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Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

THE PLACES AND FACES ISSUE

THE CITY MAGAZINE

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VOL XL NO 1 | APRIL 2015

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Jamie Harmon 3/23/15 12:10 PM


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The Face of Memphis 3DW.HUU7LJUHWW&KDLUPDQDQG&(2RIZRUOGUHQRZQHGFRXWXUHGHVLJQĂ€UP3DW.HUU,QFIRXQGHURI7KH%OXHV%DOO-LQJOH %HOO %DOO DQG 1XWFUDFNHU %DOO EHQHĂ€WLQJ 0HPSKLV PXVLF FKLOGUHQ DQG WKH DUWV IRUPHU DQG FXUUHQW PHPEHU RI PDQ\ FLYLF FKDULWDEOHDQGFXOWXUDOERDUGVLQFOXGLQJ6W-XGHSKLODQWKURSLVWDQGIDQRIWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI0HPSKLV “The value of a major university at a city’s core cannot be overestimated. Potential becomes reality in its classrooms, progress is measured on its campus, promises are made to tomorrow in every commencement. Regardless of where you went, this is where your city is going. We at Northwestern Mutual are proud to join other civic leaders in recognition and support of the Fogelman College of Business & Economics, University of Memphis. We are, each and all, Tigers.â€? Jim Meeks, Managing Partner, Northwestern Mutual Memphis

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VOL XL NO 1 | APRIL 2015

Up Front 8 10 14 16 18 20 22

in the beginning spotlight fine print city journal out and about front and center fashion

THE MIND’S EYE

photograph by jamie harmon

Features

53 Spiritual Pioneer

A new book and award recognize the work of Father Don Mowery. ~ by darrell uselton

56 The Right Moves

For “Dancing George” Nettles, the beat is in the feet.

~ photo essay by karen pulfer focht

61 The Living Art of Babak Tabatabai One of Memphis’ best-known tattoo artists shares his story. ~ by shara clark

94 The Mind’s Eye: Jamie Harmon

A visual anthropologist’s visions. ~ by richard alley

Memphis (ISSN 1622-820x) is published monthly for $15 per year by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 © 2015. Telephone: 901-521-9000. For subscription info, please call 901-5219000. Subscription customer service mailing address is Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. All rights reserved. • Periodicals Postage Paid at Memphis, TN. Postmasters: send address changes to Memphis, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

THE PLACES AND FACES ISSUE

on the cover and above: One of Memphis’ most iconic shopping destinations is the vintage department store Flashback on Central Avenue in Midtown. The window was dressed for Elvis Week in August 2014.

104 Less Is More

Moore Tech: The college of the future based on a school built in the past. ~ by michael finger

139 At Home with the Fricks

This light-filled home reflects the owners’ love of art, traditions, and family history.

~ by anne cunningham o’neill

144 The Mummy Mystery

Did the body of Abraham Lincoln’s assassin end up in a Central Gardens garage? ~ by michael finger

Columns/Departments 178 ask vance

The Birth of Broad Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. ~ by vance lauderdale

180 books

A Double Life A debut novel examines parallel lives: What makes you you? ~

by leonard gill

182 dining out Off Menu

Chef Erling Jensen streamlines fine dining with more casual plates.

~ by pamela denney

184 city dining

Tidbits: Rizzo’s; plus the city’s most extensive dining listings.

192 last stand

Time in a Bottle Tomorrow’s past today.

~ by eileen townsend APRIL 20 15 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • 5

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Join us for the 2nd Annual Walking As One

Memphis THE C IT Y MAGAZ INE

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PUBLISHER/EDITOR kenneth neill SENIOR EDITORS michael finger, marilyn sadler MANAGING EDITOR frank murtaugh ARTS & LIFESTYLE EDITOR anne cunningham o’neill FASHION EDITOR augusta campbell FOOD EDITOR pamela denney SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR shara clark CONTRIBUTING EDITORS richard alley, jackson

baker, john branston, anna cox thompson, leonard gill, tom jones, vance lauderdale, eileen townsend

Saturday, April 11 @ 9 a.m. 1115 Union Ave. @ I-240 Walk with us, and enjoy great music, food, interactive games and much more! This 1.5 mile walk and event are FREE. Register now at walkingasone.org. For volunteer or fundraising questions, call Jennie Dickerson at 901-701-2097 or dickersonj@churchhealthcenter.org.

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CREATIVE DIRECTOR brian groppe ADVERTISING OPERATIONS DIRECTOR margie neal ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR christopher myers GRAPHIC DESIGNERS dominique pere, bryan rollins PHOTOGRAPHY justin fox burks, brandon dill, karen

pulfer focht, jamie harmon, larry kuzniewski, amie vanderford, andrea zucker

Benefitting the Church Health Center 901-272-7170 | churchhealthcenter.org

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published by contemporary media, inc. 460 tennessee street, memphis, tn 38103 901-521-9000 p • 901-521-0129 f subscriptions: 901-521-9000

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CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER kenneth neill CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER jennifer k. oswalt DIRECTOR OF NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT jeffrey a. goldberg EDITORIAL DIRECTOR bruce vanwyngarden DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL/OPERATIONS molly willmott ADVERTISING DIRECTOR penelope huston SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES joy bateman,

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member: City and Regional Magazine Association member: Circulation Verification Council 6 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • APRIL 20 15

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IN THE BEGINNING | by kenneth neill

Not So Minor Distinctions

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pring is in the air, and with April every year comes the opening of another baseball season. By the time many of you read this, the Memphis Redbirds’ 2015 season will have begun, with the team’s exhibition game against its major-league affiliate (and owner), the St. Louis Cardinals. Weather permitting, AutoZone Park will be packed for the big game. That’s the good news. The bad news is that this particular contest will almost certainly represent the highlight of the Redbirds’ year, a Pacific Coast League season that will literally and figuratively be over before it begins. As a lifetime baseball fan, one devout enough to spend part of most every March the last two decades watching spring-training games in Florida, I worry about baseball. Okay, maybe not as much as I worry about climate change, paying my bills, or the Grizzlies making a strong playoff run. But I am concerned about the future of what once was described as “our national pastime.” It’s certainly nothing like that in these parts, where football and basketball reign supreme among Mid-South spectator sports. Take, for example, what happened here late last summer. The Redbirds had an excellent season, and followed that with a five-game playoff series with the Omaha Storm Chasers, their aptly named PCL rivals. The teams split two games in Omaha, Memphis lost Game 3 at home, and the Redbirds faced a critical win-or-go-home Game 4 played on the first Saturday evening in September. But the game’s importance was obviously lost upon Memphis sports fans; the Redbirds were eliminated at AutoZone Park — before fewer than 2,000 spectators. That’s the kind of attendance one expects at Rhodes College football games, not for national-pastime playoff encounters. So what has happened to baseball? All the “experts” tell us that baseball’s decline in popularity is the result of the game being too slow, too cumbersome, and simply out-of-step with the instant-action sports universe of the early twenty-first century. But I think the answer to that question is a bit more complicated. Baseball remains enormously popular all across America, but virtually all that enthusiasm is concentrated in the 27 markets where major-league teams are located. Think the biggest game in town in Boston is the New England Patriots or the NBA’s Celtics? Think again. Despite the formidable challenge these other teams present, Boston’s baseball Red Sox still garner as much zeal and enthusiasm as their peers. The same is true in New York City (anybody worried about the Yankees going out of business on account of attendance decline?), Chicago, Philadelphia, and St. Louis, where fan interest in the baseball Cardinals far exceeds that of the football Rams. No, baseball’s problems are concentrated in

the hinterland, outside of the nation’s top-metro areas. Yes, there may be 176 minor-league baseball teams scattered across America, in every state of the union, but virtually all of them are owned and/or operated as “farm teams” of the major-league clubs. They are, in a very real sense, simply branch operations, whose employees both on and off the field report to “headquarters.” In fact, the on-the-field players in minor-league baseball can be moved around their major-league organizations much like chess pieces. The Redbirds, for example, may find themselves in the middle of a ten-game win streak in the PCL, but if the parent Cardinals need a pitcher and/or slugger to replace an injured player or one who’s fallen upon hard times at the plate, our local heroes will be off to St. Louis quicker than you can say Red Schoendienst. The sad truth is that baseball’s public profile outside the major-league markets is a mile wide and an inch deep. Ask even an avid Redbirds fan which player is his favorite, and said fan is likely to take a few minutes answering, trying to remember exactly which Cardinal prospect is still on the team this week. What we have now is the saddest of possible systems for marketing baseball to new and future generations of Americans. Hell, who wants to pay attention to anything that has the word “minor” in its product description? Football and basketball long ago figured out how to get around this not-so-minor distinction between teams that play at the very top level and those that play at various tiers beneath. In both these sports, the powers-that-be simply call their minor-leaguers “college players.” Think that label doesn’t make a big difference? Then explain why all eastern Washington goes ga-ga over Gonzaga, and why you’ve probably never even heard of the Spokane Indians, a Texas Rangers farm team in the Northwest League. It’s simply impossible for baseball to get around that “minor-league” moniker. It’s a label that one day might be all baseball’s undoing. Kenneth Neill ceo / editor

8 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • APRIL 20 15

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SPOTLIGHT | Krewes for Kids | February 27, 2015 | Memphis Botanic Garden | Photography by Andrea Zucker 1

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resented by Carnival Memphis and the Grand Krewes of Carnival Memphis, this annual fundraiser for Carnival Children’s Charities had a colorful Mardi Gras theme, “Fat Friday.”

1 Keith Renard (this year’s King of Luxor) and Katia Turner 2 Elise Barassi and Bill Hunt 3 Michael Lightman Jr., Suzana Lightman, Michael Lightman, and Ellen and Bill Wells 4 Anita Howald, Sarah Trouy, and Selina Chan 5 John Bobango (this year’s Carnival King), Mary Lauren Bobango, Lisa Bobango, Jo Gilbert, Blair Gilbert, and John Haase 6 Julia and Rush O’Keefe 7 Cole Wilder and Jennifer Baker Atkins 8 Sean Bonner and Tara Bodansky 9 Kathy and Roger Sapp 10 Valerie and Jeff Morris 11 Karolina Grabowicz and Jim Calhoun 12 Barbara Patronis and Michael DeHority

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SPOTLIGHT | 60th Anniversary of the Phoenix Club | Memphis Country Club, February 28, 2015 1

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he Phoenix Club of Memphis celebrated 60 years of raising money for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis in an elegant event with cocktails, dinner, and a ceremony. This outstanding civic club enrolls young men who further the goals of the club and are potential leaders in our community. 1 Andy Cowan, Suzie Cowan, and Tim Tatum 2  Franklin Childress, Rebecca Childress, Bethany Harrell, Zach McRae, Megan Klein, and Larry Pennington 3 Jerrold and Martha Graber, Sally and Clay Isom 4 Norman Brown, Dan Conaway, and Gina Brown 5 Mark and Traci Strickland, Chris Gossett, Holly Crump, Jason Higginbotham, and Dabney Collier 6 Ham Smythe IV, Ben Adams, and Tom Cowens 7 John Gillespie and Scott Kirk 8 Kirby and Windy May 9 Noel and Chip Brown 10 Bob and Edith Heller 11 Mary Miles and Bill Loveless 12 John and Tammy Golwen 10

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA ZUCKER

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FINE PRINT

The Dips and the Dow Lessons learned from the City of Memphis pension fund.

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out returns when one asset class (stocks) is up while another (fixed income) is down. In 2007, CD interest rates were 3.5-4.5 percent; now they are 1-2 percent. Money-market accounts pay a fraction of 1 percent. Cash is a drag on returns. An index such as the Dow or S&P, by definition, is 100 percent among others, has used it in the stocks. But many mutual fund managers keep some cash to context of back-and-forth with the City Council. buy more of the companies they The pension fund is murder for like when they believe they are reporters. It is extremely intertrading at bargain prices. The esting to vested city employees Memphis-based Longleaf Partand a few City Council members ners fund, for example (I am an and boring and confusing to evinvestor), held 20 percent of its aseryone else, especially those of sets in cash in 2014 when the S&P us with self-diwas up 13.7 perrected defined cent. The city The dumb or unlucky pension fund contribution 401(k) plans investor chose or was forced is the ultimate instead of delong-term into sell everything in early fined benefit vestor a nd pensions. But doesn’t hold 2009 at rock-bottom prices. it offers some much cash. An instructive lesindividual resons for everyone about the contiree who can’t afford to lose his ventional wisdom of investing. modest 401(k) keeps a lot of it and Diversification is a pillar of his returns suffer. “Buy on the dips” assumes Investing 101, but the only asset class to achieve outsized returns there will be dips. Years ago since 2009 is stocks. The pension I became a fan of investments fund is 57 percent in stocks, 37 writer James Stewart when he percent in fixed income, 1 perwas at The Wall Street Journal. He advocated buying stocks cent in cash, and 5 percent in real estate. Diversification evens when averages fell 10 percent.

o, if stock market indexes have tripled since 2008 then why aren’t you rich? That’s the question many investors are asking themselves as they watch the Dow, Nasdaq, and S&P 500 reach or approach all-time highs. For some answers, take a look at the City of Memphis Retirement System, better known as the pension fund, which is also much in the news these days. Somewhat surprisingly, the pension fund is not at an all-time high. And it hasn’t made a killing since the market rebound began in 2009. “The high was in 2007 when the fund was worth about $2.3 billion,” Sam Johnson, investment manager for the city, told me recently. The fund’s balance when we spoke (late February) was $2.18 billion — a lot healthier than the $1.8 billion mark in 2008, to be sure, but not a record. The stock market rally has taken pressure off of fund managers and politicians inclined to do something to change it. The fund can meet its short-term obligations to pensioners and satisfy the 80 percent funded benchmark (assets to liabilities) used by some rating agencies. Pension skeptics say the ratio is bunk, and Johnson says the goal is 100 percent funding, but the 80 percent standard persists and Mayor A C Wharton,

Sounded good to me. On March 6, 2009, the Dow bottomed at 6,627, after which it began a run of six positive years in a row that carried it to 18,000. Oh, to have been fully invested in 2009 and stayed that way. Big gains follow big losses. The pension fund has a multitude of managers and monitors their performance, but its allocation stays pretty much the same. Unlike nervous individual investors, the fund didn’t bail out of stocks when the market tanked. The double-digit annual returns on stocks in the last six years were due to the 50 percent drop in 2008, and history suggests they won’t reoccur until there is another market catastrophe. Timing is everything. The smart or lucky investor piled into the stock market in early 2009 and has tripled his money since then. The dumb or unlucky investor chose or was forced to sell everything in early 2009 at rock-bottom prices to avoid foreclosure or pay for longterm care or some emergency. A pension fund is built to take the worry out of individual decision-making. That’s a luxury unavailable to those in 401(k) plans. But if your nest egg isn’t “even” with 2007, don’t beat yourself up. The pros aren’t either.

PHOTOGRAPH BY HJALMEIDA | DREAMSTIME

by john branston

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CITY JOURNAL

City of the Future The time to define it is now.

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emphis, incorporated as a city in 1826, is about 10 years away from beginning its third century. Even sooner, in May 2019, Memphis will observe the 200th anniversary of its founding by land speculators John Overton, James Winchester, and Andrew Jackson. As it closes in on these milestones, the lack of conversations about what kind of city it should be is startling — a city where we are still talking about problems or one where we have taken dramatic action to solve them. Memphis approached its 150th anniversary celebration much differently. The calendar for its sesquicentennial included an array of events, concerts, speeches, a regatta, special newspaper editions, and even commemorative porcelain, and annual events like the Mid-South Fair, Cotton Carnival, and Cotton Makers Jubilee tied their events to the city’s 150year party. Planning had been under way for years, but a year before the events, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered in downtown Memphis, casting a pall over the celebrations. As a result, the sesquicentennial was as much as anything an exercise in mass hypnosis as Mayor Henry Loeb, other elected officials, and business leaders ignored the evidence of a city already in transition and generally defined the future as an extension of the present. To some degree, that attitude continues to characterize Memphis, but more and more we realize

cators, most notably, college-educated workers, and in the top rankings for child poverty and the violent crime rate. So, what if Memphis decides to use its 200th anniversary to provide the nation with a city renewed by progress and change? Speaking in Memphis recently, Carol Coletta, Knight Foundation Vice-President for National and Community Initiatives, said the that the city must change its trajectrick for Memphis is to see the tory to be more prosperous. The next few years as its “runway to emerging willingness by today’s its third century,” and to “start leaders to call trend lines troubling imagining what we can do in the next 10 years.” rather than pretending they don’t exist is largely the result of honesty The “biggest challenge,” acfrom younger business leaders and cording to Joe Cortright, Portlocal philanthropies land economist and “People who are impatient with busihead of the City Obness as usual. servatory think tank, committed to the As a result, for who spoke with Cofuture and what the first time in reletta, “is asking the they do in their cent years, we feel right question.” He a palpable sense of added: “When we cities cannot be urgency and a push think about the sucunderestimated.” for change that is cess of cities, it hingreshaping local pries on citizens and a —Joe Cortwright orities and putting citizenship. Even in muscle behind some issues like a global economy, people who entrepreneurship, poverty reare committed to the future and what they do in their cities can’t duction, and neighborhood rebe underestimated.” vitalization that have in the past been defined more by rhetoric “It’s all about place and talent,” than results. he said. “Talented people are moMoving to the future without bile so if you don’t have a great an intentional program to improve place, it is very hard to hang on Memphis’ trend lines means that to educated people in the comthe city remains in the bottom munity. This is important because rankings for most economic india better educated city is a more

successful city. A person with just a high school diploma earns more in a city with higher educational attainment because there is more economic opportunity.” In particular, both said that Memphis should pay closer attention to improving neighborhoods within three miles of downtown. “Well-educated young adults are more likely than ever to live in urban neighborhoods,” Cortright said. “Close-in neighborhoods are growing twice as fast as other neighborhoods.” It’s why, Coletta said, downtown needs more vibrancy, but also, “we’ve written off North and South Memphis, and there are strengths there we can build on to create affordable opportunities” that can be a competitive advantage. If Memphis picks up the challenge of using the next 10 years to prepare to enter its third century strong and attracting national media coverage, it should develop an ambitious agenda seen through the lens of talent, opportunity, and quality of life, Coletta said. Ultimately, “the future is made by thousands of people making small decisions about their lives in the city,” she said, adding, “it’s the collection of these decisions that will define Memphis’ third century.” But to get to that destination successfully, it’s a journey that should begin today.

