Page 1

Weeknight Dinners

Pasta, Steak, Chicken & More, p. 27

Make-Ahead

3 ways Bread 1 dough, to shape it

Secrets

to the best

Hummus Rustic

Spanish

Stews

HOW TO COOK Pork Belly FEB/MAR 2016 • No.139 www.finecooking.com

Cheesy Breadstick Twists, Seeded Rolls, and Whole Wheat Sandwich Loaf, p. 46


THE SECRET INGREDIENT IS

For over 100 years, Sun-Maid’s natural sweetness has elevated all kinds of dishes—everything from stews to sauces. So the next time you’re getting creative in the kitchen, #RememberRaisins

LAMB PITAS WITH BALSAMIC-INFUSED RAISINS See recipe on opposite page

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SUNMAID.COM/RECIPES


RAISIN RECIPE 124 Lamb Pitas with Balsamic-Infused Raisins NO.

—— I N G R E D I E N T S —— MARINADE · · · · · · · · · · · ·

2 Tbsp. ground annatto seed 1 Tbsp. orange juice 1 /2 tsp. cumin 1 /8 tsp. cloves 1 /8 tsp. allspice 3 cloves garlic, crushed 1 Tbsp. vinegar (white or cider) 1 tsp. salt 1 /2 tsp. pepper 1 tsp. lemon or lime juice 1 /2 tsp. lemon or lime zest 1 Tbsp. adobo sauce from canned chipotles

· · · · · · ·

1 lb. lamb stew meat, (2” pieces) 2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 onion, chopped 3 cups vegetable broth 2 chipotles in adobo 3 bay leaves 6 pitas

F O R T H E S TOV E TO P

BALSAMIC RAISINS · 1 cup Sun-Maid Natural Raisins · 1 cup balsamic vinegar, warmed · 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced

P I TA TO P P I N G S · · · · · ·

1 cucumber, thinly sliced 1 /2 cup Greek yogurt 1 clove garlic, minced 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 Tbsp. thinly sliced mint Salt & pepper to taste

©2015 SUN-MAID GROWERS OF CALIFORNIA

—— D I R EC TI O N S —— - Mix marinade items into a paste. Rub into lamb. Marinate for 8 hrs. - Heat 2 Tbsp. oil in a pan and sear the lamb. Add onions and sauté. - Blend veggie broth and chipotles. Add this and bay leaves to the lamb pan. - Boil then cover. Cook on low for 60 mins. - Uncover and cook until liquid reduces to a sauce and lamb is tender (30 mins.) Then shred lamb with a fork. - While lamb cooks, put raisins and balsamic in small saucepan. Simmer until raisins plump and vinegar reduces halfway. - Remove raisins. Set aside with other toppings. - Heat pitas in a pan with a little oil. Add meat & toppings.


E E V E RY D AY K A M B M E MOR A L E W I T H

Meals. Maille.Memories. MAILLE.COM


contents

f e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 1 6 i s s u e 1 3 9 f e at u r e s

46 Make-Ahead Breads

Make one dough, choose how to shape it, and bake it on your schedule. By Donna Currie

52 Celery in the Spotlight

Usually a bit player, celery takes center stage in soup, side dishes, and even a main course. By Ronne Day

60 Heavenly Hummus

Light, smooth, ethereal. Here’s how. By Marge Perry

64 Pork Belly

3 ways to cook this rich, meltingly tender cut By Duskie Estes

72 Bread Pudding 101

Learn the basics behind this classic, comforting dessert. By Abigail Johnson Dodge

74 Catalan Comfort

Get to know the rustic, deeply flavored stews of Catalonia. By Jeff Koehler

82 Hot Chocolate

Chef Rick Bayless pairs chiles and chocolate in Mexican-inspired recipes both savory and sweet.

Learn the secrets to making the best hummus, plus six tasty ways to flavor it, on page 60.


contents f e b r u a ry/ m a r c h 2 0 1 6 i s s u e 1 3 9

90 38

91 38

39

d e pa r t m e n t s Kale Sprouts

WHAt We’Re cooKInG noW

Pineapple, Napa Cabbage, Blood Oranges, Grapes, Avocados, Spaghetti Squash, Beets 3 WAYs WItH...

Maple Syrup

27 Make It Tonight

Fresh and easy weeknight cooking. FooD scIence

36 Brassicas

Cooking these beloved vegetables can be tricky, but a little know-how will help you turn out tastier results.

Our latest buys for the kitchen and table. on LocAtIon

41 Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking

A new breed of chefs takes Hawaiian food back to its roots.

10 12 16 18 96 97 98

eDItoR’s LetteR MenUs contRIBUtoRs #FInecooKInG soURces nUtRItIon RecIPe InDeX

89 Test Kitchen

Tips, techniques, equipment, ingredients, and more, from our experts.

p. 27

p. 46 p. 60 p. 74 p. 64

6

FINE COOKING • FEB/MAR 2016

Cover photograph by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day

Contents photographs by Scott Phillips

tRY tHIs

in every issue

38 Great Finds

21 CookFresh

39

89

39


TO F E E D M Y

BECAUSE A NEW

C R E AT I V I T Y

INGREDIENT IS LIKE

B EC A U S E

W H Y I CO O K®

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f i n e c o o k i n g .c o m

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JOIN OUR

T A B L E

a truste ami ran FIND THIS AND OTHER INNOVATIVE RECIPES USING OUR EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL ON COLAVITA.COM DEA

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facebook.com/ColavitaOliveOil o f t h e we youtube.com/ColavitaOliveOil

pinterest.com/ColavitaEvoo @ColavitaEVOO


L E T T E R F R O M T H E E D I TO R

The stories behind the stories “Where do you get your ideas for articles?” I’m asked this question all the time. The answer: everywhere. Sometimes we get ideas (“pitches” in magazine lingo) from food writers or chefs, but more often than not, our ideas come from our everyday experiences. Our editors are constantly looking at the world through the lens of what might make a good Fine Cooking article, whether we’re physically at work or not. Maybe we’ll be at the grocery store on a Saturday, shopping for our families, when we spot an unfamiliar food (“Hey, maybe we should do a story on that”). Or we’re flipping through a cookbook and think, “This could make a great feature.” That’s how the article “MakeAhead Breads” on page 46 (from a book by the same name) came to be. Another feature in this issue grew out of a simple side dish recipe that was created by our food stylist, Ronne Day, for our Make It Tonight column. When she presented her dish of caramelized celery with lentils to the staff for tasting, we were so surprised and delighted by its flavors that I asked her to continue exploring celery as a main ingredient. Thus, “Celery in the Spotlight” (p. 52) was born. “Catalan Comfort” (p. 74) originated in a sidewalk café in Barcelona, Spain. That’s where one of our past contributors, Jeff Koehler (“Tagines,” April/May 2014), lives, and when I was there last April, I met up with him. Inevitably, our conversation turned to food, and Jeff began telling me about his favorite rustic slow-cooked stews that are prepared in a cassola, a traditional piece of Catalan cookware. As he described the flavors, I started to get hungry—a sure sign that these were dishes worth learning to cook and sharing with Fine Cooking readers. I’m telling you these stories because I bet you have moments of curiosity like these, too. So the next time you catch yourself thinking, “I wish I knew how to cook that,” drop us a note at fc@taunton.com, and maybe one day, you’ll open a new Fine Cooking to find your article idea in print. Hope you enjoy the issue! —Jennifer Armentrout, editor

Whole Wheat Bread Dough from “Make-Ahead Breads,” p. 46

Caramelized Celery with Lentils from “Celery in the Spotlight,” p. 52

JOIN OUR ADVISORY PANEL for A CHANCE TO WIN! We want to hear from you. Your opinions and insights are important to us. As a member of Fine Cooking’s advisory panel, you’ll have the opportunity to tell us what you think about the magazine, website, and other products.

Catalan Stewed Lamb with Potatoes and Green Olives from “Catalan Comfort,” p. 74

For more information and to sign up, visit finecooking.com/panel and be entered to win Fine Cooking’s digital magazine archive.

10

FINE COOKING • FEB/MAR 2016

P h o t o g r a p h s b y S c o t t P h i l l i p s , e x c e p t c e n t e r r i g h t b y C a r m e n Tr o e s s e r


Steep a cup of Yogi tea and you have something more than delicious. Every intriguing blend of herbs and botanicals is on a mission, supporting energy, stamina, clarity, immunity, tranquility, cleansing or unwinding.

®,©2015-2016 East West Tea Company, LLC

Every cup is a gift to mind, body and spirit.

®

f i n e c o o k i n g .c o m

11


MENUS

Weeknight Pairings

Dinner with Friends

Sticky Pomegranate Drumsticks

Cider-Glazed Pork Belly & Brussels Sprouts

page 29

page 70

Caramelized Celery with Lentils

Cheesy Breadstick Twists

page 57

page 50

Spicy Thai Chicken and Pineapple Soup

Chocolate, Chile, and Beer Ice Cream with Hot Chocolate Sauce

page 28

Cucumber, Basil, and Peanut Salad FineCooking.com

page 87

To drink: 2012 Harden Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley, California ($29)

Cumin and Cracked-Pepper Filet Mignon with Brie Butter

Sunday Supper with Your Valentine Roasted Celery and Garlic Soup with Crisp Prosciutto page 56

Seafood with Romesco Sauce page 80

Chocolate-Chile Truffles page 83

To drink: 2014 Château Le Payral, Bergerac, France ($13)

Cozy Comfort for a Cold Winter’s Night Frisée, Avocado, and Grapefruit Salad FineCooking.com

Roasted Carrots with Blood Orange and Rosemary page 31

Seared Sea Scallops with Sesame-Cilantro Gremolata page 34

Lemony Rice Pilaf with Scallions FineCooking.com

Spaghetti with Shrimp, Lemon, and Chard

Super Bowl Spread Cumin-Coriander Hummus

page 28

page 63

Seeded Dinner Rolls

Maple-Wasabi Chicken Wings

page 51

page 25

Gremolata Popcorn FineCooking.com

Sausage and Pepper Calzones page 32

Braised Short Ribs and Celery with Celery Seed Polenta

Arugula, Mint, and Apple Salad with Walnuts and Buttermilk Dressing

page 55

FineCooking.com

Chocolate-Cherry Bread Pudding

Chocolate Cake with Candied Ancho and Pepitas

page 73

To drink: 2014 Merlin Mâcon La Roche Vineuse, Burgundy, France ($26)

12

page 30

FINE COOKING • FEB/MAR 2016

page 86

To drink: 2014 Ramsay Petite Sirah, North Coast, California ($14)

Photographs by Scott Phillips


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Editor Jennifer Armentrout Art Director Teresa Fernandes

Senior Editors Joanne Smart Layla Schlack

Senior Copy/ Chris Hoelck Production Editor

Staff Photographer Scott Phillips

Senior Food Ronne Day Editor/Stylist Associate Food Editor/ Diana Andrews Test Kitchen Manager

Administrative Assistant Tinsley Morrison Test Kitchen Intern Neema Syovata

Editor at Large Susie Middleton

Contributing Editors Tasha DeSerio Abigail Johnson Dodge Maryellen Driscoll Rebecca Freedman Allison Ehri Kreitler Kimberly Y. Masibay Melissa Pellegrino Tony Rosenfeld Molly Stevens Patrick Watson (drinks)

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fine cooking • feb/mar 2016

© 2015 The Taunton Press

Senior Managing Editor, Carolyn Mandarano Books FineCooking.com Senior Web Producer Sarah Breckenridge Video Director Colin Russell Web Design Director Jodie Delohery

Fine Cooking: (ISSN: 1072-5121) is published six times a year by The Taunton Press, Inc., Newtown, CT 06470-5506. Telephone 203-426-8171. Periodicals postage paid at Newtown, CT 06470 and at additional mailing offices. GST paid registration #123210981. Subscription Rates: U.S., $29.95 for one year, $49.95 for two years, $69.95 for three years. Canada, $31.95 for one year, $53.95 for two years, $75.95 for three years (GST included, payable in U.S. funds). Outside the U.S./Canada: $36 for one year, $62 for two years, $88 for three years (payable in U.S. funds). Single copy U.S., $6.95. Single copy Canada, $7.95. Postmaster: Send address changes to Fine Cooking, The Taunton Press, Inc., 63 South Main St., PO Box 5506, Newtown, CT 06470-5506. Canada Post: Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Fine Cooking, c/o Worldwide Mailers, Inc., 2835 Kew Drive, Windsor, ON N8T 3B7, or email to mnfa@taunton.com. Printed in the USA


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contributors Marge Perry (“Hummus,” p. 60) is an award-winning food writer. She chronicles her adventures in food, travel, and life in her blog, asweetandsavorylife.com. • My favorite thing to dip in hummus is… raw fennel. Second is warm pita sprinkled with cumin, and a close third is a spoon. • I like writing about food because… food is a universal human need and pleasure; all of human connection can be viewed through the lens of food. Plus, I get to eat really well. • My guilty-pleasure snack is... a Fluffernutter—a peanut butter and Marshmallow Fluff sandwich.

Rick Bayless (“Hot Chocolate,” p. 82) is the author of nine cookbooks and host of the long-running cooking show Mexico: One Plate at a Time. He’s also the recipient of the Order of the Aztec Eagle Award, Mexico’s highest award for foreigners. • M y favorite place to visit in Mexico is... the Yucatán Peninsula right now, but it changes all the time. • M y current ingredient obsession is... wild mushrooms. They’re so flavorful, and there are so many different varieties! • M y favorite non-Mexican cuisine is... Thai.

Duskie Estes (“Pork Belly,” p. 64), a farmer and chef-owner of Zazu Kitchen + Farm and Black Pig Meat Co. in Sebastopol, California, competed on two seasons of Food Network’s The Next Iron Chef and is currently a judge on Food Network’s Guy’s Grocery Games.

• The three things always in my fridge are... lemons, goat cheese, and bacon.

• The best thing about being a food-show judge is... hanging out with Guy Fieri.

• The worst thing about being a food-show judge is... not being able to come up with

something nice to say. Photographer Carmen Troesser (“Celery in the Spotlight,” p. 52) grew up on her family’s farm, where the farm-to-table concept was a way of life. She travels for assignments from her home in Missouri. • My favorite food to photograph is… food that is closest to its natural state—identifiable as what it is and what it’s meant to be. I find food made with bare hands and an abundance of care irresistible and beautiful. • M y favorite breakfast is… a frittata made with eggs from Ruby, our duck. There’s nothing like a fresh duck egg. • T he toughest thing about living in Missouri is… that despite our mighty rivers, I miss living near the ocean—and fresh seafood.

16

fine cooking • feb/mar 2016

Donna Currie (“MakeAhead Breads,” p. 46) is a Colorado-based blogger (cookistry.com) and food writer. Her first book, Make Ahead Bread, was published in 2014. • My latest kitchen purchase was... a Vitamix. It’s a beast. It has a dry-blending container that can be used for grinding grains into flour. I plan on experimenting with that soon.

• The three things always in my fridge are... mustard, butter, and dry yeast. I probably have six different kinds of mustard.

• My favorite beverage on a snowy day is... hot chocolate. If it’s a snowy night, the hot chocolate might be laced with Bailey’s.

To contact us: Fine Cooking The Taunton Press 63 South Main Street PO Box 5506 Newtown, CT 06470-5506 Tel: 203-426-8171 Send an email to: fc@taunton.com Visit: finecooking.com To submit an article proposal: Write to Fine Cooking at the address above or Call: 800-309-0744 Fax: 203-426-3434 Email: fc@taunton.com To subscribe or place an order: Visit finecooking.com/fcorder or call: 800-888-8286 9am-9pm et Mon-Fri 9am-5pm et Sat To find out about Fine Cooking products: Visit finecooking.com/products To get help with online member services: Visit finecooking.com/customerservice To find answers to frequently asked questions: Visit finecooking.com/FAQs To contact Fine Cooking customer service: Email us at support@customerservice.taunton.com To speak directly to a customer service professional: Call 800-477-8727 9am-5pm et Mon-Fri To sell Fine Cooking in your store: Call us toll-free at 866-452-5179, or email us at tradecs@taunton.com To advertise in Fine Cooking: Call 800-309-8940, or email us at fcads@taunton.com Mailing list: We make a portion of our mailing list available to reputable firms. If you would prefer that we not include your name, please visit: finecooking.com/privacy or call: 800-477-8727 9am-5pm et Mon-Fri For employment information: Visit careers.taunton.com The Taunton guarantee: If at any time you’re not completely satisfied with Fine Cooking, you can cancel your subscription and receive a full and immediate refund of the entire subscription price. No questions asked. Copyright 2016 by The Taunton Press, Inc. No reproduction without permission of The Taunton Press, Inc.

Photographs clockwise from top left by Jeff Koehler, Bernadette Tolentino-Cuevas, courtesy of DNC Parks at Yosemite, Debbie Adams, Naomi Lan Derfel, Paul Elledge

Writer, photographer, traveler, and cook Jeff Koehler (“Catalan Comfort,” p. 74) lives in Barcelona, Spain, with his family. His most recent book is Darjeeling: The Colorful History and Precarious Fate of the World’s Greatest Tea. • T he destination I most want to return to is... Kashmir. I spent an amazing month on a houseboat there once and would love to return. • T he dish I most want to learn to cook is... masala dosa, with chutney and sambar. • M y perfect dinner is... carpaccio with bold Spanish olive oil and grilled asparagus.


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While at my library, I was captivated by the tart cover on your October/ November 2015 issue. This issue was filled with useful recipes with delicious ingredients that I hope to prepare. I review many cooking magazines, and none is as useful and enjoyable to read as Fine Cooking. Your staff does a great job, and I thank you for such a wonderful product. —Laura Henkes

2 Tbsp. Torani Dark Chocolate Sauce 2 Tbsp. Torani Salted Caramel Syrup 1 cup milk, heated Combine ingredients in mug and top with whipped cream. Garnish with sauce drizzle. Enjoy.

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In our inbox

A welcome return I have been a subscriber since issue 16. I just received issue 138 (December 2015/ January 2016). Bravo! I found the topics stimulating. I loved the nod to the holidays in “Duck!” (p. 52) in that it didn’t instruct me on how to have a better holiday meal, but rather focused on techniques for preparing an ingredient that’s traditionally holiday. Biscotti, et al., instead of holiday cookies (“Classic Italian Cookies,” p. 94) was inspired. I think that in the midst of pre-Thanksgiving Christmas music in the stores, an honest discussion of meatballs (“Meatball Mania,” p. 60) was a welcome diversion that will prove invaluable in the party season. In short, I saw a lot of what makes this publication my favorite. —Tim Carter

Digital Editions

Twitter @bluegalley: Brown butter #pumpkin #cake | thank you @finecooking and @jeannekelley for the most amazing fall cake… @mdgolfer38: @finecooking Dec/ Jan issue arrived....still need to tinker from Oct/Nov!....sensory overload....LOL @Flavias_Flavors: Ciao @domenica cooks, I love your article on Italian cookies in the December/January issue of @finecooking. Bravissima!

Oops! Correction: Due to an editing error, a wine pairing in the December 2015/January 2016 issue (Pasta e Fagioli, p. 22) said Alto Adige is on Italy’s Ligurian coast. It is in northern Italy, away from the coast.

Fine Cooking’s tablet editions—available for iPad, Windows, and Android devices—are the same gorgeous issues you love, plus bonus recipes and drinks pairings. Download the app at FineCooking.com/app. Access is free with your print subscription.

