM SAUCE • 1½ cups cream • 1 clove garlic, minced • 5g fresh basil, finely chopped

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 46g Carbs 14g Protein 11g

• chopped red onion, to garnish • lemon wedges, to serve

ANCHOVY AND COURGETTE FRITTERS WITH BASIL CREAM SAUCE

• extra virgin olive oil, to drizzle • micro herbs, to serve 1. For the base: Preheat the oven to 180ºC. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Place the kale, egg yolks, mozzarella, parmesan, coconut flour and baking powder in a food processor. Blitz 58 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

to combine, then place in a bowl. 2. Whisk the egg whites until stiff and fold into the kale mixture. Spread this mixture onto the baking tray, shape into a round and bake for 12–15 minutes or until firm to the touch. Remove from the oven. 3. For the topping: Cover

1. For the fritters: Place the grated courgettes in a clean dish towel and squeeze out as much moisture as possible, then place in a bowl with the remaining ingredients and stir well. 2. Heat the coconut oil in a pan and fry dollops of the mixture on both sides until browned, then drain on paper towel. 3. For the sauce: Place the cream in a small pot, add the garlic and basil, bring to a boil,


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING

WARM CALAMARI SALAD WITH PEPPERS AND OLIVES RECIPE ON PAGE 60

Fat 45g Carbs 21g Protein 36g

BROCCOLI WITH POACHED EGGS KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 26g Carbs 15g Protein 11g

then simmer for 5 minutes until thickened, and season to taste. 4. To serve: Serve fritters hot, garnished with chopped red onion, with cream sauce and lemon wedges on the side.

BROCCOLI WITH POACHED EGGS SERVES 4

• 2 heads broccoli, broken into florets • 300g asparagus, chopped • 1 tbsp coconut oil • 2 leeks, finely chopped • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 1 cup homemade vegetable stock • 2–3 tbsp butter • himalayan salt and black pepper • ½ cup crème fraiche • 4 poached eggs • smoked paprika, to sprinkle

1. Place the broccoli and asparagus in a food processor and blitz to chop. 2. Heat the coconut oil in a pot, sauté the leek and garlic until golden, then toss in the chopped broccoli and asparagus and sauté until just browned. Pour in the vegetable stock, bring to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes or

until most of the moisture has evaporated. 3. Stir in the butter and season to taste. 4. To serve: Divide broccoli and asparagus between 4 bowls, top each with about 2 tbsp of crème fraiche and a poached egg, cooked to your liking, and sprinkle with smoked paprika. VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 59


SERVES 4

• 6 small sweet peppers (red, yellow and orange) • 800g calamari tubes • himalayan salt and black pepper • 2 tbsp coconut oil • 100g black olives, drained • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil • 2 tsp lemon juice • 1 clove garlic, minced • 15g micro herbs, to serve 1. Preheat the oven to 200ºC. Place the peppers on an oven tray and roast until the skin blisters, then remove from the oven, place in a glass bowl and cover tightly with foil. Allow peppers to cool, then peel off the skin and set the flesh aside. 2. Place the calamari on a board and cut along the side of each tube to open it up flat. Score the open tubes in a crisscross manner, then slice into strips and season well. Heat a pan, add the coconut oil, cook and turn the calamari until golden and cooked through, then remove from pan and set aside. 3. Place the peppers, calamari and olives on a platter, then whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice and garlic, and pour over the salad. 4. To serve: Serve immediately, sprinkled with micro herbs.

Removing the skin of sweet peppers makes them more digestible, as well as more succulent. 60 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

LAMB SHOULDER WITH GARLIC AND LEMON SERVES 6–8

• 1 x 2.5kg lamb shoulder with knuckle bone FOR THE MARINADE • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil • 3 garlic cloves, minced • 2 tbsp dried oregano • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary • juice and rind of 1 lemon • ½ cup dry white wine • 3 lemons, sliced • 2 red onions, sliced • 4 heads garlic, halved • himalayan salt and black pepper • fresh bay leaves, to garnish 1. Place the lamb in a dish, mix together the marinade ingredients and pour over the lamb, then cover and refrigerate for 1–2 hours. 2. Preheat the oven to 150ºC. Place the slices of lemon and onion in the base of a large ovenproof dish, add ½ cup water, top with the garlic and the lamb, and season well. 3. Roast the lamb for 3–3½ hours, or until the meat is brown and falling off the bone. 4. To serve: Serve hot, garnished with fresh bay leaves.

MACKEREL COURGETTE SPIRALS SERVES 4 • • • • •

500g smoked peppered mackerel 250g cherry tomatoes, halved 30g parmesan, finely grated himalayan salt black pepper

FOR THE COURGETTE SPIRALS • 1 tbsp coconut oil • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 500g courgettes noodles • 5g fresh parsley, roughly chopped • extra virgin olive oil, to drizzle • extra parmesan, to serve 1. Remove the skin from the mackerel and flake the fish into a bowl. Stir in the tomatoes and parmesan, and season well. 2. For the spirals: Heat the oil, add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute, toss in the courgettes, add ¼ cup water and cook until water has evaporated. Stir in the parsley, add to the mackerel mixture and toss to combine. 3. To serve: Divide between 4 bowls, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with extra parmesan.

POMEGRANATE GRANITA SERVES 6–8

• 80g pomegranate rubies • 2/3 cup lemon juice • 1 cup warm water • 90g xylitol • fresh mint, to garnish 1. Place the pomegranate rubies, lemon juice, water and xylitol in a pot and stir over a low heat until xylitol dissolves. Remove from the heat, allow to cool then pour into a shallow metal container and freeze. 2. Once frozen, scrape mixture with a fork to form crystals, then either serve immediately or keep frozen until needed. 3. To serve: Spoon into sundae glasses and garnish with fresh mint. ■

JUNIOR FOOD EDITOR: PIA-ALEXA DUARTE

WARM CALAMARI SALAD WITH PEPPERS AND OLIVES


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 0g Carbs 5g Protein 0g

POMEGRANATE GRANITA

VOLUME 6 2016 LOSE IT! | 61


a taste of

ASIA

FOOD EDITOR • JUSTINE KIGGEN

PHOTOGRAPHS • ANÈL VAN DER MERWE

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 4g Carbs 10g Protein 26g

CHICKEN AND PRAWN ZOODLE SOUP RECIPE ON PAGE 66

A combination of spices, garlic, citrus, chillies and coconut will help satisfy your yen for oriental flavours. 62 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 47g Carbs 33g Protein 61g

SPICY COCONUT CHICKEN CURRY RECIPE ON PAGE 66 VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 63


GINGER CURRIED PORK SKEWERS

KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 23g Carbs 8g Protein 48g

1. Place the pork fillet in a shallow bowl and season well. 2. For the marinade: Mix together the marinade ingredients, pour half over the pork and allow to stand for 30 minutes. Place the remaining marinade ingredients in a small pot, bring to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, then remove and allow to cool. 3. Preheat the oven grill or a griddle pan. Thread the pork onto skewers and grill, turning regularly, until golden and cooked through. 4. To serve: Serve pork with chilli and onion slices, sesame seeds, coriander leaves and lime wedges, with cooked marinade dipping sauce on the side.