PHOTOGRAPH BY RAWPIXELIMAGES | DREAMSTIME

by tom jones

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OU T A ND A BOU T |

4.2015 |

compiled by anna cox thompson raised in the Mississippi Delta and became a great blues musician known for his hit records “Grits Ain’t Groceries,” and “We’re Gonna Make It.” Since 1980, the Blues Foundation has inducted members into a Blues Hall of Fame, though no physical hall existed. A retrofit of the Foundation’s offices is correcting that. 421 S. Main, 527-2583

4.10

“The Wonder Bread Years” with Pat Hazell

Bob Dylan

This fast-paced production walks the line between stand-up comedy and theater. As one of the original writers for NBC’s Seinfeld and a Tonight Show veteran, Pat Hazell has been declared one of the five funniest people in America by the Showtime network. Bartlett Performing Arts & Conference Center, 3663 Appling, 385-6440

4.30 Bob Dylan and His Band

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or one night only, experience the influence of a master firsthand. Dylan’s recording career has spanned 50 years and covered genres from folk, blues, and country to gospel, rock-and-roll, and rockabilly. In his latest release he embraces jazz and the Great American Songbook. The Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main, 525-3000

4.1

Sarah McLachlan

One of the most celebrated singer-songwriters in entertainment with more than 40 million albums sold worldwide is headed to Memphis. The threetime Grammy Award winner’s latest album explores her personal journey over the last three years navigating love, loss, and change. The Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main, 525-3000

4.3

Battle of the Birds: Memphis Redbirds vs. St. Louis Cardinals

Grab the peanuts and Cracker Jacks, it’s time to play ball. The exhibition game is always a home run for a family outing. Snag your tickets early and head out to the ballpark to cheer on your favorites. AutoZone Park, 200 Union, 721-6050

4.5-19

“Made in Dixon” A beloved tradition returns, showcasing the latest creations from the museum’s educational programs. Dixon Gallery and Gardens, 4339 Park, 761-5250

4.9

Blues Hall of Fame Unveiling Little Milton “Think of Me” Statue James Milton Campbell, better known as “Little Milton,” was born and

CRAZY FOR

CRAWFISH 4.11

Overton Square Crawfish Festival

Enjoy all-day music, an arts-and-crafts market by regional artists, and plenty of freshwater fishies. Leave your pets, coolers, and outside food/beverages at home but bring as many friends as you like. Madison Avenue in Overton Square

4.19

23rd Annual Rajun Cajun Crawfish Festival

Serving an abundance of tasty gumbo, and a whopping 15,000 pounds of crawfish. Wagner Place and Riverside Drive, between Union and Beale

4.11

Wild World of Wine and Beer

Sip featured wines and specialty beers at the largest fundraiser for the Zoo’s Conservation Action Network, which supports projects here and abroad. Memphis Zoo, 2000 Prentiss Place, 333-6500

4.15-19

Africa in April

Celebrate the 29th anniversary of this festival honoring the arts, history, culture, and diversity of the African Diaspora. This year’s featured country is the Republic of Gabon. Emphasis on entrepreneurs, health and wellness, music, and more. Robert Church Park, africainapril.org

4.17-19

Ballet Memphis presents Swan Lake

The dance world’s iconic story of good and evil, in its entirety on The Orpheum stage for the first time in 15 years. Beautiful movements narrate the tale of the maiden transformed into a swan by an evil magician, and the prince who must swear his enduring love for her. The Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main, 525-3000

4.18-25 Memphis Beer Week

Now in its third year, the event kicks off with Memphis Brewfest on 4.18 (AutoZone Park), presents the Barrel Aged Ball on 4.19 (Wiseacre Brewing), and wraps up with the celebration of handcrafted beers and locally crafted foods on 4.25 (Memphis Brooks Museum of Art). Midtown, various locations, memphisbeerweek.com

18 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • A P R I L 2 0 1 5

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3/24/15 9:07 AM


Russian National Ballet

4.23

Russian National Ballet: Sleeping Beauty

Introduce children to the art of ballet through a cherished story they know and love. The first successful ballet composed by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, this fairy-tale piece choreographed by Marius Petipa features monsters, spells, and one magical kiss. Germantown Performing Arts Center, 1801 Exeter, 751-7500

4.24-5.10

Philadelphia Story

Tracy Lord is all set to walk down the aisle for a second time when suddenly confronted by an ex-husband — as well as a charming reporter covering the wedding. Theatre Memphis, 630 Perkins Extd., 682-8323

4.24-26

University of Memphis Opera presents Speed Dating Tonight A comic opera in one act conceived by Dean Anthony, music and words by Michael Ching, former artistic director

of Opera Memphis. Two performances: 4.24 at 7:30 p.m. And 4.26 at 3 p.m. Harris Concert Hall, 3775 Central, 678-2541

4.26

Beale Street Wine Race

Come watch the area restaurants battle it out in the grape stomp and relay race, and see the Queen of the Vine coronation. The race traditionally kicks off Memphis in May and the spring season. Come one, come all; this one is free and open to the public. Beale Street Entertainment, 154 Beale Street

4.28-29

Celtic Women

The global music sensation delivers an enchanting selection of traditional Irish standards, classical favorites, and contemporary pop songs, in the group’s distinctive signature style. The 10th Anniversary Tour features three vocalists, a Celtic violinist, and a full band, plus the Anotas Choir, bagpipers, and Irish dancers. The Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main, 525-3000 A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 19

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3/24/15 10:13 AM


FRONT AND CENTER

Avron Fogelman with marilyn sadler

A

lthough eight months out of the year he and his wife, Wendy, live in Boca Raton, Florida, Avron Fogelman still has a heart for Memphis. Over past decades we’ve seen his mark on many philanthropic and civic projects, from pulling the Memphis Chicks baseball team out of a deficit in the 1980s, to awarding scholarships to underprivileged students in more recent years. While he was in Memphis this February for his 75th birthday celebration, the retired real estate developer took time to talk with us about baseball, sports memorabilia, books, filling voids where he finds them, and the joy he feels hearing from people he’s helped. You’ve been involved in several sports programs. What’s your favorite? I’ve always had a passion for baseball. I played in the Rotary Club league at Overton Park when I was 7 or 8. That’s probably one of the reasons I wanted to own a major league baseball team. That team was the Kansas City Royals. It’s been 30 years since the Royals beat the St. Louis Cardinals to win the World Series. Your memories of that time? Pure exhilaration. Truly it was the thrill of thrills. And the ironic thing, it was a seven-game series and we’d lost three of the first four games. So we had a mountain to climb and that made the exhilaration even greater. So many Memphians are Cardinal fans. Did you catch flak about that? I was also a Cardinal fan up to that time. I was very surprised that so many Memphians supported the Royals because of me, and that the Royals received so much support during those years. And we ended up having a farm team here, the Memphis Chicks, before the Cardinals did. A good relationship. You have an impressive sports memorabilia collection. Where is it now? I have built a museum in Boca Raton to display it, but I am trying to find a way to permanently bring it back to Memphis. In fact, the ball is starting to roll in that direction. It covers a lot of sports, but is primarily directed toward baseball, and the historical significance of all the items can’t

be overlooked. I’ve got Babe Ruth’s first uniform, his last uniform, the uniform Roger Maris wore when he broke Babe Ruth’s home run record, and so much more. Talk about your Fogelman Scholars Program, helping city schools students go to the University of Memphis. Were you satisfied with what it accomplished? Nothing is as good as you want it to be. But when you’re objective and you realize that it did do so much to help young people go to college, you have to say it’s a success.

Do you keep up with any recipients? Some keep up with me. I got a letter from a young lady who is doing clinical work at Harvard this year. She wrote a very nice letter telling me where she is and that she has a doctorate degree and wanted to thank me. This was within the last six months. I get letters like that out of the blue from time to time and I very much appreciate it. Now you’re committed to sending children to the city’s summer camp programs in community centers. What prompted that? The need. There’s got to be a way to keep kids off the streets in long hot summers and give them a structured environment. I’m not sure of the amount yet, but it’s around $85 per student to cover the basic costs. I told Mayor [A C] Wharton I’d foot the bill for those who can’t pay for it. Wharton was recently quoted as saying you write him a letter each year. More on that? It’s not a regular event, but it’s a friend communicating with a friend that I’m pleased to see certain things happen. It comes from my interest and a desire to stay in touch. You’ve also committed funding to the Center for Professional Career Development at the U of M. Why do you think that’s necessary? I observed through my association and relationship with Dr. [Rajiv] Grover [dean of the Fogelman College of Business and Economics] that students were graduating but were not really equipped to enter the workplace to the extent the dean and I thought they should be. The center will give students direction in writing resumes, in making speeches, and having successful job interviews. It’s a multilayered curriculum, all directed toward making the student better prepared for employment.

20 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • A P R I L 2 0 1 5

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3/24/15 10:33 AM


You’re a graduate of Tulane, but you’ve been a good friend to the U of M. Did you ever attend? I attended one year of law school the first year it opened. Then I decided I needed to make a living. What’s your role now with Fogelman Management Group (formerly Fogelman Properties), the real estate development firm you founded? I am chairman of the board. I assume responsibilities, but my sons — Rick and Mark [CEO and president, respectively] — are doing a marvelous job. I have another son, Hal, who runs a market research company. What keeps you busy in Boca Raton? My number-one job is to improve my golf score (smiles). My second job is to take part in philanthropy, and thirdly, in educational resources to enrich myself. At Florida Atlantic University, which is not far from my home, I take courses and attend several lectures a week. Anything with history or biographies. I’m just a keen observer of history and individuals. What do you like to read? I just finished David McCullough’s book, John Adams. I was with the author a couple of weeks ago, and I enjoyed our discussion about Harry Truman. I’ve also met and spent time with Woodward and Bernstein, Doris Kearns Goodwin, and other prominent authors. What do you want to do that you haven’t done? To travel more than I have lately. But I also want to fill voids that I see. I may not bring peace to the world and I don’t have an open checkbook — but whatever I can do the rest of my life to fill some needs in the community, I want to do it.

Lauren Harkins Wiuff (901) 682-1868 (901) 859-3565 www.laurenharkinswiuff.com A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 21

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3/24/15 9:24 AM


FASHION

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3/20/15 11:16 AM


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SPRING FORWARD W I T H PE TA L -P U S H I N G FA S H I ON S

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emphis is so ready for spring. And perfectly enough, floral prints happen to be one of the major

trends that are blooming all over clothing and accessories this season. Designers are going crazy with their floral presentations, showing them mismatched with geometric patterns and even paired with other floral prints. We

Nothing makes a heart skip a beat like fresh flowers and couture dresses. Hand-painted silk dress by Giambattista Valli, $2,995; flower and Lucite purse by Ash-B-Blossom, $360; both from 20Twelve on Broad Avenue. White druzy earrings, $126 by Brave Design available on bravearrowjewelry.com. Victorian gold, diamond, and pearl bracelet, $1,250; platinum and 18-kt gold and diamond bracelet by Tiffany & Co., $5,900; both from A. Shaw Antiques & Jewelry.

took this trend and ran with it because at last it’s time to embrace sunshine and flowers. The day of our photo shoot, we were welcomed into the greenhouses of Memphis Botanic Garden, where we posed our model wrapped in petals among colorful orchids and juicy succulents.

A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 23

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3/20/15 11:16 AM


This structured dress has everything fresh including stretch fabric and a cut-out midriff. Add even more fashion sense with this spring’s “It” bag shape — the bucket. Dress by Clover Canyon, $282; bucket bag in tabasco by Gucci, $1,750; Stuart Weitzman shoes, $425; white-enamel and goldtone bangles (2 sets), $135; wooden and bead necklace, $265; all from Joseph in Laurelwood.

022_MM04_2015_Fashion_v2.indd 24

3/20/15 11:16 AM


This vintage maxi dress is all about channeling the casual glamour of Palm Beach. Dress, $42; beaded purse, $65; both from Found Studio on Broad Avenue. Vintage platinum, diamond, and emerald ring, $7,900, from A. Shaw Antiques & Jewelry.

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3/20/15 11:17 AM


Go crazy by mixing florals with everything. This works here because the colors are similar and the patterns are varied in scale. A vintage clutch adds charm and rose-gold accessories make it modern. Top by Guess, $69.50; pants by Ralph Lauren, $125; shoes by Steve Madden, $89; chubby chain necklace in rose goldtone by I.N.C., $39.50; neon pink rubber watch by Kate Spade, $125; rose goldtone bangles by I.N.C., (2 sets), $29.50 each; all from Macy’s Oak Court. Fuchsia druzy and opalite horn earrings by Brave Design, $126, available at Spruce. Silk floral clutch by Sheila Davlin, $34, from Found Studio on Broad Avenue.

A very special thank-you to Memphis Botanic Garden and its staff: Scott McCormick, Director Rick Pudwell Kyle McLane Nick Esthus Chris Cosby Also to our fashion team: Nicole Forsythe, AMAX Talent Agency Sara Harrison, production and wardrobe assistant John Upton, photography assistant Lucy Hadskey, hairstylist Matt Gossett, makeup artist Suzi Reuter, digital artist 26 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • A P R I L 2 0 1 5

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2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ADMIRALTY & MARITIME LAW

BRATTON & O’NEAL, P.C. >>> G. Ray Bratton, Gregory W. O’Neal, and Elissa M. Mulrooney Bratton & O’Neal, P.C. is the only law firm in Tennessee that specializes in admiralty and maritime law. The attorneys in the firm have over 70 years of combined experience in representing inland towing companies, barge owners, fleeting and harbor services, cargo owners, and marine underwriters in matters involving maritime personal injury and wrongful death claims,

collisions, sinkings, maritime contracts, Coast Guard proceedings, maritime insurance disputes, cargo claims, and limitation of liability actions. The firm’s attorneys started their careers at large law firms and believe that a boutique firm such as theirs allows them to better serve the needs of their clients by giving them the highest level of personal service.

675 Oakleaf Office Lane, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.684.6100 | brattononeal.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

AESTHETICS MONA ESTHETICS >>> Mona Sappenfield

-ˆ˜Vi£™Ç™]œ˜>->««i˜wi`…>ÃLii˜>Ì̅i vœÀivÀœ˜Ìœv˜œ˜‡ÃÕÀ}ˆV>>iÃ̅ïVÃ]>˜`ˆÃ`i`ˆV>Ìi` ̜«ÀœÛˆ`ˆ˜}iÝVÕÈÛi]“œ`iÀ˜Έ˜‡V>ÀiÃiÀۈVià >˜`«Àœ`ÕVÌð ÞVœ“Lˆ˜ˆ˜}v՘`>“i˜Ì>>˜` ÕÝÕÀÞv>Vˆ>ÌÀi>̓i˜ÌÃ܈̅Ã>vi]ëiVˆ>Ìޏˆ}…Ì ÌiV…˜œœ}Þ]ՏÌÀ>Ü՘`]>˜`“i`ˆV>ˆ˜iV̈œ˜Ã]œ˜> Ã̅ïVÃœvviÀÃ>Vœ“«Ài…i˜ÃˆÛi>˜`ÀiëiVÌi` >««Àœ>V…̜«Àœœ˜}ޜÕ̅vՏ>˜`…i>Ì…ÞΈ˜°

œ˜>i>À˜i`̅i«ÀiÃ̈}ˆœÕà  - " ˜ÌiÀ˜>̈œ˜> ˆ«œ“>]ˆÃ>˜>̈œ˜>ÞViÀ̈wi` Ã̅ïVˆ>˜]>˜`ÃiÀÛiÃ/i˜˜iÃÃi>˜Ã>Ã̅iwÀÃÌ Ã̅ïVˆ>˜œ˜̅i œÃ“i̜œ}Þ>˜` >ÀLiÀ Ý>“ˆ˜iÀà œ>À`° čÌÈÝÌއœ˜i]œ˜>VÀi`ˆÌÃ…iÀÈ}˜>ÌÕÀiºv>ViˆvÌ» iÝ«iÀˆi˜Vi>ú-ˆÝÌÞˆÃ̅i˜iÜœÀÌÞ°»

Laurelwood Shopping Center | 4564 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.683.0048 | monaspa.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION HOFFMAN LAW AND MEDIATION OFFICE >>> Sheree Hoffman

“I emphasize Mediation and Collaborative Law as the most appropriate methods to settle differences arising out of divorce,” says Sheree Hoffman, a Tennessee Supreme Court approved Mediator and one of only a few Memphis attorneys specially trained in Collaborative Law. Our attorneys understand that it is in the best interest of our clients and their children to avoid litigation, whenever possible. But, with over 30 years’ experience in the courtrooms of Shelby County and surrounding counties, Ms. Hoffman is capable and effective when litigation is necessary. We negotiate on behalf of our clients to reach

equitable agreements without the cost, anger, fear, and time it takes to go through trial. We help our clients stay focused on the children and their best interests.

ˆÛœÀVi`œi؜̅>Ûi̜Li>LœÕÌw}…̈˜}] frustration, and the unknown. Our goal is to peacefully resolve all disputes involving divorce or the breakup of domestic partnerships. Whether you choose mediation, collaborative resolution, or litigation, the right attorney is crucial, and Sheree Hoffman will help you create the best arrangement for you and your family.