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COOKFRESH Shop Smarter, Eat Better

Try ThiS

kale sprouts iT SEEMS ThErE ArE NO TWO VEGETABLES more popular right

now than kale and Brussels sprouts. Kale sprouts, a hybrid of russian red kale and Brussels sprouts, combine the best of both. imagine kale’s thick leaves and peppery flavor paired with the sweet nuttiness and adorable size of Brussels sprouts. Some things are popular for good reason. Continued on p. 22 

Photograph by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day

F I N E C O O K I N G .C O M

21


try this

kale sprouts

Created in a British lab

Firm is better

Kale sprouts first came on the market in England in 2012 under the name Flower Sprouts. They were developed using natural breeding processes by British company Tozer Seeds. In 2014, both seeds and vegetables became available in the U.S. under the name Kalettes. Seeing the little vegetables’ potential star power, American farmers started growing them and giving them names like Lollipop Kale and BrusselKale. But because the plants require a lot of care to grow, they’ve been slow to take off. Demand is increasing, though, and kale sprouts are gradually becoming available in many well-stocked grocery stores.

Kale sprouts are often sold in sealed bags, so keep an eye out for sturdy-looking leaves with bright color and no wilting. They’ll keep for up to five days in the refrigerator.

Pair with bold flavors Kale sprouts are delicious roasted, sautéed, or braised and served as a side dish or tossed with pasta. Blanched, they’re also great on skewers for the grill or on a pizza like the one below. The leaves can be plucked and used raw in salads—just massage them with dressing to tenderize them.

Aged cheeses like Parmigiano-Reggiano and fontina and nuts like pine nuts or walnuts highlight kale sprouts’ nuttiness. They have a pleasantly bitter undertone that’s balanced by acidic ingredients, like lemon, or sweet flavors, like brown butter. —Layla Schlack

garlicky kale sprout pizza This pizza highlights all the best in kale sprouts: Pine nuts and fontina splay off their nutty flavor, while goat cheese adds creamy tang and rosemary enhances their pepperiness. Serves 4 to 6

1 lb. pizza dough

2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt

8 oz. kale sprouts, cut into bite-size pieces

1 Tbs. unsalted butter

4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

1 tsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary

1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

Freshly ground black pepper

3 Tbs. toasted pine nuts

11/2 Tbs. medium-grind cornmeal or semolina

4 oz. fresh goat cheese, crumbled

8 oz. fontina, grated

Coat the pizza dough with the oil, place in a large bowl, cover with a kitchen towel, and set aside until doubled in size, about 3 hours. Position a rack in the bottom of the oven, place a pizza stone on the rack, and heat the oven to 500°F. Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil. Boil the kale sprouts until tender, about 5 minutes. Drain, rinse with cold water, and pat dry. Meanwhile, in a small skillet, heat the butter over medium heat until golden brown. Add the garlic and rosemary and cook until the garlic is golden, 20 to 30 seconds. Stir in the lemon juice and 1/4 tsp. pepper. Toss the kale sprouts and pine nuts with the butter mixture. Sprinkle a pizza peel or upside-down baking sheet with cornmeal. Transfer the dough to the peel and stretch to about a 14-inch diameter. Sprinkle with half of the cheeses, and top with the kale sprout mixture and then the remaining cheeses. Slide the pizza onto the stone and bake until the top is golden and the cheese is bubbling, about 10 minutes, rotating halfway through. Cool briefly, and serve. —Ronne Day

22

fine cooking • feb/mar 2016

P h o t o g r a p h b y M i k e Ya m i n ; f o o d s t y l i n g b y R o n n e D a y


AT THE MARKET

What we’re cooking now Fine Cooking editors (and a reader) share some delicious ideas for in-season ingredients.

Pineapple Fried Rice Stir-fry onion, garlic, ginger, and curry powder in oil. Add cold cooked rice, and stirfry until hot. Toss with diced pineapple, and garnish with sliced basil.

—Neema Syovata

Roasted Napa Cabbage

Toss thickly sliced Napa cabbage with olive oil, salt, pepper, and a pinch each of cumin, coriander, and mustard seeds. Roast in an even layer, tossing once, until tender with browned edges. Serve with your favorite roast or braise.

—Joanne Smart

Blood Orange Salsa

Photographs by Scott Phillips, except bottom left courtesy of David McCaughan

Slice blood orange segments into thirds and toss with diced avocado, red onion, black beans, chopped cilantro, minced serrano chile, fresh lime juice, extra-virgin olive oil, and salt. Serve with tortilla chips or as a topping for chicken or fish.

—Jennifer Armentrout

Grape-Taleggio -Taleggio Flatbread

Top pizza dough with sliced Taleggio (it’s fine to include the rind), halved grapes, olive oil, fresh rosemary, and flaky sea salt. Bake until the crust is browned.

—Layla Schlack

Avocado-Arugula -Arugula Dressing

Purée avocado, arugula, extravirgin olive oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, garlic, and chili powder in a blender. Use as a dressing on your favorite greens or sandwich.

—Diana Andrews

Spaghetti Squash Frittata

Roast a halved, seeded spaghetti squash until just tender. Use a fork to rake the squash from the skin, and pat dry. Sauté in olive oil in an ovensafe nonstick skillet until it colors a little, then stir in beaten eggs, grated Cheddar, chopped dill, salt, and pepper, and bake until the eggs are set.

—Ronne Day

ONE READER’S SEASONAL SPECIALTY

Beet and Balsamic Crostini Purée roasted, peeled beets in a food processor with olive oil, rosemary, salt, and balsamic vinegar. Spread goat cheese on toasted baguette slices, and then top with the beet purée. —David McCaughan, New Milford, Connecticut

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3 WAYS WITH...

Maple Syrup Sure, it’s great at breakfast, but it adds rich depth to savory foods, too. T E X T B Y L AY L A S C H L A C K ; RECIPES BY DIANA ANDREWS

crunchy french toast with maple-bourbonpepper butter French toast with maple syrup is delicious but ordinary. Save it for the kids. This French toast gets dipped in a rich maple batter, coated in crispy cornflakes, and slathered with butter spiked with pepper-infused bourbon and more maple. Serves 4 FOR THE BUTTER 1 Tbs. bourbon Coarsely ground black pepper 4 oz. (½ cup) unsalted butter, softened 2 Tbs. pure maple syrup Flaky sea salt FOR THE FRENCH TOAST 1 cup half-and-half ¼ cup pure maple syrup 4 large eggs ½ tsp. ground cinnamon 3½ cups cornflakes, lightly crushed 8 ¾-inch-thick slices challah 1½ tsp. unsalted butter for the griddle; more as needed MAKE THE BUTTER

Combine the bourbon and ½ tsp. pepper in a small bowl and let sit for 30 minutes. In a food processor, pulse the butter, syrup, ½ tsp. salt, and bourbon until well combined. Transfer to a small ramekin and set aside, or cover and refrigerate for up to 1 week. MAKE THE FRENCH TOAST

In a medium bowl, whisk together the half-and-half, syrup, eggs, and cinnamon. Transfer to a wide, shallow bowl or pie plate. Put the cornflakes on a separate plate.

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FINE COOKING • FEB/MAR 2016

Soak a slice of bread in the egg mixture, turning once, until saturated but not falling apart. Transfer the soaked bread to the plate with the cornflakes and press down gently to coat, turning once. Place on a baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining bread. Melt the butter on a griddle or in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat. Working in batches and adding more butter as needed, cook as many slices of bread as will fit in a single layer, flipping occasionally, until the cornflakes are golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Serve topped with the maple-bourbon butter.

Crystals: Clear

You may notice large, clear crystals in older maple syrup. These are caused by evaporation and are harmless. You can heat the syrup and melt them down for serving, if you like. What’s not OK is mold. If you see any, you should toss the whole bottle. Refrigerate maple syrup to slow mold and crystal formation.

Photographs by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day


maple-wasabi chicken wings Crushed wasabi peas are a fun, colorful garnish for these stickyspicy-sweet wings. Look for them in your grocery store’s Asian section. Serves 4 as a first course 2 tsp. wasabi powder 1½ cups pure maple syrup ¾ cup soy sauce 3 medium cloves garlic, finely grated 1½ lb. chicken wings, drumettes separated from winglets Cooking spray ½ cup crushed wasabi peas

Mix the wasabi powder with 1 Tbs. water and let sit for 5 minutes. Combine the maple syrup, soy sauce, and garlic in a 4-quart saucepan, and whisk in the wasabi. Simmer over low heat, whisking occasionally, until reduced to 2 cups, 20 to 25 minutes. (Monitor closely, and if it starts to bubble over, remove from the heat briefly.) Let cool to room temperature. In a medium bowl, toss the wings with half of the syrup mixture. Cover and refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours, turning occasionally. Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400°F. Meanwhile, let the wings sit at room temperature. Spray a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray. Shake the excess marinade off the wings and arrange them in a single layer on the

baking sheet. (Discard the marinade.) Roast until cooked through and crisp on the outside, about 30 minutes, flipping halfway through. Transfer the wings to a large bowl. Toss with the remaining syrup mixture, and let sit for 10 minutes, tossing occasionally. Put the crushed wasabi peas in a pie plate or wide, shallow bowl. Roll each wing in the crushed peas, and serve.

Grade Expectations

Pure maple syrup (as opposed to maple-flavored or breakfast syrups, which are mostly corn syrup and aren’t recommended for these recipes) is made by cooking down maple sap to the right sugar concentration. Sap that’s more watery will cook longer and caramelize more, making for a darker, more assertively flavored syrup. Historically, letter grades were used to denote how strong and dark syrup is, with A being the lightest. Now, many U.S. states and Canadian provinces are moving to color descriptors, like golden and amber.

maple-cheddar twicebaked sweet potatoes Maple-candied walnuts play off the sweetness of the potatoes, while sharp Cheddar keeps it balanced. Serves 6 3 sweet potatoes (about 12 oz. each) ¼ cup plus 3 Tbs. pure maple syrup ¼ tsp. plus 18 tsp. ground cinnamon Kosher salt 1 cup walnut halves 4 oz. extra-sharp Cheddar cheese, grated (about 1 cup) Freshly ground black pepper

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 425°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil. Prick the sweet potatoes all over with a fork, transfer to the baking sheet, and bake until fork-tender, about 1 hour, turning halfway through. Let cool slightly. Meanwhile, combine 3 Tbs. of the maple syrup, 18 tsp. of the cinnamon, and 18 tsp. salt in a small skillet. Add the walnuts and stir to coat. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until the walnuts begin to darken, about 2 minutes. Spread on a plate to cool, then chop coarsely. Halve the sweet potatoes lengthwise and scrape most of the flesh into a large bowl, leaving 18 inch to ¼ inch of it in the skins. Set the skins aside on the baking sheet. To the flesh, add half of the cheese, the remaining ¼ cup maple syrup, ¼ tsp. cinnamon, 1 tsp. salt, and ½ tsp. black pepper. Blend with a fork or potato masher until smooth. Divide the mixture evenly among the skins, and bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Top with the remaining cheese and the nuts, and serve.

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homemade

pizza delivers

extra smiles With Fleischmann’s® Yeast, you can toss together the perfect pizza night in 30 minutes.

Visit BreadWorld.com/Pizza for this recipe and more!

©2015 ACH Food Companies, Inc.

30 Minute Pizza Crust


m a k e i t to n i g h t Fresh and easy weeknight cooking

Spicy Thai Chicken and Pineapple Soup, p. 28 Spicy Thai Chicken and Pineapple Soup, p. 28

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spicy thai chicken and pineapple soup This bright, fragrant soup is just the thing to take the chill off a cold winter night. The sweetness of pineapple meets the heat of chile for a flavor duel that brings excitement to every bite. Serves 4 2 Tbs. fresh lime juice 2 tsp. finely chopped fresh cilantro, plus 2 Tbs. whole leaves 1 tsp. Asian sesame oil 4 oz. pad thai rice noodles, broken into 3- to 4-inch pieces

TIP

To save time, buy a pineapple that’s been peeled and cored or cut into chunks.

4 cups lower-salt chicken broth 1 lb. boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 1/2 cup well-shaken canned coconut milk 1 small red or green hot chile, such as serrano, thinly sliced Kosher salt 8 oz. fresh pineapple, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 11/2 cups) 2 scallions, thinly sliced Sriracha, for serving

in a medium bowl, combine 1 Tbs. of the lime juice with the finely chopped cilantro and sesame oil. cook the rice noodles according to package directions. Drain (do not rinse), then toss with the lime juice mixture. in a 4-quart saucepan, bring the chicken broth and chicken to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer until the chicken is almost cooked through, about 5 minutes. Add the remaining 1 Tbs. lime juice, the coconut milk, chile, and 1 tsp. kosher salt. Bring to a boil. Add the pineapple and cook for another minute. Stir in the cilantro leaves and noodles, and season to taste with salt. Divide the soup among bowls, garnish with the scallions, and serve with the Sriracha on the side. —Ronne Day Pair With: JUNMAI DAIGINJO SAKE These sakes have hints of exotic pears and succulent fruits to complement the tangy pineapple.

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FINE COOKING • FEB/mAR 2016

spaghetti with shrimp, lemon, and chard Silken Swiss chard replaces spinach in this delicious riff on shrimp Florentine. A good amount of lemon, in zest and juice forms, keeps things bright, while a bit of cream ties everything together. Serves 4 10 oz. Swiss chard, tough stems removed, remaining stems and leaves cut crosswise 1/2 inch thick 1/4 cup plus 2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt 1 lb. large shrimp (31 to 35 per lb.), peeled and deveined 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes 12 oz. spaghetti 1 Tbs. finely grated lemon zest plus 1/4 cup lemon juice (from about 2 lemons) 1/4 cup heavy cream Freshly ground black pepper

Rinse and drain the chard, but don’t spin dry. Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil. meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat 2 Tbs. of the oil over medium-high heat. Add the chard, 3 Tbs. water, and a generous pinch of salt. cook, stirring occasionally, until wilted, about 5 minutes. Add the shrimp and pepper flakes; cook, stirring occasionally, until the shrimp is just cooked through, 3 to

4 minutes more. Remove from the heat and set aside. Boil the pasta according to package directions until al dente. Reserve 1 cup of the cooking water, then drain the pasta. Return the reserved cooking water to the pot. Add the remaining ¼ cup oil, lemon zest, and cream. Bring to a boil, and cook until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Add the pasta, lemon juice, and ¼ tsp. salt. Toss together and remove from the heat. Add the chard mixture and toss for about 1 minute to allow the pasta to absorb some of the sauce. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve. —Mindy Fox Pair With: JURANÇON SEC White wines from the warm Jurançon region in southwestern France produce intense acidity balanced by ripe fruit flavors, which mirror the contrast between the lemon and the sweet shrimp.


sticky pomegranate drumsticks A sweet, tangy, slightly spicy glaze makes for messy but delicious eating. Serve with plenty of napkins. Serves 4 2 cups pomegranate juice 1 Tbs. dijon mustard 11/2 tsp. red wine vinegar 1 tsp. Sriracha 2 medium cloves garlic, peeled and smashed 8 chicken drumsticks (about 2 lb.) Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 medium scallion, thinly sliced

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°f. in a 12-inch skillet, combine the pomegranate juice, mustard, vinegar, Sriracha, and garlic. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally, and cook until the liquid reduces to a thick glaze, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove and discard the garlic. meanwhile, pat the drumsticks dry with paper towels and season all over with salt and pepper. Arrange on a rack set over a large, foil-lined rimmed baking sheet and roast for 10 minutes. Brush the glaze all over the drumsticks and flip. Roast until cooked through (170°f), about 10 minutes more. Remove the drumsticks from the oven and turn the broiler on high. Brush the drumsticks with half of the remaining glaze and broil to crisp the skin, about 1 minute. flip, brush with the rest of the glaze, and broil until the other side is crisp, about 1 minute more. Transfer to a platter and sprinkle with the scallion before serving. —Erica Clark Pair With: WHITE IPA The creamy brightness of these beers will balance the tart pomegranate glaze.

MOre QUICK gLAZeS FOr drUMSTICKS

• Apricot jam and crushed red pepper flakes

• Honey and soy sauce • Balsamic glaze and black pepper • Peach preserves and chopped thyme • Maple syrup and minced fresh ginger

Photograph this page by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day

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dInner FOr TWO

cumin and cracked-pepper filet mignon with brie butter Fragrant, spice-crusted steaks become even better when topped with Brie butter spiked with chives and chipotle. Leftover butter will keep refrigerated; try it slathered on warm bread, spread on a roll for an egg sandwich, or dolloped on potatoes. Serves 2 4 oz. Brie, rind removed, softened 3 Tbs. unsalted butter, softened 1 Tbs. thinly sliced fresh chives Pinch chipotle chile powder Fresh coarsely cracked black pepper and kosher salt 1 Tbs. ground cumin

30

FINE COOKING • FEB/MAR 2016

2 6- to 7-oz. beef tenderloin steaks, preferably 11/2 to 2 inches thick 2 Tbs. olive oil

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 425°F. In a small bowl, combine the Brie, butter, chives, chile powder, ¼ tsp. cracked pepper, and ��₈ tsp. salt with a fork until smooth. In another small bowl, combine the cumin, 1 tsp. cracked pepper, and ½ tsp. salt. Rub the steaks evenly with the mixture, pressing it on firmly. Heat the oil in an oven-safe 12-inch skillet, preferably cast iron, over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the steaks and

cook, flipping once, until browned on both sides, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer the skillet to the oven and roast until cooked to your liking (125°F for rare or 130°F for medium rare), 2 to 3 minutes. Tent the steaks with aluminum foil and let rest for about 5 minutes. Serve the steaks topped with some of the Brie butter. —Ronne Day Pair With: MONTEPULCIANO D’ABRUZZO These red wines from the Abruzzi coast of Italy are spicy enough for this delicious steak and will accentuate the cumin and Brie perfectly.

P h o t o g r a p h s b y M i k e Ya m i n , e x c e p t w h e r e n o t e d


THree eASy SIdeS brussels sprout and mushroom sauté Serves 4 Heat 2 Tbs. olive oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1 lb. very finely sliced or shredded Brussels sprouts, 8 oz. chopped shiitake mushrooms, 1 chopped garlic clove, and 1 tsp. chopped fresh rosemary. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring, until the sprouts are tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Stir in 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice, 1 Tbs. honey, 1 tsp. kosher salt, and ¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper; cook for another minute, and serve with seared salmon or the steak at left. —Ronne Day

savory corn spoonbread Serves 6 to 8 melt 4 Tbs. unsalted butter in a 10inch skillet over medium heat. Add 3 Tbs. minced shallot, and cook until softened, about 2 minutes. Let cool slightly. meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine ��₃ cup all-purpose flour, ½ cup yellow cornmeal, 3 Tbs. granulated sugar, 1 Tbs. baking powder, ½ tsp. kosher salt, and ¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper. Stir in one 14.5-oz. can creamed corn, one 14.5-oz. can corn (drained), 1 cup sour cream, 2 lightly beaten large eggs, and the shallot. mix until thoroughly combined. Pour into a buttered 2-quart baking dish and bake at 350°f until the top is golden brown, about 30 minutes. Serve with baked ham, roast chicken, or seared shrimp. —Julissa Roberts

roasted carrots with blood orange and rosemary Serves 4 Peel 1½ lb. slender carrots, leaving an inch of greens on top, if possible. Arrange the carrots in a single layer on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. in a small bowl, whisk 3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil, 1 tsp. dijon mustard, and the finely grated zest of 1 medium blood orange or regular orange. Pour over the carrots and toss to coat. Season generously with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Pour ¼ cup fresh orange juice around the carrots. Top with ½ Tbs. fresh rosemary leaves. cover tightly with foil and roast at 425°f until the carrots are nearly tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Uncover, drizzle with 1 Tbs. pure maple syrup, and roast, uncovered, until tender and beginning to brown, 15 to 20 minutes more. gently toss, season to taste with salt, and serve with lamb chops or roast duck. —Laraine Perri

roasted curried cauliflower salad with orange and tarragon Peppery greens and a light orange vinaigrette build on the pairing of curry and cauliflower in this main-course salad. Serve with naan, if you like. Serves 4 1 large head cauliflower, cut into 1-inch florets (about 8 cups) 1 cup thinly sliced shallots (from 2 large) 11/2 tsp. curry powder 7 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 large navel oranges 1 Tbs. rice vinegar 2 tsp. dijon mustard 3 Tbs. coarsely chopped fresh tarragon ��₃ cup roasted tamari almonds, coarsely chopped, or toasted slivered almonds 1/4 cup dried currants 5 oz. (5 cups) mâche or baby arugula

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°f. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil. in a large bowl, toss the cauliflower and shallots with the curry powder. Add 2 Tbs. of the oil, season with 1 tsp. salt and ½ tsp. pepper, and toss again. Spread on the baking sheet and roast

until the vegetables are tender and browned, 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool. meanwhile, slice off the ends of the oranges so they rest flat on a cutting board, and then cut off the peel and pith. Working over a large bowl, cut the orange segments free from the membranes, letting them fall into the bowl. Squeeze the juice out of the membranes into a small bowl. in another small bowl, whisk the vinegar and mustard. Slowly whisk in the remaining 5 Tbs. oil. Whisk in 3 Tbs. of the orange juice and the tarragon. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and more orange juice. Add the cauliflower, almonds, and currants to the orange segments and toss with enough vinaigrette to coat well. Transfer to a platter or divide among plates. in the same bowl, toss the mâche with just enough vinaigrette to coat lightly. Top the cauliflower mixture with the mâche, drizzle with the remaining vinaigrette, and serve. —Tony Rosenfeld Pair With: RIESLING These exceptional white wines have notes of sweet, tart green apple fruit—a perfect balance for the oranges, curry, and fresh tarragon.