TROUT WITH LIME HOLLANDAISE AND PICKLED KALE SALAD SERVES 4

GINGER CURRIED PORK SKEWERS SERVES 4

• 800g pork fillet, cut into strips • himalayan salt and black pepper FOR THE MARINADE • ¼ cup almond nut butter • 1 x 400g can coconut cream 64 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

• 10g fresh ginger, crushed • 2 tsp curry powder • 1 tsp garam masala • big pinch chilli flakes • 1 tsp lemon juice TO SERVE • red chilli and red onion, sliced • toasted sesame seeds, fresh coriander and lime wedges

FOR THE HOLLANDAISE • 2 egg yolks • 130g butter, melted • 2g fresh ginger, finely grated • 5g fresh coriander, finely chopped • 1 tbsp lime juice • himalayan salt and black pepper FOR THE TROUT • 4 x 250g trout portions • melted ghee, for brushing FOR THE SALAD • 200g kale, shredded • 1 red pepper, finely sliced • ¼ red onion, finely sliced


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 44g Carbs 9g Protein 54g

TROUT WITH LIME HOLLANDAISE AND PICKLED KALE SALAD

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 65


• 2 tbsp vinegar • 2 tbsp xylitol • 1 tsp himalayan salt • lemon wedges, to serve 1. For the hollandaise: Place the egg yolks in a heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water and whisk until pale. Slowly add the butter, whisking constantly until the sauce is thick, then add the ginger, coriander and lime juice and season well. Set aside and keep warm. 2. For the trout: Preheat the oven to 180ºC. Place the trout in a pan or dish, season to taste and brush with melted ghee. Bake in the oven for 10 minutes or until cooked to your liking, then remove and set aside. 3. For the salad: Place the kale, red pepper and onion in a bowl. In a jug, whisk together the vinegar, xylitol, salt and 2 tbsp warm water. Pour over the kale and toss well to combine. 4. To serve: Divide salad between 4 plates, top with trout, drizzle with hollandaise and serve with lemon wedges.

ASIAN-STYLE BEEF FILLET SALAD SERVES 4

• 800g beef fillet • himalayan salt and black pepper • 2 tbsp coconut oil FOR THE SALAD • 2 heads baby gem lettuce, leaves separated • 1 cup radishes, with tops • 1/4 red onion, sliced 66 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

FOR THE DRESSING • 1 mild red or green chilli (optional) • 1 clove garlic, chopped • juice of ½ lime • 1 cup coconut cream • 1 tsp xylitol 1. Preheat the oven to 200ºC. Place the beef on a board and season well. Heat the coconut oil in an ovenproof pan and sear the beef on all sides. Then roast in the oven for 15–20 minutes, or until done to your liking. Remove and allow to cool completely, then slice. 2. For the salad: Place all the ingredients on a platter. 3. For the dressing: Place all the ingredients in a blender and blitz to combine. 4. To serve: Serve the sliced beef with the salad, with dressing drizzled over the top.

CHICKEN AND PRAWN ZOODLE SOUP SERVES 4

FOR THE BROTH • 1.3L homemade fish stock • 1 large knob ginger, grated • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 4 dried lime leaves • 1 lemongrass stalk, finely chopped • 1 green or red chilli, chopped • 10g fresh coriander • himalayan salt and black pepper • 150g exotic mushrooms FOR THE BALLS • 200g prawn meat, minced • 200g chicken mince • grated zest of 1 lime • 1 clove garlic, minced • 5cm knob of ginger, finely grated

TO SERVE • 350g zoodles • 5g fresh coriander • red chilli, sliced 1. For the broth: Place all the ingredients for the broth in a pot, except for the mushrooms, and simmer for 10 minutes. 2. For the balls: Mix all the ingredients together and roll up into small balls. Add to the simmering soup and poach for 5 minutes. Then toss in the mushrooms and continue to cook for 2 minutes. 3. To serve: Divide zoodles between 4 bowls and top with hot soup. Garnish with coriander and chilli and serve immediately.

SPICY COCONUT CHICKEN CURRY SERVES 4

• ½ cup double cream yoghurt • 2 cloves garlic, crushed • juice of 1 lime • pinch of saffron in a little hot water • 1 tbsp each ground cumin and coriander • ½ tsp paprika • 1kg boneless chicken thighs • 1 tbsp ghee FOR THE CURRY • 2 tbsp ghee • 1 onion, chopped • 10g fresh ginger, chopped • 1 red or green chilli, chopped • 1 tsp each turmeric and garam masala • 1 x 400g can crushed tomatoes • 100g ground almonds, toasted • 1 x 400g can coconut cream


KEEP ON TRACK PER SERVING Fat 30g Carbs 7g Protein 44g

ASIAN-STYLE BEEF FILLET SALAD

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 67


KEEP ON TRACK

PISTACHIO AND SAFFRON-STYLE KULFI

PER SERVING Fat 36g Carbs 6g Protein 6g

TO SERVE • cauli rice • fresh coriander • chopped onion and tomato 1. Place the yoghurt, garlic, lime juice and spices in a bowl, add the chicken, cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Then scrape off the marinade and reserve it. 2. Heat 1 tbsp ghee in a large pan, brown the chicken on all sides, remove and set aside. 3. For the curry: Heat 2 tbsp ghee in the pan, add the onion, ginger, chilli and spices and sauté until golden. Add the remaining ingredients, plus the chicken and reserved marinade, bring to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes or until thickened. 4. To serve: Serve with cauli rice and fresh coriander, with onion and tomato on the side.

PISTACHIO AND SAFFRON-STYLE KULFI • 3 tbsp xylitol • 1 egg • 1 egg yolk • 2 cups cream • 6 cardamom pods, bruised • big pinch of saffron in a little hot water • 50g pistachio nuts, chopped 1. Place the xylitol, egg and egg yolk in a bowl and whisk until pale and fluffy. Set aside. 2. Place 1 cup cream in a pot along with the cardamom and 68 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

saffron, bring to just below a boil, remove from heat, allow to cool slightly, then strain into a jug. 3. Add the warm cream to the egg mixture, whisking constantly, then return this mixture to the pot and warm over a very low heat, stirring until thickened. Remove

from heat and set aside to cool. 4. Place the remaining 1 cup cream in a bowl and whisk until firm, then fold into the cooled custard. Pour mixture into 80ml moulds and freeze until firm. 5. To serve: Unmould kulfis and scatter with nuts. ■

JUNIOR FOOD EDITOR: PIA-ALEXA DUARTE

SERVES 4


URGENT!

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Sign up for BANTING BOUNCEBACK, LOSE IT’s 2-week meal plan to get you back on track IN JUST TWO WEEKS, YOU’LL • lose weight • up your energy levels • sleep better • and feel completely reinspired!

CHANGE YOUR LIFE! Sign up to Ladies That LCHF (LTL) at www.loseit.co.za For more info, email us at info@loseit.co.za


sound advice BY: JUSTINE KIGGEN

Eat this, not that!