>ÕÃ̜`ˆÃVÕÃÃޜÕÀëiVˆwVÈÌÕ>̈œ˜̜`>Þt

7515 Corporate Centre Drive, Germantown, TN 38138 901.754.9994 | Sheree@HoffmanFamilyLaw.com | MemphisDivorceHelp.com/Faces SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANIMAL CARE

WALNUT GROVE ANIMAL CLINIC >>> Thomas Slattery, DVM, Sara Hoefker, DVM, CR Halford, DVM, and Anu Debes, DVM With every patient and client, we are guided by our core values: Integrity, Excellence, and Compassion. Our professional staff is highly trained and well educated. All employees participate in regular training and development programs. Walnut Grove Animal Clinic is a full-service, state-of-the-art, small animal hospital located in the center of Memphis at the corner of Walnut Grove Avenue and Tillman. New clients are always welcome. 2959 Walnut Grove Road, Memphis, TN 38111 | 901.323.1177 | MyMemphisVet.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

APARTMENT MANAGEMENT FOGELMAN MANAGEMENT GROUP >>>

There is no substitute for EXPERIENCE! Over the past 50 years, Fogelman Management Group has built a reputation for delivering exceptional property management services to both its clients and residents. The handsœ˜Ž˜œÜi`}i}>ˆ˜i`œÛiÀ̅iÃi«>ÃÌwÛi`iV>`iÃi˜>LiÃÕÃ̜LÀˆ˜}«ÀœÛi˜«ÀœViÃÃiÃ̜̅iÌ>Li̜µÕˆVŽÞ respond to changing market conditions. Our unparalleled combination of leadership, experience, knowledge and a proven track record has made Fogelman Management Group a leader in the multifamily industry. Memphis area properties: ADDISON AT COLLIERVILLE 400 Orchard Cir. W., Collierville, TN 38017 | AddisonCollierville.com BLAIR TOWER 810 Washington Ave., Memphis, TN 38105 | BlairTower.com CHEROKEE CABANA 3204 Sharpe Rd., Memphis, TN 38111 | CherokeeCabana.com LEGACY FARM 1130 Legacy Farm Ct., Collierville, TN 38017 | Legacy-Farm.com RETREAT AT GERMANTOWN 7865 Grove Court West, Germantown, TN 38138 | TheRetreatatGermantown.com THE EDGE OF GERMANTOWN 1730 Hunters Trace Dr., Memphis, TN 38120 | TheEdgeOfGermantown.com MADISON HUMPHREYS CENTER 330 N Humphreys Blvd., Memphis, TN 38120 | LiveAtMadison.com METRO 67 67 Madison, Memphis, TN 38103 | Metro67.com PRESERVE AT SOUTHWIND 7991 Capilano Dr., Memphis, TN 38125 | ThePreserveAtSouthwind.com THE SUMMIT 4981 Hidden Lake Dr., Memphis, TN 38128 | TheSummitMemphis.com TRAILS AT MT. MORIAH 3048 Moriah Trail, Memphis, TN 38115 | TrailsAtMtMoriah.com Fogelman-Management.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ARCHITECTURE

LOONEY RICKS KISS>>> Left to right: Tony Pellicciotti, Rebecca Courtney, Victor Buchholz, Rob Norcross, Carson Looney, and Frank Ricks

For over 30 years, LRK has worked to renew and improve Memphis and the region. We are intent on creating projects, places, and spaces that make a difference in people’s lives. Our collaborative and multidisciplinary approach has evolved naturally from a growing diversity of project types ranging from «ÀˆÛ>Ìi…œ“iÃ̜VœÀ«œÀ>ÌiœvwViÃ>˜`Vœ““Õ˜ˆÌÞ«>˜˜ˆ˜}̜ urban design.

175 Toyota Plaza, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.521.1440 | LRK.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH THE FACE OF

ARKANSAS REAL ESTATE FARMS CABINS RANCHES & OUTDOOR PROPERTIES >>> Joey Burch, Arkansas Principal Broker For almost 20 years Joey Burch, broker, has traveled the region networking with sellers and potential buyers of real estate. Joey specializes in traditional sales and listings, 1031 tax exchanges, auction services, cabin designs, and agri tours. If you’re in the market for real estate there’s a good chance that Joey has it in inventory! Whether you’re looking for a weekend home on HORSESHOE LAKE, a cotton plantation along the MISSISSIPPI RIVER, >ÌÀœÕÌwň˜}V>Lˆ˜˜i>À"1 /č 6 7] a ranch on CROWLEY’S RIDGE, or a duck …՘̈˜}VÕLœ˜̅i½č 1 ,6 ,] Joey can assist you. FEATURED LISTINGS: HORSESHOE LAKE — 2731 Horseshoe Circle $395,000; HORSESHOE LAKE —140 Pecan Circle $219,000; CROWLEY'S RIDGE — 40 acres near Bay Village $100,000; č,č -č- č,č — 485 acres irrigated row crop $2,500,000; č,č -č-/ ,č  —1,135 acres in Lee County $3,660,000; "1 /č 6 7]č,č -č-— Creek House 110 Lick Fork Drive $189,000; OZARK "1 /č - — 200 acres on Livingston

ÀiiŽœˆ˜Ã̅i >̈œ˜>œÀiÃÌfÈää]äää° Visit more than 200 listings online FARMANDCABIN.COM or OUTDOORPROPERTIES.COM Outdoor Properties, LLC Real Estate ܈̅œvwViȘčÀŽ>˜Ã>Ã>˜`/i˜˜iÃÃii Contact: Joey Burch or Pat Burch 501.454.1782

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ART

MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART >>> Emily Ballew Neff, Executive Director Founded in 1916, the museum will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2016. One of the largest art museums in the American South, the Brooks Museum houses over 9,000 works of art dating from antiquity to the present and is dedicated to enriching lives through wide ranging exhibitions and dynamic educational programs. Nearly 20,000 children participate in free school tours each year. Through these world class exhibitions and programs, the Brooks has become a center of cultural activity in Memphis. 1934 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901.544.6200 BrooksMuseum.org

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BAVARIAN BEER & PORK SCHWEINEHAUS >>>

What are two things Memphis cannot get enough of? Pork and beer, of course. This is the celebration of these two great things that go great together. The setting is a traditional Bavarian beer hall with those influences melded with a southern twist into the menu. This is the first restaurant for the Walker family in Memphis with plans for more to

come. David, a French Culinary Institute graduate, missed these traditional beer halls when leaving his restaurant in Manhattan to return home to Memphis. Thus pairing up with Andy, his brother and partner, and David Todd, Schweinehaus Executive Chef, to craft a unique menu focusing on our loves, pigs and beer. Prost!

2110 Madison Avenue | 901.347.3060 | Schweinehaus.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BBQ

CENTRAL BBQ >>> Craig Blondis and Roger Sapp After competing in Memphis in May's World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest and many other regional competitions, we made the leap from friends to business partners. The pit at our original location on

i˜ÌÀ>čÛi˜ÕiÜ>ÃwÀi`Õ«ˆ˜ÓääÓ>˜`…>à been a success for more than a decade now, thanks to our wonderful and loyal customers. Memphians know great barbecue, and won't settle for less. All our meats are rubbed

with a secret combination of dry spices, “>Àˆ˜>Ìi`vœÀÓ{…œÕÀÃ]̅i˜ӜŽi`œÜ and slow over a pit of hickory and pecan woods. Building on a successful recipe, we opened a second location on Summer čÛi˜Õiˆ˜ÓääȰ̿ØœÜ>`iÃ̈˜>̈œ˜vœÀ banquets, parties, and Memphis Tiger fans ޜ՘}>˜`œ`°č˜`ޜÕV>˜˜œÜw˜`Õà downtown! Stop in before a basketball game for the best barbecue in town.

2249 Central Ave., 901.272.9377 | 4375 Summer Ave., 901.767.4672 147 E. Butler Ave., 901.672.7760 | CBQMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL FACES

THE LANGSDON CLINIC >>> Phillip R. Langsdon, MD, FACS and Carol H. Langsdon, RNP For over 26 years, Dr. Phillip Langsdon, Facial Plastic Surgeon, has been treating patients one face at a time. He is the only surgeon in the Mid-South whose practice is limited to facial plastic surgery (Rhinoplasty, Facelift, Eyelid Surgery). Dr. Langsdon believes in “Compassionate Care with Natural Looking Results.” Seeing each person’s face as unique, Dr. Langsdon treats the common and the complicated cases. The Langsdon Clinic staff also provides expert nonsurgical facial aesthetics, such as Botox®, dermal fillers,

lasers, peels, and customized medical-grade skincare. Dr. Langsdon serves as Southern Region Director of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS), and Vice PresidentMemphis Medical Society. He was also appointed Senior Co-Chair of the AAFPRS 2014 National Fall Meeting. Dr. Langsdon is Board-Certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery. Winner of Memphis Most "Best Cosmetic Surgery" five years in a row.

901.755.6465 | DrLangsdon.com | LangsdonClinic@BellSouth.net | Facebook.com/pages/The-Langsdon-Clinic SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL SMILES CHRISTOPHER COOLEY, DDS >>>

When you visit the office of Dr. Christopher Cooley, you become part of a caring dental family. Along with his highly trained, professional staff, Dr. Cooley is committed to listening to your needs and providing care that works for your lifestyle. Our team believes our patients should feel informed and comfortable at every step of their dental treatment. We believe that when our patients are relaxed and happy, they maintain better oral health. Dr. Cooley takes the time necessary to constantly improve his skills and the technological capabilities of the practice. He has trained with many of the best clinicians in the country, and insists on the best materials and highest quality lab work available. Thereby, you benefit from the latest treatment techniques, including innovative advances in patient comfort, the highest-quality and longest-lasting materials, and the most aesthetically pleasing results.

Dr. Cooley is a lifetime Memphian who graduated in 1976 with honors from the University of Tennessee Knoxville, then from the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry in 1982. Dr. Cooley has undergone training with the Hornbrook Group and PAClive, the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top program for hands-on continuing education for dentists. Dr. Cooley is also a proud member of: the American Dental Association, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, Tennessee Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and the Crown Council. These organizations keep Dr. Cooley abreast of developing studies in the fields of cosmetic, restorative and general dentistry. Dr. Cooley always welcomes new patients into his office with most referrals coming from existing, very satisfied patients. The highest compliment we receive is when our patients refer their family and friends.

7938 Wolf River Blvd., Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.754.3117 | CooleyDDS.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BLINDS

BLIND AMBITION OF TENNESSEE, LLC >>> Seated: Doni Sadler, Standing: Elizabeth Parker, Kim Jones, Ty Young, Richard Sadler, and Steve Weaver Blind Ambition of Tennessee, LLC is a window treatment business serving the Mid-South since January 1997. They specialize in the commercial industry, and are staffed with a highly qualified professional team whose priority is to exceed the expectations of their clients, and to perform their duties with integrity. They are experienced in the areas of medical facilities, churches, schools,

libraries, restaurants and many other types of businesses. Blind Ambition of Tennessee, LLC is certified by the Uniform Certification Agency (UCA) as a Woman Business Enterprise (WBE) and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE). Their success is measured by their ability to provide exceptional service and quality products.

2602 Faxon Avenue, Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.324.7733 | BlindAmbitionLLC.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BOUTIQUES & BEAUTY

THE ATTIC / THE IVORY CLOSET / ADEL AMOR COSMETICS / THE CEDAR ROOM >>> Alexandra Nicole As a Memphis makeup artist and owner of three clothing stores and a cosmetic line, Alexandra has a knack for style. Each of her shops complements her two very different concepts on fashion. The Ivory Closet and The Cedar Room, located in Harbor Town, satisfy her fun, colorful personality carrying all things fashion-forward and trendy. The Attic, on the other hand, located in Overton Square, mirrors Alexandra's more serious side, carrying classic, chic garments

fit for the man or woman who prefers to keep their wardrobe timeless. Let Alexandra style your closet with her complimentary personal shopping services or give you a fresh face using her brand of makeup, Adel Amor Cosmetics. After a brief phone consultation with Alexandra you will be invited to enjoy an evening of fashion at one of her stores where you will be welcomed with a private room filled with the hottest styles fit to your figure and personality.

THE ATTIC - 2121 Madison Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104 | 901.207.1273 | TheAtticApparel.com THE IVORY CLOSET - IvoryCloset.com THE CEDAR ROOM - 103 Harbor Town Square, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.527.9538 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BRANDING

TACTICAL MAGIC >>> Trace Hallowell is a brand visionary who understands the power of words and design â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and how the world responds to them. Trace has spent more than 30 years in the creative branding business and his success is evident by the numerous national and international honors he has received from advertising and creative competitions. All the while his work has been published in books, magazines, and college textbooks as examples of branding excellence. Trace founded Tactical Magic in 2001. The firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diverse clientele includes Fulmer Helmets, Leadership Memphis, Lumatrak, Oak Hall, and Sterling National Bank (New York). 1460 Madison Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104 | 901.722.3001 | TacticalMagic.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BRIDAL REGISTRY BABCOCK GIFTS >>>

In 1972 my late husband, Richard Hussey and I purchased Phillip Babcock Gallery, an antiques shop in Germantown. Having a passion for tabletop, we enlarged the building to accommodate our new selections of china, crystal, silver, and general gifts to

add to the antique furniture collection. In 1988 we moved to our present location on Poplar Avenue. Over the years our goal at Babcock Gifts has been to offer Memphis a stellar collection of tabletop selections and gifts that are local, regional and global in scope.

4626 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.763.0700 | BabcockGifts.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BUSINESS BANKING TRIUMPH BANK >>>

The dedicated and passionate team at Triumph focuses each day to work side by side with you to improve ޜÕÀw˜>˜Vˆ>ˆvi°/…ÀœÕ}…œÕÀœvwViȘi“«…ˆÃ]iÀ“>˜ÌœÜ˜] œˆiÀۈi>˜`čÀˆ˜}̜˜]Üi…i«œÕÀ VÕÃ̜“iÀÃÀi>V…̅iˆÀ}œ>Ã°-œ“iÃÌ>ÀÌ>˜`LՈ`LÕȘiÃÃiÃ]œÌ…iÀÃÃ>Ûi“œ˜iÞvœÀVœi}ii`ÕV>̈œ˜ÃœÀ ̅iˆÀ`Ài>“Û>V>̈œ˜Ã°iÌœÕÀiÝ«iÀˆi˜Vi`“œÀÌ}>}iÌi>“…i«ޜÕ«>˜ÌޜÕÀÀœœÌÃLÞLÕވ˜}œÀÀiw˜>˜Vˆ˜} ޜÕÀ…œ“i°č``ˆÌˆœ˜>Þ]œÕÀÃՈÌiœvœ˜ˆ˜i>˜`“œLˆi«Àœ`ÕVÌÓ>ŽiÃL>˜Žˆ˜}ȓ«ivœÀœÕÀVÕÃ̜“iÀð œÜV>˜Üi…i«ޜÕÌÀˆÕ“«…¶i̽ÃÌ>Ž}ÀœÜ̅° 5699 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.333.8800 | TriumphBank.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CATASTROPHIC INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH LAW PEEL LAW FIRM >>> David B. Peel, injury attorney

Injury lawyer David B. Peel has been handling serious injury auto accidents, tractor-trailer crashes, deaths and disabilities for almost 20 years. “We make a difference in the lives of injured victims against incredible œ``Ã]»*iiiÝ«>ˆ˜Ã°Àœ“…ˆÃ“œ`iÃÌÃÕLÕÀL>˜œvwVi]…i…>Ã>“>ÃÃi`µÕˆÌiˆ“«ÀiÃÈÛiÀiÃՏÌÃ>˜`>Ü>À`Ã\ • Life Member Million Dollar Advocates Forum U>À}iÃÌV>ÃiÀiÃՏÌ̜`>Ìi\fÓ]nxä]äää°ää • Life Member Multi-Million Dollar Advocates Forum • Rated highest available “AV-Preeminent” by peers through M-H Ratings • Listed Mid-South Super-Lawyers (multiple years)

• “Best of the Best Attorney” in the Readers Choice Awards (multiple years) • Inducted into the “Top 100 Trial Lawyers” by the National Trial Lawyers • Christian Legal Society (CLS President while in law school)

Serving as a Deacon and youth leader at Bellevue Baptist Church, he also has taught classes on “Logic,” “Creation Science,” and, appropriately, “Making a Difference.” Peel also serves as a Board Member of Love Worth Finding, the ministry of his late Pastor, Dr. Adrian Rogers. He has served as President of the Millington Area Chamber of Commerce. His mission trips abroad include Africa, Ukraine, and recently leading a Pastor’s Conference in Southern India with his family. “My lasting impact will not be one primarily of law, or service to others,” he explains. “My true legacy is my three children whom I love, and I am so proud of.” 8582 U.S. Highway 51 North, Millington, TN 38053 | 901.872.4229 | DavidPeel@PeelLawFirm.com | PeelLawFirm.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CATERING

PARADOX CATERING & CONSULTING >>> Chef Jimmy Gentry For the second consecutive year Paradox Catering & Consulting is the Face of Catering. Chef Jimmy Gentry formally trained at the College of Culinary Arts at Johnson & Wales in Charleston, South Carolina. Thereafter, Chef Jimmy began his career in Memphis and has since led kitchens to six consecutive “Best Restaurant” awards and 4 Star Ratings from publications such as Memphis magazine, Memphis Flyer, and the Commercial Appeal. Almost four years ago, Chef Jimmy and his partner, Alia Hogan, seeing a need for

a creative and innovative approach to catering, started Paradox. Since its creation, Paradox has seen tremendous success both with clients looking for a truly unique catering experience and with media accolades. Paradox is known as one of the Mid-South’s Hottest Boutique Caterers. From corporate receptions, weddings, kosher events, and everything in between, Paradox wants its customers' occasion to be special, memorable, and to capture their personality. Paradox provides a one-of-a-kind catering experience.

901.619.1196 | Info@ParadoxCuisine.com | ParadoxCuisine.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CATHOLIC EDUCATION HOLY ROSARY SCHOOL >>>

Holy Rosary School has a proud legacy of providing a quality Catholic education for the Memphis community since 1954. We offer a coeducational experience for students in 3 year old preschool through grade eight. By following the teachings of the Catholic Church we help develop each child spiritually, morally and academically. Through a

challenging curriculum, which integrates traditional teaching with todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s technology, we prepare each student for the challenges of the future. It is our goal at Holy Rosary School to provide all students with an education that will prepare them to be successful in life; their life next year, five years from now and on into the future.

4841 Park Avenue, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.685.1231 | HolyRosaryMemphis.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CHARTER SCHOOLS KIPP MEMPHIS COLLEGIATE SCHOOLS >>> In 2002, KIPP Memphis Collegiate Schools promised to provide a quality education to students in underserved communities in Memphis, getting them â&#x20AC;&#x153;to and through college." Its network of charter schools is delivering on that promise. Being the first and the largest charter school network in Memphis, KIPP Memphisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; impact is felt in the urban education reform movement all over the city. Families that choose to be a part of this Team and Family enter

into an organization that will have a total of 10 schools by 2016, serving more than 4000 students K-12, a 95-percent graduation rate for alumni, and national partnerships with leading universities across the nation resulting in an 85-percent college matriculation rate. Most importantly, families join an organization that equips students with the necessary academic and character skills to succeed in college and the competitive world beyond.

2670 Union Avenue Ext., Suite 1100, Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.452.2682 | kippmemphis.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH THE FACE OF

CHRISTIAN SCHOOL ATHLETICS

HARDING ACADEMY >>> Kevin Starks, Executive Vice President Kevin Starks’s connection with Harding Academy began in 1987 when he was just twelve years old. As a Harding athlete, he became one of the most decorated and celebrated athletes in the history of the school. After playing college basketball at Abilene Christian University, and teaching Bible and coaching in Fort Worth, TX, Starks returned to Harding as Athletic Director in 2004. During Starks’s tenure as director, Harding athletic teams have appeared in state tournaments more than 50 times and claimed state championship titles seven times (across five sports) while being coached by an impressive collection of Christian mentors. Two of those state titles are Starks’s own boys basketball team. His team finished this season as runner-up at state. 1100 Cherry Rd. Memphis, TN 38117 HardingLions.org Facebook.com/HardingAcademy

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COFFEE

CAFE ECLECTIC >>> Cafe Eclectic has been family-owned and operated since 2008 when Cathy Boulden opened the doors at their "mothership" fullservice restaurant in Midtown at 603 North McLean. Cafe Eclectic started the scratch bakery and fine coffee movement in Memphis and has since expanded to three locations

including Harbor Town, and Highland near the University of Memphis. All three locations serve local ingredients, breakfast all day, artisan illy coffees and scratch-baked breads and pastries. Eclectic's staff prides itself on caring for the community through the love poured into service, food and beverages.