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game-day dinner

sausage and pepper calzones Imagine a cross between pizza and a sausage and pepper sub sandwich, and you get the gist of how good these are. Serve with your favorite marinara sauce for dipping, if you like. Serves 4 1/2 lb. sweet or hot Italian sausage, casings removed 1/2 small red bell pepper, thinly sliced 1/2 small green bell pepper, thinly sliced 1/2 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced

2 medium cloves garlic, minced

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 lb. pizza dough, at room temperature

All-purpose flour, as needed 4 oz. fresh ricotta (1/2 cup)

6 oz. mozzarella, grated (11/4 cups)

1 large egg

1/2 tsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Put a pizza stone or an upside-down baking sheet on the rack and heat the oven to 450°F. Line a pizza peel or cookie sheet with parchment paper. In a 12-inch nonstick skillet, cook the sausage, peppers, onion, and garlic over medium-high heat, stirring and breaking up the sausage, until the sausage browns and the onions and peppers soften, about 5 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Remove from the heat and let cool slightly. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces. Lightly flour a work surface. Using your hands or a rolling pin, stretch each piece into a 6- to 7-inch round. Divide the ricotta among the four rounds, placing it on one half and leaving a little

room around the edge. Top with the sausage and pepper mixture and the mozzarella. Fold the dough in half over the filling. Pinch and crimp the dough either with a fork or your fingers to seal tightly (see Test Kitchen, p. 91). In a small bowl, whisk the egg with 1 Tbs. water. Brush over the calzones and sprinkle with the rosemary and a little sea salt. Transfer to the parchment-lined peel. Slide the parchment and calzones onto the hot pizza stone and bake until golden on top and bottom, 10 to 14 minutes, rotating halfway through baking. —Julissa Roberts Pair With: LAGER  A hearty, yeasty lager will balance the sausage and peppers perfectly.


seared sea scallops with sesame-cilantro gremolata A playful take on the traditional topping for osso buco, the bright, zingy flavors of this gremolata are a perfect foil for rich, sweet scallops. Serves 4 ¼ cup mirin 1/4 cup fresh lime juice plus 1 tsp. finely grated lime zest (from about 2 medium limes)

2 tsp. Asian sesame oil

2 tsp. finely grated fresh ginger

11/2 lb. large dry-packed sea scallops (about 12) ¼ cup finely chopped fresh cilantro

1 Tbs. toasted sesame seeds

2 tsp. finely chopped garlic

In a medium bowl, combine the mirin, lime juice, sesame oil, and ginger. Add the scallops, toss, and set aside for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the cilantro, sesame seeds, garlic, and lime zest. Set aside. In a 12-inch heavy-duty skillet, heat the vegetable oil over high heat until shimmering. Remove the scallops from the marinade, pat dry with paper towels, and season with salt and pepper. In two batches, cook the scallops until nicely browned on both sides, about 1 minute per side, adding more oil if needed. Serve sprinkled with the gremolata. —Ronne Day

11/2 Tbs. vegetable oil; more as needed Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Pair With: BARREL-FERMENTED CHARDONNAY  A buttery, mouthcoating Chardonnay pairs beautifully with the sweet scallops and bright gremolata.

Be part of our Emmy®-nominated television show

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© 2015 The Taunton Press

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fine cooking • feb/mar 2016


TICKETS ON

T I CA K E TL S OE N S S 0 9A . 1 3L. 1E5 N OW

Peacock-tailing / pē’käk-te • ling / v. Ordering obscure and unknown cocktails in order to draw attention to oneself. See figure 1.

MARCH 02-06

2016 CHARLESTONWINEANDFOOD.COM


food science

Brassicas Cooking these beloved vegetables can be tricky, but a little know-how will help you turn out tastier results. B y D av id J o a c hi m a n d A n d r e w S c h l o ss

Arugula and turnips bear little resemblance to one another on the plate, so you might be surprised to learn that they both belong to the cabbage family, otherwise known as Brassica. Other members include broccoli, Broccolini, broccoli raab, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens, kohlrabi, rutabaga, bok choy, mustard greens, mizuna, tatsoi, kale, watercress, radish, and horseradish. While incredibly popular, these vegetables can be tricky to cook. When stored or prepared improperly, they can turn bitter and even unpleasantly smelly. Here, we’ll explain the science behind these vegetables and what you need to know to cook them right.

When is the best time to buy brassicas? In the fall and winter. Brassicas grown in cold conditions produce fewer bitter-tasting compounds, which are the plant’s chemical defenses against pests (fewer pests mean fewer defenses are needed in the cold). Low temperatures also cause these plants to convert starch to sugar, making the vegetables sweeter. This isn’t to say that you shouldn’t make coleslaw in the summer; it’s just that the cabbage itself will taste sweetest in the cooler months.

How should I store brassicas? To keep these vegetables tasting their best, wrap them tightly in plastic and keep them in the coldest part of your refrigerator. The lack of oxygen and cold temperatures keep the vegetables from using up stored sugar for energy by slowing down their cellular respiration. All plants “respire” by taking in oxygen and giving off carbon dioxide, but less so in a cold, oxygen-depleted environment.

Why do brassicas turn bitter or stinky when cooked? How can I avoid this? Unpleasant flavors and odors come mostly from sulfur compounds, which are released when you chop brassicas, and more so when you cook them. That’s why raw cabbage is mildly pungent when shredded and eaten raw (as in coleslaw), more pungent when stir-fried, and disagreeably sulfurous when boiled. With more heat, sulfur compounds convert to trisulfides, such as hydrogen sulfide, which produces a rotten egg smell. To leach some of the bitter compounds from raw brassicas, you can soak the cut vegetables in cold water before cooking. Fermenting these vegetables into sauerkraut and kimchi also

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fine cooking • feb/mar 2016

mitigates bitterness. To reduce odor, blanch the vegetables in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds to leach out some of the chemical precursors to malodorous hydrogen sulfide. As for cooking, quick, high-heat methods are best, especially for Brussels sprouts, which are particularly high in sulfur compounds and have the most potential to develop unpleasant aromas. For the best flavor, cut the vegetables into small pieces so they can be cooked quickly, and always cook them uncovered to allow sulfurous compounds to escape.

Why do brassicas change color when cooked? How can I avoid this? Brassicas are prone to changing colors due to chemical reactions with their various pigments. The main pigments at play are chlorophylls (greens), anthoxanthins (yellows), and anthocyanins (reds, purples, and blues). Above right is a guide to avoiding these strange color changes.

I l l u s t r a t i o n b y Fe l i c i t a S a l a


avoiding color changes in brassicas PIGMENT/COLOR

COLOR CHANGE

COMMON CAUSE

HOW TO AVOID

Chlorophyll/green (broccoli, broccolini, broccoli raab, brussels sprouts, Romanesco, green cabbage, napa cabbage, collards, kohlrabi, rutabaga, bok choy, mustard greens, mizuna, tatsoi, kale, watercress)

Dull brownish green

acid or prolonged heat displaces magnesium in chlorophyll pigment

avoid acids like lemon juice and vinegar (use lemon zest instead); avoid long cooking times; to “fix” the green color, blanch the vegetable in boiling water, then shock in ice water

anthoxanthins/yellow and white (cauliflower, white turnip, daikon radish)

blue

Iron or aluminum reacts with anthoxanthin pigment

avoid cutting with carbon steel knives and cooking with iron or unanodized aluminum cookware

Pink or brown

alkaline (hard) water darkens anthoxanthin pigment

Cook with acidic ingredients or add 1⁄2 tsp. vinegar or lemon juice per gallon of cooking water

blue or murky green

alkaline water reacts with anthocyanin pigment

Cook with acidic ingredients or add 1⁄2 tsp. vinegar or lemon juice per gallon of cooking water

anthocyanin/red (cabbage, red radishes, purple turnips)

I’ve heard that many brassicas are superfoods. Is this true? Yes. Brassicas rank among the most healthful foods we can eat. They’re full of fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and phytochemicals, all of which may help prevent a range of diseases from osteoporosis to heart disease to certain cancers. Here’s a list of brassica phytochemicals and their potential health benefits. Incidentally, some of these healthy plant chemicals, such as anthocyanins, are also the pigments that give brassicas their beautiful colors.

phytochemicals & potential health benefits PHYTOCHEMICAL

FOUND IN

MAY HELP PREVENT

anthocyanins

red cabbage, blue kale, purple cauliflower

Heart disease, memory loss, urinary tract infections

beta-carotene

broccoli, collards, kale

Cancer, DNa damage, night blindness, skin disorders, infections

Indoles and isothiocyanates

bok choy, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, turnips, watercress

Cancer, DNa damage

Lutein

broccoli, brussels sprouts, collards, kale

Cancer, cataracts, heart disease, high blood pressure, macular degeneration

Quercetins

broccoli, kale

Cancer, lung damage, asthma symptoms, arthritis pain

Sulphoraphane

bok choy, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, turnips, watercress

Cancer, complications from diabetes, infections

f.y.i. Broccoli is a flower. If harvested late or stored too long in a moist environment, the tiny clusters of green flower buds open into yellow blooms. at that point, it’s still OK to eat, but it will be more pungent and softer in texture.

Collards and kale are the brassicas that most closely resemble wild cabbage plants.

Cauliflower is kept white by tying the plant’s green leaves over the white curd to shield it from sunlight. Otherwise, cauliflower turns yellow-green.

Asian cabbages, like bok choy, napa, and tatsoi, come from the same species of brassica that includes turnips.

Romanesco is a variant of cauliflower, even though it’s sold as a form of broccoli in many markets.

Brassicas are also called “cruciferous” vegetables because these plants have four cross-shaped petals resembling a crucifix.

Kohlrabi and turnips are not technically root vegetables. They’re actually the swollen lower stems of brassica plants.

David Joachim and Andrew Schloss are the authors of the award-winning reference book The Science of Good Food.

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Great Finds

1

Our latest buys for the kitchen and table. B Y L AY L A S C H L A C K

1 Whisk-y Business

3

What makes one whisk better than another? In this case, the long, pointed wire loop is a standout feature. It reaches into corners to thoroughly incorporate all your ingredients. The copper handle is awfully pretty, too. $27; thecooksatelier.com.

2 A Butter Tomorrow For perfectly spreadable butter, a butter keeper is the best option. These clever containers use cold water to keep butter from spoiling when left on the counter all the time. This marble one not only looks nice but also helps the water stay cool. $25.95; givesimple.com; 800-7908969.

2

3 A-Oak-ay Let’s be honest: We don’t always splurge on top-shelf liquor. The Oak Bottle understands and is here to help. Just pour whiskey, rum, or wine into the reusable bottle for 24 to 48 hours, and it comes out infused with warm, rich, oaky flavor. $79.95; oakbottle.com; 312-566-8368.

4 Dutch Treat Make no mistake, we love our enameled cast-iron Dutch ovens. But this steel-clad, copper-core 5½-quart version from AllClad’s Thomas Keller Collection has all the heavy-duty heat-retaining characteristics at a much lighter weight. Big handles make it easy to carry with oven mitts on. $350; williams-sonoma.com; 877-812-6235.

4

5 Knife Dreams The only thing better than a great knife is a great knife for only $65 that comes with free sharpening for life. While the price tag is a big selling point for the Misen 8-inch chef’s knife, it also has an incredibly durable, sharp carbon-steel blade with nice heft and a comfortable plastic handle and sloped bolster. $65; misen.com.

5

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FINE COOKING • FEB/MAR 2016

Photographs by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day


»

Into the Steep

Pick Up the Paste

Nashville hot chicken—fried chicken slathered in oil-based chile sauce—is having a moment. We don’t always buy into trends, but Coop’s Hot Chicken Paste is really, really good. The scorpion pepper mixture is great in other Super Bowl snacks, too, like chili. $11; coopshotchicken.com.

We’re always looking for tools to make prep work easier, and Fast-Prep Kitchen Shears do that. You just squeeze the handles to cut, thanks to a spring mechanism. The 5-inch version is great for herbs, and we like the 7-inch ones for everything else. $12.99 to $17.99; fiskars.com; 866348-5661.

»

»

Cheese the Day

»

Chance of Drizzles

Feel the Beet

The bright color isn’t all that drew us to this smallbatch cultured beet kvass, a fermented tonic meant to be sipped in small servings. It has a salty, sweet, earthy flavor and health benefits from probiotics. In addition to original, it comes in ginger and spicy, garlicky Bubonic Tonic flavors. $56 for 4 bottles; fabfer ments.com; 513-562-7531.

»

Crescenza-Stracchino is a rich, mild whole-milk cheese with a texture somewhere between fresh mozzarella and cream cheese. Made by BelGioioso in Wisconsin, it’s based on an Italian cheese called stracchino that’s produced from the milk of cows that have just come down from the Alps. Stracchino means tired, but we never get tired of this cheese on pizza or served with cured meat or fruit. $8.99; igourmet .com; 877446-8763.

It’s a whole lot easier to make loose-leaf tea with a good infuser. These spring-loaded long-handled tea balls from The Friendly Swede make for mess-free scooping and cleaning. Four to a set means everyone gets to choose their own brew. $16.99 for four; amazon.com; 866-216-1072.

Good Apple

We’re reminiscing fondly on apple season (and its warmer temperatures); Carr’s Ciderhouse Cider Syrup— made by boiling down cider— channels that time of year. Try it on pancakes and French toast, in whiskey cocktails, or as a glaze for pork. $19.99; farmtopeople.com; 877564-0367.

February tends to be all about chocolate. Sometimes we like ours tangy and savory, as in Chocolates by Kelly’s Chocolate Balsamic Vinegar. Try it drizzled over ice cream, fruit, funky cheeses, or steak. $21; chocolatesbykelly .com; 804-814-5496.

»

»

»

Snip in a Snap

Sugar and Spice

These organic cane sugar blends really are everything nice. Flavored with orange and chile, hibiscus and citrus, or rose petals, Beautiful Briny Sea’s sugars are great for the rims of cocktails or sprinkling on sugar cookies, and they’re an intriguing addition to spice rubs for fish and poultry. $15 each or $35 for all three; beautifulbrinysea.com.

» In the Bag

Besides reusable shopping totes, how can you cut down on packaging waste? Try these 14-cup cloth bags for bulk items like grains and nuts. Breathable muslin helps keep food fresh, and a zipper is more reliable than a twist tie in preventing spills. $14 for three; flipandtumble.com; 415-830-5624.

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In our humble opinion, this is the snack equivalent of a two -point conversion. Spicy Jala

penËœo Stre

et Tacos

Signature play better. The snacking stakes are high for the biggest game of the season, so bring your best with al fresco game day recipes and a $1 off coupon at alfrescoallnatural.com.

70% less fat than comparable pork and beef products


o n lo c at i o n

In Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking, our PBS TV show now in its third season, host Pete Evans travels America, creating a feast with local chefs and artisans in every episode.

Host Pete Evans (top) with chefs Jon Matsubara (left) and Lee Anne Wong (center) enjoying fresh coconut with Jenny Bickel (right) from Frankie’ s Nursery.

Aloha, Local!

A new breed of chefs takes Hawaiian food back to its roots. B y Na n ette Ma x i m

There’s a wave of food innovation happening in Hawaii, with Oahu on the crest. Pop into restaurants around the island, and chefs like Jon Matsubara are serving up locally raised meat, fish so fresh you’d think it swam to the table, and salads and sides made with island-grown ingredients like kukui nuts (from Hawaii’s official state tree), fresh lychees, guava, and taro. It’s hard to believe that in a land as lush and temperate as this, with all the farms, artisans, and purveyors Oahu has now, it hasn’t always been this way. “Twenty years

ago, when I was growing up here, everything was shipped in. There was no such thing as Hawaiian regional cuisine,” says Jon, a leader in the local-foods movement and culinary executive director of Restaurant Kaona at 40 Carrots Bloomingdale’s Ala Moana. In Hawaiian, makai means “from the sea,” and mauka indicates “toward the mountains, inland.” These terms inspire Jon’s cooking, and he builds his restaurant menus around both. And now, joined by host Pete Evans and Lee Anne Wong,

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o n lo c at i o n

an Iron Chef America winner and chef-owner of Honolulu’s Koko Head Café, the sea and land inspire not just Jon’s food, but the entire menu for one of our Moveable Feast Hawaiian episodes. The backdrop for the feast is quintessential Hawaii: an oceanfront beach house complete with swaying palm trees, flowering hibiscus, and surfboards. (We’re not saying Pete had an ulterior motive for visiting Hawaii, but in addition to cooking, big-wave surfing is how he gets his kicks.) The chefs agree that local, sustainably caught seafood is going to be front and center at their feast, along with some of the island’s luscious fruits. So they divide and conquer. Pete and Jon get a sneak peek at the flavors of this island from Dan Nellis, general manager of Wahiawa Pineapple Plantation, where the fruit is grown. As they stroll the fields, Dan invites them to slice open one of the fresh, golden fruits. “Straight from the earth, you really taste the terroir,” says Jon, who can already envision the sweet pineapple in a salad paired with grilled herb-marinated shrimp at the feast. Lee Anne started her day a little earlier than usual to scope out the Honolulu Fish Auction with Brooks Takenaka of the United Fishing Agency, which runs the sale. The public auction is a crack-of-dawn hot spot for buying and selling the fresh catch of aku, wahoo, mahimahi, tuna, and snapper, along with plenty of

Above left: At the Honolulu Fish Auction, Lee Anne discusses the fresh catch with Brooks Takenaka. Above right: Jon harvests the fruit (and sneaks a taste) from a mafai tree at Frankie’s Nursery. Bottom: Lee Anne, Pete, and Jon share some stories and laughs while cooking for the feast.

Several years ago, Jon took first prize at the World’s Best Mai Tai competition with his inventive smoked version.

Left: Lee Anne uses a favorite wok to fry the opah. Center: Jon shows Pete how to make a smoked mai tai. Right: Mai tais garnished with bruléed pineapple and fresh mint (recipe online at FineCooking.tv).