Whip up your own mayo to be sure you stick to LCHF! MAKES 1 CUP

KEEP ON TRACK PER CUP

• 2 egg yolks • 2 tsp dijon mustard • juice of ½ lemon • ¾ cup avocado or macadamia nut oil • himalayan salt and white pepper, to taste

Fat 180g Carbs 5g Protein 6g

EAT THIS

homemade mayo

1. Place the egg yolks in a bowl, add the mustard and lemon juice and blend with an immersion blender until light and creamy. 2. Add the oil, drop by drop to begin with, blending continuously until the mixture starts to emulsify, then add it in a thin, steady stream, blending continuously until all the oil has been used. 3. Season to taste and refrigerate until ready to serve. ■

NOT THAT

shop-bought mayo

We used a Russell Hobbs Stainless Steel Blender (R539) Game. 70 | LOSE IT! VOLUME MONTH 2014 11 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: ANÈL VAN DER MERWE. JUNIOR FOOD EDITOR: PIA-ALEXA DUARTE. PRICE CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRINT

HOMEMADE MAYONNAISE


test house BY: TASNEEM LARNEY

CHEF’S CHOICE

TAURUS ESTILO 3-TIERED FOOD STEAMER (ABOUT R799) YUPPIECHEF.COM

PHILIPS AVANCE LARGE AIRFRYER (3L: ABOUT R3699) YUPPIECHEF.COM

JAMIE OLIVER GARLIC PRESS (R159) BOARDMANS

There’s no better way to keep those delicious LCHF dishes coming than to have all the gizmos! ADE SLIM DIGITAL KITCHEN SCALE IN GREEN (ABOUT R649) YUPPIECHEF.COM

JAMIE OLIVER 6-PIECE KNIFE BLOCK SET (ABOUT R2300) BOARDMANS MAGIMIX LE MINI PLUS FOOD PROCESSOR (1.7L: ABOUT R3499) YUPPIECHEF.COM

GLOBAL SAI COOK’S KNIFE (19CM: R1549) YUPPIECHEF.COM

JAMIE OLIVER PARK CHARCOAL PORTABLE BRAAI (ABOUT R999) TAKEALOT, BOARDMANS

STONE-CRAFTED MORTAR & PESTLE SET (R199) POETRY

GLASS INFUSER TEAPOT (R325) WOOLWORTHS

LE CREUSET SIGNATURE SQUARE SKILLET GRILL (26CM: R1 400) LECREUSET.CO.ZA

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED

JAMIE OLIVER BRUSCHETTA SERVING BOARD (ABOUT R339,95) BOARDMANS

ALVA DIGITAL BBQ FORK THERMOMETER (ABOUT R290) BANKS

BELLA ICE CREAM MAKER (1L: ABOUT R600) BANKS

KITCHEN AID CHOPPER (ABOUT R1490) YUPPIECHEF.COM

NUTRIBULLET BLENDER (ABOUT R1849) YUPPIECHEF.COM *prices correct at time of going to print

LK’S POTJIES ENAMEL POTJIE POT (SIZE 3: ABOUT R1199) YUPPIECHEF.COM

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 71


RECIPE INDEX READERS’ RECIPES

• Aubergine rolls in a creamy tomato sauce VOL1 P44 • Brian Berkman’s cheesecake VOL2 P37 • Nicolette Schoonbee’s low carb rusks VOL3 P36 • Willem Theron’s tuna & bacon tartlets VOL4 P69 • Sonia Brilus’s chicken parmigiana VOL5 P63 • Sandy Marwick’s courgette fritters VOL6 P25 • Kathy White’s coconut pie VOL7 P75 • Zelda Theron’s savoury tart VOL8 P23 • Dianne Bibby’s fillet of beef stroganoff with lemon-parsley pesto VOL9 P31 • Barbara Robertson’s banting seed crackers VOL10 P33 • Elsi Meyer’s spiced chicken and cauli rice VOL11 P29

BREAKFAST

• Asparagus and bacon parcels with avocado VOL1 P53 • Asparagus and chive frittata VOL1 P49 • Avocado and berry smoothie VOL1 P51 • Baked blueberry ricotta loaf with crispy bacon VOL4 P50 • Baked eggs with cream & spinach VOL1 P50 • Banting bake with olives, eggs, ham & vine tomatoes VOL4 P52 • Boiled eggs with griddled tomato VOL1 P53 • Breakfast salad VOL1 P56 • Cheesy gem squash and sweet potato fritters VOL10 P64 • Coconut flapjacks with bacon VOL1 P56 • Cocoa crêpes with cream cheese & raspberries VOL4 P50 • Courgette blinis with chicken livers VOL1 P54 • Courgette blinis with cream cheese and smoked salmon VOL1 P50 • Egg and bacon ‘muffins’ VOL1 P54 • Eggs, salmon & griddled asparagus VOL4 P50 • Eggs with creamy kale and spinach VOL10 P65 • French toast with syrup and berries VOL10 P65 • Indulgent low carb muffins VOL1 P57 • Parma ham & poached eggs with a mustard butter sauce VOL4 P52 • Poached egg on pancetta with mixed mushrooms VOL1 P50 • Poached egg with aubergines and mushrooms VOL1 P51 • Poached eggs with asparagus and parmesan VOL1 P54 • Poached fish with lemongrass VOL1 P54

76 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

• Pumpkin fritters with bacon and hollandaise VOL1 P52 • Sausage, eggs and sautéed baby bok choy VOL1 P57 • Smoked salmon with avocado and bacon VOL1 P57 • Smoked trout and grilled vine tomatoes with parsley butter VOL1 P51 • Spicy baked eggs VOL1 P57 • Spicy breakfast wraps VOL10 P64 • Trout with scrambled eggs and aubergine VOL1 P54

CHICKEN

• Bacon-wrapped chicken with cauliflower purée VOL2 P62 • Balsamic chicken with shallots and artichokes VOL8 P73 • Bay leaf and parsley chicken VOL1 P73 • Butterflied chicken with herb chorizo butter VOL9 P64 • Chicken and green bean salad VOL1 P65 • Chicken and mushroom soup VOL8 P64 • Chicken and red peppers VOL9 P56 • Chicken meatballs in tomato sauce VOL3 P50 • Chicken meatballs with zoodles and kale pesto VOL9 P63 • Chicken ‘paella’ VOL6 P64 • Chicken pie with courgette topping VOL2 P65 • Chicken salad with mint dressing VOL1 P63 • Chicken tikka masala VOL1 P76 • Chicken thighs with chermoula VOL6 P62 • Chicken with garlic and creamy tarragon asparagus VOL6 P62 • Chicken with saffron yoghurt VOL11 P43 • Coconut chicken in lettuce cups VOL5 P57 • Creamy mushroom chicken with courgettes VOL1 P81 • Crispy chilli chicken and bacon burgers with tangy mayo VOL7 P54 • Crumbed chicken, blue cheese & spinach salad VOL4 P57 • Curried chicken livers with veg bhaji VOL3 P68 • Grilled butternut, beetroot, chicken and mozzarella salad VOL2 P65 • Harissa chicken VOL1 P79 • Lemon and cinnamon spatchcock chicken VOL2 P62 • Mozzarella chicken VOL11 P54 • Mushroom chicken burgers VOL1 P66 • Nori chicken wraps with coriander mayo VOL1 P60 • Olive & anchovy stuffed chicken breasts with caper butter VOL1 P74