MIDTOWN: 603 N. McLean Blvd | 901.725.1718 â&#x20AC;˘ HIGHLAND: 510 S. Highland | 901.410.0765 HARBORTOWN: 111 Harbortown Square | 901.590.4645 CafeEclectic.net SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COLLEGE PREP CHRISTIAN EDUCATION BRIARCREST CHRISTIAN SCHOOL >>>

Briarcrest offers an impressive selection of choices, not only in the academic curriculum, but also in >̅ïVÃ]w˜i>ÀÌÃ]ÃÌÕ`i˜Ì>V̈ۈ̈iÃ]ëˆÀˆÌÕ> development and community service. We provide >՘ˆµÕiœ««œÀÌ՘ˆÌÞ̜w˜`ޜÕÀV…ˆ`½Ã«iÀviVÌ balance. For over 40 years, Briarcrest Christian School has been recognized in the Mid-South for its unparalleled combination of academic excellence and Christian education. Beginning at the preschool level, our commitment is to educate

the total student, providing a nurturing, balanced, well-rounded educational experience and to help young men and women achieve their full potential in all facets of life. Briarcrest Christian School is a nondenominational, co-educational environment in which the Christian world view and biblical values are taught and practiced in every aspect of school ˆvi°7iÃiiŽv>“ˆˆiÃ܅œ>««ÀiVˆ>Ìi̅iLi˜iwÌœv a challenging, Christ-centered education.

HOUSTON LEVEE CAMPUS 76 S. Houston Levee Road, Eads, TN 38028, K2–12th grade EAST MEMPHIS CAMPUS 6000 Briarcrest Avenue, Memphis, TN 38120, K2–4th grade 901.765.4600 | Briarcrest.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


S

ummertime

SPECIALS

Shrimp Boil – Crawfish Boil 7SHUUPUNHZLHMVVKIVPSMVYHSHYNL JYV^KJHUILHJOHSSLUNPUN[HZR 6\YWYVMLZZPVUHSVUZP[LIVPSPUNJYL^ OHZ[OLL_WLYPLUJLHUKL_WLY[PZL[V THRL`V\YZOYPTWJYH^ÄZOVYJYHI IVPSHO\NLZ\JJLZZ)LWYLWHYLKMVY NYLH[MVVKHUKNYLH[[PTLZ SHRIMP BOIL 7YPJLZ Fresh Gulf Shrimp :[HY[PUNH[ Corn on the Cob   Red Potatoes WLYWLYZVU Onions Special Recipe Cornbread Homemade Cocktail Sauce CRAWFISH BOIL Cost is based on the market price. Live Crawfish are only available in certain times of the year. Please call for more information.

the

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Our grill can fit anywhere from a small patio, a company parking lot, to even serve a crowd of 1,000. We use only the best meat for our patio grill, and this is sure to please. 1/3 lb. hamburgers, all beef hot dogs, grilled chicken breasts, and all the fixings.

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Waffle Bar Smoothie Bar

Omelette Station

Contact Steve at 901-569-5952

Fajita Station

Panini Station

Cappuccino Bar

Pasta Station

“Drop Off” Food


Spiritual PIONEER ^6

A NEW BOOK AND AWARD RECOGNIZE THE WORK OF FATHER DON MOWERY.

^6

by darrell uselton

PHOTOGRAPH BY ALEX GINSBERG

K

nown to most people in Memphis as simply “Father Don,” the Rev. Donald Edgar Mowery spends much of his time these days reflecting on his legacy of service to others, especially during the three decades between 1963 and 1995 when he led the Episcopal-based Youth Service in Memphis, Inc., and later the nationally recognized Youth Service, USA. Now, at age 83, Mowery is sharing the story of his life’s work with these social-service organizations in Spiritual Networking: Father Don Mowery and Youth Service, a newly released book written by local authors David Yawn and Darrell B. Uselton. The pioneer youthtraining programs that Youth Service developed here in Memphis and all across America were largely the result of this one man’s efforts. A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 53

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Mowery at St. Andrew’s, 1960

Youth Services volunteers, 1970s

Mowery grew up in Chattanooga, attending Baylor School for Boys, a military school for grades 7-12, developing an exemplary work ethic that went well with a sense of determination derived from his parents and grandparents. Early on, Mowery also had an uncanny sense for selling. At age 10, he sold magazines and Christmas cards; at 14, he began selling ice cream from a pushcart. He soon purchased a panel truck, which enabled him to add a line of frozen-food products to his door-to-door business. Mowery also held jobs in his father’s businesses, gaining a broader perspective of commerce and trade. In fact, he worked in the funeral home business while attending the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and maintained his funeral director’s license for more than 50 years. After graduating from UTC in 1953, Mowery studied for the Episcopal priesthood at Berkeley Divinity School at Yale. He was ordained a deacon in 1956 at St. Paul’s Church in Chattanooga and then was assigned by Bishop John Vander Horst to St. Andrew’s Church in the Green Hills neighborhood in Nashville. There, Mowery assisted in transforming a struggling mission into an active and thriving congregation. On January 18, 1957, he was ordained an Episcopal priest at St. Andrew’s. It was from this church that Mowery became known for his work with young people who attended several Nashville high schools. Partly on account of his influence in the Green Hills community, then-Mayor Ben West named Mowery chaplain for the Nashville Police Department. In January of 1963, Mowery was asked to come to Memphis by the board of directors of Youth Service, a then-fledgling social-services agency sponsored by the Episcopal Church and supported by United Way, to take charge of operations. Mowery spent the next three decades building Youth Service Memphis into a viable and dynamic organization, one that over time became a model for dozens of similar programs across the country. In the beginning, however, Youth Service’s reach was limited, like many other church programs for young people in the city. But in

the summer of 1963, Mowery developed a series of youth camping programs designed to provide urban boys a chance to experience the outdoors and learn valuable life lessons. Mowery’s ambitions extended beyond the Episcopal Church; he began working closely with the Memphis Police Department, Memphis Juvenile Court, and the Memphis City Schools, recruiting youth for his summer camps. His timing was perfect, given the upheavals urban America was experiencing during the 1960s. From the beginning, Mowery worked with both white and black youth; his camps were integrated in 1964. The camping experience by itself promoted discipline and helped disadvantaged young people direct their energy into constructive rather than destructive pursuits. But Youth Service also brought black and white adolescents together, in many cases for the first time. Today, Mowery’s work as a pioneer in the area of youth integration does not always get the recognition it deserves. Mowery’s success with innovative youth training programs under the Youth Service umbrella was a direct result of what he calls his “spiritual network.” He worked tirelessly to build bridges with influential people in the Memphis community, both to generate funding for his programs and to increase their visibility throughout the community. Elvis Presley, for example, became a key supporter of Mowery’s work; after all, Elvis had grown up in Lauderdale Courts, one of the many Memphis housing projects well served by Youth Service during this period. Interestingly, Elvis’ donations always came with a catch; he insisted that they never be put into the general-operating fund, but instead set aside for “special projects.” No one knew at that time how much of an impact Elvis’ contributions would have on the future of the organization. The year 1968 was not one of Memphis’ best, as fear and confusion gripped the city following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The unrest obviously had a considerable impact on Youth Service’s programs, which had already become a stabilizing force in the community, reaching out as they did with compassion and

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With Sally Hook and Fred Smith, 1980s

With Barbara Walters, 1989

With President George H.W. Bush and other White House officials, 1989

At the microphone for the Talk It Out radio program, 1980s

innovation to both the black and white communities. After King’s death, however, Shelby County Sheriff Bill Morris warned Mowery that his interracial camping groups were at some risk, gathering as they did then at T.O. Fuller State Park. As Mowery reached for a safe haven for his young people, his Youth Service Board president, Lester Crain, a former Navy pilot, suggested contacting the Naval Air Station in Millington, as a possible relocation site. After much “spiritual networking,” Mowery persuaded Navy officials to allow the agency to use the base for its camping program. The move was wildly successful, so much so that Mowery took the Millington model to other American cities located near military bases, traveling around the country convincing generals and admirals to embrace his youth integration programs. As a result, Youth Service, USA was born. By 1985, Memphis-style programs were operating in dozens of cities all across America. Mowery’s concept is generally considered the most innovative social-service effort developed between the military and civilian sectors in the late-twentieth century. Ironically, much of the funding for this national expansion came from that “special projects” fund that Elvis Presley had supported in the 1960s. Mowery’s work with Youth Service, USA became the premier template for a viable national program designed for underprivileged and troubled youth that enjoyed accolades from the highest levels. The growth and expansion of Youth Service, USA across this myriad of military bases is unparalleled. No other civilian organization, before or since, has been awarded the use of military facilities in both the manner and scope that Youth Service was allowed. In the process, Mowery and Youth Service garnered 13 Freedom Foundation awards for their efforts. Mowery also garnered support from four U.S. presidents in his effort to build a national program. Three members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, representing the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force, actively supported the agency and served at various times on the board of directors for Youth Service, USA. Legendary coaches Bud Wilkinson and John

Wooden also served as board members, among the many notable contributors who helped forge the success of Youth Service programs. But Mowery has never forgotten his Memphis roots. He put his “spiritual networking” on the air on radio station WHBQ in 1970. Talk It Out with Father Don was designed to let teenagers share their concerns. Talk It Out is now is one of the oldest continuing radio programs in the country, and over the decades, Mowery has hosted thousands of celebrity guests. As the winding down of the Cold War brought about the closing of numerous military bases across the country, Mowery refocused his efforts in the Memphis market. Under the Youth Service umbrella, Memphian Becky Wilson founded the Bridge Builders program in 1989, which became the capstone program of Youth Service. Mowery continued to preside over Youth Service until his retirement in 1995. Since then he has been a consultant for The Urban Child Institute, continuing to work with young people and families in the Memphis area. In 1996, Youth Service in Memphis became BRIDGES, Inc., led by a new president and CEO, Jim Boyd, who successfully ran the organization for 12 years. In 2012, Cynthia Ham was chosen as president and CEO of BRIDGES. She continues the Mowery legacy of supporting youth in the Memphis community, providing year-round high quality programs and workshops in diversity, leadership, human relations, and community impact for the young people of Memphis. Mowery’s “spiritual network” has thus been transformed, and yet it endures. From his early days in Nashville to the BRIDGES program of today, his legacy continues to influence countless lives of young people in need of support, direction, and inspiration. On January 20, 2014, Mowery received the 2014 “Be The Dream” Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton at the Mason Temple in Memphis — the site of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” sermon before he was assassinated the following day in April of 1968. The award was an appropriate recognition for Father Don’s lifelong devotion to the youth of America. A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 55

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THE RIGHT MOVES ^6

FOR “DA NCING GEORGE” NET TLES, THE BE AT IS IN THE FEET.

^6

photo essay by karen pulfer focht

W

hen visitors come to Memphis, they sometimes get no farther than the Rendezvous, The Peabody, and Beale Street. But often some of Beale Street’s favorite characters become the face of Memphis for guests who are just passing through. “Dancing George” Nettles is one of them. Most weekends, he can be found tap-dancing along Beale, expressing himself with his feet. He is passionate about keeping the art of tap alive in Memphis. “He is one of the last tap dancers,” says Bud Chittom, club owner and Beale Street entrepreneur. “By and large, that style of tapping is a lost art.” Nettles usually works the doors up and down Beale. He taps for the crowd, coaxing smiles and cheers. Performers like “Dancing George” offer tourists and locals some authentic entertainment. “Tap is one of the most classic dances of all times,” says Nettles, 62. A few years ago, he returned to Memphis from New York. There, he says, tap is still big; people can still be found tapping in the subways. He strolls up and down Beale until he feels something he can tap to. “It’s automatic, it just clicks in,” he says. “If I hear good music, my feet just start moving to the beat.” Between routines outside the Old Daisy Theatre, his favorite place to perform, he pauses to reflect. “I just think here, in the black community, that kind of dance was lost,” he says, and he wants to rekindle tap in Memphis. “I want to get the kids interested,” he says, as he demonstrates his steps to a fascinated teenager from Cordova.

To this end, Nettles has been doing workshops in Orange Mound and Glenview Community Centers. He recently started working with Bennetta Nelson West of the Memphis Black Arts Alliance. West asked Nettles to be a dance teacher at the arts center in early April. “His knowledge spans the gamut from the old black masters, who do traditional hoofin’, to the contemporary jazz tap of Broadway,” she says. “He is a wonderful teacher, has a great passion for it, and he enjoys sharing it. He is a treasure for us here in Memphis.” West remembers Memphis legend Rufus Thomas introducing her to Nettles back in the early 1980s. Thomas was his mentor. Nettles can also be found occasionally in the front line of the Beale Street funeral processions. Chittom recalls the dancer trying to cheer up June Dunn, the widow of Duck Dunn, bass guitarist for Booker T. and the MGs, during Dunn’s funeral in 2012. “His widow was all broken up,” Chittom says. “George kept grinning at her and by the end of the street she had a smile on her face.” Chittom believes dancers like George Nettles are what people want to see when they come to Beale Street. “George takes the blues away. Makes the sun shine on a cloudy day,” says Chittom. “That’s ‘Dancing George.’ ”

“Dancing George” Nettles is interested in bringing back the art of tap dancing to Beale Street, to local kids and to elderly Memphians, many of whom remember tap from its heyday. Nettles is an artist who expresses himself with his feet.

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opposite: “Dancing George” Nettles and other street performers are often the first thing many visitors encounter when they visit Memphis. Nettles works his way up and down Beale Street, offering an authentic Memphis experience as he tap dances for tips. On this day, a young visitor could not resist joining Nettles in a dance. Ava Thienel snuck away from her parents, joining “Dancing George,” while her parents were eating lunch on Beale street.

top: Somedays Nettles has to compete with loud music and other entertainers on Beale Street to get the attention of the passing crowd. Sometimes, just across the way, there will be kids from the neighborhood who flip their way down Beale Street. Nettles says he would like to teach some of them to tap dance, old-style.

left: Nettles says he tapped while he lived in New York City, but since coming home to Memphis, he finds dancing on Beale Street for tips to be a lucrative venture. The pavement, however, causes his taps to break, so he often has to stop and screw the taps back into his shoes.

above: “Dancing George” makes his way back onto Beale Street after resting inside one of the clubs. Tap dancing requires stamina and at 62, he admits he has to work hard to stay in shape so that he can do several dances in a day.

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YOUR TRIP BEGINS HERE

Garvan Woodland Gardens, Hot Springs

There’s a lakeside botanical garden in Arkansas with a few surprises alongside the peonies, tulips, chrysanthemums and hydrangeas. Also surprising? Bathhouse Row’s turn-of-the-century spas, one of the EPA’s “Cleanest Lakes in America” and a Smithsonian-affiliate science museum. Come. Let us surprise you. ORDER YOUR FREE VACATION PLANNING KIT AT ARKANSAS.COM OR CALL 1-800-NATURAL.

#VisitArkansas


THE LIVING A RT OF

^6

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JONATHAN POSTAL

ONE OF MEMPHIS’ MOST WELL-K NOWN TAT TOO A RTISTS SH A R ES HIS STORY.

^6 by shara clark

T

hey say a picture is worth a thousand words. But what about a tattoo — a picture permanently inked onto flesh? Anyone who has one probably

has a story to tell about where, when, and why they got it — its significance, obvious or symbolized. Tattoos act as mile markers of sorts for their wearers, art in the form of body modification that stands as tribute to moments of importance.

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Though I had seen tattoos here and there on friends and in movies and magazines, I wasn’t really introduced to the world of tattoos until a few years ago. While working on my journalism degree at the University of Memphis, I got a job as a receptionist at Trilogy, a popular tattoo studio near campus. Over the months, I came to realize a few things about the culture in which I found myself submerged. Tattoos weren’t just for bad-decision-making college kids or hardened criminals or weirdos who had an affinity for pain. I saw people of all ages (well, 18 and up; that’s the law) — people who wanted to immortalize a moment, people who’d lost loved ones, people who’d survived cancer or some other harsh life event, people who wanted to be branded with their passions. I found that these people were not unlike you and me. Granted, I saw some people getting marked with things I thought were ridiculous — like cheeseburgers and names of (probably fleeting) significant others. But it didn’t matter what I thought because it wasn’t my body. (Though before I ended my tenure there, I did get my own, and only, ink — my zodiac symbol discreetly applied to the wet flesh inside my bottom lip. As fickle as I am, I figured I couldn’t change my mind about being a Capricorn. Plus, my grandma would never see it there.) It was while working at Trilogy that I met Babak Tabatabai. Talented tattoo artists are held in high regard among those who are part of the tattoo community, treated as rock stars or celebrities in a way, as (I assume) are renowned artists in other mediums. And from what I could tell, Babak was one of the most reputable tattoo artists in town. His work was in high demand. Even then, just a few years into his tattooing career, he had become somewhat of a local legend. If I’m to be honest, he’s always been a notoriously late man. So much so that back then his business cards had a place to write in your appointment time, right next to a line noting, “Bring a lunch.” Late or not, people waited. With many days booked out a month or more in advance, a scheduled time to get inked by Babak was coveted. And those who sport his art do so with pride. In the years since I left Trilogy, I’ve maintained a friendship with Babak, occasionally meeting for a quick lunch if our schedules were too busy to hang on a weekend. Every time we’ve gone anywhere together, he’s been stopped by at least one person — usually more than one — who wants to say hi or set up some ink time. So who is this man who seems to be known by half of Memphis? (He even played soccer in a rec club league with our own editor and publisher, Ken Neill, in the ’90s.) Who is this rock star tattooist whose art is forever etched on thousands of people?

T

HIS VISION QUEST

he youngest of five children, Babak was born in Frankfurt, Germany, to Iranian parents. His mother and father were visiting relatives at the time and decided to wait out the pregnancy before heading back to Iran when Babak was about a month old. When he was 6, they packed up and moved to the Canary Islands of Spain, so his mother could do missionary work. At age 11, he moved to Holland to live with his sister for about a year-and-a-half before going back to Spain until he was 15. His parents then 62 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • A P R I L 2 0 1 5

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top left: The Pieta, Michelangelo’s famous Renaissance sculpture, has been transformed into a tattoo by Babak. The iconic image depicts the Virgin Mary cradling the dead body of Jesus.

bottom left: Babak created this custom artwork of a rabbit dressed in Victorian attire sitting stoically among shelves of books. The tattoo was framed in a realistic-looking picture frame.

top right: A KISS fan chose to have these portraits of the band’s members tattooed as homage. Many tattoos are expressions of fandom and reflect the wearer’s favorite people or things.

bottom right: This lifelike etching of a chimpanzee was tattooed on one of Babak’s clients, perhaps as a representation of the wearer’s spirit animal. Its eyes are piercing and realistic.