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Photo by Scott Phillips


photo by Scott Phillips

other wild Pacific fish. She lucks out with a gorgeous opah (also called moonfish), known for its rich flavor. Later, that opah will be fried in a light tempura batter whose secret (and surprise) ingredient, says Lee Anne, is vodka. And a pineapple–Thai basil salsa (with hints of lime and coconut) that Pete is planning to whip up will make a gently sweet, herby topping for the fish. Getting to know purveyors all over Oahu and helping to promote and celebrate what they produce is part of Jon’s MO. Take what he calls a “treasure chest of fruit,” Frankie’s Nursery, in nearby Waimanalo, and staffer Jenny Bickel, who helps cooks find the best of the more than 400 varieties Frankie’s grows. When Jon, Lee Anne, and Pete meet up at the orchard, Jenny offers them a rare treat—mafai, a sweet, slightly acidic cherry-like fruit whose season is amazingly brief. “I like to introduce people to new things,” says Jon. “Fruit like the wax jambu, which is like an Asian pear, is great in a salad. But mafai is better when you just leave it alone instead of masking its flavor with other ingredients.” The light crunchiness and mild flavor of Frankie’s wax jambu inspires Jon to mix it

Jon grilled local Kauai shrimp for this dish. They are known for their sweet flavor, firm texture, and jumbo size, but any shrimp can be used.

grilled shrimp with fresh fruit salad In this version of Jon’s recipe, Asian pears stand in for the wax jambu he used at the feast. Serves 4 to 6 For the shrimp

1 cup grapeseed oil

8 medium cloves garlic, 4 peeled, 4 minced

4 sprigs fresh basil, plus 1/4 cup lightly packed leaves

Kosher salt 12 jumbo shrimp (21 to 25 per pound), preferably wild caught, peeled with tails left intact and deveined

3 Tbs. unsalted butter, softened

Finely grated zest of 1 lime ¼ cup lightly packed fresh mint leaves; more for garnish ¼ cup lightly packed fresh cilantro leaves ¼ cup lightly packed chopped fresh sorrel or watercress leaves For the fruit salad ½ cup fresh lime juice (from about 4 limes)

2 Tbs. coarsely chopped jalapeño

2 Tbs. palm or turbinado sugar

2 Tbs. fish sauce

2 cups peeled and thinly sliced pear wedges, preferably Asian

1 cup thinly sliced pineapple wedges

1 cup peeled and thinly sliced papaya or mango wedges

Make the shrimp

Purée the oil, peeled garlic, basil sprigs, and 1 tsp. salt in a blender until smooth, about 1 minute. Transfer to a medium bowl and add the shrimp, tossing to coat. Cover and refrigerate for 11/2 hours. Prepare a hot (375°F to 450°F) gas or charcoal grill fire. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, mix the butter, minced garlic, lime zest, and ½ tsp. salt until well combined. Remove the shrimp from the marinade and grill, turning once, until just cooked through, about 1 minute per side. Toss the shrimp in the butter mixture. Let cool slightly, and then add the basil leaves, mint, cilantro, and sorrel. Toss to evenly coat the shrimp. Make the fruit salad

Combine the lime juice, jalapeño, sugar, and fish sauce in a small food processor and process until blended. In a large bowl, toss the fruit with enough dressing to coat. Serve

Transfer the fruit salad to plates, top with the shrimp, and serve with the remaining dressing on the side. Garnish with fresh mint. —Recipe by Jon Matsubara, adapted from Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking For more Moveable Feast recipes, go to FineCooking.TV

Above: Jon’s ready to serve his grilled shrimp dish.

Photographs by John DeMello, except where noted

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o n lo c at i o n

Top: Jon, Lee Anne, and Pete serve their dishes to the guests. Center: Surfs up! Pete takes a break to catch a wave. Below: Guests enjoy the ocean view while dining.

up with the fresh pineapple he picked up at Wahiawa for the tropical fruit salad that he plans to serve with his grilled shrimp. Beyond the beach-house terrace where guests are gathering for the feast, blue water stretches out as far as the eye can see. Jon mixes his prizewinning smoked mai tai cocktail for the crowd. Lee Anne cooks up batches of opah tempura in a wok whose patina tells the story of many meals past. And as bites are taken and drinks sipped, one Hawaiian word in particular is heard plenty among the cooks and guests: mahalo—thanks. With a meal like this—of local Hawaiian food at its best, and company to match—there’s a lot to be thankful for.

Sweeping views, perfect temperatures, and a light breeze make dining al fresco one of Honolulu’s many delights.

Jon’s Picks Chef Jon Matsubara loves the combination of local and international flavors found around Honolulu. Here are five of his favorite places to kick back and chow down.

• After work, I like to grab some

fried pork chops and kimchi fried rice at Home Bar and Grill. It’s laid back, open until 2 a.m., and they make a fantastic garlic chicken. (1683 Kalakaua Ave.; 808-942-2235)

• The Saturday farmers’ market

at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) is more than a market— it’s an event, with fresh island produce and fantastic food and music. (hfbf.org/market; 4303 Diamond Head Road, Parking Lot C)

• You can get food from all over

the world on Oahu. Leonard’s Bakery has the fluffiest Portuguese fried donuts called malasadas. They come lightly coated in sugar or filled with custard, chocolate, or hupia (coconut). (leonardshawaii.com; 933 Kapahulu Ave.; 808-737-5591)

• Alicia’s Market is famous for

poke, a spicy seafood salad. I love the limu ahi (seaweed and tuna) poke. Grab a side of crab potato salad or go for the Puerto Rican spicy pork with green olives. (aliciasmarket .com; 267 Mokauea St.; 808841-1921)

• I decompress at Waimanalo

Bay, on the east side of the island. The beach is never crowded and it’s clean, with superfine white sand. Body boarders love it. (best-of-oahu.com/waimanalo -bay.html; Waimanalo)

Find out when Moveable Feast is showing in your area at FineCooking.tv/ schedule.


Asian crab cakes

with Pineapple Sriracha Aioli 1/2 cup white rice, uncooked 2 cans (6 oz. each) lump crab meat, well-drained and picked through 1 can (8 oz.) DOLE® Crushed Pineapple, well-drained & divided 1 egg, beaten 2 green onions, finely chopped

2 tbsp. oyster sauce 6 tbsp. cornstarch 1-1/2 cups panko breadcrumbs 2 tbsp. vegetable oil 1/2 cup mayonnaise 2 tsp. sriracha 1 clove garlic

Prepare rice according to package directions; cool. Combine crab meat, one-half pineapple, rice, egg, green onions, oyster sauce, and cornstarch in a large bowl. Gently mix and form cakes, pressing firmly. Coat cakes with breadcrumbs. Heat oil in large skillet, pan fry cakes until golden brown on both sides. Transfer crab cakes to a paper towel-lined baking sheet to drain. Combine mayonnaise, remaining pineapple, sriracha and garlic in food processor container. Cover; blend until smooth. Serve crab cakes with sauce.

............... . . . PREP

SERVINGS

10

6

Find more delicious recipes at dolepackaged.com/recipes ©2016. TM & ® Dole Packaged Foods, LLC


cheesy breadstick twists, p. 50

Âť

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make one dough, choose how to shape it, and bake it on your schedule.

make-ahead

« seeded rolls, p. 51

breads By DOnna CUrrie

T H I N K Y O U D O N ’ T H AV E T I M E T O B A K E F R E S H B R E A D ? T H I N K A G A I N . Baking bread from scratch is actually not too time-

consuming, especially if you follow my make-ahead method that divides the process into a few quick steps. When you have about an hour of free time, you’ll mix and knead the dough, let it rise (this is hands off for you), and sometimes shape it (depending on what kind of bread you’re making). It doesn’t matter when you do this—after dinner, early in the morning, or late at night. Then you’ll put the dough in the refrigerator, where it rises slowly, developing flavor. When you’re ready, the dough is ready to be baked, whether that’s 8 hours later or 24. To get the best results from this method, that first rise is important. The dough needs to double in volume at room temperature in order to accomplish a full second rise in the refrigerator. After the first rise, you choose what kind of bread you want to make: Shape your dough into little seed-studded dinner rolls, make a super-simple sandwich loaf, or twist it into cheesy breadsticks. No

« whole

wheat sandwich bread, p. 49

matter which way you go, you might just find bread-baking quickly becoming part of your daily routine. Colorado-based food writer Donna Currie is the author of Make Ahead Bread.

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master recipe whole wheat bread dough Use this all-purpose dough to make one of the three types of bread on the following pages. If you don’t have a stand mixer, mix the ingredients with a wooden spoon, then knead by hand. 9 oz. (2 cups) bread flour 41/2 oz. (1 cup) white whole wheat or whole wheat flour (see Test kitchen, p. 90) ¼ cup nonfat dry milk 1 oz. (2 Tbs.) unsalted butter 1 Tbs. granulated sugar ¼ oz. (2¼ tsp.) active dry yeast 11/2 tsp. kosher salt

On prep Day Combine all the ingredients in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. add 1 cup lukewarm water, and mix on mediumhigh speed until smooth, about 3 minutes. remove the dough hook and shape the dough into a smooth ball 1 . Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rise in a warm spot until doubled in size, about 1 hour 2 . Shape and bake according to the recipes that follow.

1

2

The dough should be smooth and elastic before it rises.

The warmer the room, the quicker the dough will rise.

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Photographs by Scott Phillips; food styling by ronne Day


shape #1

sandwich loaf

whole wheat sandwich bread In addition to sandwiches, this tender loaf is perfect for French toast or bread pudding (see p. 72). Makes 1 loaf; serves 12

1 recipe Whole Wheat Bread Dough (opposite page)

Cooking spray Bread flour, as needed On prep day

Spray a 81/2x41/2-inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and pat it into a rough 8-inch square 1 . Fold the bottom quarter over and press to secure it 2 . Fold over again, leaving a 1- to 2-inch edge on the top, and press to seal. Fold

the 1- to 2-inch edge up and over 3 and press to seal. Pinch the ends closed, and place the dough, seam side down, in the loaf pan. Cover the pan with plastic wrap 4 and refrigerate for at least 8 and up to 24 hours. On baking day

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Meanwhile, let the dough sit, covered, at room temperature. Remove the plastic and bake the bread until the top is browned and the internal temperature reads 205°F on an instant-read thermometer, about 55 minutes 5 . Remove the bread from the pan and let cool completely on a rack before slicing.

3

When you fold up the last edge, it will create a seam. Make sure that’s facing down in the pan so your loaf has a smooth top.

On prep day 4

Cover tightly to keep the surface of the dough from drying out in the fridge.

On baking day

1

Use your fingertips to press the dough lightly into a square. It shouldn’t be too sticky, but flour the surface just in case.

2

5

Press the dough firmly after folding to avoid an air bubble in your loaf.

Color is a good indicator of doneness, but if you want to be sure, insert an instant-read thermometer at a slight angle.

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49


shape #2

breadsticks

On prep day

cheesy breadstick twists These fat, soft breadsticks get shaped on baking day, so be sure to allow time for that. Serves 12

1 Tbs. olive oil

1 recipe Whole Wheat Bread Dough (see p. 48)

Bread flour, as needed

3 oz. finely grated Asiago (about 11/2 cups)

1 large egg

Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon On prep day

1 Olive oil prevents the dough from sticking to the bag.

On baking day

Drizzle the olive oil into a 1-gallon zip-top bag. Add the dough, then squeeze and massage to coat 1 . Refrigerate for at least 8 and up to 24 hours. On baking day

Let the dough sit at room temperature until soft enough to shape, about 1 hour. Position racks in the top and bottom thirds of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Line two large rimmed baking sheets with parchment. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Shape it into a rough

rectangle, then use a rolling pin to roll it into an 8x12-inch rectangle. Sprinkle the Asiago over the top of the dough 2 , then gently press it in with the rolling pin. Fold the dough in half lengthwise, making a 4x12-inch rectangle, then roll it so it’s about 6x12 inches. Using a pizza wheel or sharp knife, cut the dough crosswise into 12 strips 3 . Place 6 on each baking sheet, evenly spaced. Stretch each strip to 9 or 10 inches long, and then twist to form a spiral 4 . Beat the egg with 1 Tbs. water. Brush gently on all the twists. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt and any cheese that fell out during twisting. Bake until browned, 25 to 35 minutes, rotating and swapping the pans’ positions halfway through. Cool on racks and serve slightly warm or at room temperature.

2

Sprinkle the Asiago on in a thick layer.

3 To get even strips without a ruler, divide the dough into quarters, and cut each quarter into three strips.

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4

If any strips come untwisted, return to them after shaping the rest. The dough will be more relaxed after sitting.


shape #3

dinner rolls

On prep day

seeded rolls Inspired by monkey bread, a pull-apart sweet bread, these savory dinner rolls are great for soaking up soup or sauce, or on their own with just a bit of butter. Serves 24 Cooking spray

2 Tbs. black sesame or poppy seeds

2 Tbs. untoasted white sesame seeds

dish in a random pattern 3 . They should fill the pan, but gaps and overlap between rolls are OK. Cover with plastic wrap 4 and refrigerate for at least 8 and up to 24 hours.

2 Tbs. toasted white sesame seeds

On baking day

1 recipe Whole Wheat Bread Dough (see p. 48)

1

A bench knife is a good tool for dividing the dough.

On prep day

Spray an 8-inch square baking dish with cooking spray. Shape the dough into a rough rectangle, and then divide it into 24 pieces, about 1 oz. each (it’s OK if they’re not completely even) 1 . Put the seeds in separate bowls. Shape the pieces of dough into balls. Roll 8 balls in each type of seed 2 , and then transfer them to the baking

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Meanwhile, let the dough sit, covered, at room temperature. Remove the plastic 5 and bake the rolls until the tops are browned and the internal temperature reads 195°F on an instant-read thermometer, about 45 minutes. Remove the rolls from the pan and cool slightly on a rack. Separate into rolls or serve whole and pull apart at the table.

4 2

If the rolls dry out, the seeds may fall off, so cover them tightly.

It’s fine if the seed coating isn’t totally even.

On baking day

3

5

Don’t pack the rolls in too tightly. They need room to rise, so it’s OK to make more than one layer.

After rising, the rolls may not look much bigger, but they should be puffy.

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celery in the spotlight

Usually a bit player, celery takes center stage in soup, side dishes, and even a main course. b y R o n n e

D ay


OPEN YOUR FRIDGE AND LOOK IN THE CRISPER DRAWER. Chances are there’s a head of celery in there. Maybe you bought it last week to make that stew you like, the one that starts with sautéing celery with carrot and onion. But what have you done with it lately? Most people think of celery as a bit player, adding crunch to a salad or an aromatic edge to a pot of soup, but I’ve been a fan forever. I like its bold, salty-herbaceous flavor so much that I often make it

using your head Celery ribs (also called stalks) grow in a head (also called a bunch). Though the tough bottom is usually trimmed away, the whole head is edible, and each part can play a different role in a dish. The most commonly cultivated variety of celery is Pascal (shown below), which has a compact shape, thick outer ribs, and a mild, somewhat salty

flavor. at the farmers’ market, you may spy varieties like Tango, which has darker, more spindly and curvaceous ribs topped by an abundance of leaves and a stronger, slightly more bitter flavor. Somewhat confusingly, celery root (celeriac) comes not from the celery plant we eat but from a cousin.

the star of the dish. I also appreciate its range: Raw, it can be the freshest, crispest bite on the plate, yet it can also cook to perfect tenderness. When cooking with celery, I tend to gravitate toward assertive, complementary flavors, such as garlic, sharp cheeses, and herbs like tarragon and rosemary, which you’ll find in the recipes that follow. These dishes—a soup, a main course, and two side dishes—really show off celery’s versatility. So open that crisper drawer, grab the celery, and let the show begin. Ronne Day is senior food editor/stylist at Fine Cooking.

INNEr rIBS Inside the head, you’ll find the celery heart: smaller, lighter colored, less fibrous ribs. They’re perfect for when you want a more delicate flavor and subtle crunch. (Lobster salad comes to mind.) There’s generally no need to peel them.

LEAVES CELErY SEEDS Despite their tiny size, celery seeds are a potent source of the warm, aromatic flavor of celery. They come not from cultivated celery but a wild variety called smallage. a key player in pickling spices, celery seeds are often added to slaws and potato salad, as well as marinades and dressings. In the recipes here, they underscore celery’s flavor.

Think of celery leaves as a fresh herb. add them with celery ribs to flavor stocks and broths. or add them to a dish just before serving; the fresh leaves lend an herbaceous, slightly peppery flavor. The smaller, frilly inner leaves are especially nice used whole, while larger outer leaves are best thinly sliced or chopped.

P h o t o g r a p h s b y C a r m e n Tr o e s s e r ; fo o d s t y l i n g by R o n n e D a y ; i l l u s t r a t i o n s b y R o d i c a P r a t o

oUTEr rIBS The outer ribs offer the most crunch and color and hold up well during cooking. It’s a good idea to peel any you plan to eat raw or cooked in large pieces; thinly sliced or chopped ribs or those destined for the stockpot can remain unpeeled.

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braised short ribs and celery with celery seed polenta Short ribs and celery become good friends in a braise: As the celery cooks, it flavors the beef and the sauce while absorbing some of the beefy flavor of the meat. Walnuts add extra crunch, while celery seed in both the braise and the polenta further underscores the celery flavor of the dish. Serves 4 to 6 for THE RIBS

5 lb. bone-in English-style beef short ribs (see Test Kitchen, p. 93)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 Tbs. olive oil; more as needed

1/2 cup chopped shallots

2 Tbs. unsalted butter

6 medium cloves garlic, chopped

3 Tbs. fresh lemon juice

4 cups lower-salt beef broth

1 cup dry white wine

½ cup coarsely chopped walnuts, toasted

2 Tbs. whole-grain Dijon mustard

11/4 tsp. celery seeds

1 head celery, outer ribs peeled and cut on the diagonal into 3-inch pieces (to yield about 4 cups), inner leaves reserved for garnish

8 oz. shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, large caps cut in half

4 sprigs fresh thyme

1/2 tsp. finely grated fresh lemon zest

3 Tbs. cornstarch

Toasted walnut oil, for serving FOR THE POLENTA Kosher salt

1 cup polenta (coarse cornmeal), such as Bob’s Red Mill

1/2 tsp. celery seed

6 oz. fresh goat cheese, crumbled

Freshly ground black pepper braise the ribs

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 325°F. Generously season the ribs on all sides with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a 6- to 7-quart Dutch oven or other heavy-duty pot over medium-high heat. Add half of the ribs, and brown on all sides, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer to a rimmed baking sheet, and repeat with the remaining ribs, adding more oil if needed.

Reduce the heat to medium, add the shallots and butter, and cook, stirring, until the shallots begin to brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for another 15 seconds. Add the lemon juice and scrape up any browned bits from the bottom of the pot. Add 33/4 cups broth, the wine, walnuts, mustard, and celery seeds; stir to combine. Return the ribs to the pot, cover the surface with a piece of parchment, cover the pot with the lid, transfer to the oven, and braise for 2 hours. Stir in the celery, mushrooms, thyme, and lemon zest. Replace the parchment, cover with the lid, and braise until the beef is very tender, 40 to 50 minutes. (The ribs may be prepared to this point up to 2 days head. Cover and refrigerate; reheat gently.) Using a slotted spoon, transfer the ribs, celery, mushrooms, and thyme to a rimmed baking sheet, leaving the liquid in the pot. Bring the liquid to a simmer over medium heat. In a small bowl, combine the remaining ¼ cup broth with the cornstarch. Stir this slurry into the liquid, a little at a time, until thickened to your liking for a sauce (you may not need it all). Return the ribs, celery, and mushrooms to the sauce (discard the thyme), and keep warm. make THE POLENTA

In a 2- to 3-quart saucepan, bring 3 cups water and 1/2 tsp. salt to a boil over medium heat. Reduce to a simmer, and then slowly whisk in the polenta and celery seeds. Adjust the heat to medium low, and cook, stirring frequently, until the polenta is tender, about 25 minutes, adding more water as needed to keep the polenta loose. Remove from the heat, stir in the goat cheese, and season to taste with salt and pepper. SERVE

Divide the polenta among large shallow bowls or rimmed plates. Top with the ribs, celery, mushrooms, and some sauce. Garnish with the celery leaves and drizzle with a little walnut oil. Serve with the remaining sauce on the side. Pair With: RED WINE FROM LANGUEDOC, FRANCE  Reds from this warm coastal region have spicy fruit notes with a dash of salinity, which means they’ll pair well with celery.