• Paprika chicken wings with coriander and kale slaw VOL9 P63 • Paprika chicken with a buttermilk chive dressing & pumpkin chunks VOL3 P59 • Parsley and coconut-crusted chicken VOL9 P63 • Peri-peri chicken liver salad VOL6 P64 • Roasted chicken breasts with chimichurri sauce VOL3 P76 • Roast chicken Portuguese style VOL8 P56 • Roast dukkah chicken VOL11 P46 • Rolled stuffed chicken breasts VOL6 P61 • Smoky chicken with jalapeño ranch sauce and cucumber salad VOL9 P52 • Spatchcock chicken with lemon peri-peri butter VOL10 P46 • Spicy coconut chicken curry VOL11 P66 • Stuffed chicken breasts with green beans and almonds VOL2 P62 • Turmeric chicken kebabs with coconut almond sauce VOL4 P66 • Yoghurt-marinated chicken with coriander sauce VOL5 P54

DUCK

• Asian duck breasts with egg pancakes VOL5 P56 • Duck with ginger, raspberry and star anise VOL8 P48 • Duck with ‘noodles’ VOL3 P62 • Roast duck breasts with lettuce cups VOL7 P46 • Roast duck with pumpkin and garlic beans VOL1 P80

FISH

• Almond-crusted calamari VOL6 P76 • Anchovy and courgette fritters with basil cream sauce VOL11 P58 • Asian-style salmon & cucumber salad VOL4 P56 • Aubergine chips with trout & cream cheese VOL3 P21 • Baked fish with nutty cabbage salad VOL1 P72 • Baked salmon with mint and cucumber salad VOL1 P68 • Baked stuffed trout VOL3 P67 • Broccoli rice kedgeree VOL6 P52 • Calamari, chorizo & rocket on courgette pizzettes VOL3 P76 • Calamari stuffed with chorizo, feta & broccoli VOL5 P66 • Caper, chive and pepper-crusted tuna with sweet potato cakes VOL9 P65 • Catalan tomato fish with saffron mayonnaise VOL2 P58


• Courgette crêpes with trout & red pepper filling VOL6 P58 • Crispy fish with sweet potato fries VOL7 P54 • Crumbed hake & courgette fries VOL3 P50 • Deluxe cauliflower pizza with crème fraiche and smoked salmon VOL7 P54 • Easy salmon fish cakes with cauliflower purée VOL1 P67 • Feta and warm prawn salad VOL1 P68 • Fish and tahini sauce and fresh parsley VOL11 P44 • Fish in cabbage leaves with a tomato sauce VOL4 P62 • Fish poached in coconut and lemongrass VOL8 P48 • Fish with cucumber and coconut salad VOL1 P64 • Fresh tuna mayo lettuce leaf wrap VOL1 P79 • Fresh tuna salad VOL3 P76 • Ginger trout parcels with coconut sauce VOL9 P48 • Glam tuna salad VOL1 P68 • Hake in banana leaves VOL5 P67 • Hake with tomato, rocket and coriander sauce VOL9 P65 • Herby tuna steaks VOL2 P60 • Hot & spicy prawns VOL2 P60 • Lettuce cups with prawn salad VOL4 P56 • Mackerel and spiced nut salad VOL1 P68 • Mackerel courgette spirals VOL11 P60 • Mussels with tomato & chilli VOL9 P59 • Prawn and noodle-stuffed nori rolls VOL6 P9 • Roast chermoula fish with peppers VOL11 P42 • Roasted fish and tomato tray/bake VOL1 P72 • Roast salmon side with cucumber and red onion pickle VOL10 P56 • Roast stuffed snoek with lemon butter sauce VOL8 P56 • Salmon and bacon fish cakes VOL2 P58 • Salmon eggs benedict VOL6 P52 • Salmon with basil and jalapeño topping and minted cauli purée VOL9 P66 • Sesame-roasted yellowtail VOL7 P44 • Smoked haddock and tomato soup VOL2 P52 • Smoked salmon & cream cheese terrine VOL3 P60 • Snoek with fresh tomato salad & watercress pesto VOL6 P46 • Steamed mussels VOL5 P66 • Stuffed brinjals VOL8 P66 • Tomato prawn salad with herbed feta & tomato dressing VOL6 P48 • Trout and avocado salad VOL1 P66 • Trout on cauliflower ‘bruschetta’ VOL5 P66

• Trout with herb & almond crust VOL6 P76 • Trout with lime hollandaise and pickled kale salad VOL11 P64 • Tuna salad with green beans VOL1 P65 • Warm calamari salad with peppers and olives VOL11 P60 • Yellowtail with roasted basil tomatoes, olives and garlic courgettes VOL9 P66

BEEF

• Asian-style beef fillet salad VOL11 P66 • Beef and balsamic salad VOL3 P59 • Beef and mushroom goulash VOL8 P73 • Beef and mushroom pies VOL7 P56 • Beef bolognaise with courgette pasta VOL4 P65 • Beef braciole VOL2 P67 • Beef burgers and banting buns VOL2 P70 • Beef cottage pie VOL6 P68 • Beef chilli con carne with crispy aubergine VOL5 P56 • Beef curry with almonds and green beans VOL8 P50 • Beef fillet with kimchi and bok choy VOL9 P50 • Beef pot roast with mushroom gravy VOL2 P67 • Beef salad with spicy roasted almonds VOL6 P77 • Beef sausages with cauliflower mash and gravy VOL1 P76 • Beef with chimichurri sauce VOL8 P60 • Boerewors and mixed sweet peppers VOL10 P48 • Braised brisket in a tomato balsamic sauce VOL6 P48 • Broccoli & basil pesto soup with beef meatballs VOL3 P72 • Cucumber beef rolls VOL3 P69 • Liver with sweet potato, red pepper and glazed onions VOL1 P78 • Mexican-style beef VOL8 P64 • Paprika and white wine oxtail VOL8 P49 • Peppered fillet with rocket salsa verde VOL4 P68 • Pepper-rubbed fillet steak with broccoli and red wine sauce VOL2 P70 • Pesto-rubbed brisket VOL1 P72 • Picanha with red onions, vine tomatoes and chimichurri sauce VOL10 P49 • Prime rib roast with horseradish cream VOL7 P46 • Rump steak with grilled mushrooms and red pepper relish VOL9 P48 • Rump steak with parmesan fried mushrooms VOL4 P65 • Rustic meat loaf with eggs VOL6 P68

• Sally-Ann’s juicy meatballs VOL1 P74 • Seared beef carpaccio VOL1 P64 • Spiced beef flatbreads VOL11 P42 • Steak with creamy horseradish cauliflower purée VOL1 P78 • Steak with sweet pepper butter VOL11 P56 • Sticky beef short rib with creamy slaw VOL5 P55 • Thai aubergine beef curry VOL6 P58 • Thai beef salad VOL3 P50 • Zesty beef carpaccio VOL2 P68