^6

“SOMETIMES IT SEEMS LIK E SOCIET Y H AS A LL THESE PR EDETER MINED PL A NS [A ND NOR MS], A ND I THIN K GET TING TAT TOOS GI VES YOU THE FEELING TH AT AT LE AST YOU H AVE SOME CON TROL .”

^6

3/19/15 5:32 PM


PHOTOGRAPH BY JONATHAN POSTAL

top: This tattoo of renowned Jamaican musician Bob Marley shows Babak’s skills as a portrait artist. Using fine lines and shading, he brought this iconic image of Marley to life.

bottom: Another of Babak’s impressive portrait tattoos, this image of painter Frida Kahlo — a Mexican self-portrait artist and feminist icon — almost looks like a photograph.

right: Babak in his element. Here, he is tattooing an image of the face of Buddha on the forearm of a client. For reference to details, he keeps a printout of Buddha next to him as he works.

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sent him to live with one of his brothers who had come to the United States to study zoology at what was then Memphis State. “When I first came here, I didn’t really speak English. I just drew a lot, and I got to make friends through that,” Babak says. That, and he attended a lot of live music shows in town. “I came here in ’79, and it was a pretty good time for [the music scene] and we’d hang out at all the metal shows in the early ’80s,” he says. Kids in school started asking him to draw band logos, and he began to explore different types of subject matter. He found himself getting in trouble for drawing in class. But soon, he enrolled in the Creative and Performing Arts program at Overton High School, where creativity was encouraged, and he spent much of his time in AP art classes. There, his passion for art further blossomed, though he didn’t care much for other subjects. Without a clear idea of what he wanted to do after high school, Babak set out on what he refers to as a “vision quest” — hitchhiking from Memphis to California alone. He landed in a carnival there, working as a carny

below: Babak has several shelves of books in his studio, many used as reference for the various styles, designs, lettering, illustrations, and images his clients choose to have him tattoo. From realistic forms and portraits to mystical or mythological figures, he’s applied thousands of tattoos during his 16 years as a tattoist.

for about a year. Of course, Babak saw many tattooed people in that atmosphere. He had seen some of his classmates in high school who had tattoos, too. But he didn’t have one yet. His earliest memories of tattoos were those worn by the Greco-Roman wrestlers he idolized as a child. “Greco-Roman and freestyle wrestling is really big in Iran, and they have wrestling clubs all over the cities and towns,” he says. “They used to have calendars where all the wrestlers in each club would pose. And when I was little, I remember seeing these guys have tattoos.” Though he didn’t know as a child what tattoos were exactly, he was fascinated by them. “These guys were wrestlers, and they were hardcore dudes,” he says. “It was almost like the same fascination people in Spain have for bullfighters. They have this whole culture and reverence for bullfighting.” Unlike wrestling in the United States, these guys were what Babak calls “real wrestlers.” At the time, the fascination wasn’t about art. “I just saw the markings on their bodies. It was tough-guy cool,” he says. “It’s like the biker guy that you see or that your dad hangs out with. He’s got all these tattoos, and you’re sort of afraid of him, but at the same time, you kind of want to be like that. It’s like the archetype, the anti-hero.” Back in the carnival, Babak took his first step toward that archetype. He and a group of his coworkers got together and all got tattooed by “some weird runaway biker that was hiding in the carnival” in ’83. Though he laughingly says that first tattoo came out of sheer stupidity (a “ridiculous” and “bizarre” tattoo of a unicorn with a super-small head applied by a guy named Happy), its significance was not to be belittled. Babak says there were three kinds of people who worked for the carnival. “There were the people who were running away from whatever was going on in their personal life,” he says. “There were the career/family multigenerational workers that had been there forever, and their home was the carnival. And then there were people like me who would come in and work for a little while and grow up,” he says. Between hitchhiking and working so far from home directly out of high school, Babak basically grew up on the road. “That was a really important year, and I feel like if that tattoo and the circumstances under which I got it didn’t exist, then I wouldn’t have been able to value the lessons I learned during that year traveling around on my own,” he says. “When I came back to Memphis, I was a completely different person.”

U

MOR E TH A N J UST A PASSING THING

PHOTOGRAPH BY JONATHAN POSTAL

pon his return to Memphis, Babak worked carpentry and high-end remodeling jobs. He painted murals in people’s homes and did some commercial art, like creating logos, before acquiring a position at Rainbow Studio, where he made signs and learned how to do stained glass and gold-leafing — all of these skills he’d utilize later in one way or another. It wasn’t until around 1994 that Babak got an inkling he might want to become a tattoo artist. He was working with an artist at Underground Art to design a tattoo for himself. “I put a lot of thought into what I was getting,” he says. “I designed it and took it up there and 64 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • A P R I L 2 0 1 5

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY SHARA CLARK

really got to see the whole process. That’s when I became interested in it as more than just a passing thing.” Over the next four years, Babak was in and out of town working remodeling jobs and continuing his work for Rainbow Studio when he was in Memphis. It wasn’t until 1999, when he was 34, that he finally got an apprenticeship at Trilogy to become a tattoo artist. He honed his skills there for just over a year before receiving an offer to help open a tattoo shop in Chattanooga, Standard Ink, where he worked for four years to establish and maintain a successful shop — one that is still in business today. When he left Chattanooga, he came back to Trilogy full-time and stayed there from 2004 to late 2010, making a name for himself as one of the best tattoo artists in the city. (It was during this time that I met him.) He worked at Underground Art for a stint in 2011 as he began the search for a spot to open his own tattoo parlor and art studio. Later that year, he signed a lease for a place on Broad Avenue, in what was then a fledgling arts district, but the district was not zoned to allow tattoo shops. After a long battle with the Historic Broad Business Association, which fought against having a tattoo shop in the Broad Avenue Arts District, he was awarded the city’s first-ever conditional use permit by the Board of Adjustment in October 2012. He was able to officially open up shop in 2013 at 2615 Broad. Ronin Design & Manufacturing, a dream many years in the making, was born.

T

top: The front of Ronin Design & Manufacturing serves as a gallery where Babak displays some of his mounted skull and bone art, as well as art by other local artists. bottom: His shop is located in the Broad Avenue Arts District at 2615 Broad. Babak hand-made the signage out front, and inside, he transformed the once bare space by putting up dividing walls and refurbishing antique futurniture and reclaimed wood to create the reception desk, a hand-washing station, and built-in cabinetry.

has recently led to new artistic endeavors — mounting animal skulls and bones. “My dad was a doctor, and I would look through his anatomy books,” he says. “And when I moved here to live with my brother who was working on his doctorate in zoology, I got really interested in animal anatomy. We grew up in a family that hunted a lot, so I was around different kinds of mounts and taxidermy.” Using the woodworking skills he learned as a carpenter and animal bones he’s acquired through his brother’s collection or through trade deals with friends, he mounts skulls and skeletons to create a sort of suspended animation for these deceased animals. “The skeletal structure is like the scaffolding, but the bones don’t hold themselves together without the tendons and muscles,” he says. “Everything in the world is a combination of systems that work together.” Using a little bit of wood, wire, and metal, he’s able to reanimate and display these pieces. As much as he enjoys tattooing, he doesn’t take ownership of the art as his own. “They’re something that someone else wants — they’ve basically commissioned me to do the artwork,” he says. “You almost have to develop a certain level of detachment from what you do, but not in a way that you don’t feel pride in your work.” The skull and bone mounts are an alternative creative outlet. “I’m not doing it for anyone else,” he says. “With tattooing, I constantly have to do artwork for other people, so this has been an avenue for me that isn’t drawing.” Ronin Design & Manufacturing serves as Babak’s tattoo studio, as well as his woodworking and art studio. He built all of the woodwork interior of the shop, put up the dividing walls, and refurbished and transformed antique furniture to create the reception desk, a hand-washing station, and built-in cabinetry. The front of the shop serves as an art gallery. Some of his mount-work is on display, along with artwork by other local artists, many of them local college students or recent graduates. “I always wanted to have a place to display art. Not just not my own art — because I don’t

LE AVING HIS M A R K

he name Ronin represents this culmination — this chance to own his own shop and work for himself. The term references Samurai in feudal Japan who once worked for shoguns. “Whenever the shoguns were overthrown, the Samurai would become masterless and go out on their own. Then they were called ronin,” he says. “I remember watching Samurai movies as a kid, and that’s where I originally heard the word. I was involved in martial arts for a long time and always had a big interest in the warrior culture.” He also had an interest in anatomy, an interest that A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 65

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produce enough. I can’t hang up my tattoos,” he says. “People need more places to display their art, and we’re providing that.” At 50, Babak is happy to have a chance to do what he loves. In his 16 years as a tattooist, he’s tattooed people from all over the world, including countless tourists who came in for TCB tattoos and the like during Elvis Week. He was the artist to do former Grizzlies player Rudy Gay’s first tattoo. He tattooed Mike Miller and Hamed Haddadi, also former Grizzlies. He’s tattooed former Memphis police director, Larry Godwin, and a handful of famous musicians. He has left his mark on thousands of people — from family crests and portraits of loved ones or role models to cartoon characters and spirit animals and everything in between. The body can be a blank canvas, and the wearer of tattoos can speak volumes about their personality and passions through the art they choose. “Sometimes it seems like society has all these predetermined plans and [norms],” he says. “And I think getting tattoos gives you the feeling that at least you have some control.”

right: Local artists have the chance to display their art in Ronin Design & Manufacturing’s gallery. Shown here is macabre artwork by Nathan Parten. The unique pieces are available for purchase and priced from $65 to $175.

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FASHION, STYLE & CULTURE LAURELWOOD SHOPPING CENTER >>> Tom Prewitt, President

Since its opening, Laurelwood Shopping Center has been a fashion and style staple in our community. Locally owned and operated, Laurelwood offers a truly unique luxury shopping experience in Memphis. For over four decades, Laurelwood has catered to those who appreciate beauty, style, and convenience. From small boutiques to nationally known retailers, Laurelwood has something for

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FINE HOME BUILDING MARK SMITH FINE HOMES >>> Mark Smith

Mark Smith Fine Homes specializes in the design and construction of custom properties that fit your lifestyle. Incorporating elegant and updated styling as well as energy-efficient features, without sacrificing affordability, our homes are built with personalized attention to every detail, while maintaining the highest standards of construction and customer service. Mark is an award-winning builder with over

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INBALANCE FITNESS >>> Not your ordinary gyms, inbalance FITNESS offers our members and clients a true urban getaway in two of Memphis’ most unique communities. Get a }Ài>ÌܜÀŽœṎ˜œ˜iœvœÕÀ}ÀœÕ«w̘iÃÃV>ÃÃià overlooking the Wolf River in Harbor Town, or join a group of friends for personal training at our private training facility in Cooper-Young. Both our 24-hour gym in Harbor Town and our personal-training studio in Cooper-Young embrace the character, charm and ëiVˆwVw̘iÃØii`ÃœvˆÌÃÃÕÀÀœÕ˜`ˆ˜}Vœ““Õ˜ˆÌÞ° HARBORTOWN 718 Harbor Bend Road, Memphis, TN 38103 MIDTOWN 794 South Cooper Street, Memphis, TN 38104 901.522.1559 | InbalanceFitness.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


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FRIED CHICKEN JACK PIRTLE'S CHICKEN >>> Cordell and Tawanda Pirtle

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happy by serving them great southern food at a reasonable price. Over the years, the Pirtles have loved sharing laughs, stories, and great food, with their customers. Jack Pirtle’s has eight Memphis Locations and is proud to say “Business is GREAT in MEMPHIS.” The Pirtles are very thankful for growing sales year after year and are also very proud to call Memphis home. The owners of Jack Pirtle’s believe in treating customers with loving care. Being active and giving back to community is one of the major keys to success.

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HOLLOWAY FURS >>> Jim and Casey Holloway Holloway Furs, located at 404 Perkins Extended, was established in 1992 by Master Furrier Jim Holloway after eight years of apprenticeship with four different Master Furriers. We specialize in custom-made garments, fur coat enlargements, reductions, and remodeling. All types of repairs, monograms and appraisals. Cold storage and cleaning/glazing are also offered by Holloway Furs. We have a newly remodeled cold storage

and cleaning facility located in East Memphis. We have the largest inventory with the best prices in the Memphis area. We accept trade-ins and offer a 12-month layaway program. All work is done in house by Jim Holloway and his staff. Jim also specializes in the manufacturing of beaver and mink blankets/throws. Open six days a week. Come meet Jim, his son Casey (now on an apprenticeship) and the friendly staff at Holloway Furs.

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GAMING

SOUTHLAND PARK GAMING & RACING >>> Troy Keeping, President and General Manager Furthering their claim as the area’s fastest-growing gaming destination, Southland Park started 2015 by opening its new $38 million expansion. Adding more than 41,000 square feet, Southland now boasts more than 1,700 games — arguably the largest gaming floor in the area. An exclusive part of Southland's expansion is Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar & Grill. Promoted as “A Sports Bar that Rocks," it’s an all-new concept by the rocker-turned-restaurateur featuring classic bar

food such as wings, burgers, and nachos, with a Southern twist. The construction also included a new facade accented with eye-catching active LED lighting, a new grand entrance, expanded free valet services, a new High Limit Room, and of course more parking to accommodate all the new guests Southland is now attracting. True to its new advertising, Southland Park has come a long way so you don’t have to; it's still only seven miles from downtown Memphis.

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An independent college preparatory school for girls in grades PK-2 to 12, Hutchison was founded in Memphis in 1902. Under the leadership of Dr. Annette Smith since 2000, Hutchison provides a challenging academic curriculum in a culture that encourages critical thinking, rewards resiliency, and cultivates strong leaders. Each girl is given the opportunity to discover her passion and reach her full potential intellectually, socially, and physically. 1740 Ridgeway Road, Memphis, TN 38119 901.762.6672 | HutchisonSchool.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


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GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY >>>

The mission of the Graduate Business Programs at CBU is to provide students with a fundamental yet complete understanding of the world of business — on a global scale, within a classroom setting. Rooted in Lasallian tradition, CBU’s instructors focus on teaching to the application in order to provide students with the knowledge and material relevant to the real-world workplace. The MBA program requires no pre-requisites, so working

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THE MIND’S EYE

by richard j. alley

Jamie Harmon ^6 VISUA L A NTHROPOLOGIST

ABOUT THIS SERIES: Memphis has played muse over the years to artists across the spectrum, from the music of Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, Al Green, and the collective at Stax Records, to the prose of Peter Taylor, Shelby Foote, and John Grisham. But what about visually? The look of Memphis has been described equally as gritty, dirty, active, eerie, beautiful, and captivating. In our ongoing series, titled “The Mind’s Eye,” Memphis magazine takes a closer look at some of this city’s most prominent photographers, a few homegrown, many transplanted, but all drawn in by that grittiness, that activity, that beauty. Is there something special about the look of Memphis? We’ll ask each and, along the way, learn what makes these photographers tick, what got them started on their professional paths, and what it is that keeps them looking around every corner and down every alley. We’ll turn the camera on the cameramen, as it were, capturing their portraits and seeing what develops. At the same time, we will be showcasing each photographer’s own remarkable work. Hopefully, that will speak for itself. — Richard J. Alley

W

^6

ith the consistent connectivity of the twenty-first century, the Internet acts as the eye on the world. Through the click of a mouse we see myriad cultures and a diversity of people. We witness pain, happiness, grief, violence, justice, and injustice. Though we may be sitting in a cubicle a thousand miles away from the origin of an image, the connection is personal when considering that someone took that photograph. The scene on your monitor unfolded before a person who captured it on a camera or phone as it was actually happening. For Memphis photographer Jamie Harmon, his art is a most personal medium. He likes to get to know a subject, he says. The image is about the individual. This fascination with people is apparent in his portraits, which are mainly taken from close range. If you look closely, you can see the reflection of light in a subject’s eyes, the beginning of a smile across her lips. It’s an intimate signature, as much a product of happenstance as of any artistic vision. “Early on I could only afford one lens,”

says Harmon as he lounges on one of several vintage vinyl sofas in his studio on Cleveland Avenue in the orbit of the mammoth Sears distribution building currently being rehabbed. “I got a wide-angle, so I had to be close and it forced me to push the boundaries of personal space in a very congenial way.” To illustrate, he tells the story of a long-haired kid, shirtless and with a scar across his chest who posed for Jamie’s camera. He didn’t know the young man, but would come to over the following

left: Harmon parked his Amurica mobile photo booth inside the Cadre Building downtown. The occasion was a fundraiser for The Phoenix Club of Memphis, and the doors of the building had to be removed to accommodate the trailer.

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“Something’s going to be different and who knows what I’ll see.” year. “I have another picture of him and it is so obvious that a year later he knows me,” he says. “The first picture is kind of blank, the next picture is totally different, he was working with me.” As kids, our parents dressed us in uncomfortable clothes pulled from the closet for the special occasion of sitting in a nondescript studio at Sears or Olan Mills to have our portraits taken. Mom, dad, little sister, brother, all with smiles that were also pulled out only on special occasions. Amurica, as Harmon’s studio is known, is a throwback to that — it’s a portrait studio, it’s with-

in shouting distance of an old Sears — but Jamie imbues those staid old portraits with a funkiness and his unique vision; the individuality of each family is captured through his shutter. His home base in the Crosstown neighborhood is a large and eclectic room filled with kitschy props and banners, music, spotlights, strobe lights, and a disco ball. Backdrops of lightning bolts and stars and stripes are painted directly on the walls. “It’s an alternative,” he says, “it’s part of the job that pays the rent, but it’s fun.” But you don’t need to visit that studio to find

above: Harmon’s dog Moon Pie, rescued from the pound in Amarillo, Texas, is at the wheel of Jamie’s 1971 Volkswagen Crew Cab. The mural adorns a building on Summer Avenue.