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roasted celery and garlic soup with crisp prosciutto Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Sweet roasted garlic harmonizes with salty celery and prosciutto in this creamy soup. Since the soup is strained, there’s no need to peel the celery.

1 oz. thinly sliced prosciutto, finely chopped (about 3/4 cup)

4 cups lower-salt chicken broth

Makes about 51/2 cups; serves 4 to 6

¼ cup heavy cream

11/2 lb. celery (about 11/2 heads), ribs trimmed and coarsely chopped (about 6 cups), 1/4 cup inner leaves reserved for garnish 20 cloves garlic, peeled

3 Tbs. olive oil

1 Tbs. sherry vinegar

1 tsp. celery seeds

2 Tbs. cornstarch

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400°F. In a large bowl, toss the celery and garlic with 2 Tbs. of the oil, the vinegar, celery seeds, 1/2 tsp. salt, and ½ tsp. pepper. Transfer to a rimmed baking sheet and roast until browned in spots, about 35 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small skillet, heat the remaining 1 Tbs. oil over mediumhigh heat. Add the prosciutto

and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a paper-towellined plate and set aside. Working in batches, purée the celery mixture with the broth in a blender until smooth. Pass through a fine-mesh strainer into a 4-quart saucepan, pressing hard with a spatula to force the liquid through. In a small bowl, whisk the cream and cornstarch together. Bring the soup to a boil, then lower the heat to a simmer. Whisk the cream mixture into the soup a little at a time until thickened to your liking; you may not need it all. Skim off any foam with a spoon. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve garnished with the prosciutto and thinly sliced celery leaves. Pair With: SAISON BEER  Earthy, refreshing saisons pair well with celery, and their soft carbonation will balance the sweet garlic and cream.


caramelized celery with lentils The toasty flavor of caramelized celery pairs well with earthy lentils and an unusual finishing touch of dill, maple, and cider vinegar. Originally created for our Make It Tonight column, this dish was so loved by our editors that it inspired this feature. Serves 6 as a side dish 71/2 oz. beluga lentils (about 1 cup)

1 Tbs. unsalted butter

1 Tbs. olive oil

8 oz. celery, sliced 1/4 inch thick on a slight diagonal (about 2 cups)

1 Tbs. cider vinegar; more as needed

2 tsp. pure maple syrup

1 Tbs. chopped fresh dill

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a medium saucepan, bring 6 cups water to a boil. Add the lentils and simmer, adjusting the heat as needed, until just tender, 20 to 25 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a 12-inch skillet, heat the butter and oil over medium-high heat until the butter melts. Add the celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown in places, about 5 minutes. Add the vinegar and maple syrup, and cook until the liquid is mostly absorbed, about 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and toss with the lentils, dill, 1 tsp. salt, and 1/2 tsp. pepper. Season to taste with more vinegar, salt, and pepper, and serve.

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tip

roasted celery with stilton and almonds

Celery and blue cheese make for a boldly flavored gratin. Tarragon adds an aromatic note, balsamic glaze contributes welcome sweetness, and almonds provide nutty crunch. Serves 4 to 6 as a side dish

3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1 Tbs. mild honey

1/8 tsp. cayenne Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 11/2 lb. celery ribs, trimmed, peeled, and cut on the diagonal into 2-inch pieces (about 5 cups), rinsed but not dried

3 oz. Stilton cheese, crumbled (about 3/4 cup)

1/2 cup chopped blanched almonds

Peel for a better bite The fibrous strings on celery won’t become tender with cooking, so remove them with a vegetable peeler. You need to do only the convex side.

tip

Keep it fresher in foil To keep celery fresh and crisp longer, wrap it in foil before refrigerating it. Because it’s not airtight, the foil allows naturally occurring ethylene gas, which accelerates moisture loss and spoilage, to escape.

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1 to 2 tsp. balsamic glaze (see Test Kitchen, p. 93)

1 tsp. chopped fresh tarragon

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°F. In a large bowl, combine the oil, honey, cayenne, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. pepper. Add the celery and toss to coat. Transfer to an 11-inch quiche dish or a 9x13-inch baking dish, and spread in an even layer. Roast until crisp-tender and starting to brown in spots, 25 to 30 minutes. Sprinkle the cheese and almonds over the top and roast until the cheese melts and the almonds are toasted, about 10 minutes. Drizzle with the balsamic glaze, sprinkle with the tarragon, and serve.


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fava–za’atar hummus

mint–feta hummus

harissa–almond hummus

artichoke– olive hummus

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cumin– coriander hummus

h

e v n a ly e

cilantro –pepita hummus

Hummus Light, smooth, ethereal. Here’s how. By Marge Perry

Last fall, I made my first trip to Israel. It was memorable in many ways, but one of the things that will stick with me most was a new outlook on a dish I’ve eaten all my life: hummus. I fell deeply, madly in love with it. At lunchtime, rather than having a sandwich or salad, I’d go to a hummus shop and have a bowl of this creamy, ethereal, smooth, fluffy chickpea-and-tahini spread, served with pita, vegetables, and—often— flavorful toppings. It had a mild, nutty, toasty flavor and delicate texture that was still hearty enough to sustain me until dinner. It was worlds apart from the grainy, dense dip I’d had—and made—before. I returned home determined to replicate it. Continued on p. 62 »

Photographs by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day

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My first attempts were with canned chickpeas, but I got the same coarse, heavy results I’d had before. Starting with dried chickpeas resulted in better flavor, but the texture was still thick and grainy. The key, it turned out, was removing the chickpea skins—a tedious job. After reading about and testing many methods, I developed an approach that spares me from having to skin each chickpea individually. I cook the chickpeas with baking soda, which scrubs the skin to loosen it, so a lot comes off during cooking. Then I rinse the cooked chickpeas under cold water to dislodge the majority of the skins. It’s the perfect compromise—a little bit of extra work, but the results are luscious and dreamy, just like I had in Israel. Marge Perry is a cooking instructor and awardwinning food, nutrition, and travel writer in New Jersey.

Flavor Factors Hummus has only a few ingredients, and the key is to balance them in perfect harmony. Here are some tips to keep in mind.

• Garlic should be gentle,

not raw. Cooking the garlic with the chickpeas tames its harshness and brings out its sweet, mellow side.

• Lemon balances and enhances richer flavors. You don’t want to take a taste of hummus and think “Lemon!” It should be there in a supporting role.

• Tahini varies greatly by brand.

When made with roasted seeds (like the common Joyva brand), it has an aggressive presence. I prefer untoasted or lightly toasted, milder-tasting brands like Whole Foods 365 Everyday Value and Lieber’s.

• Olive oil goes on top of, not in, hummus. The unctuous texture of hummus comes from the fat in the tahini. Running olive oil through the food processor can break it down, unleashing bitter notes. Drizzled on at the end, though, it lends its signature fruity, grassy flavor.

israeli-style hummus This fluffy dip has a creamy, nutty flavor unlike anything you’ll find in a grocery store. Serve with pita, cucumbers, peppers, or carrots. Makes 21/2 cups; serves 8 to 10

8 oz. dried chickpeas (about 11/4 cups)

1 tsp. baking soda

2 to 3 medium cloves garlic, smashed and peeled

½ cup tahini 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice; more to taste

1 tsp. fine sea salt; more to taste

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 Tbs. coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Paprika for garnish (optional)

Soak the chickpeas in 8 cups cold water in the refrigerator for at least 8 hours and up to 24 hours. Drain. In a large, heavy-duty pot, cook the chickpeas and baking soda over medium heat, stirring often, for 3 minutes. Add 8 cups fresh cold water and the garlic and

bring to a boil. Immediately reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the chickpeas are very tender throughout, about 1 hour. Reserve 1/4 cup of the cooking liquid, and then drain the chickpeas. Transfer the chickpeas to a large bowl, and cover with cold water. Gently agitate the chickpeas with your fingers to help dislodge the skins. Stir with a skimmer or slotted spoon, and remove the skins as they rise to the surface. Drain well. Reserve 2 Tbs. of the chickpeas, and transfer the rest, including the garlic, to a food processor. Purée until the mixture balls up. With the machine running, add the tahini, lemon juice, salt, and chickpea cooking liquid through the feed tube. Scrape down the sides, and purée until very smooth. Transfer to a bowl, cover, and refrigerate at least 30 minutes and up to 3 days. The hummus thickens and the flavors develop as it sits. Just before serving, season to taste with more salt and lemon juice, if necessary. Use the back of a spoon to create a well on the surface of the hummus and drizzle on the olive oil. Scatter the reserved chickpeas, parsley, and paprika, if using, over the top, and serve.


6 Tasty Ways to Top Your Hummus

Secrets for skinning the chickpeas

fava–za’atar hummus

artichoke–olive hummus

Top the hummus with 1/3 cup cooked fava beans or edamame. In place of the paprika, sprinkle with 1/2 tsp. za’atar in addition to the olive oil, reserved chickpeas, and parsley.

Drain and chop 1 cup jarred artichokes, and stir into the hummus. Omit the paprika. Top with 2 Tbs. chopped black olives, 1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, and 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts in addition to the olive oil and reserved chickpeas.

cilantro–pepita hummus Baking soda loosens the chickpeas’ skins and makes the water alkaline so they cook faster.

Agitating the cooked chickpeas causes the skins to float to the surface, where they can easily be skimmed off.

Replace the parsley with fresh cilantro and the paprika with smoked paprika. Top with 1/4 cup roasted pepitas in addition to the olive oil and reserved chickpeas.

mint–feta hummus Top with 1/3 cup crumbled feta, 2 Tbs. chopped fresh mint, and 1/2 tsp. finely grated fresh orange zest along with the olive oil, reserved chickpeas, parsley, and paprika, if using.

cumin–coriander hummus

harissa–almond hummus

Stir 1/2 tsp. toasted ground cumin into the hummus and top with 1/4 tsp. each toasted cumin and coriander seeds along with the olive oil, reserved chickpeas, parsley, and paprika, if using.

In place of the paprika, swirl 1 Tbs. harissa into the oil on top. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup chopped toasted almonds in addition to the reserved chickpeas and parsley.

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Pork Belly 3 ways to cook

this rich, meltingly tender cut

by Duskie Estes

My husband, John Stewart, and I were named King and Queen of Pork in 2011, when we won Grand Cochon, a national snout-to-tail pig-cooking competition. Needless to say, I’m enthusiastic about the whole hog. If I had to choose just one cut, though, it would be pork belly. Pork belly is exactly what it sounds like: the belly of the pig. You probably know it as bacon, which is cured, smoked pork belly. Left uncured, it’s incredibly tender meat layered with silky, lustrous fat, both of which have intensely porky flavor. Often served in restaurants, it may seem tricky to cook, but it’s easy enough to enjoy at home. The key to cooking pork belly is time-preferably two days. In some of my recipes, I season the pork the day before cooking so that the seasoning can penetrate. In others, I braise it the day before serving, because everything braised is better the second day. Cook times are long, too, to break down all the connective tissue in the meaty part of the belly and melt the fat so that the whole thing is tender enough to give at the mere sight of a fork. I have several methods for cooking pork belly. I often like to use a rub that

has sugar in it, and then roast it so the dry heat caramelizes the sugar on the surface. Other times, I’ll give it a quick sear to enhance the pork flavor, then braise it in a really flavorful liquid to break it down into silky luxuriousness. I love pork belly with the skin on, too, for a crunchy pop. When I’m cooking it skin on, I simmer the belly in water so that the meat and fat get the tender quality that comes with wet cooking; then I broil it skin side up before serving to puff and crisp it. The surrounding elements on the plate are really important, no matter how the belly is cooked. The meat is so rich that you eat only a small portion, so you want to incorporate it into a delicious dish. On the following pages, you’ll find three of my favorite pork belly dishes. Try one, and soon enough, your friends and family may be calling you the king or queen of pork, too.

Duskie Estes is the co-chef and co-owner of Zazu Kitchen + Farm restaurant and Black Pig Meat Co. in California.

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Illustration by Janet Stein


honey-tabasco pork belly with black-eyed peas and collard greens A brown sugar rub and a spicysweet glaze give this roasted belly a deliciously caramelized flavor. It’s served over bacony slow-simmered beans and tangy braised collards for a truly delicious Southern-style dinner. Serves 8 to 10 For the Black-Eyed peas

2 cups dried black-eyed peas

4 oz. bacon

3 medium cloves garlic, thinly sliced

2 medium red onions, cut into medium dice

4 cups unsalted chicken stock or water; more as needed

2 cups beer, such as Heineken

3/4 cup store-bought or homemade barbecue sauce 1/2 cup ketchup 1/4 cup mild unsulfured molasses 1/4 cup cider vinegar

1 Tbs. Tabasco; more to taste

1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes; more to taste Kosher salt For the pork belly 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar

2 Tbs. kosher salt

2 lb. boneless, skinless pork belly

make the beans

Place the beans in a large bowl and cover with water by 2 inches. Cover and soak the beans overnight in the refrigerator. Arrange the bacon in a single layer on a baking sheet lined with plastic wrap. Cover and freeze for about 1 hour. Transfer to a food processor and process until finely ground, about 1 minute. In a heavy-duty 5- to 6-quart pot, cook the bacon over medium heat until it begins to crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic and onions and cook, stirring frequently, until translucent, about 3 minutes. Rinse and drain the beans, then add to the pot along with the stock. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally until the beans are tender, adding more stock as needed if the liquid level drops below the beans, 1 to 11/4 hours. Add the beer, barbecue sauce, ketchup, molasses, vinegar, Tabasco, and pepper flakes. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and continue to cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally until the sauce thickens and the beans are very tender, 3 to 4 hours. Season to taste with salt and more Tabasco. (The beans can be made up to 1 day ahead and refrigerated. Reheat before serving.)

For the collard greens

cook the pork belly

2 Tbs. olive oil

2 medium cloves garlic, thinly sliced

In a small bowl, mix the sugar and salt. Pat the pork belly dry with paper towels. With a paring knife, cut a 3/4-inch crosshatch pattern through the fat of the belly, but not through to the meat. Rub both sides with the sugar mixture. Place the belly, fat side up, in a foil-lined 9x13-inch baking dish (cut to fit, if necessary). Cover and refrigerate overnight. Let the pork sit at room temperature for about 1 hour. Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400°F. Put the pork in the oven and roast, basting frequently with the fat as it renders, until the meat is golden brown, about 1 hour. Reduce the oven temperature to 250°F, cover with foil, and bake until very tender, 1 to 11/2 hours. Cool to

1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes

1 smoked ham hock

1 14.5-oz. can diced tomatoes

8 cups lower-salt chicken broth or water 2 Tbs. apple cider vinegar; more to taste

3 lb. collard greens, stemmed and cut into 2-inch-thick ribbons

Kosher salt For the glaze 1/3 cup honey

1 tsp. Tabasco

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room temperature, and then refrigerate until ready to serve. (The pork belly can be made 1 day ahead.) make the collard greens

Heat the oil in a heavy-duty 6- to 8-quart pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and pepper flakes and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the hock, tomatoes and their juice, broth, and vinegar. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Add the collard greens by the handful, stirring until wilted enough to add more. Cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the greens and the hock meat are tender, about 11/2 hours. Remove the hock from the pot. Discard the skin, pick the meat off the bone, and add to the greens. Discard the bone. Season the greens to taste with salt, more vinegar, and pepper flakes. glaze the pork and serve

Combine the honey and Tabasco in a 1-quart saucepan. Bring to a simmer over low heat, stirring continuously. Remove from the heat. Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400°F. Cut the pork belly crosswise into planks about 1 inch wide and 3 to 4 inches long. Arrange the pork belly planks in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet and heat in the oven until just warmed through, 7 to 10 minutes. For each serving, put a helping of beans in a bowl, and using tongs or a slotted spoon, top with some greens. Lean two pieces of the pork belly against the greens, brush with the glaze, and serve. Pair With: GRÜNER VELTLINER FROM AUSTRIA  With a blast of salty freshness and lemony tang, these white wines have exceptional acidity to cut through the sweet glaze and highlight the greens and beans.

Photographs by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day


clams with herb cream and pork belly cracklin’ Puffy, crunchy little cubes of skin-on pork belly are the star of this dish, but briny clams, potatoes, and light herbed whipped cream make it a meal to remember. Serves 8

2 lb. boneless, skin-on pork belly

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

5 lb. Manila or littleneck clams

1 lb. medium Yukon Gold potatoes (about 4), unpeeled, cut into 1/2-inch dice

3/4 cup packed mixed fresh herbs of your choice, such as parsley, cilantro, thyme, tarragon, oregano, mint, chives, and dill, coarsely chopped 2/3 cup heavy cream

2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1 medium shallot, finely chopped

1/2 cup sweet vermouth or Lillet

2 Tbs. fresh lemon juice

Crusty bread, for serving

Pat the pork belly dry with paper towels. With a sharp paring knife, cut a 3/4-inch crosshatch pattern through the skin into the fat, but not through to the meat. In a small bowl, mix together 2 tsp. salt and 1 tsp. pepper, and rub onto both sides of the pork. Place on a rimmed baking sheet and refrigerate, uncovered, overnight. Clean the clams by soaking them in a large bowl of well-salted water in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 hours, changing the water occasionally until no sand appears at the bottom of the bowl. Remove the clams from the refrigerator and soak in fresh water for about 30 minutes before cooking. Let the pork sit at room temperature for about 1 hour. Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Place the pork, skin side up, in a 10-inch ovenproof skillet (cut to fit, if necessary). Add ½ cup water and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Transfer to the oven and bake, uncovered, for 45 minutes. Add another ½ cup water and continue to bake until the pork is fork-tender, 1 to 11/2 hours more. Remove from the oven and set aside. Put the potatoes in a 3-quart saucepan and cover with cold water. Add 1 tsp. salt, bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Cook until just tender when pierced with a fork, 15 to 16 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Combine the herbs and cream in a blender and purée until a soft whipped cream forms, about 1 minute. Set aside. Position a rack 6 to 8 inches from the broiler and heat the broiler (on low, if possible). Broil the pork in the skillet until the skin is puffed and crunchy, 11/2 to 2 minutes, rotating halfway through. Put the pork on a cutting board, skin side down, and set aside until cool enough to handle. Cut the pork into bite-size pieces by gently slicing through the meat with a sharp knife, then pressing the blade down firmly to cut through the hard skin. Heat the oil in a heavy-duty 6-quart pot over high heat until shimmering. Add the shallot and cook until just fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the clams and vermouth; cover and cook until the clams open, 5 to 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the potatoes, herb cream, and lemon juice. Toss and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve the clams topped with the pork belly, and the bread on the side. Pair With: LAGER OR PILSNER Traditional lagers and pilsners offer a refreshingly dry yeast flavor and a satiating finish to balance the rich cream and pork belly.

Scoring the skin allows the fat to render.