LAMB

• Aubergine & lamb involtini with yoghurt sauce VOL5 P54 • Crispy lamb ribs with a fresh herb sauce VOL4 P62 • Greek lamb shoulder VOL8 P58 • Greek-style lamb kebab salad VOL4 P56 • Harissa lamb kebabs with balsamic onions VOL9 P48 • Italian-style lamb casserole VOL2 P72 • Lamb & aubergine bakes VOL3 P66 • Lamb and green bean curry VOL2 P72 • Lamb burgers on large mushrooms VOL3 P62 • Lamb chop kebabs with green chilli and lemon VOL10 P50 • Lamb chops with salsa verde and brussels sprouts VOL1 P73 • Lamb koftas with harissa yoghurt VOL11 P48 • Lamb loin chops with olives and sweet potato mash VOL9 P54 • Lamb loin chops with red pepper and walnut dip VOL11 P46 • Lamb meatball wraps with Greek salad VOL9 P51 • Lamb neck with artichokes and orange peel VOL8 P48 • Lamb sausages with harissa aubergine VOL4 P64 • Lamb schwarma with yoghurt, tomato and pine nuts VOL11 P47 • Lamb shanks with caper berries, anchovies, lemons and olives VOL8 P72 • Lamb shin curry with tamarind and baby brinjals VOL8 P66 • Lamb shoulder with garlic and lemon VOL11 P60 • Roasted lamb shoulder VOL3 P71 • Roasted rack of lamb & spinach salad VOL3 P55 • Roast deboned leg of lamb with baby onions and cabbage VOL1 P80 • Roast leg of lamb VOL2 P72 • Roast leg of lamb with béarnaise sauce VOL1 P81 • Rolled leg of lamb with mixed nut and herb stuffing VOL7 P46 • Sally-Ann’s juicy meatballs VOL1 P74 • Spicy double lamb patties on banting wraps VOL6 P69

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• Sunday lunch leg of lamb VOL1 P62 • Tagine of lamb shanks VOL11 P48

PORK

• Asian-style pork meatballs with slaw VOL2 P76 • Baked goat’s cheese and mushrooms VOL1 P61 • Balsamic pork neck braise VOL2 P76 • Banting BLT VOL3 P21 • Braised pork belly VOL2 P76 • Calamari, chorizo & rocket on courgette pizzettes VOL3 P76 • Courgette, gruyère & ham loaf VOL6 P59 • Crispy chorizo, green bean and egg salad VOL1 P69 • Gammon with raspberry glaze VOL10 P54 • Ginger curried pork skewers VOL11 P64 • Green chilli pork mince VOL8 P71 • Green olive and black forest ham salad VOL1 P61 • Herby pork fillet with a strawberry & baby spinach salad VOL5 P55 • Kale pizza with goat’s cheese VOL11 P56 • Lemongrass pork with cashew nuts and mangetouts VOL9 P52 • Mixed tomato salad with mozzarella & crispy chorizo VOL4 P58 • Pork chops with cauliflower puttanesca VOL1 P80 • Pork chops with cranberries and red cabbage VOL8 P64 • Pork fillet in a creamy coconut sauce VOL1 P74 • Pork fillet with bacon and asparagus VOL9 P50 • Pork fillet with coconut, green beans and tomatoes VOL9 P59 • Pork loaf with tomato & halloumi salad VOL3 P52 • Pork loin roast on the bone VOL8 P60 • Pork meatballs in almond satay sauce VOL6 P70 • Pork ribs with pumpkin crisps VOL10 P46 • Pork sausages with pancetta VOL4 P62 • Pork sausages with peppers and onions VOL8 P49 • Pork shoulder in a rich tomato sauce VOL8 P71 • Potted pork pie VOL6 P70 • Pulled pork with banting buns VOL3 P55 • Quick thai-style curry VOL3 P60 • Roast pork belly VOL7 P47 • Roulade with spinach, parma ham, tomato & ricotta VOL6 P54 • Rustic meat loaf with eggs VOL6 P68 • Sausage & bacon bake with sautéed spinach VOL1 P77 • Sausage, apple & fennel bake VOL3 P66

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• Spicy mince stuffed small peppers VOL3 P76 • Sweet and sour pork with superlite noodles VOL7 P57 • Warm tomato & pork stir-fry with courgette noodles VOL6 P46 • Warm paprika pork fillet with apple salad VOL1 P72

SALADS & SIDES

• Artichoke salad VOL1 P60 • Artichoke, prawn and parma ham salad VOL10 P54 • Asian-style salmon & cucumber salad VOL4 P56 • Avocado, roast sweet potato and tomato salad VOL2 P56 • Baby spinach with crispy bacon and lemon butter VOL7 P60 • Baked leek and vine tomato gratin VOL7 P62 • Baked marrow bones with herb garlic butter VOL7 P60 • Beef and balsamic salad VOL3 P59 • Beef salad with spicy roasted almonds VOL6 P77 • Broccoli pilaf VOL3 P9 • Brussels sprouts, roast pumpkin & fennel salad with a creamy dressing VOL5 P31 • Cauliflower purée VOL2 P21 • Chargrilled eggplant & macadamia salad with yoghurt dressing VOL5 P62 • Chicken and green bean salad VOL1 P65 • Chicken salad with mint dressing VOL1 P63 • Courgette and calf liver salad with blue cheese and walnuts VOL10 P48 • Crispy chorizo, green bean and egg salad VOL1 P69 • Crumbed chicken, blue cheese & spinach salad VOL4 P57 • Cucumber & courgette salad with egg mimosa VOL5 P60 • Cucumber salad with coconut dressing VOL10 P47 • Fennel & radish salad VOL3 P21 • Feta and warm prawn salad VOL1 P68 • Fish with cucumber and coconut salad VOL1 P64 • Fresh tuna salad VOL3 P76 • Glam tuna salad VOL1 P68 • Greek-style lamb kebab salad VOL4 P56 • Green beans, walnuts and roasted baby balsamic onions VOL10 P56 • Green olive and black forest ham salad VOL1 P61 • Grilled aubergine salad VOL1 P67 • Grilled butternut, beetroot, chicken and mozzarella salad VOL2 P65 • Grilled vegetables and ricotta salad with rocket pesto VOL1 P69 • Lettuce cups with prawn salad VOL4 P56

• Mackerel and spiced nut salad VOL1 P68 • Mixed tomato salad with mozzarella & crispy chorizo VOL4 P58 • Peri-peri chicken liver salad VOL6 P64 • Red cabbage & green apple winter salad with red onions VOL7 P62 • Roast cauliflower & broccoli salad with a creamy dressing VOL4 P58 • Roast squash with taleggio and walnuts VOL7 P62 • Saffron cauliflower purée VOL10 P57 • Spicy cauliflower salad with poached egg VOL5 P60 • Steamed bok choy & tender stem broccoli with toasted sesame seeds VOL7 P62 • Stuffed tomatoes VOL3 P54 • Sweet potatoes with herb butter VOL10 P47 • Thai beef salad VOL3 P50 • Tomato prawn salad with herbed feta & tomato dressing VOL6 P48 • Tomato salad with halloumi & pistachio gremolata VOL5 P62 • Trout and avocado salad VOL1 P66 • Tuna salad with green beans VOL1 P65