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above: Harmon’s work is informed by his surroundings, and he finds interest in the everyday world around him. “I preferred my influences to be subliminal,” he says, “but I saw the tricycle picture of [William] Eggleston and thought, ‘Someone else took a picture I would’ve taken if I’d been alive then.’”

yourself on a page in Harmon’s portfolio. He’ll bring the magic to you. You may have seen around town the repurposed, Airstream trailer donned with lights inside and out, and a red-white-andblue “Amurica” sign affixed to the side. This is a traveling studio, Harmon’s wandering wonder of whimsy. Inside you’ll find more props — oversized sunglasses, hats, animal heads, baby dolls, and magic wands — and you’ll find fun by the wagonload. Private parties, public functions, and office gatherings are all ripe for photos and Harmon is there to capture — and distort — it all. The camper, though, with all its camp and charisma, has a far more personal and cathartic origin. In 2010, Harmon’s wife, Danielle, died of cancer. As a form of closure, he photographed and catalogued her artwork, and put on a retrospective in Valdosta, Georgia, where

she’d been an art teacher at Valdosta State University before they moved back to Memphis to be closer to his parents and for medical care. “When I took the show down … it was a great closure of one avenue,” he says..”Then I bought this old trailer just to have something to do and create a space to take a photograph. My son, who was 11, helped me do it, and he had some ideas about what to put up inside of it, so we worked together on it for about a month and I would take pictures of it as we went along.” He took the finished product to his birthday party at Tad Pierson’s downtown base of operations for American Safari Tours. Harmon wanted to get pictures of all of his friends, a way to remember the good times. “After that night, everyone was saying, ‘You’ve got to rent this out.’ So I worked on that over the next year and it just kind of developed into what it is now.”

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above: Inside the Amurica photo booth during a fundraiser held for an organization that recovers stolen wages for immigrant and migrant workers swindled by employers.

right: A toddler was the perfect model for Amurica’s first holiday-themed portrait series held over two weekends every November. “Santa” is the studio’s “security guard” François.

“After that night, everyone was saying, ‘You’ve got to rent this out.’ So I worked on that over the next year and it just kind of developed into what it is now.”

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right: Nine-year-old Emmaline seems to be as fascinated by the magnification of her hand in a jar of water as stepfather and photographer Jamie. The photo was taken in the Midtown driveway of their makeshift family studio.

“When I took the show down ... it was great closure of one avenue. Then I bought this old trailer just to have something to do and create a space to take a photograph.”

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H

armon’’s interest in photography was born of curiosity and loneliness. Born in Greenville, Mississippi, he moved often with his family. “We moved every year of my life until I started high school,” he says. “My father started working for Kroger as a sacker and worked his way up in the system.” The addresses changed as the titles improved — produce manager, Forrest City, Arkansas; co-manager, Clarksdale, Mississippi. “We moved so much, I didn’t make a lot of deep-rooted friends.” Instead of friends, Harmon became infatuated with

objects and places. Wherever they moved, it seemed, he found himself on the periphery of a wooded area with ditches and trees that held a young boy’s interests. He’d take his camera — a rangefinder brought back from Germany by an aunt — and take pictures of his forts and the landscape of his home, using the timer to take selfies before selfies were cool. That camera was one of the few items not to succumb to Harmon’s curiosity. “I didn’t want to take it apart but it had a timer on it and I could tell it had some kind of gear that you pulled and it made a [mechanical] sound, so I could tell there was a clockwork in it and I really wanted to take it apart.” Harmon is tall and lanky, and with his friendly manner and ease of conversation it’s difficult to imagine him ever short on friends. He sports a bushy beard and wears a straw porkpie to cover the gleaming baldness of his head. He looks like a man from the mountains, living a life in the wilderness with an old soul, and a penchant for collecting oddities and memorabilia from

above (clockwise from top left): The green color pops at a neighborhood Independence Day gathering; 6-year-old son Hopper plays in the leaves of autumn; backflipping at Heber Springs, Arkansas; 15-year-old son Gus Harmon shows off his vintage find on a snowy day.

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“I’m going to make your eye go there [to the photograph’s subject] generally, and that’s what I do, but what if you could see everything around it? I was fascinated by just that concept.”

top left: Harmon, the consummate do-it-yourselfer and scavenger hunter, stops on the road two miles from Jackson, Tennessee, where he’d purchased this sign on Craigslist. The trailers’ bearings had frozen, and he had to work to dismantle it from the sign. bottom left: A riverboat deckhand grinds a railing before welding the pieces together alongside the Mississippi River.

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childhood and far beyond. “I still have the [rangefinder] camera, I don’t have much else. I basically ran through stuff my whole life; all my cars are old, mainly Volkswagens. I would have one for six months, then sell it and get another one. I’ve probably had 40 Volkswagens from the time I was 15. I learned to drive when I was in third grade in Tupelo and that was a ’76 MG. My dad just said, ‘You’re driving on this gravel road.’” The nomadic Harmons finally settled into Bartlett and Jamie attended Bartlett High School where his fascination with photography thrived. “We had a printmaking class at Bartlett and I took it for my last two years,” he says. “They had a stat camera and a darkroom, and the darkroom was safe and quiet, people couldn’t just walk in there. So I made sure I was the one who knew the darkroom because I could be in there and a teacher couldn’t even mess with me. Then I had a darkroom in my bedroom in high school.”

He graduated in 1988 and immediately moved downtown to Talbot Heirs on Second Street before it was turned into a boutique hotel. He studied at Memphis College of Art though he never finished. Shortly after leaving MCA, Harmon convinced a friend they should both sell everything they owned, buy a 1972 Volkswagen camper, and drive to Nova Scotia by way of the Ozarks. The trip took two months, the pair living in that camper and Jamie’s camera at the ready. “I always had the camera and I photographed it all; the camera is always with me,” he says. “There’ve been too many times when I left the house without a camera and then something happened in my life.”

above: “A tilt-shift lens created the odd effect on the shoreline of Mud Island during the 100-year flood in 2011,” says Harmon.

H

e went back to school several times over, making stops at West Texas A&M, Amarillo College, University of Memphis, Shelby State Community College, and Valdosta State UniA P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 101

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right: A gingko tree stands near Lamar Avenue and Central Avenue in Midtown.

Wherever they moved, it seemed, he found himself on the periphery of a wooded area with ditches and trees that held a young boy’s interests.

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versity. “I had several teachers talk to me about my photography and working with me, and someone mentioned there was a magazine called Visible Anthropology. The two words just sounded good together and kind of made sense of a lot of what I was doing at the time. It also dawned on me that every time I left the house I was going to a job I may not want to go to and that once I get there I’m trapped, so between here and the job I’m going to take a different route or I’m going to go slower or I’m going to ride a bike or I’m going to walk; something’s going to be different and who knows what I’ll see. I’m always on a scavenger hunt but I don’t know what I’m looking for.” Harmon would eventually return to Memphis and a job held seasonally, every summer, for 22 years — photographing tourists as they came off the riverboats downtown. “I’d work June, July, and August. I have to say, that was a huge influence on me because we were using manual cameras, everything was film, taking thousands of pictures of people manually, processing it by hand, printing it on an old 1981 French 1-hour photo machine. So the camera just became an extension [of me]. Shooting thousands of pictures a week kind of honed that technical skill. I just picked it up, I knew what the room should be metered at, and I just did it. Plus there were a lot of characters down there.” Harmon’s earliest photos in the forests of his youth, the trip to Canada and back, and the riverboat gig, were all taken with film; thousands upon thousands of negatives, many of which he still has. A holdout on the digital age, he had a darkroom in his house until 2007, still processing, still printing his own photos. “I finally made the transfer to digital when I realized the technology had caught up where the full-frame digital sensor cameras were just as good as the negative, or looked close enough. I switched because no one knew that I was still printing film. When I tried to be in the art world, everybody just said, ‘Who did your printing? Is this a digital print?’ I was like, ‘No, I labored over this.’ So, after a few years of that I got to the point where nobody cares, nobody knows. It’s about the image and not about the process or print to a lot of people, so I’ve kind of embraced [digital] more in the last four years.”

A

nd in those digital images the color pops. They’ve become quickly iconic through Harmon’s near-obsessive use of social media, and they are instantly recognizable. There is movement in his photos, whether he’s onstage with a local band, photographing the musicians and the audience, or whether in his studio with a single model. Blurred just around the edges, it is left up to the viewer to determine where to look, what detail to focus on. Just as a writer, Jamie has a voice, and that voice comes through loud and clear in reds, whites, and blues. Informed more by his surroundings than any specific photographer, there is still, no doubt, a comparison to be made with another Memphis artist. “I preferred my influences to be subliminal,” he says, “but I saw the tricycle picture of [William] Eggleston and thought, ‘Someone else took a picture I would’ve taken if I’d been alive then.’ I was influenced by Eggleston without even knowing it.” His muse now is his family. He and wife Leah have three children between them — Gus, 15; Emmaline, 9; and Hopper, 6. Harmon has strung café lights down his driveway between his blue Midtown home and a neighbor’s green one, and uses them as a backdrop to photograph his family. It’s a makeshift studio susceptible to the changes of the seasons. There, you might see Gus with his face painted green or Hopper wearing the cartoonish head of a rabbit and oversized, rubber hands on his own. Leah is the creator of the storytelling event Spillit held at Crosstown Arts, and the affection between husband and wife, and parents and children, beams through the lens and from the monitor of this eye into the world. It’s something they’ve grown used to, daddy with a camera. The family is creative and collaborative, full of projects and costumes and whims that become reality through a hammer, saw, and camera. Harmon’s photos evoke the playfulness of a child, apropos for a body of work that began with the curiosity and explorations of a boy. “Amurica is a playground for kids,” he says. “It’s normal to them.” 

above: Harmon’s wife, Leah, walks away from the camera carrying an American flag. The empty lot in Clarksdale, Mississippi, is now walled up and impassable. bottom left: A unique perspective of the Sears building in Crosstown (now the Concourse), was taken just prior to renovation in February 2014. Harmon’s studio Amurica is located across Cleveland from the construction site and he is documenting its progress.

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LESS IS MORE

WELCOME TO MOOR E TECH, THE COLLEGE OF THE F UTUR E BASED ON A SCHOOL BUILT IN THE PAST. by michael finger

I

t’s been 75 years since the school opened in Memphis, and over the years it has never fielded a football team or packed the bleachers for a basketball tournament. Its students have never pulled all-nighters in the library before mid-terms, or mingled with their classmates in fraternity or sorority houses. They’ve never fought for seats in a crowded cafeteria, or winced at the prices of books sold in the student center, or scribbled autographs in their friends’ yearbooks.

What this school does have in common with other institutions of higher learning in Memphis, however, is a traditional graduation ceremony, held in the auditorium of its campus at Poplar and Bellevue. “It’s fun to watch their faces light up when we hand them that diploma,” says Skip Redmond, president of the William R. Moore College of Technology. Those graduates have a reason to smile. In these challenging economic times, while other colleges and universities across America struggle to find jobs for the young men and women who have spent two to four (and longer) years on their campuses, Moore Tech, as it’s perhaps better known these days, quietly posts an eye-popping job placement rate of 95 percent. It’s a remarkable accomplishment for any school, even more so considering this establishment was founded by a rather eccentric merchant who lamented that he was “the most despised man in Memphis.” In fact, the beginnings of Moore Tech involve an unusual bequest, a missing will, and a family named Blood.

“HE DID THE BEST HE COULD.”

W

illiam R. Moore — a newspaper reporter would later insist the “R” stood for “rambunctious” — was by all accounts a remarkable gentleman. He was born in 1830 in Alabama to a family that was considered somewhat aristocratic; Moore’s father claimed he could trace his ancestry back to Oliver Cromwell. But when the father died just six months after Moore’s birth, the destitute family took up farming in the tiny community of Beech Grove in Middle Tennessee.

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left: William R. Moore’s imposing monument in Forest Hill.

opposite page: The school’s campus hasn’t changed much in 75 years.

Moore never went to school. At the age of 12 he clerked in a county store and must have quickly developed a knack for business, for in his teens he moved to Nashville and began working for that city’s largest dry goods store. In those days, a “dry goods” store meant all kinds of merchandise, including hardware, clothing, fabric, clocks, sewing machines, stoves, silverware, just about everything except groceries. The ambitious lad then moved to New York City, where he quickly prospered in the retail business, and by 1859, when he decided he had made enough money, he came to Memphis, at the time the fastest-growing city in the South. But the newcomer quickly became what he considered “this city’s most insulted resident.” It didn’t endear him to Memphians that as a civil war loomed, Moore not only opposed secession but openly supported Abraham Lincoln. Historian Paul Coppock noted, “He was publicly abused, vilified, and held in contempt.” His own church even threw him out. When the war began, Moore not only managed to remain in business, but soon realized a way to build his fortune. Suspecting that Confederate money would be worthless when — not if, in his mind — the South lost the war, he didn’t save it. Instead, he bought downtown property with it, and when the war ended, Moore was not only a wealthy landowner, he was one of the richest men in the city. Memphians must have been a forgiving lot, because Moore was elected to Congress in 1880 and his supporters even urged him to run for governor. But he declined, focusing instead on civic and business ventures here. Among other endeavors, during the yellow fever epidemic of 1878, Moore organized a sanitation committee to improve our city’s drinking water system, and as a result (though nobody knew this at the time), eradicated the breeding grounds for the deadly mosquitoes. The William R. Moore Company prospered, opening a branch office in Atlanta and building an eight-story headquarters and warehouse in downtown Memphis (still standing today as the Toyota Center). He had unusual notions about business. Among other things, he was resolutely opposed to alcohol, claiming that even a sip would give anyone a “muddled brain.” In the company handbook, he made clear that employees caught with a beer or bottle would be fired. After all, “occasional drinking leads to habitual drinking, and habitual drinking leads inevitably to both financial insolvency and the drunkard’s grave.” At the age of 58, he married a woman with the memorable name of Charlotte Blood, and newspaper accounts describe the couple living in the “Blood Residence” on Union, near present-day Methodist Hospital. Despite his wealth and success, Moore began to obsess about his legacy. When he retired in 1902, he wanted people to remember him — not for his business acumen — but for building one of the finest schools in the South. According to an old Press-Scimitar article, “from then until his death his time was largely filled with dreaming and planning for his college.” His attorney told reporters that in the months before his death, Moore changed his will at least a dozen times, but never wavered about starting the school. Moore died in 1909, and following his wishes, a charter for the school was drawn up. He was buried in a massive stone vault that

stands outside the Forest Hill Mausoleum. Topped by a larger-than-life statue, the monument carries a humble epitaph: “He Did the Best He Could.” He divided his fortune, with half going to his wife, and the remainder — some $500,000 — going to the new school. But construction of the school was delayed. A board of trustees, drawn up from a veritable who’s who of local business leaders, decided that half a million dollars — though a decidedly large sum in those days — still wasn’t enough to build the kind of school Moore envisioned. And his wife wasn’t giving up her share. So plans for the school were put on hold until 1919, when Charlotte Blood Moore died in Chicago, where she had been living in a hotel. Then came another delay, when attorneys couldn’t locate Moore’s original will. When it finally turned up, once again the board decided they still didn’t have enough money for the school. So they invested the funds, and they must have been keen investors; within a dozen years or so, they had more than doubled the original endowment. The trustees pondered various locations for the school, at one time considering the empty Pink Palace mansion built, but never occupied, by grocery store magnate Clarence Saunders. They eventually settled on a parcel of land at Poplar and Bellevue, and on April 11, 1939, the new William R. Moore School of Technology opened to the public.

“HE WA N TED BOYS TO GET TR A INING.”

T

he new school, built in an art-deco style of red brick and polished granite, included classrooms, workshops, and even a museum. A spacious room for mechanical drawing and drafting took up the entire third floor, and wings along the sides of the U-shaped building held labs and shops for the wide-ranging technical training program. These were extensive; in the 1940s, students could concentrate on drafting, electricity, machine shop, internal combustion engines (both automobile and aircraft versions), welding, carpentry, metalworking, and even furniture making and repair. From the beginning, this was hands-on work, not just education gleaned from reading a book or taking notes in class. Perhaps because of his own lack of a formal education, Moore had specified that he wanted no emphasis on the liberal arts. Instead, as the school’s first president told reporters, “Moore didn’t say anything about wanting academic subjects taught. He wanted boys to get training that would enable them to make a good living.” Regardless of the field of study, a student’s work often involved full-scale projects. Forget about the simple little bookends students at Central or Messick were making in their shop classes. Moore students worked on real automobiles, machined parts for airplane engines, sawed and sanded full-size furniture, and one year even built a fullscale two-story playhouse, complete with electric lights and working brick fireplace. “Students getting instruction in the shops of the William R. Moore School,” said the 1940 bulletin, “will be well-prepared to go directly into positions of responsibility in industrial plants.” A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 105

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Hands-on classes of yesterday have merged into the modern classes of today.

A

“WE C A N MOVE ON A DIME .”

keen-eyed visitor to Moore Tech, as the school is called today, may notice a tiny brass tag nailed to a post in an upstairs classroom, reading “Built by Students of William R. Moore School of Technology.” That, and a half-dozen battered wooden workbenches here and there in the building, are all that remain of the school’s old furniture shop. Over the years, many of the old programs were phased out, because there was no demand for them in the modern world. Not too many years ago, one of the most popular courses at the school was computer repair. “An important factor of this school,” says John Malmo, chairman of the board since 1998, “has been how flexible we can be in terms of our curriculum. Computer repair was a very big program, but fewer and fewer people wanted to get into it, because nobody was repairing computers anymore. They were just throwing them in the garbage. So we discontinued those programs.” Moore Tech, then and now, remains a privately funded institution. “We can move on a dime, because we’re not government,” says Malmo. “If we want to change a program, we can do it next week, and as Memphis’ industrial needs change, we can change right with them.” Other courses or classes discarded over the years included car painting, body and fender repair, and furniture design. Instead, the school now focuses on six key areas: Machine Technology; Property Maintenance; Industrial Electricity / Plant Maintenance; Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Heating; Welding; and Plumbing. The Mid-South is home to a number of other vocational technology and trade schools, such Vatterott College and Southwest Tennessee Community College. Moore Tech, however, is one of just three private, nonprofit vocational colleges in the United States. (The others are Rankin College in St. Louis, and Dunwoody College in Minneapolis.) The little campus, still in the same location at 1200 Poplar, has a current enrollment of 260 students, making it one of the smallest schools or colleges in the Mid-South, but even so the school has reached capacity. “We’re completely outgrown our welding shop,” says Skip Redmond. “But we’ve received a U.S. Department of Labor grant that has allowed us to purchase the former Bellevue Bedding Company, just down the street, and we plan to move our welding operation there. That will also free up space in the existing building for other programs.” Though privately funded, Moore Tech has recently taken advantage of other Department of Labor grants, as well as donations from local businesses.