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cider-glazed pork belly and brussels sprouts This dish uses a classic flavor combination—pork, Brussels sprouts, and apples— in new ways. The pork is braised and glazed with cider for deep apple flavor and served over a Brussels sprout-apple side dish that’s punched up with Marcona almonds and Gorgonzola. Serves 6 FOR THE BELLY

2 lb. boneless, skinless pork belly

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

2 medium carrots, coarsely chopped

2 ribs celery, coarsely chopped

1 medium red onion, coarsely chopped

1/2 medium head fennel, coarsely chopped

1 12-oz. bottle hard cider

2 cups lower-salt chicken broth

FOR THE GLAZE

2 cups apple cider

1 12-oz. bottle hard cider

FOR THE BRUSSELS SPROUTS

5 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1 lb. Brussels sprouts, sliced lengthwise 1/2 inch thick (about 4 cups)

1 medium shallot, minced

1/4 cup sherry vinegar

1 head frisée, cut into bite-size pieces

1 red apple, unpeeled, cut into 1/2-inch dice

3 Tbs. coarsely chopped Marcona almonds

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup crumbled Gorgonzola braise the pork belly

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Pat the pork belly dry with paper towels. With a paring knife, cut a 3/4-inch crosshatch pattern through the fat, but not through to the meat. Season with 2 tsp. salt and 1 tsp. pepper. Heat the oil in a heavy-duty 7- to 8-quart pot over medium heat. Put the belly, fat side down, in the pot (cut to fit, if necessary) and cook until golden brown, about 7 minutes. Flip the belly, then add the carrots, celery, onion, fennel, hard cider, and broth. Cover, transfer to the oven, and braise until the pork is fork-tender, 2 to 3 hours. Remove from the oven and cool. Cut into 12 pieces, about 1 inch wide and 3 inches long. Discard the braising mixture. (The belly can

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be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to two days. Bring to room temperature before proceeding.) make the glaze

Put the apple cider and hard cider in a 2-quart saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring occasionally, until syrupy, about 1 hour. Make the brussels sprouts and serve

Heat 2 Tbs. of the oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat. Add the pork belly and cook, fat side down, until the meat is warm and the fat softens, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a plate. Add the Brussels sprouts and cook undisturbed until browned on one side, about 3 minutes. Add 1/4 cup water, stir, and cook until tender, about 3 minutes more. Add the shallot and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the vinegar and toss. Add the frisée, apple, nuts, and the remaining 3 Tbs. oil, and toss. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Brush the pork belly with the glaze, then drizzle the remaining glaze evenly over the Brussels sprout mixture. Top the Brussels sprout mixture with the pork belly pieces. Sprinkle with the Gorgonzola, and serve. Pair With: BARBERA The supple tannins and sharp acidity in these reds from Italy’s Piemonte region are a perfect match for the sweet apples and bitter sprouts.

The Pork Queen Manifesto If I told you I was a vegetarian for more than 20 years, you might wonder how I came to win a pork-cooking competition. Well, I met a guy. He made his own bacon and salumi, and wanted to raise pigs. He eventually became my husband, so we had to come to an arrangement. We agreed that our pigs would be raised on pasture so they could roam and enjoy each day with their faces in the sun and the wind. This isn’t just an ethical imperative—pigs raised this way taste better. Eating diverse diets of foraged food (plus scraps from our kitchen)

makes the meat flavorful. Heritage breeds, which we raise, have more fat, which means more flavor still. When you’re buying pork, try to learn about how it’s raised—find a local farmer, or talk to your butcher. If your butcher doesn’t normally stock pork belly, the shop can get it for you with a few days’ notice, or you can mail-order it (see Sources, p. 96). It comes in slabs that weigh from 1 to 5 lb., and you can ask your butcher to remove the skin or leave it on. Occasionally, it’s sold bone-in, but for these recipes, ask for boneless.


Bread Pudding 101 Learn the basics behind this classic, comforting dessert. by Abigail Johnson Dodge

Bread pudding is one of those desserts that’s as soothing as it is satisfying. Made by soaking cubed or sliced day-old bread in a lightly sweetened custard base and then baking it, bread pudding is, at its most basic, simple comfort food at its best. But bread pudding can also be sophisticated, as when topped with a sauce like the rumraisin one on the opposite page, or flavored with any number of additions. It’s also a dessert that’s easy to whip up at a moment’s notice since bread pudding’s core ingredients—eggs, milk, cream, sugar, and, of course, bread—are often on hand. I like to add two other ingredients to my bread pudding to

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boost its flavor: vanilla and salt. Adding a healthy dose of vanilla gives the pudding a lovely aroma while a little salt elevates all of the flavors; without it, the pudding would taste flat. Finally, I like my bread pudding to have a texture that’s more pudding than bread, which means it’s best eaten with a spoon. One bite will have you swooning and—yes—feeling comforted as well. Abigail Johnson Dodge is a Fine Cooking contributing editor and cookbook author. Her latest book, The Everyday Baker, is her biggest and best yet.

Photograph by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day


Need to Know White bread works well. My go-to is a soft, thin-crusted Italian-style loaf that’s porous enough to soak up just the right amount of custard for a creamy, smooth pudding consistency. Breads with a firmer texture, such as challah or brioche, will be, well, firmer but are also good candidates. You can experiment with croissants or even doughnuts in place of the bread, too.

Older is better. Fresh bread is fine, but drier bread will absorb the custard better. If your bread isn’t at least a day old, let the cubes sit out for a few hours, or very lightly toast them in the oven. Crusts can be on or off. The choice is yours. The crust will give the pudding a little more chew and color. One caveat: The crust of an artisan loaf or even the bottom of a soft Italian bread may be too hard and dense. In such cases, it’s best to cut the crust away.

Use a combination of milk and cream. Milk alone is too thin to make a creamy custard while just cream is too thick and cloying.

Bake in a water bath. The gentle heat cooks the custard to a nice softly set texture without overcooking the eggs.

Soak the bread for at least 45 minutes to give it enough time to absorb the custard, which softens and flavors the bread. The bread can soak for up to 24 hours; the longer it soaks, the softer it will be.

Serve with a sauce, if you like. Though delicious on its own, bread pudding also benefits from a sauce. The Rum-Raisin Sauce below dresses up plain bread pudding and is also a good match for the Coconut-Ginger variation.

bread pudding Simply mix the liquid ingredients, pour over the bread, let soak, and bake. It’s that easy. Serves 8 to 10 1/2 Tbs. unsalted butter, softened

6 to 7 cups lightly packed 1-inch bread cubes, preferably from a day-old, Italian-style loaf with any hard crusts removed

4 large eggs

1 large egg yolk

2/3 cup granulated sugar 11/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste 1/4 tsp. table salt 21/2 cups whole milk

1 cup heavy cream

Confectioners’ sugar, for serving (optional) Rum-Raisin Sauce (right; optional)

Butter an 8-cup baking dish, such as an 8-inch square. Pile in the bread cubes; the dish should be almost completely filled. Have ready a larger baking pan that can comfortably hold the smaller dish. In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs, yolk, sugar, vanilla, and salt. Add the milk and cream, and whisk until well blended. Pour the egg mixture evenly over the bread. Cover with plastic wrap directly on the surface, and let sit at room temperature, pressing down on it occasionally to submerge the bread in the custard, for at least 45 minutes and up to 24 hours. (Refrigerate if soaking for more than 2 hours; let sit at room temperature while the oven heats.) Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Bring a kettle of water to a boil, and then take it off the heat. Remove

the plastic wrap from the pudding and place the baking dish in the larger baking pan. Put the baking pan on the oven rack. Carefully pour enough hot water into the pan to reach about halfway up the sides of the baking dish. Bake until the center of the pudding springs back when gently pressed with a finger and a knife inserted in the center comes out almost clean, 50 to 55 minutes. Cool in the water bath on a rack for about 15 minutes. Carefully lift the baking dish out of the water and transfer to the rack to cool. Serve warm or at room temperature with a dusting of confectioners’ sugar or the Rum-Raisin Sauce, if using.

rum-raisin sauce Use a spoon when you serve this sauce to be sure you get some raisins, which will sink to the bottom. Serves 8 to 10 11/2 cups heavy cream 3/4  cup raisins 2/3  cup packed dark brown sugar

3 to 4 Tbs. dark rum

Combine the cream, raisins, and sugar in a 3-quart saucepan. Bring to a boil over mediumhigh heat, reduce the heat to low, and cook, stirring frequently, until the mixture thickly coats a silicone spatula and holds a line drawn through it, 6 to 8 minutes. Off the heat, stir in the rum. Serve warm or at room temperature.

GREAT WAYS TO ADD FLAVOR Coconut-Ginger Scatter 2 Tbs. finely chopped crystallized ginger over the bread cubes. In place of milk and cream in the custard, use two well-shaken 13.4-oz. cans coconut milk. Increase the vanilla to 21/2 tsp. and add 11/4 tsp. finely grated fresh lemon zest to the custard. After baking, sprinkle toasted shredded coconut over the pudding. Cranberry-Almond Soak 1/2 cup dried cranberries in very hot tap water until plumped, about 20 minutes. Drain well. Scatter the cranberries over the bread cubes. Add 3/4 tsp. pure almond extract to the custard. After baking, sprinkle toasted sliced almonds over the pudding. Chocolate-Cherry Soak 1/2 cup dried cherries in very hot tap water until plumped, about 20 minutes. Drain well. Scatter the cherries and 2 oz. finely chopped bittersweet chocolate over the bread cubes. Increase the granulated sugar to 3/4 cup, and whisk 1 oz. (1/3 cup) unsweetened Dutchprocess cocoa powder into the custard.

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a l an t a C Get to know the rustic, deeply flavored stews of Catalonia.

BY JEFF KOEHLER

Co

t r mfo

NEARLY 20 YEARS AGO, NOT LONG AFTER I MOVED TO CATALONIA, the region in northeastern Spain of which Barcelona is the capital, my soon-to-be mother-in-law gave me my first cassola. Also known by its Spanish name, cazuela, this shallow, round, kiln-fired terra-cotta casserole is the workhorse of the traditional Catalan kitchen, where it’s used to stew and braise meats, poultry, and seafood, and even to make rice dishes. Then, when the dish is ready, the cassola is carried to the dining table, where it serves double-duty as an attractive serving vessel. Already

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a deep ruddy color and veined with a patina of hairline cracks when it was given to me, that first cassola lasted me for years as I learned to cook a repertoire of Catalan classics in it.

How to cook a la cassola

Dishes cooked a la cassola often follow a similar formula. First, the main ingredient—whether meat or seafood—is browned in the cassola 1 and then transferred to a platter. Next, a sofregit (sofrito in Spanish) is prepared 2 . This slow-cooked onion and tomato base is the foundation of countless dishes and a hallmark of the Catalan kitchen. Cooking the sofregit is never rushed— the flavors must be allowed to deepen and sweeten and the texture to become soft and pulpy. As my mother-inlaw told me long ago when I tried to hurry along a late lunch, “A quick sofregit does not exist.” The meat or seafood is then returned to the cassola along with a splash of wine—crisp white for a tangy, mineral touch, muscatel or even brandy for earthier tones. Stock is ladled in, the heat is turned to low, and the dish is left to braise slowly. This, in Catalan, is called xup-xup (pronounced “choop-choop”), for the sound of the bubbles just popping through the surface of the sauce as it reduces. Whereas the sofregit leads, a picada often finishes. Ten minutes or so before the dish is done, a handful of almonds, a clove of garlic, some parsley, and perhaps a small piece of day-old bread are pounded with a mortar and pestle into a fine paste and stirred into the stew 3 . This mixture—the picada—thickens the sauce and draws the flavors together, giving the dish body and boldness, along with a rustic hue. So distinctive is the way of cooking in a cassola that it often lends its name to the dish: conill a la cassola (rabbit), costilles a la cassola (pork ribs), arròs a la cassola (rice).

1 BROWN THE MEAT—rabbit is shown here.

2 MAKE THE SOFREGIT.

These are family dishes, Sunday dishes, dishes to linger over. Flavors might be few, but they are concentrated, and the last of the sauce gets shamelessly mopped up with bread from the cassola sitting in the middle of the table. But just as important is the element of gathering others around that table. The comfort that the dish brings is the ultimate goal of cooking a la cassola. Jeff Koehler is the author of the cookbooks Spain and Morocco, as well as a book on the history of Darjeeling tea. He’s currently at work on a book about coffee, which has him traveling to Ethiopia, among other exotic locations, for research. When he’s not traveling, Jeff divides his time between Barcelona and Menorca, where he lives with his wife and two children.

Photographs by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day

3 ADD THE PICADA.

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C ATALAN S TEWED L AMB WITH P OTATOES AND G REEN O LIVES (E STOFAT I

C ORDER AMB P ATATES O LIVES V ERDES ) DE

Olives offer a salty contrast to rich, tender pieces of lamb in this hearty dish. Instead of a picada, the stew relies on starch from the potatoes for thickening. Bone-in lamb pieces are traditional, but boneless lamb makes for easier eating; the choice is yours. Serves 4 to 6 2½ lb. boneless lamb shoulder, cut into 1-inch pieces, or bone-in lamb, such as shoulder, shank, or neck, cut into 1½- to 2-oz. pieces (ask your butcher to do this) Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 3 Tbs. olive oil; more as needed 1 medium yellow or red onion, finely chopped 3 medium tomatoes, halved, seeded, and grated (see Test Kitchen, p. 89) ½ cup dry white wine or ¼ cup brandy 1½ cups unsalted chicken or beef stock; more as needed 1 dried bay leaf 2½ lb. Yukon Gold potatoes (about 4 large), peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces ¾ cup unpitted green olives, such as manzanilla, Cerignola, or Castelvetrano, rinsed Crusty bread, for serving

Pat the lamb dry with paper towels and season generously with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a 12½-inch cassola (on a heat diffuser if recommended by the manufacturer) over mediumhigh heat. Working in batches so as not to crowd the cassola, brown the lamb on all sides, 8 to 10 minutes

per batch, adding more oil as needed. Transfer each batch to a platter and cover with foil to keep warm. Reduce the heat to medium, add the onion, and cook, stirring frequently, until translucent, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the tomatoes, reduce the heat to low, and cook, uncovered, stirring frequently and then tapping down the mixture with the back of a wooden spoon until thickened and darker, 10 to 15 minutes, adding a little water as necessary to keep it from drying out and sticking. Return the lamb to the cassola and turn to coat well. Drizzle with the wine, stir, and cook for 1 minute. Add the stock and bay leaf, increase the heat to medium high, bring to a boil, and then reduce to a simmer. Cover with a large pot lid or foil, leaving it slightly ajar, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes if using bone-in lamb or 30 minutes if using boneless. Add the potatoes and olives, replace the lid slightly ajar, and cook over low heat until the lamb and potatoes are fork-tender, 45 minutes to 1 hour, adding more stock if needed to keep the sauce moist. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve from the cassola with the bread, and be sure to warn everyone about the olive pits. Pair With: SPANISH GARNACHA–CARIÑENA BLENDS FROM DO MONTSANT The balance and complexity of old-vine Garnacha and Cariñena complement the dish’s flavors—the earthiness of the lamb and the piquancy of the green olives.

CARING FOR YOUR CASSOLA

Buying Traditional cassolas are glazed terra cotta, though some cooks prefer more modern heavy cast-aluminum or cast-iron ones that distribute and retain heat just as well for simmering and braising but are much less fragile. Cassolas come in a variety of sizes, the most common being 30 cm (about 12½ inches). When shopping for a cassola

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anywhere outside of Catalonia, you’ll most likely see it called by its Spanish name, cazuela. See page 96 for a mail-order source.

Seasoning Before using a traditional earthenware cassola for the first time, you may need to season it, which typically involves soaking it overnight in water and then allowing it to fully air-dry. Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions for this step.

Cooking An earthenware cassola shouldn’t be used over heat higher than medium high. Some manufacturers suggest using a heat diffuser to further protect the cassola and help it cook foods more evenly; see Test Kitchen (p. 90) for more information on this tool. Never set a hot cassola down on a cold surface or place a cold cassola—i.e., one that was refrigerated with leftovers—on a hot surface. Small cracks may appear with use and won’t affect the cassola’s perfor-

mance, but deep cracks mean that it’s time for a new one.

Cleaning and Storing Let your cassola cool completely before hand-washing in warm, soapy water. Rinse and then dry with a soft cloth.

Substituting For the recipes here, you can also use a 12-inch-wide heavyduty Dutch oven or straight-sided skillet.


“

Cassolas are perfect to prepare in advance and then reheat when everyone is ready to eat. In fact, this will often make them better, with more developed flavors.

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C ATALAN B RAISED R ABBIT (C ONILL

A LA CASSOLA )

Lean, mildly flavored rabbit is delicious when slow-cooked in a cassola with tomatoes, carrots, almonds, and garlic. Adding a piece of the rabbit’s liver is a traditional way of giving the dish deep, earthy tones. Serves 4 1 whole cleaned rabbit (about 2½ lb.), cut into 12 pieces (ask your butcher to do this) Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper ½ rabbit liver (optional) 3 Tbs. olive oil; more as needed 3 medium cloves garlic, peeled 1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped 3 medium tomatoes, halved, seeded, and grated (see Test Kitchen, p. 89) ¼ cup dry white wine 2 to 3 medium carrots, cut into ¼-inch-thick rounds (about 1½ cups) 1 cup lower-salt chicken broth or water; more as needed 1 sprig fresh thyme 10 to 12 toasted and skinned almonds or hazelnuts 1 Tbs. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley; more for garnish (optional) Crusty bread, for serving

Pat the rabbit dry with paper towels and generously season with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a 12½-inch cassola (on a heat diffuser if recommended by the manufacturer) over medium-high heat. Working in batches so as not to crowd the cassola, brown the rabbit pieces (and liver, if using) on all sides, 8 to 10 minutes per batch, adding more oil as needed. Transfer each batch to a platter and cover with foil to keep warm. Reduce the heat to medium, add the garlic,

and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Transfer to a small dish and set aside. Add the onion to the cassola and cook, stirring frequently, until it becomes translucent, 3 to 4 minutes (add a bit more oil if it seems dry). Add the tomatoes, reduce the heat to low, and cook, uncovered, stirring frequently and then tapping down the mixture with the back of a wooden spoon until thickened and darker, 10 to 15 minutes, adding a little water as necessary to keep it from drying out and sticking. Return the rabbit leg and thigh pieces to the cassola, turning to coat. Drizzle with the wine, stir, and cook for 1 minute. Add the carrots, broth, and thyme. Increase the heat to medium high, bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes. Add the remaining rabbit pieces and continue to cook until the rabbit is tender, about 30 minutes more, adding more broth if needed to keep the sauce moist. Meanwhile, using a mortar and pestle, pound the liver (if using), garlic, almonds, and parsley into a fine paste. Loosen with 1 to 2 Tbs. water. (Alternatively, grind in a food processor using short pulses, adding water as needed.) Stir the garlic mixture into the sauce until well blended, and continue to cook about for 10 more minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper, garnish with parsley (if using), and serve from the cassola with the bread. Pair With: SPANISH MONASTRELL FROM DO ALICANTE While the rabbit has a neutral flavor, the deeply flavored sauce needs a wine that is full-bodied but not overly tannic in the finish.

Be patient when cooking in this manner. Taste, probe, and watch. Tip in a bit more broth if needed. Or let it cook longer if not completely tender or if the sauce is still a bit runny.