TREATS & BAKES

• Almond milk, coconut & rose jelly VOL6 P75 • Almond raspberry muffins VOL5 P78 • Baked almond & orange puddings VOL8 P61 • Banting buns VOL2 P81 • Banting seed crackers VOL7 P15 • Berry and coconut ices VOL10 P66 • Berry pudding VOL3 P79 • Berry popsicles VOL4 P74 • Butterscotch sauce VOL7 P70 • Cheesecake and strawberry jelly trifle VOL10 P57 • Cheesy almond and rosemary crackers VOL7 P74 • Chocolate almond cake VOL2 P80 • Chocolate cake with marshmallowy topping VOL8 P61 • Chocolate chip cookies VOL7 P74 • Chocolate fondue VOL8 P66 • Chocolate frozen dessert VOL3 P79 • Christmas cassata VOL10 P58 • Coconut cake VOL5 P77 • Coconut custard pudding with berries, topped with meringue VOL6 P54 • Coconut and lime pudding VOL2 P81 • Coconut fridge tart with raspberries VOL4 P72 • Coconut macaroons VOL7 P74 • Courgette cake VOL3 P79 • Dairy-free almond butter ice cream VOL4 P74 • Dark chocolate fondant VOL6 P55 • Deluxe chocolate fudge truffles VOL7 P70 • Lemon tart with chocolate-hazelnut base VOL2 P80


• Lemon meringue pie VOL5 P77 • Lemon yoghurt poppy seed cake VOL4 P74 • Lime & mint granita VOL5 P78 • Mini coffee cocoa tarts VOL4 P72 • Mixed berry yoghurt dessert VOL1 P82 • Nutty courgette loaf VOL4 P53 • Pistachio and saffron-style kulfi VOL11 P68 • Pistachio ice cream VOL5 P78 • Pomegranate granita VOL11 P60 • Raspberry coconut ice VOL7 P70 •Soft almond cookies VOL10 P58 • Steamed chocolate custards VOL8 P51 • Syrupy lemon & almond cake VOL6 P75 • Toasted coconut marshmallows VOL7 P70 • Turkish delight jellies VOL11 P48 • Yoghurt and apple popsicles VOL2 P81 • Yoghurt rose panna cotta with a berry jelly VOL5 P76

• Roast aubergine with feta & yoghurt rocket dressing VOL6 P59 • Roast cauliflower & broccoli salad with a creamy dressing VOL4 P58 • Roasted tomato soup VOL6 P48 • Spicy cauliflower salad with poached egg VOL5 P60 • Spicy roast cauliflower in lettuce cups VOL2 P54 • Spinach & courgette quesadillas VOL5 P61 • Spinach & mixed tomato tart VOL4 P66 • Spinach & ricotta gnocchi with burnt sage butter VOL3 P67 • Spinach with curd cheese and fresh tomato topping VOL8 P50 • Streusel-topped roast vegetable bake VOL7 P44 • Stuffed baked onions VOL8 P58 • Stuffed brinjals VOL8 P66 • Stuffed tomatoes VOL3 P54 • Tomato salad with halloumi & pistachio gremolata VOL5 P62 • Vegetable omelette VOL1 P67 • Winter vegetable bake VOL8 P60

VEGETARIAN

OTHER

• Asian-style open omelette VOL2 P56 • Avocado, roast sweet potato and tomato salad VOL2 P56 • Baked ricotta, hazelnut and artichoke pots VOL9 P67 • Banting roulade filled with red pesto broccoli & cream cheese VOL3 P68 • Beetroot & tomato tart VOL5 P60 • Braised cabbage VOL3 P72 • Broccoli pilaf VOL3 P9 • Broccoli with poached eggs VOL11 P59 • Brussels sprouts, roast pumpkin & fennel salad with a creamy dressing VOL5 P31 • Cauliflower cheese VOL6 P57 • Cauli pizzas with tomato, blue cheese and walnut topping VOL9 P52 • Celery and blue cheese soup with crispy sage VOL9 P67 • Chargrilled eggplant & macadamia salad with yoghurt dressing VOL5 P62 • Coconut cream curried vegetables VOL8 P72 • Cucumber & courgette salad with egg mimosa VOL5 P60 • Curried pumpkin frittata VOL9 P51 • Fennel & radish salad VOL3 P21 • Gourmet banting pizza VOL2 P54 • Grilled aubergine salad VOL1 P67 • Grilled eggplant stacks with tahini dressing VOL9 P57 • Grilled vegetables and ricotta salad with rocket pesto VOL1 P69 • Halloumi cheese wrapped in vine leaves VOL11 P54 • Labne and spinach bake VOL11 P44 • Mozzarella, pesto and tomato stack VOL1 P68

• Avocado and kale smoothies VOL10 P66 • Banting wraps VOL8 P44 • Cucumber vodka blitz VOL10 P72 • Low carb pizza VOL1 P79 • Pomegranate martini VOL10 P73 • Rum and coconut with basil sugar VOL10 P73 • Sparkling lime water VOL10 P50 • Sparkling wine with berries and rose petals VOL10 P73 • Tequila with raspberry crush VOL10 P72 • Whisky rooibos iced tea VOL10 P72 • White wine and apple spritzer VOL10 P73

SOUPS

• Broccoli & basil pesto soup with beef meatballs VOL3 P72 • Cauliflower and caraway soup with coriander oil VOL2 P52 • Celery and blue cheese soup with crispy sage VOL9 P67 • Chicken and prawn zoodle soup VOL11 P66 • Chilled watercress and avocado soup with radish salt VOL10 P54 • Classic brown onion soup VOL7 P66 • Creamy cauliflower soup with a drizzle of truffle oil VOL3 P62 • Creamy cauliflower soup with bacon bits VOL6 P57 • Curried spinach, fennel & coriander soup with yoghurt VOL7 P66 • Hearty tomato soup VOL7 P66 • Minestrone-style soup with herbed ricotta dumplings and shredded chicken VOL7 P67 • Roasted tomato soup VOL6 P48

• Roasted red pepper soup VOL2 P52 • Smoked haddock and tomato soup VOL2 P52

SNACKS

• Aubergine & yoghurt dip VOL3 P21 • Aubergine parmesan chips with creamy pesto-style dip VOL4 P78 • Baba ganoush VOL5 P70 • Baked nutty camembert VOL10 P71 • Beetroot tzatziki VOL5 P70 • Biltong dip VOL9 P73 • Broccoli and cauliflower falafels VOL11 P40 • Cauliflower dolmades VOL5 P72 • Cauli-nut hummus VOL11 P42 • Chicken liver pâté VOL9 P72 • Courgette & fennel fritters with snoek pâté VOL5 P71 • Courgette bhajis VOL6 P26 • Courgette brownies VOL10 P71 • Courgette pesto dip VOL5 P70 • Cucumber & trout with saffron mayonnaise VOL4 P77 • Cucumber rolls with tuna VOL10 P70 • Egg & courgette muffins VOL3 P21 • Eggs filled with creamy avocado VOL10 P70 • LCHF scotch eggs VOL6 P26 • Mini pizzas VOL6 P26 • Mixed nut-coated cheese balls VOL 5 P71 • Moutabel-style eggplant dip VOL11 P40 • Nut and cream cheese roll VOL10 P65 • Parmesan-and-nut crisps with rosemary salt VOL10 P70 • Pork terrine VOL9 P72 • Red pepper and tomato dip VOL9 P73 • Roast beef nori rolls with pesto & asparagus VOL4 P78 • Roasted spiced macadamia nuts & pumpkin seeds VOL6 P26 • Skewered beef koftas with mixed tomato and cucumber pickle VOL5 P70 • Smoked angel fish pâté VOL9 P73 • Spicy curry mince stuffed peppers VOL5 P72 • Stuffed mushrooms with creamy bacon VOL4 P78 • Wrapped spinach-and-apple balls VOL10 P71