“That has been Skip’s major accomplishment since he’s been here,” says Malmo. “His ability to go outside and take advantage of the school’s history and reputation and turn it into meaningful dollars that have allowed us to make major capital improvements.” Among them: The school recently purchased more than $600,000 worth of state-of-the-art CNC (computer numerical control) machine-tooling equipment, with a Department of Labor grant adding an additional $300,000 worth of equipment and remodeling. “When I first came here, all we had was a CNC machine built in 1997, with a little computer screen on it,” says Redmond. “But thanks to grants and donations, we have the latest equipment. Over in the welding department, we are now going to offer a robotic welding course. The new ‘pulse’ MIGs are the latest things in welding, and one of the things I did was go to NexAir and ask them to donate a pulse MIG machine.” Every six months, the board of Moore Tech meets with advisors from local industries to determine exactly what their needs are. “Keeping up with the latest technology is key,” says Redmond. “Memphis is the second-largest medical technology manufacturer in the country. We have Smith & Nephew, Richards Medical, and Wright Medical Technology here, and those industries are desperately looking for employees. In fact, there are at least 200 jobs open right now in machining technology. So our main objective is to make sure that our competencies are what the employees are looking for.” Judging by the numbers, they certainly are. Moore Tech just released its latest job placement figures. In an uncertain economy, the school manages to place 95 percent of its graduates in jobs in their fields within six months of graduation. The numbers vary a bit, depending on the field of study: ◗ Machining Technology: 100% ◗ Property Maintenance: 100% ◗ Welding: 95% ◗ Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Heating: 94% ◗ Industrial Electricity / Plant Maintenance: 92% (The school has no job placement numbers on its plumbing program, a three-year program that started just two years ago. Its first students will graduate in 2015.) The classwork can be very specific. Depending on the field, Moore Tech offers classes such as Electric Motor Controls, Precision Medical Machining, and even Storm Drains and the Effects of Temperature Change. Those are in addition to the general education courses that include Business Concepts, Technical Writing, and Math for Technicians.

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“A WILLING WOR K FORCE .”

B

ut prospective students shouldn’t think that anyone who walks into the doors at 1200 Poplar will stroll out with a job offer. The graduation rate — though better than most — needs improvement, ranging from 93 percent for Industrial Electricity to 67 percent for Property Maintenance. The average for all programs is still a very respectable 81 percent.

“It’s a l l a bout mak ing sure they w il l be good employees.”

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To boost their chances of finding and — just as important — keeping a job, the faculty teaches students how to become good employees. “We not only need a skilled workforce,” says Malmo, “but we need a willing workforce.” As a result, one of Moore Tech’s stated principles is to help its students “develop the skills, knowledge, and desirable habits and attitudes essential to securing a job, holding a job, and gaining advancement in industrial organizations.” “One of the things we do to mirror industry standards,” says Redmond, “is random drug testing of our students. Our policy is not to kick them out of school, but they must find and document some treatment, and they have 90 days to get their system cleaned out.” Don Smith, the school’s president from 1998 to 2012, mentions, “Another thing we implemented is we do a 100 percent background check on all of our employees and students. “It’s all about making sure they will be good employees.” Another lure for students is the relatively low cost of tuition. This varies, depending on whether a student is working towards a twoyear Associate Degree in Applied Technology, a one-year diploma, or a certificate in a specific field, but the maximum cost is around $14,000. Moore offers no student loans and no financial aid programs, but it helps many students apply for federal Pell Grants. The school also offers scholarships through the Optimist Club and the Pyramid Peak Foundation. “That cost isn’t high, and when they walk across the stage to get their diploma, they don’t owe anybody a dime,” says Redmond. “Either the Pell Grant has paid for it, or it has come out of their own pocket.” One of the reasons Larry Maclin chose Moore Tech, after graduating from Central High School, was the low cost. “It was cheap,” he says. “I paid my entire tuition off by working while I was going to school. It was the

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most reasonable tuition out there, and I was blessed to find a good-paying job after I graduated, so it definitely paid off.” Maclin earned a degree in the Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Heating program. “Everybody needs heat and air — especially AC in Memphis.” He’s currently employed as a maintenance technician at a Memphis apartment complex. “The counselors worked with me on just about everything,” he says. “They didn’t help me with my grades, because I did that part myself, but I have nothing but positive things to say about the school.” Tracy Jackson went to Moore Tech after working at various jobs for more than 20 years after high school. “When I saw how Mr. Moore had used his own money and invested it into the community, that really impressed me,” he says. Jackson earned a diploma in Industrial Electricity and now works in plant maintenance at Nike. “They helped me find the job here,” he recalls. “I didn’t even know they had sent my resume over, but Nike called and asked me to come in for an interview. Just last night I had to rewire a motor, and I knew how to do it because I had already done it at Moore Tech.”

“WE DECIDED TO GA MBLE .”

S

o what’s the catch? Why is Moore Tech still such a little-known name in Memphis? Part of it is the perception that a “trade school” isn’t a good thing. But that attitude is evolving, say many educators, especially as students majoring in liberal arts and business find themselves struggling to find a job. “The biggest change I’ve seen,” says Malmo, “is the recognition, outside of the world of vocational education, of the importance of vocational education.” That recognition is growing. A recent NPR segment titled “Economists Say Millenials Should Consider Careers in Trades,” noted that this country needs more skilled tradespeople: “The baby-boom workers are retiring and leaving lots of openings for millenials. There are 600,000 jobs for electricians in the country today, and about half of those will open up over the next decade.” Changing attitudes towards “blue collar work” hasn’t been easy for Moore Tech and other schools like it. In fact, as recently as 2005, the school was in danger of closing, after ten years of steadily declining enrollment. “I asked the trustees to spend the entire day here, to decide whether we could continue to operate the college,” says Malmo. “If things kept going down, we would be eating into our trust fund, and pretty soon it would be gone.” They discussed closing the college and selling the property. The problem was, he says, “we had no top-of-mind awareness.” But Malmo says, “We decided to gamble.” After all, he knew a thing or two about mar-

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keting. So the school committed to spending $200,000 in advertising the next year, $100,000 in 2007, and $50,000 in 2008. “And we would see, after each year, just what happened.” Readers have probably seen or heard some of Malmo’s TV and radio commercials for the school. “I wrote, directed, and starred in them myself,” he laughs. “And they worked. By the second year, our enrollment had doubled. We found out very quickly that we could raise the level of awareness.”

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“The biggest change I’ve seen is the recog nit ion of the impor tance of vocat iona l educat ion.”

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The advertising campaign also gave the school its new (though unofficial) name: “I couldn’t make 30-second TV spots trying to say ‘The William R. Moore College of Technology’ because it’s just too long. So the brand is Moore Tech.”

“A BLESSING IN DISGUISE .”

L

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a st year , G overnor Bill Haslam introduced Tennessee Promise, guaranteeing free tuition to any state residents who attend any of the state’s 40 two-year community or applied technology colleges. In Memphis, that list includes Southwest Tennessee Community College and the Tennessee College of Applied Technology. Moore Tech is not included — not yet, anyway. Redmond hopes to change that. “Right now, we’re working with our representatives in Congress to have Moore Tech included in Tennessee Promise.” It’s not just a simple matter of adding the school’s name to the list of schools. “It takes an act of the legislature,” he says, “but I’m hopeful we’ll succeed.” If that happens, it means more opportunities for students like Larry Maclin, Tracy Jackson, and others who chose Moore Tech after considering other options. “Moore Tech is a blessing in disguise, and I don’t think many people know about it, but word is getting out,” says Maclin, who graduated in 2012. “There weren’t many students my first year, but when I went to orientation the next year, that entire building was full. They must have had 200 to 300 people there.” Like Maclin, Jackson has nothing but praise for the school. “They have some of the greatest teachers that I have ever met, and Skip Redmond is amazing. I bet Moore Tech will be one of the greatest schools in the nation by the time he gets through.” For more information, visit williamrmoore.org

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THE FACE OF

LASALLIAN HIGHER EDUCATION

CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY >>> As president of Christian Brothers University, Dr. John Smarrelli Jr. is upholding a Lasallian tradition that …>ÃyœÕÀˆÃ…i`vœÀ“œÀi̅>˜ÎääÞi>Àà ܜÀ`܈`ip>˜`ȘVi£nÇ£>Ì̅iwÀÃÌ college in the city of Memphis. The focus of Lasallian teaching is touching hearts and educating minds, preparing students for life, work, and service to society. By combining its historical emphasis on providing practical, real-world experience with the most contemporary innovations in teaching, technology and scholarship, CBU is uniquely positioned to transform the Mid-South’s 21st-century workforce. Under Dr. Smarrelli’s leadership, CBU is partnering with the Memphis business community, especially in the STEM and healthcare industries, to build a more innovative, just, and prosperous Memphis. CBU.edu

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MASSAGE

MIDTOWN MASSAGE & BODYWORK >>> Larrie Rodriguez “You NEED them to KNEAD you.” That’s the word on the street about this popular massage studio. Larrie Rodriguez became a massage therapist after holding a high-stress government job for 11 years. Stress was affecting her health and she realized she needed to make a change. Larrie quit her sixw}ÕÀiœL]i˜Àœi`ˆ˜“>ÃÃ>}iÃV…œœ>˜`>Þi>À >ÌiÀ]œ«i˜i`…iÀœÜ˜LÕȘiÃÃ>˜`ºVœÕ`˜œÌLi happier.” She and her therapists provide a variety of services to improve one’s health for people of >>}iÃ]ˆviÃÌޏiÃ>˜`«ÀœviÃȜ˜Ã° ˆi˜ÌÃÃV…i`Տi ÜiiŽÞ]Lˆ‡ÜiiŽÞ]œÀ“œ˜Ì…Þ>««œˆ˜Ì“i˜ÌÃ>Ã

ºÌ…iÞ՘`iÀÃÌ>˜`̅>Ì]ˆŽii>̈˜}>…i>Ì…Þ`ˆiÌ >˜`iÝiÀVˆÃˆ˜}Ài}Տ>ÀÞ]“>ÃÃ>}i>˜`Lœ`ÞܜÀŽ are essential to their everyday lifestyle.” Larrie’s >Ü>À`ȘVÕ`i\6*7œ“>˜œv̅i9i>À]National Association of Professional Women ­Óä£{®]ˆÌÌiÃÌ >ÃÃ>}i/…iÀ>«ˆÃÌ]Memphis Health + Fitness ­Óä£{®>˜`>ۜÀˆÌi>ÃÃ>}i/…iÀ>«ˆÃÌ]Natural Awakenings (2012.) Her studio’s awards include: >ۜÀˆÌi>ÃÃ>}i]Yelp Memphis­Óä£x®] iÃÌ >Þ -«>]Commercial Appeal½Ãi“«…ˆÃœÃÌ­Óä£{®] >˜` iÃÌ*>Vi̜iÌ>>ÃÃ>}i]Memphis Health + Fitness (2013).

885 South Cooper, Memphis, TN 38104 | 901.596.3838 | Midtown-Massage.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MEMPHIS SURGERY

MEMPHIS SURGERY ASSOCIATES, PC AN AFFILIATE OF SAINT FRANCIS MEDICAL PARTNERS >>> G. Randolph Turner, MD, FACS, William Scott King, Jr., MD, FACS, Carter E. McDaniel, III, MD, FACS, Hugh Francis, III, MD, FACS, Albert E. Laughlin, Jr,. MD, FACS, Melvin P. Payne, III, MD, FACS, Justin Monroe, MD, FACS, D. Benjamin Gibson, MD, FACS, D. Alan Hammond, MD, FACS, Norma M. Edwards, MD, FACS, Joshua A. Katz, MD, FACS, Sirinya Prasertvit, MD We’re more than surgeons. We’re your medical partners. At Memphis Surgery Associates, it is our mission to treat patients with the latest procedures and most specialized surgical skill sets in the region. But just as importantly, we pledge to treat every individual with the humility, equality, dignity, and respect they deserve. We serve most area hospitals in the area and specialize in the following surgical procedures: General, Endocrine, Oncologic, Colorectal, & Robotic. 6029 Walnut Grove Road, Medical Plaza #3, Suite 404, Memphis, TN 38120 2996 Kate Bond Road, Suite 309, Bartlett, TN 38134 901.726.1056 | MemphisSurgery.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS WYATT TARRANT & COMBS LLP >>> Wyatt’s Memphis M&A team knows the critical importance of transactions to our clients. You may have spent years building a company and now it’s time to sell. Or this acquisition, if it goes as planned, could vault your company to the next level. So it’s important that all of the i’s are dotted, and all of the t’s are crossed. We will draw on our years of experience representing a wide array of businesses, including: large corporations, multi-generational family businesses, fast track

entrepreneurial companies, physician practice groups and private equity investors. We regularly call upon lawyers from our intellectual property, employment, employee benefits, tax, real estate and environmental groups to assure that our clients’ interests are comprehensively protected. Our Memphis M&A team includes Billy Solmson, Lee Harkavy, Jordan Reifler, Sussan Harshbarger and Jami Lazarov. Please contact us the next time you’re considering an important transaction.

1715 Aaron Brenner Drive, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.537.1000 | WyattFirm.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MORTGAGE LENDING

LUDY CALLAWAY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; THE MORTGAGE LADY >>> A Vice-President in the Mortgage Division of Independent Bank, Ludy's passion is to teach her customers and to guide them through the intricate process of their home mortgage. With her own radio program, ("The Mortgage Lady," 8:00-9:00 AM Mondays on KWAM-AM990), website, ("LudyHomeLoans.com") and new mobile app, (" http://TheMortgageLady.MortgageMapp.com"), Ludy is able to reach people throughout the Memphis and Tri-State area and help them make those all-important mortgage decisions that will affect them for years to come. To teach. To guide. To help. That's "The Mortgage Lady." 901.494.4400 | Ludy@i-BankOnlne.com. SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MOVING

BIG LEAGUE MOVERS >>> Steven Reed, President of Big League Movers, started the company in 2008 to provide a customer-driven service based on hard work and dependability. Big League Movers was voted as The Commercial Appeal's Memphis Most â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Moving Companyâ&#x20AC;? for the last two years and has an "A" rating with the BBB. They offer full-service packing, moving and storage services to both residential and commercial customers. Whether you are moving locally or to another state, call "Moving's Heavy Hitter" BIG LEAGUE MOVERS! 1559 Madison Ave., Memphis, TN 38104 | 901.486.6897 | BigLeagueMovers.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

NEPHROLOGY MINESH PATHAK, MD >>>

Kidney disease is an often unrecognized, silent disease caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure and diabetes. The diagnosis and treatment of kidneyrelated diseases requires an in-depth evaluation of various risk factors. Obesity, vascular abnormalities, autoimmune diseases, and kidney stones have been linked to renal failure. Dr. Pathak is a boardcertified Nephrologist and member of The American Society of Nephrology and The National Kidney

Foundation. He provides compassionate care with the highest-quality treatment of kidney disease. His goal is to provide early, preventive education along with diagnosis and relevant treatments of specific conditions to lessen the risk of progression to kidney failure and to improve a patient's quality of life. Dr. Pathak takes great interest in understanding the needs of his patients and providing them with quality care with the least invasive treatment.

6025 Walnut Grove Road, Ste. 400, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.382.5256 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

NEUROTOLOGY

SHEA EAR CLINIC >>> Brian McKinnon, M.D., F.A.C.S. Neurotology is the diagnosis and treatment of hearing loss and inner ear imbalance problems — both of which can negatively impact your normal interactions with family, friends and co-workers. Based upon the philosophy “Life is worth HEARING,” Dr. McKinnon diagnoses and treats these problems. As one of a very small number of Otolaryngologists who are Board-certified in Neurotology, Dr. McKinnon is unique to the Mid-South. For more information please visit http://sheaclinic.com/ear-doctor-brianmckinnon.html. For an appointment with Dr. McKinnon, please call 901.761.9720. 6133 Poplar Pike, Memphis, TN 38119 SheaClinic.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

OB-GYN

MID-SOUTH OB-GYN A Division of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Center of Memphis, MPLLC >>> Herb A. Taylor, MD, Tom D. Greenwell, MD, Judi L. Carney, MD, Paul D. Neblett, MD, Shannon Riedley Malone, MD, Candace D. Hinote, MD, and Mary K. Johnson, MD For nearly 60 years, Mid-South OB-GYN has provided comprehensive healthcare for women of all ages. Our gynecological services include yearly wellness exams, fertility counseling, weight management assistance, and contraception, as well as management of common gynecological issues. Both permanent and long acting contraceptive options are available as in-office procedures. We manage both low-risk and high-risk pregnancies. Our physicians deliver at both Baptist Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital and Methodist Germantown

Hospital. And all of our expectant mothers here at Mid-South OB-GYN receive a complimentary 3D/4D ultrasound. The physicians of Mid-South OB-GYN have received award recognition from Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women for their leadership roles. They have also been recognized by The University of Tennessee for excellence in clinical teaching and have received certification by the American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology. We look forward to caring for you.

6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.1200 | MidSouthObgyn.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ONCOLOGY

INTEGRITY ONCOLOGY FOUNDATION >>> Standing: Suhail M. Obaji, M.D., Aaron Harris, N.P., A. Earle Weeks, M.D., and Drew S. Dill, M.D. Seated: Margaret Gore, M.D. and Loretta Shamley, N.P. A cancer diagnosis can be a life-changing event for patients and their families. Patients need the most advanced treatment and doctors they can trust. The Integrity Oncology Foundation, a member of the Baptist Medical Group and the Baptist Cancer Center, offers comprehensive support in the areas of oncology, hematology, immunotherapy and rheumatology. Our board-certified team includes Earle Weeks, MD, Suhail M. Obaji, MD, Margaret Gore, MD and Drew S. Dill, MD. Each doctor offers an impressive depth of knowledge, familiarity with the latest technology and a compassionate culture to

personally tailor treatment to a patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diagnosis. Their work is augmented by three board-certified nurse practitioners; Amy Harris, APN, Loretta Shamley, APN, OCN and Aaron Harris, APN. Our qualified staff and state-of-the art diagnostic and medical facilities offer a warm, comfortable and caring environment. Integrity Oncology Foundation offers four convenient locations in Memphis, Collierville, West Memphis, and Union City. Call 901.853.6012 to schedule a diagnostic consultation or visit us at www.IntegrityOncology.com.

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORIENTAL RUGS TAGHAVI ORIENTAL RUGS >>>

At Taghavi's Oriental Rugs, we take great pride in our 60+ years in business and the type of services we offer, including sales, hand cleaning, reweaving, color-run restoration, moth-damage repair, stain and odor removal, and much more! With every customer, we are guided by our core values: integrity, experience, excellence, and professionalism. We have not only the largest stock in new and antique rugs, but also the best cleaning and restoration method in the country. We have built our reputation for more than 60 years, not on false promises, but integrity and excellence. 3554 Park Avenue, Memphis, TN 38111 901.327.5033 | TaghaviRugs.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORTHOPAEDICS AND SPORTS MEDICINE CAMPBELL CLINIC ORTHOPAEDICS >>>

Campbell Clinic has helped Mid-Southerners reach their peak performance and get back in the game faster for more than a century. The organization has built a reputation of excellence since 1909 by providing care in Memphis and the Mid-South that ̜ÕV…iÃ̅iܜÀ`°/…i«À>V̈ViÃiÀÛiÃ>Ã̅i"vwVˆ> Sports Medicine Provider for the Grizzlies, Redbirds,

and Tigers, along with Rhodes College, Christian Brothers University, and countless other athletic programs throughout the region. Whether we’re treating NBA All-Stars or local Little Leaguers, our patients trust us as the Face of Sports Medicine in Memphis and the Mid-South. CampbellClinic.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PAIN MANAGEMENT

MAYS AND SCHNAPP PAIN CLINIC AND REHABILITATION CENTER >>> Left to right: Moacir Schnapp, MD and Kit S. Mays, MD Kit S. Mays, MD, and Moacir Schnapp, MD, have been pioneers in the management of chronic pain for over 30 years. The physicians at Mays and Schnapp Pain Clinic and Rehabilitation Center are dedicated to providing state-of-the-art care for patients suffering from chronic pain.