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S EAFOOD

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(R OMESCO Garlicky romesco sauce is best known in Catalonia as an accompaniment to grilled calçots (fat spring onions) or snails, but it is also wonderful with seafood. Its namesake chile— the romesco—is nearly impossible to buy in the U.S., so this version calls for easier-to-find substitutions. Serves 4 to 6 1 dozen medium clams 3 dried ñora or ancho chiles (see Test Kitchen, p. 90) 1 fresh lobster (about 2 lb.), steamed (ask your fishmonger to do this) 3 Tbs. olive oil; more as needed 1½ lb. skinless, boneless monkfish, sea bass, or other firm whitefish, cut into 1-inch-thick fillets Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup all-purpose flour 12 large shrimp (31 to 35 per lb.), unpeeled 4 cloves garlic, peeled 1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped 4 medium tomatoes, halved, seeded, and grated (see Test Kitchen, p. 89) 30 toasted, skinned hazelnuts or almonds or a combination 1 thin slice baguette (about 1 oz.), toasted, or two plain crackers, such as saltines 2 tsp. finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley ¼ tsp. sweet pimentón (smoked paprika) 1 cup fish or seafood stock Crusty bread, for serving Lemon wedges, for serving

Clean the clams by soaking them in a large bowl of well-salted water in the refrigerator, changing the water occasionally until no sand appears at the bottom of the bowl, 2 to 3 hours. Remove the clams from the refrigerator and soak in fresh water for about 30 minutes before cooking. Stem and seed the chiles, place in a bowl, cover with boiling water, and soak for 30 minutes; drain. Using a small spoon, scrape out all of the soft pulp from inside the skins and reserve. Discard the skins. Separate the tail, claws, and knuckles from the body of the lobster; discard the body. Cut the tail in half lengthwise, leaving the meat attached to the shell. Set aside. In a 4-quart saucepan, bring ¼ cup water to a boil over high heat. Add the clams, cover, and steam until the clams open, 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and leave in the pot, covered, until ready to use. Heat the oil in a 12½-inch cassola (on a heat dif-

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R OMESCO S AUCE DE

M ARISC )

fuser if recommended by the manufacturer) over medium-high heat. Season the fish with salt and pepper. Put the flour on a plate and season with ½ tsp. salt and ¼ tsp. pepper. When the oil begins to shimmer, dredge the fish one piece at a time in the flour and cook, in batches if necessary, turning once, until golden on both sides, 1 to 2 minutes per side, adding more oil as needed. Transfer to a platter. Add the shrimp and cook until just opaque, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Transfer to the platter. If necessary, remove any shrimp legs from the cassola. Reduce the heat to medium, add the garlic, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Transfer to a small dish and set aside. Add the onion and cook, stirring frequently, until translucent, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the tomatoes, reduce the heat to low, and cook, uncovered, stirring frequently and then tapping down the mixture with the back of a wooden spoon until thickened and darker, 10 to 15 minutes, adding a little water as necessary to keep it from drying out and sticking. Meanwhile, using a mortar and pestle, pound the garlic cloves, nuts, toasted bread, and parsley into a fine paste. Loosen with 1 to 2 Tbs. of liquid from the clams. (Alternatively, grind in a food processor using short pulses, adding clam liquid as needed.) Add the reserved chile pulp and mix to combine. When the tomato mixture is ready, sprinkle it with the pimentón, stir, and then add ½ cup of the fish stock. Stir in the garlic mixture, making sure it is completely incorporated into the stock with no lumps. Remove the clams from their liquid (reserve the liquid) and add to the cassola, along with the fish, shrimp, and lobster. Add the remaining ½ cup fish stock and bring to a simmer. Without breaking the fish fillets, spoon the sauce over them. Once simmering, reduce the heat to low and cook until the fish is opaque throughout and the sauce is slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. The sauce should be fluid but not watery. Add a bit of the reserved clam liquid if needed. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve from the cassola with the bread and lemon wedges. Pair With: SPANISH GARNACHA BLANCA FROM PRIORAT OR TERRA ALTA The seafood calls for a white wine, but the romesco sauce requires one with heft and texture to the palate.


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Always serve a cassola with plenty of bread to mop up the intensely flavorful sauce.

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Hot Chocolate

Chef Rick Bayless pairs chiles and chocolate in Mexican-inspired recipes both savory and sweet.

Chile and chocolate.

That’s an ancient Mexican tradition, right? Well, not exactly. Yes, both chiles and cocoa beans come from Mexico, but the cocoa drink of the Aztec court bears little resemblance to what we think of today as chocolate. The savory, spiced chocolate drink favored by Moctezuma, made by grinding up the bitter beans and adding spices, was more like a rich, aromatic black coffee with nothing sweet about it. It was only after cocoa beans traveled the world (to Europe via the Spaniards) that they were transformed into the chocolate we know today. Probably the most well-known savory dish showcasing the chile and sweet chocolate combination is the rich, dark sauce known as mole (pronounced MOH-lay). A complex concoction of Old World and New World ingredients, mole (p. 84) has become codified over the past few centuries as Mexico’s national dish. On the dessert side, I’ve never seen a chile-spiked chocolate sweet made by any of the traditional producers in Mexico. But I do see it in contemporary shops and kitchens—and I love it. A little chile adds a wondrous warmth to something already captivating. For example, chipotle (with a little mezcal) gives chocolate truffles (opposite page) a smoky smolder that makes them an adultsonly treat, while the luxurious chocolate sauce on page 87 deliciously demonstrates how the earthy-fruity flavor of an ancho chile echoes the fruity flavors we love in chocolate. Similarly, a chocolate and pumpkin-seed cake made with candied anchos (p. 86) reminds us that chiles are botanically a fruit and can add unexpected dimension (not just heat) to whatever dish they grace, especially those with chocolate in them, too. Rick Bayless, the chef-owner of Frontera Grill, Topolobampo, and Xoco in Chicago, is also an award-winning author, environmental advocate, philanthropist, and TV personality. His most recent book is More Mexican Everyday.

Photographs by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day


chocolate-chile truffles Just a smidge of chipotle powder is all you need to add tingling heat to dark chocolate truffles. Mezcal adds a smoky flavor; you can use tequila, but the flavor of the truffle will be less intense. Makes about 30 truffles 12 oz. bittersweet (70%) chocolate, chopped ½ cup heavy cream

3 Tbs. mezcal (see Test Kitchen, p. 91)

½ tsp. chipotle chile powder 1/4 cup sifted cocoa powder, superfine sugar, or a combination of both

Bring 1 inch of water to a simmer in a 4-quart saucepan over low heat. Put the chopped chocolate in a heatproof bowl that will fit on top of the saucepan without touching the water. Set the bowl aside. In a 2-quart saucepan, bring the heavy cream to a simmer over low heat. Pour the cream over the chopped chocolate, let sit for 1 minute, then stir. Put the bowl over the simmering water, and stir constantly until most of the chocolate has melted, about 2 minutes. Remove the bowl from over the hot water, and stir in the mezcal and 1/4 tsp. of the chipotle powder. Continue stirring until all of the chocolate has melted, about 1 minute. Refrigerate the mixture until firm enough to roll into balls, 1 to 2 hours. In a small bowl, mix the cocoa powder, sugar, or a combination of both with the remaining 1/4 tsp. chipotle powder. Scoop out about 1 Tbs. of the chocolate mixture, roll into a small ball, and then roll in the chile mixture to coat. (Wear latex gloves to keep cleanup easy.) Repeat with the remaining chocolate mixture. Arrange on a serving plate and refrigerate. The truffles may be made a few days ahead; the mezcal flavor will mellow over time. Let them warm up a little before serving.


red peanut mole with chicken Most moles contain dozens of ingredients combined in a daunting number of steps, but this easy version cooks in under an hour from a manageable number of ingredients and will still make you say wow. You can also make the sauce a day ahead, and it will only taste better. Serves 6 1/4 cup vegetable or olive oil

2 medium ancho chiles, stemmed, seeded, and torn into 5 or 6 flat pieces

2 medium cloves garlic

½ small white onion, sliced ¼ inch thick 3½ cups lower-salt chicken broth

1 14.5-oz. can diced tomatoes, preferably fire-roasted

2 oz. firm white bread, roughly torn into pieces

2 canned chipotle chiles in adobo

1 cup salted or unsalted peanuts; more chopped for garnish

½ tsp. ground cinnamon, preferably Mexican ¼ tsp. ground allspice 1½ oz. Mexican chocolate, finely chopped (about 1/4 cup) Kosher salt 1/2 tsp. granulated sugar; more as needed

6 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 8 oz. each)

1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley (optional)

In a 5- to 6-quart Dutch oven or other heavy-duty pot, heat 2 Tbs. of the oil over medium heat. Add the ancho chiles, garlic, and onion, and cook, stirring frequently, until the onion and garlic have browned and the chiles are toasted and aromatic, 5 to 6 minutes. Scrape the mixture into a blender and set the pot aside.

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To the blender, add 11/2 cups of the broth, the tomatoes and their juice, the bread, chipotle chiles, peanuts, cinnamon, and allspice; purée until very smooth, 2 to 3 minutes. Rub a drop of the purée between your fingers; if it doesn’t feel smooth, transfer to a medium-mesh strainer set over a medium bowl and press the mixture through with a spatula. Heat the remaining 2 Tbs. oil in the pot over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, add the sauce. Cook, stirring constantly, until reduced by two-thirds and darkened to a thick, rusty orange paste (about the consistency of tomato paste), 15 to 20 minutes. Stir in the remaining 2 cups broth and the chocolate. Partially cover the pot, reduce the heat to low, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the sauce thickens to a heavy cream consistency, 30 to 45 minutes. Stir in 2 tsp. salt and the sugar, adding more of both to taste. (The sauce may be made 1 or 2 days ahead. Cover and refrigerate; reheat gently before using.) Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Put the chicken in a 9x13-inch baking dish. Add the sauce, covering the chicken. Bake, uncovered, until the chicken is just cooked through (165°F), 35 to 40 minutes. Transfer the chicken to plates or a platter, scraping the sauce on the chicken back into the baking dish as you do. Whisk the sauce until well combined and spoon it back over the chicken. Top with the chopped peanuts and parsley, if using, and serve.


what is mexican chocolate? Mexican chocolate is made from toasted cocoa beans that are winnowed and coarsely ground with sugar (and often with cinnamon, and occasionally with almonds). Less refined than Europeanstyle chocolate, it has a gritty texture when eaten out of hand. Ibarra is a widely distributed Mexican brand that’s available in the United States. A domestically made brand I really like is Taza, which is produced in Massachusetts with authentic

Oaxacan stone mills called molinos. Taza makes plain chocolate as well as flavored; I tend to use their cinnamon variety the most because it’s like what I get in Mexico. For some recipes, I use a mix of Mexican and European-style chocolate or cocoa powder, most often in dishes where I’m looking for a very smooth mouth-feel, such as in truffles, chocolate sauce, and ice cream.

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chocolate cake with candied ancho and pepitas This cake has long been a favorite of mine; the sugar and pepitas (hulled pumpkin seeds) on top conspire to make a slightly crackly topping while the cake itself is packed full of chocolate. Adding ancho chiles cooked in simple syrup adds a subtle fruity warmth. Bonus: The leftover syrup is wonderful; see Test Kitchen (p. 92) for ways to use it. Serves 8

2 cups plus 2 Tbs. granulated sugar

4 medium ancho chiles, stemmed, seeded, and coarsely chopped

4 oz. (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch pieces and slightly softened; more for the pan

13/4 cups toasted, salted pepitas

3 large eggs, at room temperature

11/2 oz. (1/3 cup) unbleached all-purpose flour

1 Tbs. tequila

¼ tsp. baking powder

3 oz. Mexican chocolate, chopped (about 1/2 cup)

Combine 1 cup of the sugar and 1 cup water in a 2-quart saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring frequently to dissolve the sugar, about 2 minutes. Add the chiles and simmer for 5 minutes. Strain through a medium-mesh strainer over a bowl and set aside. (Reserve the syrup for another use, if you like.) When cool, finely chop the chiles. Position a rack in the lower third of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Butter the bottom and sides of an 8- or 9-inch round cake pan, line the bottom with a parchment round, and butter the parchment. Sprinkle ½ cup of the pepitas evenly over the bottom of the pan, and then sprinkle with 2 Tbs. of the sugar. Set aside. Combine the remaining 11/4 cups pepitas and the remaining 1 cup sugar in a food processor. Pulse until the pepitas are pulverized and resemble damp sand. Add the eggs and butter, and pulse until the mixture is well-combined. Add the flour, tequila, and baking powder and pulse until the mixture is just combined. Add the chocolate and pulse until combined. Add the ancho chiles and pulse until combined. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and bake until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 35 to 40 minutes for a 9-inch pan and 45 to 50 minutes for an 8-inch pan. Let the cake cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then invert onto a platter and remove the parchment. Let cool until just warm or room temperature, then slice with a serrated knife to serve. The cake will keep, tightly wrapped, at room temperature for up to 3 days.

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chocolate, chile, and beer ice cream Using amber lager in ice cream may sound odd, but it adds lovely malty, caramel notes. For a double dose of chocolate and chile, serve the ice cream drizzled with the Hot Chocolate Sauce at right. Makes about 1 quart ice cream; serves 8

2 large dried pasilla or ancho chiles, stemmed, seeds and veins left intact

11/3 cups half-and-half

3 oz. bittersweet (70%) chocolate, finely chopped

2 oz. Mexican chocolate, finely chopped (about 1/3 cup)

4 large egg yolks

½ cup granulated sugar 11/3 cups heavy cream ½ cup cold amber lager, such as Negra Modelo 11/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract

In an 8- or 9-inch skillet, toast the chiles over medium heat, pressing them flat against the skillet with a metal spatula, until fragrant, about 10 seconds per side. Transfer to a 2-quart saucepan, and add the half-and-half and both chocolates. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring frequently. Remove from the heat, cover, and let steep for 10 minutes. Transfer to a blender and purée. In a 4-quart saucepan, bring 3 inches of water to a simmer over medium-low heat. Put the egg yolks in a heatproof bowl that will fit over the saucepan without touching the water and whisk off the heat to loosen. Add the sugar and whisk until well combined. Whisking constantly, slowly pour the chocolate mixture into the eggs. Put the bowl over the simmering water and whisk, frequently scraping down the sides of the bowl with a spatula, until the mixture thickens and registers 180°F on an instantread thermometer, about 5 minutes. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer into a clean bowl. Refrigerate until thoroughly chilled, at least 4 hours or up to 1 day, covering once cold. If you want to freeze

the ice cream right away, nestle the bowl in a larger bowl of ice water and whisk until cold (40°F is best), 4 to 6 minutes. Stir in the cream, beer, and vanilla. Freeze in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s directions. Transfer to a container and freeze until firm, several hours or overnight.

hot chocolate sauce After trying this deep, dark, fruity, and spicy chocolate sauce, you may never go back to plain old hot fudge. Makes about 2 cups; serves 16

1 cup granulated sugar

1 cup light agave or light corn syrup

4 oz. unsweetened chocolate, finely chopped

¼ tsp. table salt 1/2 cup unsweetened Dutch-process cocoa 1/4 cup heavy cream

2 oz. (4 Tbs.) unsalted butter, softened

4 tsp. pure ancho chile powder

1 Tbs. pure vanilla extract

1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon, preferably Mexican 1/4 tsp. cayenne

In a 4-quart saucepan, bring the sugar, agave, and ¼ cup water to a boil over medium-high heat. Lower the heat to medium and cook, stirring frequently, until the sugar dissolves, 2 to 3 minutes. Cover, reduce the heat to low, and simmer for 1 minute without stirring. Remove from the heat and stir in the chocolate and salt. Let stand until the chocolate melts, then whisk until smooth. Add the cocoa and whisk until smooth. Add the cream, butter, chile powder, vanilla, cinnamon, and cayenne, and stir until combined. Serve the sauce hot. Store leftover sauce in a tightly covered jar in the refrigerator for up to 10 days. Reheat in a microwave oven or place the open jar in a pot of simmering water, stirring frequently, until hot.

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AS PURE AS THE DAY IT WAS CAUGHT.

Roasted with IF YOU CARE Unbleached Non-Stick Parchment Baking Paper. Sustainable. FSC and Compostable certified. Non-GMO. Non-toxic. Gluten and Allergen Free. Totally chlorine free. Vegan. Vegetarian. Renewable resources. All natural.

RECIPE

Lemon Salmon Filet

• One 2 lb. salmon filet • 1 lemon sliced • 1 sprig of dill (for garnishing)

Preheat the oven to 425°. Coat the salmon with olive oil and season liberally with salt and pepper and 1/2 of the lemon juice. Place the salmon on roasting pan lined with If You Care Parchment Baking Paper and top with lemon slices. Roast for 45 minutes. When the salmon is done, transfer to a platter and top with the dill, remaining lemon slices and lemon juice.

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Serves 4

• 1/4 cup olive oil +1 tsp. • 1 lemon juiced


t e s t k i tc h e n Tips/Techniques/Equipment/Ingredients/Glossary

tip

Grate your tomatoes The cassola recipes on pages 74-81 call for grating tomatoes to easily separate the pulpy flesh from the skins. Here’s how: Cut the fruit in half horizontally, seed it, and then grate it on the large holes of a box grater until all that’s left is skin. —Jennifer Armentrout

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iNGreDieNt

a guide to the dried chiles in this issue The following dried chiles play important roles in two features: “Hot Chocolate” on page 82 and “Catalan Comfort” on page 74. Although the chiles are dried, freshness matters a lot. Fresh dried chiles, ground or whole, should be very aromatic, and whole dried ones should be pliable. If yours have no fragrance, it’s time to restock.

pASillA

ANcHo

These dried poblano chiles have an earthy, fruity flavor and medium heat. Available at most supermarkets, they come ground as well as whole.

ÑorA

cHipotle

Chipotles are dried, smoked jalapeño chiles; they have a hot, sweet, smoky flavor. In this issue, they’re used ground in chipotle powder and also canned in adobo sauce.

Small, round, and vibrantly colored, these Spanish chiles have a sweet flavor with mild heat. See page 96 for a mail-order source, or use anchos as a substitute.

iNGreDieNt

What is white whole wheat flour? Like regular whole wheat flour, white whole wheat flour contains bran and germ, and it’s just as nutritious, too. But because it’s made from white wheat (not the red wheat that regular whole wheat flour comes from), it’s much lighter in color. Even though both types of whole wheat flour are whole grain, the breads baked using them will differ in color, taste, and texture. A white whole wheat loaf will be paler, with a more refined texture. It will also taste slightly less bitter as white wheat does not contain the strongly flavored phenolic compounds that are in red wheat. (The bread dough recipe on page 48 lets you choose which you’d like to use.) You can substitute white whole wheat flour for whole wheat or all-purpose flour in most recipes. If using white whole wheat flour in place of all purpose, start by replacing just some of it, as white whole wheat flour can slightly affect the finished texture. Look for it in the supermarket, or see Sources, page 96. —Joanne Smart

90

—Ronne Day

fine cooking • feb/mar 2016

Also called chile negro, the name comes from the Spanish for raisin, which is what these mediumhot chiles smell like.

tool

Diffusers defined When testing the cassola recipes on pages 74-81, we noticed that a newly purchased and diligently seasoned cassola was discoloring due to uneven heating. We called the cassola manufacturer, who suggested we use a heat diffuser. A diffuser, also known as a flame tamer, simmer ring, or burner plate, is a metal plate that sits right on the stove burner to spread heat evenly under pots and pans. Because it prevents hot spots, a diffuser is also great for cooking rice, as well as delicate sauces and custards. Most work with either gas or electric stoves, and some come with a handle for easy removal. Look for them in kitchen stores, where they range from $7 to $30, or see Sources, page 96. —Diana Andrews


BooKS

building a better broth The publication of Brodo ($20; Pam Krauss Books) by chef Marco Canora is well timed as winter is the perfect season for simmering a big pot of broth. Canora sells his own broth from a take-out window at Hearth, his Manhattan restaurant, and his book touts the healing properties of drinking broth daily. While some claims may be debatable, there’s no doubt that a well-made broth is a wonderful thing. Along with more than a dozen different broths, there are short recipes for tasty additions and recipes that put broth to delicious use. Even if you’ve been reluctant to jump on the bone-broth bandwagon, this book may inspire you to make your own, a timeless endeavor that never goes out of style. —J.S.

tecHNiQUe

crimping calzones iNGreDieNt

As with pie, there are many ways to seal and crimp a calzone, but here is a method we

mezcal vs. tequila

like: Starting at one side, stretch a bit of the bottom lip of dough, fold it onto the top lip of dough, and press it firmly with your finger. Continue around the calzone to create a tight, good-looking seal.