RUBS & MARINADES

• Minted greek yoghurt marinade VOL7 P48 • Zesty herb and lime marinade VOL7 P48 • Spicy sundried tomato marinade VOL7 P48 • Italian rub VOL7 P49 • Indian rub VOL7 P49 • Spanish rub VOL7 P49

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take note

WHAT CAN I EAT? YES MEAT

As far as possible, choose grass-fed or organic meats. Enjoy the fat and the skin! • Bacon (try to find charcuterie bacon, if possible without nitrates and nitrites, and with the lowest carb content – which means the least sugar) • Beef • Biltong (for powdered, grind your own) • Chicken • Duck • Game • Home-cured meats (if buying cured meats, avoid sugar and strange chemicals) • Lamb • Offal • Pork • Sausages containing only meat and spices (no MSG or fillers like gluten, rusk, soy, sugar and so on) • Turkey

EGGS

Any way you like, for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Real organic eggs are definitely best, if you can find them.

FRUIT* • Avocado • Berries • Coconut

FISH/ SEAFOOD

(on the SASSI green list, of course!) The oilier the better: • Anchovies • Angelfish • Calamari (squid) • Dorado • Haddock • Hake • Kob • Mackerel • Mussels • Prawns • Salmon • Sardines • Scallops • Snoek • Trout • Tuna • Yellowtail

DRINKS

• All teas (with no milk) • Coffee (with cream or butter, not milk) • Sparkling water • Water

VEGGIES

Rule of thumb here is, if it grows above ground, it’s generally okay. • Artichokes • Asparagus • Aubergine (brinjal or eggplant) • Broccoli • Brussels sprouts • Cabbage • Cauliflower • Celery • Courgettes (baby marrows or zucchini) • Cucumber

80 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

• Green beans • Kale • Lettuce • Mangetouts • Marrows • Mushrooms • Olives • Onions • Peppers • Pumpkin • Radishes • Spinach • Sugar snaps/snow peas • Tomatoes

SWEET THINGS

• Erythritol • Stevia • Xylitol (good quality)

FATS

• Animal fats • Avocado oil • Beef and lamb tallow • Butter • Coconut cream • Coconut milk • Coconut oil • Dripping • Duck fat • Extra virgin olive oil • Ghee • Lard • Macadamia oil • Mayonnaise (homemade only, using the right oils)

FLOUR

• Almond flour • Coconut flour • Hazelnut flour • Other nut flours

SEEDS

• Chia seeds • Flaxseeds • Pumpkin seeds • Sesame seeds • Sunflower seeds

NUTS*

• Almonds • Brazils • Hazelnuts • Macadamias • Pecans • Pine nuts • Walnuts

DAIRY*

(all full fat) While you are trying to lose weight, it may be better to cut out all dairy other than butter. By the way, unsalted butter is delicious in coffee! • Blue cheeses • Butter • Cream (preferably double) • Cream cheese • Double cream yoghurt • Feta cheese • Ghee • Parmesan cheese • All other high-fat cheeses

*

If you’re eating all the right things and still not losing weight, you may be eating too many nuts, too many berries or too much dairy or protein. Try to cut back and see how it goes.


These lists are always a work in progress – please feel free to share any new discoveries you make on your LCHF journey with us!

SOMETIMES ALCOHOL • Brandy • Champagne • Dry red wine • Dry white wine • Rum • Sparkling wine • Tequila • Vodka • Whisky

SWEET THINGS

• Dark chocolate (80% and above cocoa content – and only very occasionally) • Honey (no more than 1 tsp at a time, very occasionally – use honey strictly for cooking, otherwise it will seduce you back into sugar cravings in no time!)

NUTS

• Cashews

FRUIT

DAIRY

• Milk (only full cream and only very occasionally)

• All fruit other than berries

VEGGIES • Beetroot • Butternut • Carrots • Sweet potato

NEVER ALCOHOL

• Anything labelled ‘lite’ • Beer • Cider • Cocktails • Sugary liqueurs

VEGGIES & PULSES • Beans • Chickpeas • Dried beans • Lentils • Parsnips • Peas • Potatoes

SWEET THINGS

• Agave • Any artificial sweeteners • Biscuits • Cakes

• Chocolate (less than 80% cocoa content) • Energy drinks • Fizzy drinks • Fructose • Fruit juices • HFCS • Ice cream (unless it’s LCHF!) • Malt • Pastries • Sugar • Sweets • Syrup

MEATS

• Lunch meats • Processed meats • Vienna sausages

DRIED FRUIT • All of it

NUTS

• Peanuts (they’re not really nuts)

SOY

• Edamame beans • Tofu • All soy – including sausages, etc

FATS

• Canola oil • Cottonseed oil • Flaxseed oil • Grapeseed oil • Hemp oil • Margarine • Sesame oil • Rapeseed oil • Safflower oil • Soybean oil • Sunflower oil

GRAINS & CEREALS

• All whole grains • Amaranth • Barley • Bread • Breakfast cereals • Bulgur wheat • Corn • Couscous • Crackers • Millet • Muesli • Oats • Pasta • Popcorn • Porridge • Quinoa • Rice • Rye • Spelt • Wheat

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 81


books

BY: SANDRA PARMEE AND ANNA RICH

BY LUCY BEE (QUADRILLE)

Lucy Bee is the person behind Lucy Bee Limited, a small family-run business that came about because Lucy was diagnosed with coeliac disease when she was an infant. Her family took great pains to stick to healthy, organic, gluten-free food, and along the way they discovered coconut oil and its multiple benefits. Their first cookbook has been put together by Lucy, and in the first few pages she deals with the nitty-gritties: what coconut oil is, how much you should eat each day, and the many ways you can use it. A qualified beauty therapist, Lucy even recommends using coconut oil as a moisturiser, makeup remover, deodorant, and more. This is primarily a cookbook, though, with rustic recipes that cover everything from breakfast to dessert – including lots for the vegetarians out there. Recipes for dressings, stocks, sauces and marinades also feature, and the nutritional info for every ingredient used is included. Perfect for the beginner banter.

GREAT READS A ROUND-UP OF BOOKS RELATED TO THE LCHF LIFESTYLE

endorsed’; was it one of Noakes’ co-authors, tired of living in his great shadow; or was it the CEO of SnackCorp, where sales of bread and confectionery have taken a huge dive since Noakes coauthored The Real Meal Revolution? This is a fun, light-hearted read.

Giveaway:

WE’RE GIVING AWAY THREE COPIES OF DEATH BY CARBS BY PAIGE NICK. To enter, SMS the keyword PAIGE, along with your full name, physical or postal address, and email address to 33403. SMSes cost R1,50. Free SMSes don’t apply. CLOSING DATE: 20 March 2016. See page 83 for rules.

DEATH BY CARBS

RUNNING YOUR FIRST ULTRA

In this work of fiction by local author and columnist Paige Nick, Prof Tim Noakes has been murdered in his own home. The banting community is in an uproar, and the possible perpetrators are endless: was it the widow who can now safely pass off her meal plans as ‘Noakes-

When you change your lifestyle successfully with LCHF – as so many on the pages of LOSE IT! have done – the next step is often to become more active, starting with walking and perhaps gearing up to running. If you’re already a runner (you may have improved your performance

BY PAIGE NICK (N&B BOOKS)

82 | LOSE IT! VOLUME 11 2016

BY KRISSY MOEHL (PAGE STREET PUBLISHING)

by going into ketosis), it might be time to stretch the distance. Done a standard marathon? Got the Two Oceans, Comrades, Wildcoast Wildrun, Washie 100 Miler in your sights? Then this book is for you. US author Krissy Moehl is one of the top female ultramarathon runners, with more than 100 races and 46 female wins, so she’s well equipped to show us how to do it. In her detailed, flexible training plan, there’s a base phase to bulk up mileage; a hills and strength-training phase; speed, endurance and fine-tuning phases; cross-training and recovery time. See you at the finish!

FUEL FOR LIFE

BY BEAR GRYLLS (BANTAM PRESS) Okay, Bear isn’t on quite the same page as us. But with all that buffness, it’s worth hearing what he has to say about nutrition and you’re bound to find a bit of overlap in his 70-plus yummy-sounding recipes – free from wheat, gluten, dairy and refined sugar – that emphasise natural, wholesome food. In case Bear hasn’t yet made a bleep on your radar, he’s the host of TV adventure shows that have been watched by about 1.2 billion viewers in over 200 countries. An ex-army guy who served in the UK Special Forces Reserve, he has also led expeditions to the ends of the earth, raising millions for children’s charities, and has been Chief Scout since 2009.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED

COCONUT OIL – NATURE’S PERFECT INGREDIENT


10 RULES of banting LCHF/banting isn’t a high-protein diet – it’s a high-fat, medium-protein, lowcarb way of eating.

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REAL FOODS 2 CHOOSE that look like what they are, and cook them from scratch. NO SUGAR – it’s best to go cold turkey. But if you need to make a transition, use stevia, xylitol or erythritol – NOT artificial sweeteners.

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LOSE IT! DISCLAIMER

1. You mustn’t use the content in LOSE IT! as a substitute for medical advice from a healthcare professional. You should seek medical advice from a qualified professional before starting any weight-loss programme. 2. Both the LOSE IT! website and the magazine (which we sometimes refer to as LOSE IT!) provide educational information on weight-loss management and are intended to assist users in weight loss. LOSE IT! is not a medical organisation and cannot give medical advice or a diagnosis. 3. The information and material on the LOSE IT! website and in this magazine are intended as a general guide to assist weight loss and do not take into account individual circumstances. LOSE IT! will not provide any form of assistance or support in individual cases, nor feedback on any information you submit or post to the website and magazine. 4. You use the LOSE IT! website and magazine and the information contained in both entirely at your own risk and you assume full responsibility and risk of loss resulting from such use. 5. LOSE IT! and its affiliates, their shareholders, office bearers, employees, agents and consultants will not be liable for any damages that arise in any way from the content of LOSE IT! This limitation of liability includes but is not limited to any direct or indirect loss, damages and/or consequential damages. 6. We’ve taken all reasonable steps to ensure the correctness of the information provided on the LOSE IT! website and in this magazine.

STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR GIVEAWAY ON PAGE 82 1. The giveaway is open to South African residents over 18 years old. 2. The judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into. 3. Prizes are not transferable and may not be converted into cash. 4. Please supply your residential address if possible. 5. Staff members of Media24, the sponsors and their immediate family members may not enter. 6. The competition is open to readers in South Africa only. 7. Any incidental costs are not included in the prize. 8. The closing date is 20 March 2016 and no late entries will be accepted. 9. By completing any details or providing these details you give us permission to communicate with you via these channels. 10. Delivery of prizes takes 6 weeks after notification.

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NO GRAINS of any kind.

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HEALTHY FAT is not the enemy. Enjoy it!

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STOP SNACKING You won’t need to – it’s just a habit.

EAT ONLY when you are hungry; eat until you are satisfied – then stop.

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EAT EGGS – they’re healthy, satisfying and very good for you.

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NO (or very, very little) FRUIT Think of it as a sweet rather than as a healthy snack.

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DON’T EAT when you’re not hungry. You won’t die if you occasionally skip a meal you don’t feel like eating.

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THE EDITORIAL TEAM FAIRLADY EDITORIAL TEAM Editorial Head Office: ABSA Centre, 4 Adderley Street, Cape Town, 8001 Postal address: Box 1802, Cape Town, 8000 Tel (021) 408 3898 EDITOR Suzy Brokensha Office manager Deidre de Bruyn (021) 408 3898 Deputy editor: Creative Caryn McArthy Managing editor Crystal Matthews Senior editor: Departments Anna Rich Fashion editor Cara-Lee Ruditzky Fashion intern Kirstin Gerber Beauty editor Kelli Clifton Food editor Justine Kiggen Junior food editor Pia-Alexa Duarte Senior features writer Liesl Robertson Features writers Marli Meyer, Sandra Parmee Features assistant Jana Wessels Photojournalist Chris de Beer Chief subeditor Sameena Amien (021) 408 3834 LOSE IT! contributing subeditors Ethne Withers, Maya Morgan-Skillen Content manager/Consumer Test House editor Tasneem Larney (021) 408 3854 Promotions manager Washiefa Larney (021) 408 3910 Senior designer Janine Nortjé Acting production coordinator Liezel Dukes Picture editor Anèl van der Merwe Digital project manager Marli Meyer Retoucher Johan Alberts

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MEDIA24 CORPORATE CEO: Media24 Esmaré Weideman General Manager: Lifestyle Charlene Beukes CFO: Magazines Raj Lalbahadur Published by Media24, Naspers Centre, 40 Heerengracht, Cape Town, 8001 (021) 406 2121 Printed by Paarl Media Cape and distributed by On the Dot Copyright Media24 (Pty) Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, without the prior permission in writing from the publisher. While reasonable precautions have been taken to ensure the accuracy of advice and information given to readers, the editor, proprietors and publishers cannot accept responsibility for any damages or inconvenience that may arise therefrom. FAIRLADY has the right to make alterations to any material submitted, and cannot be held responsible for the loss or damage to any material submitted for publication. All prices quoted were correct at the time of going to press, and may vary from shop to shop. The distribution of prizes is the responsibility of the competition sponsor and FAIRLADY cannot be held responsible for failure to deliver or the loss of or damage to winners’ prizes. Syndication of FAIRLADY material: visit www.images24.co.za Retail queries: Tel 0861 888 989 or email assistance@onthedot.co.za

VOLUME 11 2016 LOSE IT! | 83


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