—R.D.

ceYloN ciNNAMoN

cASSiA ciNNAMoN

iNGreDieNt

mexican cinnamon

The cinnamon most likely stocked in your supermarket’s spice rack is cassia cinnamon (also called Chinese cinnamon). It’s got a strong, aromatic flavor: think Red Hots. But in Mexico, where they call cinnamon canela, the most commonly used cinnamon is Ceylon, which has a more subtle flavor with floral and citrus notes. Though all cinnamon comes from the inner bark of trees from the genus Cinnamomum, Ceylon cinnamon, which the Spanish brought to Mexico via Sri Lanka, comes from a different species than cassia. So integral is Ceylon cinnamon to Mexican cuisine that it’s also called Mexican cinnamon. Though it’s sold ground, Mexican cinnamon is commonly used in stick form, which—unlike the harder cassia sticks—is easy to crumble and grind. You can use cassia in place of Mexican cinnamon and vice versa (cassia is more widely available and usually less expensive), but there will be a slight variation in the dish’s flavor. Look for it in Latin markets, or see Sources (p. 96). —J.S.

the chocolate truffles on page 83 get their smoky flavor from mezcal (also spelled mescal). like its cousin tequila, mezcal, which originated with the Aztecs, is made from the hearts of agave plants, which grow abundantly throughout Mexico. But while tequila must include at least 51% blue agave, mezcal may be made from different species of agave. the production also differs. For most tequila, the hearts are baked in giant autoclaves. For mezcal, the hearts are cooked in underground pits fueled by wood fire, which gives mezcal its smoky flavor. Some mezcals include a worm (actually a larva found in agave plants) in the bottle. the practice has been around only since the mid-20th century, when some mass producers began adding it as a marketing ploy. As with tequila, mezcal can range widely in style, age, quality, and price, from about $25 for a bottle of the widely distributed Monte Alban (above) to $75 and up (in some cases way up) for a small-batch artisanal bottle meant to be sipped like a fine Scotch or cognac. —Neema Syovata

f i n e c o o k i n g .c o m

91


recipe tool

What to do with spicy simple syrup For the Chocolate Cake with Candied Anchos and Pepitas on page 86, ancho chiles are softened in a mixture of sugar and water before being added to the cake. What’s left behind is a simple syrup flavored with the fruity notes and subtle heat of the chiles. The syrup will keep for weeks in the fridge and can be used in all kinds of ways. Try some drizzled on pancakes or waffles along with maple syrup, or add some to a marinade for a bit of sweet heat. It’s also good mixed with butter and slathered on roasted squash, sweet potatoes, or biscuits. Or try spiking a poaching liquid for pears or apples with a little of it. The syrup is also fun to experiment with in cocktails, such as the one we created below. —J.S.

spicy bourbon sidecar

Though I’m not a fan of single-use tools, I make an exception when it comes to a nut chopper. (What wore me down was the umpteeth time a whole hazelnut went flying across the room while I was trying to chop the marble-like nuts.) With a mechanical nut chopper, you simply put the nuts in and either press down to move the blades, as in the Cuisinart model above, or turn a handle to send the nuts through the blade. Either way, the nuts get chopped while being contained. Choppers in the style shown above are not just for nuts; they can be used on hard cheeses, herbs, and garlic, too. Relatively small and relatively inexpensive (they range from about $7 to $40), they’re available at most home goods stores; see Sources (p. 96) for this one. —J.A.

tip

On a small plate, mix 2 tsp. granu-

lated sugar and 1/4 tsp. pure ancho chile powder. Moisten the rims of two coupe glasses with water and then dip the rims into the sugar. Chill the glasses until needed. Combine 4 fl. oz. bourbon, 11/2 fl. oz. fresh lemon juice, 1 fl. oz. Triple Sec, and 1/2 fl. oz. ancho chile syrup in a cocktail shaker. Fill the shaker with ice and shake until well chilled, about 10 seconds. Strain into the prepared glasses. Twist a strip of orange zest over each glass, drop the zest into the glass, and serve.

How to strip stems from greens Here’s a quick method for stemming hearty greens like collards, chard, and mustard greens: Holding the leaf so its underside faces up, grab the bottom of the stem with one hand. With the other hand, strip the leaf by forcefully pushing along the stem on each side of it. The leaf will come off where the stem becomes very thin. −R.D.

92

fine cooking • feb/mar 2016

Photographs by Scott Phillips

A handy nut chopper

A double dose of ancho— in the syrup and in powder form on the rim of the glass— gives the cocktail a nice hit of tingly warmth. Serves 2


iNGreDieNt

tip

Short-rib styles Beef short ribs come cut two ways. englishstyle short ribs (above left) are cut into 2- to 4-inch pieces with one section of rib bone supporting the meat. Flanken-style ribs (above right) are crosscut into strips with multiple bone cross sections. (in Korean cooking, they’re often very thinly sliced, marinated, and grilled.) the Braised Short ribs and celery with celery Seed polenta on page 55 calls for english-style ribs. When buying them, choose meaty ones from the butcher’s display case, if possible. Why? pre-packaged ribs often contain one rib i call a clunker in that it’s more bone than meat, and it’s hard to tell that when they’re packed tightly together. When you get the ribs home, trim away only the thickest layers of external fat. Don’t remove the internal layers of connective tissue, or the ribs will begin to fall apart. —J.S.

These are not yams In supermarkets in the United States, so-called yams are most likely sweet potatoes. True yams, which are common in many parts of Africa, are a totally different vegetable. While they slightly resemble sweet potatoes, the differences are more striking: True yams have thick, often bristly skin and pale, starchy flesh. So why do so many stores call sweet potatoes yams? The confusion dates back to when enslaved Africans referred to native American sweet potatoes as nyami, a West African word for yam. The term stuck and has since been used interchangeably with sweet potato to refer to the tuber. There are thousands of varieties of sweet potatoes—a few of them are pictured at right—and they come in different colors both outside and in. For the Maple Cheddar TwiceBaked Sweet Potatoes on page 25, we prefer a full-flavored, dark orange sweet potato with tapered ends. It’s a variety that you’ll find in most supermarkets, but it might very well be called (wrongly) a yam. —Layla Schlack

iNGreDieNt

balsamic glaze A drizzle of thick, tangy-sweet balsamic glaze can punch up the flavor of everything from beef stew to strawberries and vanilla ice cream. In the celery gratin on page 58, it adds flavor as well as striking color. You can find balsamic glaze at stores near the vinegar, or you can make it yourself by gently boiling balsamic vinegar until reduced by two-thirds. (Keep a close eye on it to avoid overreducing.) For long storage, its best to refrigerate it. —R.D.

f i n e c o o k i n g .c o m

93


Tip

TECHNIQUE

Wingette

Cutting up chicken wings Super Bowl season means one thing: There will be chicken wings. Sales of chicken wings spike in February; the National Chicken Council figures that on Super Bowl Sunday alone, 1.25 million wings will be consumed (or inhaled, if you’ve ever seen a wing fan go at them). Wings are made up of three parts: the drumette, which looks like a tiny chicken drumstick; the flat,

otherwise known as the midjoint wing or, more palatably, the wingette; and the wing tip, which is usually not eaten. Though you can buy packaged precut wings to make the Maple-Wasabi Chicken Wings on page 25, you can save a little cash by buying them whole and cutting them up yourself, which is easy to do. Plus, you can

Drumette

save and freeze the tips for broth. To cut up wings, use a sharp chef ’s knife, and cut on a diagonal to separate each piece at the joint. —Abby Simchak Donovan

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FINE COOKING • FEB/MAR 2016


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95


SOURCES Pork Belly, p. 64

• Boneless pork belly, $8.99 per lb., rehobothranch.com, 903450-8145.

Celery in the Spotlight, p. 52 Hot Chocolate, p. 82

• Za’atar, $4.99 for 2-oz. jar,

thespicehouse.com, 847-3283711. • Harissa paste, $9 for 6 oz., marxpantry.com, 866-5886279.

Make–Ahead Breads, p. 46 • Whim large basket, $12.95,

• Beluga lentils, $4.99 per lb.,

crateandbarrel.com, 800-9676696.

shilohfarms.com; 800-362-6832.

• Sag Harbor striped linen tea

From bantamtileworks.com, 860-361-9306: • Medium round platter, $70. • Small oval platter, $28.

towel, $28, libecohome

stores.com.

• Skinny rectangular platter, $15. • Large skinny rectangular platter, $60.

• Round plate, $24. • Medium bowl, $14. • Small bowl, $18.

• Various bowls, from $10 to $18, bantamtileworks.com, 860361-9306.

• Juliska pewter stoneware dinner plate ($45) and footed soup bowls ($32),

Catalan Comfort, p. 74

juliska.com, 888-414-8448.

From tienda.com, 800-710-4304:

• Ñora peppers by • 9½x13-inch blue platter, $65, • Taza Chocolate, from $5, • Mexican (Ceylon) cinnamon,

From amazon.com, 866-216-1072:

• Ancho peppers (Casa Ruiz brand), $19.99 for 1 lb.

Hummus, p. 60

• Lieber’s Sesame Tahini, $4.49 for 17.5 oz., rocklandkosher.com, 855-756-7437.

• Whole Foods

Bread Pudding, p. 72

• Vanilla paste (Nielsen-Massey brand), $12.95 for 4 oz.,

williams-sonoma.com, 877-812-6235.

96

lain bowl, $32, shopsourceand

• Sweet pimentón

Test Kitchen, p. 89

• Pasilla peppers (Casa Ruiz

brand), $18.95 for 1 lb. Chipotle peppers (Casa Ruiz brand), $24.98 for 1 lb.

• Whole manza-

tradition.com, 732-421-7304.

$3.49 for 1-oz. sticks, $6.99 for 2-oz. jar ground, thespice house.com, 847-328-3711.

FINE COOKING • FEB/MAR 2016

365 Everyday Value Organic Tahini,

$13.97 for 1 lb., amazon.com, 866-2161072.

3 oz.

etsy.com/shop/stuckinthemud pottery.

• Pinch Collection 6-inch porce-

tazachocolate.com, 617623-0804.

La Dalia, $11.95 for

• White whole wheat flour, $5.95 for 5 lb., kingarthur flour.com, 800-827-6836.

nilla olives, $6.95 for 6.98-oz. jar. (smoked paprika), $11.95

for two 2.5-oz. tins.

• 12.8-inch cloud white, Mediterranean blue, and terra-cotta-colored cazuelas,

$34.95 each.

• Cuisinart

stainless-steel food chopper, $24.99,

cuisinart.com, 800-726-0190

• Heat diffusers,

from $16.95, broadway panhandler .com, 866-2665927. Photographs by Scott Phillips


nutrition Recipe

Calories Fat Cal Protein Carb (kcal) (kcal) (g) (g)

Total Fat (g)

Sat Fat (g)

Mono Fat (g)

Poly Fat (g)

Chol (mg)

12

9

3

60

Sodium Fiber (mg) (g)

try this, p. 21 Garlicky Kale Sprout Pizza

510

250

22

43

28

1190

2

Crunchy French Toast with Maple-Bourbon-Pepper Butter

880

400

20

100

45

22

10

2

325

1550

3

Maple-Wasabi Chicken Wings

370

110

18

47

12

3.5

5

2.5

90

1870

0

Maple-Cheddar Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes

400

160

11

54

18

5

3

8

20

400

7

Spicy Thai Chicken and Pineapple Soup

360

100

30

35

11

7

2.5

1.5

65

460

2

Spaghetti with Shrimp, Lemon, and Chard

460

180

24

46

20

4.5

11

2.5

130

420

4

Sticky Pomegranate Drumsticks

240

50

26

20

6

1.5

2.5

1.5

135

530

0

Cumin and Cracked-Pepper Filet Mignon with Brie Butter

810

610

45

3

68

31

28

3.5

220

780

1

Brussels Sprout and Mushroom Sauté

150

70

5

19

7

1

5

1

0

310

6

Savory Corn Spoonbread

280

110

6

38

13

7

3.5

1

75

460

3

Roasted Carrots with Blood Orange and Rosemary

200

90

2

26

11

1.5

7

1.5

0

430

6

maple syrup, p. 24

make it tonight, p. 27

Roasted Curried Cauliflower Salad with Orange and Tarragon

410

260

8

34

30

4

17

3

0

410

8

Sausage and Pepper Calzones

610

240

30

60

26

11

8

1.5

110

1690

2

Seared Sea Scallops with Sesame-Cilantro Gremolata

280

130

21

13

15

2

3.5

8

40

690

1

290

180

9

19

21

5

4

10

75

700

3

Moveable Feast, p. 41 Grilled Shrimp with Fresh Fruit Salad make-ahead breads, p. 46 Whole Wheat Sandwich Loaf

150

20

5

26

2.5

1.5

0.5

0

5

150

1

Cheesy Breadstick Twists

190

50

7

26

6

3

2

0.5

30

770

1

Seeded Rolls

90

20

3

14

2

1

0.5

0.5

5

80

1

Braised Short Ribs and Celery with Celery Seed Polenta

730

380

45

34

43

16

15

8

115

800

5

Roasted Celery and Garlic Soup with Crisp Prosciutto

170

110

6

11

12

4

7

1

20

320

2

Caramelized Celery with Lentils

170

40

10

23

4.5

1.5

2

0.5

5

220

9

Roasted Celery with Stilton and Almonds

210

160

6

9

17

4

10

2.5

10

350

3

Israeli-Style Hummus

200

120

6

16

13

2

7

4

0

260

4

Fava-Za’atar Hummus

200

120

7

17

13

2

7

4

0

260

4

Cilantro-Pepita Hummus

220

130

7

16

15

2

7

4.5

0

260

4

Cumin-Coriander Hummus

200

120

6

16

13

2

7

4

0

260

4

Artichoke-Olive Hummus

230

140

7

18

16

2

7

5

0

300

4

Mint-Feta Hummus

210

130

7

16

14

2.5

7

4

5

300

4

Harissa-Almond Hummus

210

130

7

17

15

2

8

4

0

260

4

Honey-Tabasco Pork Belly with Black-Eyed Peas and Collard Greens

620

200

33

73

22

6

10

3

45

1450

14

Clams with Herb Cream and Pork Belly Cracklin’

780

610

22

16

68

26

31

7

130

850

1

Cider-Glazed Pork Belly & Brussels Sprouts

540

320

24

27

36

10

19

4

60

320

5

Bread Pudding

270

130

7

28

14

8

4.5

1.5

135

230

1

Rum-Raisin Sauce

230

120

1

25

13

8

4

0

50

20

0

Coconut-Ginger Bread Pudding

320

190

6

29

21

17

2

1

95

200

2

Cranberry-Almond Bread Pudding

290

130

7

33

15

8

4.5

1.5

135

230

1

Chocolate-Cherry Bread Pudding

330

160

8

39

17

9

4.5

1.5

135

230

2

Catalan Stewed Lamb with Potatoes and Green Olives

690

330

39

44

37

13

16

3

130

610

4

Catalan Braised Rabbit

570

250

60

13

28

6

13

5

175

400

3

Seafood with Romesco Sauce

360

140

39

17

15

2

9

3

135

900

4

celery, p. 52

hummus, p. 60

pork belly, p. 64

bread pudding, p. 72

spanish stews, p. 74

hot chocolate, p. 82 Chocolate-Chile Truffles

80

60

1

6

6

3.5

0

0

5

0

1

Red Peanut Mole with Chicken

590

260

57

26

30

5

11

11

125

1040

6

Chocolate Cake with Candied Ancho and Pepitas

570

260

12

70

29

12

9

7

100

115

2

Chocolate, Chile, and Beer Ice Cream

370

250

5

29

28

16

7

1.5

160

40

2

Hot Chocolate Sauce

200

80

2

33

8

5

2.5

0

15

60

2

300

0

0

39

0

0

0

0

0

15

0

test kitchen, p. 89 Spicy Bourbon Sidecar

fi n ecooki n g . com

97


RECIPE INDEX Cover

Poultry & Rabbit

Cheesy Breadstick Twists ...............50

Catalan Braised Rabbit.....................79

Seeded Rolls ........................................ 51

Maple-Wasabi Chicken Wings .......25

Whole Wheat Sandwich Loaf........ 49

Red Peanut Mole with Chicken ..... 84

Snacks & Drinks

Sticky Pomegranate Drumsticks ..29

Artichoke-Olive Hummus ...............63

Beef, Pork & Lamb

Cilantro-Pepita Hummus ................63

Braised Short Ribs and Celery with Celery Seed Polenta ................55

Cumin-Coriander Hummus ...........63 Fava-Za’atar Hummus......................63 Harissa-Almond Hummus..............63 Israeli-Style Hummus .......................62 Mint-Feta Hummus ...........................63 Spicy Bourbon Sidecar ....................92

Soups & Salad Roasted Celery and Garlic Soup with Crisp Prosciutto ........................56 Roasted Curried Cauliflower Salad with Orange and Tarragon ... 31 Spicy Thai Chicken and Pineapple Soup...................................28

Breads Cheesy Breadstick Twists ...............50 Seeded Rolls ........................................ 51 Whole Wheat Sandwich Loaf........ 49

Seafood Clams with Herb Cream and Pork Belly Cracklin’............................ 69 Grilled Shrimp with Fresh Fruit Salad .............................................43 Seafood with Romesco Sauce ..... 80

Catalan Stewed Lamb with Potatoes and Green Olives.............76 Cider-Glazed Pork Belly and Brussels Sprouts ................................70 Clams with Herb Cream and Pork Belly Cracklin’............................ 69 Cumin and Cracked-Pepper Filet Mignon with Brie Butter ......... 30 Honey-Tabasco Pork Belly with Black-Eyed Peas and Collard Greens................................................... 66 Sausage and Pepper Calzones......32

Meatless Mains Crunchy French Toast with Maple-Bourbon-Pecan Butter ......24

Roasted Carrots with Blood Orange and Rosemary...................... 31 Roasted Celery with Stilton and Almonds ................................................58 Savory Corn Spoonbread................ 31

Desserts Bread Pudding.....................................73 Chocolate Cake with Candied Ancho and Pepitas ............................ 86 Chocolate-Cherry Bread Pudding..................................................73 Chocolate, Chile, and Beer Ice Cream ............................................. 87 Chocolate-Chile Truffles .................83 Coconut-Ginger Bread Pudding ...73 Cranberry-Almond Bread Pudding..................................................73 Hot Chocolate Sauce ....................... 87 Rum-Raisin Sauce..............................73

Sauces Hot Chocolate Sauce ....................... 87 Rum-Raisin Sauce..............................73

Roasted Curried Cauliflower Salad with Orange and Tarragon ... 31 Garlicky Kale Sprout Pizza ...............22

Side Dishes

VEGETARIAN: May contain eggs and dairy ingredients

Brussels Sprout and Mushroom Sauté....................................................... 31

MAKE AHEAD: Can be

Caramelized Celery with Lentils ... 57 Maple-Cheddar Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes...................................25

completely prepared ahead (may need handsoff cooking, baking, or reheating to serve) QUICK: Under 30 minutes

Seared Sea Scallops with Sesame-Cilantro Gremolata..........34 Spaghetti with Shrimp, Lemon, and Chard .............................................28

What to drink with what’s in this issue

Select recipes in this issue include pairings by our drinks editor, Patrick Watson (except for those on pp. 74-81, by Wines from Spain). Pairings and bottle recommendations for all recipes are included in our digital tablet edition, free to print subscribers.

98

FINE COOKING • FEB/MAR 2016


Really want to “Cook Fresh”?

Cook with Shun Handcrafted in Japan,

Shun knives are different from the western-style knives most of us are used to using. They’re thinner and made with harder, more advanced steel, which means that Shun can sharpen them to a razor edge. Heavier, duller knives crush the cells in food, leaving too much of the flavor on the cutting board. But Shun’s razor-sharp edge cuts through cells cleanly, keeping more of the juices—and the flavor—where it belongs.

For fresh, flavorful, extraordinary meals, choose extraordinary knives: Shun.

shuncutlery.com

@shuncutlery


©2016 SALOV North America Corp.

Sure, perfection takes more time. But only a man with uncompromising standards could have crafted an olive oil with such exceptional flavor. Let Filippo Berio’s passion for excellence inspire you to create delicious meals for your family and friends.

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