œ˜Ìˆ˜Õ>ÞViÀ̈wi`LÞ̅i œ““ˆÃȜ˜ for Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities ȘViˆÌȘVi«Ìˆœ˜]ˆÌˆÃÃ̈̅iœ˜ÞViÀ̈wi` pain clinic within 500 miles of Memphis. The physicians' philosophy of care is to treat the whole patient by relieving

pain, restoring function and improving quality of life. That approach starts with taking a comprehensive and fresh look at each suffering individual. This unique multidisciplinary approach may include nerve blocks, physical therapy, and medical management, as well as psychological support when needed. Every patient is evaluated personally by a physician during i>V…œvwViۈḚ̀ "When the problem is pain, we're here to help, offering world-class care in the heart of the Mid-South."

55 Humphreys Drive, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.0040 | MaysAndSchnapp.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

THE FACE OF

PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY

MID-SOUTH

NANCY A. CHASE MD, FAAP, FACC >>>

Dr Nancy A. Chase has been practicing Pediatric Cardiology in the greater Memphis area for over 30 years. She is proud to œvviÀÃÌ>Ìi‡œv‡Ì…i‡>ÀÌœvwVi and hospital consultative care for the newborn, child, adolescent and adult with congenital heart disease, rhythm disorders or other cardiac concerns of childhood. She and her caring staff offer on site EKG, Echo, and Holter as well as outpatient hospital-based syncope and exercise tests. Appropriate referral is made for in-patient heart catheter interventions and surgery. Always interested in promoting good education and life experiences, Dr. Chase often gifts sports, concert and theater tickets to her patients. She is proud and happy to help her young patients enter life's normal patterns and treasures the many announcements of commencements, career choices, marriages, and births she receives. 805 Estate Place, Suite 1 Memphis, TN 38120 901.287.4150 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PEDIATRICS

BAPTIST MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND THE SPENCE AND BECKY WILSON BAPTIST CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL >>> At Baptist, we are experts at taking care of kids. The new, 17,000-square-foot pediatric emergency department, housed within the Spence and Becky Wilson Baptist Children’s Hospital, gives the community another option in pediatric care. Conveniently located at Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women, it features 10 rooms for patient care with flexibility to expand to 15 and is staffed 24/7 with pediatric emergency medicine physicians, pediatric hospitalists and an array of other pediatric specialists, including the Baptist system’s

first pediatric general surgeon and a pediatric anesthesiologist. Boasting a colorful and engaging nature theme designed to appeal to children, the emergency department features a 400-gallon fish tank; whimsical artwork; quilts featuring Baptist’s pediatric mascot, P.D. Parrot, and his friends; and other child-friendly touches. Other pediatric services offered are inpatient and outpatient care, including surgery; diagnostics; and the Pediatric Eye Center, which offers the full spectrum of eye care under one roof.

6225 Humphreys Blvd., Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.227.PEDS (7337) | BaptistOnline.org/Pediatrics SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PIZZA

BROADWAY PIZZA >>> Legendary Broadway Pizza, one of Memphis’ favorite family-owned-and-operated restaurants, was opened by Lana Jeanette Cox in 1977 at 2581 Broad. Third-generation family members now offer Broadway East at 629 S. Mendenhall. Elder family members raised in extreme poverty

w˜`ˆÌˆ“«œÀÌ>˜Ì̅>Ìv>ˆÌ…vՏvÀˆi˜`ú}iÌ̅iˆÀ money’s worth and not leave hungry.” Not just a pizzeria, Broadway offers salads, whole wings, spaghetti, chicken parmesan, burgers; homestyle plate lunch specials. Call-in orders welcomed.

2581 Broad Ave, Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.454.7930 629 S. Mendenhall, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.207.1546 BroadwayPizzaMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

POLITICAL STRATEGY SUTTON REID >>> Steven Reid

Steven Reid is widely recognized as one of the best political strategists in the Mid-South. President of Sutton Reid Advertising, Reid has engineered some of the area’s most successful campaigns including D.A. Amy Weirich, Sheriff Bill Oldham, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael

and Mayor AC Wharton, whose “One Memphis” campaign still resonates among political insiders. After shaping public opinion and voter turnout for more than two decades, Reid remains the powerhouse behind who’s in and who’s out when it comes to those running our government.

266 S. Front Street, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.522.8640 | SuttonReid.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2015

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PRINTING

PEERLESS PRINTING COMPANY >>> Established in 1928, Peerless Printing Company is a Memphis-based boutique printing company with a long tradition of commitment to excellence and dedication to preserving the fine art of print. The print house specializes in commercial, financial, and government printing with full service design, communications, digital and offset printing and bindery operations. Peerless Printing Company encompasses a multi-disciplined, diverse team of graphic designers, communications experts, world-

class printmen, and bindery professionals to achieve our customerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end product from start to finish â&#x20AC;&#x201C; marketing collateral, booklets and magazines, letterpress stationary, annual reports, direct mail campaigns, distribution and fulfillment, large format imaging, and creative bindery and finishing operations. Brant Paxton Frey is the President and CEO of the nearly 100 year old Memphisbased printing company.

2896 Walnut Grove Road, Memphis, TN 38017 | 901.458.8152 | PeerlessPrintingCompany.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


At Home *7 *7

GR E AT HOM ES

WITH THE FRICKS

^6

THIS LIGHT-FILLED HOUSE R EFLECTS THE OWNERS’ LOVE OF A RT, TR A DITIONS, A ND FA MILY HISTORY.

^6

by anne cunningham o’neill photography by andrea zucker

Y

e s , w e p h o t o gr a p h e d t h e Central Gardens home of Elise and Mike Frick on a March day when

winter was still with us. Oh, but what a wonderful place to be — so full of natural light and large colorful paintings on the walls to cheer our chilly souls.

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The midtown neighborhood of Central Gardens is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is famous for both its range of architectural styles and its unique character. The Fricks’ home was built in 1910 and is a perfect example of the iconic American “four square,” the most prevalent design form in the area. These block-shaped, two-story houses were built between 1895 and 1915 and are characterized by their being of equal width and depth, with broad window and door openings and large front porches. No wonder Central Gardens has been called a “front-porch neighborhood” where homeowners use their porches as outside living rooms! This is certainly the case for the Fricks, who say they spend many months of the year enjoying their porch, which in this world of ever-expanding backyard loggias, patios, and poolhouses sounds reassuringly old-fashioned and downright neighborly. It seems to Elise Frick as though she has lived her whole life on this very street, which she has, with the exception of some time spent at Mount Vernon College in Washington, D.C., and as a young married woman on Fenwick Street a bit farther east. She was raised just a half-block away, and she and her husband have lived in their current home since 1996. It’s no wonder that her mother likes to tease that “Elise didn’t get very far in life.” The Fricks’ four-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath stone house boasts many period details including pocket doors, stained-glass windows, and box molding in the entrance hall and living room, which Mike Frick tells me still seep coal dust from long ago coal-burning fires. The burnished original floors in the house are oak from old-growth forests. The original carriage house out back was renovated and expanded using, among other things, old stones from a wall that once stood on the property. Two cars are now “stabled” where once a carriage and horse were housed, and there is ample storage up top for what Elise Frick says are some 20 dozen wreaths that decorate lampposts at the holiday season all around the Central Gardens neighborhood. What struck me about the Frick house unlike many older homes is how open, bright, and airy it feels. This is due to the large front-facing windows in the living room, generously proportioned rooms, high ceilings, and Elise’s minimalist, uncluttered decorative style. Not surprisingly she is an avid practitioner of Ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arranging, with its credo of “less is more.” Several of the amazing paintings hanging on the walls were gifts from Mike’s parents, among which are several beautiful flower paintings by the late Pennsylvania artist, Sterling Strauser. Lesley Samuels Marks of the Samuels Furniture family was a great help with the home’s interior design for which the Fricks are very grateful. On a more idiosyncratic note, Elise Frick confessed to me her special love for monkeys, which in turn led husband Mike, quite the joker, to quip, “That’s why she married me!” And yes, monkeys are jumping (figuratively) everywhere in the house, in lamps, chandeliers, and sculptures. The Fricks are passionate about their neighborhood and are famous for planning and participating in all kinds of local events and celebrations. The annual Central Gardens 4th of July parade is always a highlight of the year’s festivities, and Elise noted that two of

opposite page: The dining room features period furniture, inherited family silver, and a treasured “ancestor” painting — and of course a monkey in the mix. above: A side view of the carriage house with its original Dutch door, nicknamed the “Mr. Ed” door — a reference to the horse that lived there once upon a time.

our late, great Memphis citizens had key roles in this beloved parade — famed lawyer and wine connoisseur Walter Armstrong Jr. liked shooting off the cannon, while opera diva Marguerite Piazza would sing “The Star-Spangled Banner.” The Frick home was on the Central Gardens Home Tour in September 2007, and several years later the Fricks held a grand 100th birthday party for their house. Elise Frick is a wonderful cook and holds sway with her talents in the home’s sleek modern kitchen. With its creamy Corian countertops, magnificent professional chef’s gas stove, and long streamlined space, this workplace was a major renovation that has proven to be a great enhancement to the house. The inclusion of several stained-glass windows (which were originally in the living and dining rooms) lend a pretty period accent to the decor. And as everyone who is privileged to be invited to the family’s famous New Year’s Day brunch can attest, casseroles of cheese grits roll nonstop out of this kitchen to the parents’ delight, as their children bounce away on the jumping machine out front. You might have gathered that the Fricks are very busy people. Mike Frick is president of Bank of America for Memphis and the bank’s commercial bank market executive for Tennessee, Kentucky, and Mississippi. He has served on numerous boards, is a past president of the Central Gardens Neighborhood Association, and is currently the chairman of the Memphis/Shelby County Redevelopment Agency. In her own right, Elise was for years a radio marketing consultant for FM104.5/The River, and she’s served on the Memphis Landmarks Commission and has volunteered for the Junior League, the Tuesday Study Club, the Central Gardens home tour, and the Church Health Center to name a few. This dedication to community service is something Elise Frick learned at her mother’s knee — that mother being the one and only Florence Leffler, former principal of Central High School and a well-known thespian who has performed both here and in New York. (Now an octogenarian, Leffler has been quoted as A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 141

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The original carriage house out back was renovated and expanded using, among other things, old stones from a wall that once stood on the property.

saying, “I just can’t retire from life.” And believe me she has not! She has been a city councilwoman and member of numerous garden clubs, church groups, arts groups, the English Speaking Union — too many organizations to mention. She is an inspiration to us all!) Elise Frick is understandably proud of her Memphis history. On her paternal side she is a descendant of the prominent Buntyn family that gave their name to the area around Buntyn station at Southern Avenue and Goodwyn. Frick’s great-great-great-grandfather was Geraldus Buntyn who, as payment for his services in the War of 1812, was granted a parcel of land approximately 10 miles east of the city. With his wife, Eliza, he reared eight children and became a very successful corn and cotton planter. Buntyn prospered, bought additional land, and at the time of his death in 1865 owned 40,000 acres. His antebellum home still stands on Goodwyn Street, now occupied by Allen Morgan and his family. Among the cherished inherited Buntyn family mementos is the charming painting of a woodland scene,

above left: Elise and Mike Frick in the home’s warm and welcoming yellow entrance hall. above right : One of the original antique stained-glass windows in the house. opposite page: A corner of the bright and airy living room with its flowery, overstuffed upholstery and an Ikebana floral arrangement on the coffee table.

one that features a man, a large dog and a young girl riding the dog. (Now, stay with me on this.) It so happens the little girl is Elise’s grandmother, Euzelia Buntyn Rutland Leffler, and the picture was painted by her mother, who was Geraldus Buntyn’s granddaughter. Elise kindly provided me with copies of newspaper articles relating to her home’s history. I read that its first resident was Harry Cohn, owner of the Dixie Clothing House and American Savings Bank & Trust, who tragically had a fatal heart attack in 1926 in the basement of his bank after finding out two employees had embezzled a great deal of money. One of his daughters, who grew up in the house, later became Mrs. Abe Plough. As Elise reminisced about her historic house on her beloved, lifelong street, these very famous lines from Dr. Seuss’ first children’s book kept running through my mind: “And this is a story that no one can beat. . . And to think that I saw it on Mulberry Street!” Substitute the word “Carr” for “Mulberry,” and you can understand better just what a treasure this home really is.

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The

Mummy Mystery ^6

IN THE E A R LY 1900S, A MEMPHIS L AW YER CL A IMED TH AT THE

MUMMY OF JOHN WILK ES

by m i c h a e l f i n ge r

S

weating furiously, the old man pried the last nail from the wooden crate, opened the lid, and peered inside.

BOOTH WAS STOR ED IN HIS MIDTOWN GA R AGE .

Memphis attorney Finis Bates breathed a long sigh of

relief when he saw that the fragile contents were undamaged. “John, my old friend,” he said. “You’re home at last!”

WAS HE R IGHT?

^6

Lying inside the box was the mummified body of a man Bates believed was John Wilkes Booth. How the corpse of Abraham Lincoln’s assassin came to rest in a Central Gardens garage — half a century after Booth was supposedly shot and buried — remains one of the strangest episodes of this city’s past.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY AMIE VANDERFORD

John Wilkes Booth, as portrayed by David Foster in the recent production of Assassins at Circuit Playhouse. A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 145

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T

THE CR IME

his year marks the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Most history books tell us the familiar story: On the evening of April 14, 1865, Lincoln was murdered at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C., during a performance of Our American Cousin. John Wilkes Booth, a noted actor of the day, stole into the president’s box and fired a single shot from a derringer into the back of Lincoln’s head. In a dramatic gesture, Booth shouted, “Sic semper tyrannis” (“Thus always to tyrants!”) to the horrified audience and leapt PER H A PS THE A R MY from the box. As he jumped, he caught his spur in a flag R E A LIZED IT H A D KILLED draping the balcony, and hit the stage awkwardly, snapping his ankle. Amid the conTHE WRONG M A N, A ND fusion, Booth still managed to escape out the back door TH AT JOHN WILK ES of the theatre, where a horse was held for him in the alley. Lincoln died just ten hours BOOTH H A D ESC A PED later. It was soon established that the terrible crime had A F TER A LL . been part of a conspiracy, and an intense manhunt began. In a matter of days Booth’s fellow criminals were caught, but the assassin himself and a young companion named David Herold had seemingly disappeared into the night. Not for long. Hobbled by his injured leg, Booth was not able to get far. On April 26th, federal troops cornered the two men in a tobacco barn on the Garrett farm near Fredericksburg, Virginia. When Booth and Herold refused to surrender, the barn was set afire. Herold dashed out and was nabbed immediately, but Booth remained inside. Silhouetted against the flames, he was shot in the neck by a soldier firing (against orders) through a crack in the wall.

^6

^6

B

THE C A P TUR E

ooth was dragged from the flames and died within minutes. His body was wrapped in a blanket and carried up the Potomac to the capital aboard a steamer, where it was examined and “identified” (more about this later). Then it was quickly buried in a secret location on the grounds of the federal penitentiary. According to the Army officials in charge, the hasty burial was designed to thwart Southern sympathizers from seizing the body, or parts of it, and glorifying the remains. Four years later, the Booth family was allowed to retrieve the body — but only if they buried it in an unmarked grave in the family plot in Baltimore. Perhaps there was a more sinister reason. Skeptics wondered why no autopsy was performed, why no

family members or close friends were permitted to view the body, and — oddest of all — why the appearance of the corpse was so unlike that of John Wilkes Booth. Perhaps the Army realized it had killed the wrong man, and that Booth had escaped after all. All accounts of Booth mention his curly black hair, yet two citizens who saw the body lying on the ground at the Garrett farm described it as red-haired. According to some reports, Herold surprised his captors at the farm by asking them, “Who was that man in the barn with me? He told me his name was Boyd.” And even though hundreds of people in Washington knew Booth well, no close friends or stage associates were summoned to identify the remains. Instead, the army relied on the verdicts of a few military men who had seen Booth on stage, along with the proprietor of a Washington hotel where Booth had lodged. As recounted in the February 1944 issue of Harper’s, the strangest testimony came from Booth’s personal physician, who had once operated on his neck. When this man examined the body the day after the shooting, he was stunned. He recalled years later: “My surprise was so great that I at once said to General Barnes [the surgeon general], ‘There is no resemblance in that corpse to Booth, nor can I believe it to be that of him.’” That didn’t faze the general, who persuaded the doctor that a scar on the corpse’s neck was the result of the earlier operation. According to Harper’s, when the body was placed in a sitting position, the doctor reluctantly admitted, “I was finally enabled to imperfectly recognize the features of Booth.” The doctor’s final comment, however, suggests he was not entirely convinced: “But never in a human being had a greater change taken place … .” Stories like these fueled rumors that John Wilkes Booth had survived. Blanche Booth, his niece, claimed that Booth had secretly met with her mother a year after the assassination and had lived on for another 37 years. A Maryland justice of the peace reported he met Booth in Central America in the 1870s. And an Idaho man who had seen Booth many times on stage always insisted he came face to face with the assassin on a Memphis street in 1929. “Booth” fled, he claimed, and others refused to pursue him. Most of these reports are imaginative, if not utterly preposterous. (In 1929, for example, Booth would have been 90 years old.) But one story cannot be dismissed so lightly. In 1872, a young lawyer who would one day serve as attorney general for the state of Tennessee encountered a rather remarkable man in Texas. The lawyer’s name was Finis Langdon Bates. The strange man called himself John St. Helen.

B

THE CLIEN T

ates was born in 1851 on a plantation in Mississippi. He studied law in Carrollton, and then moved to the frontier town of Granbury, Texas, to begin his legal career. He had been in Texas only a short time when he was approached by St. Helen, who needed help settling a dispute over a liquor license.

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I

THE CONFESSION

n a lengthy and emotional confession that Bates transcribed, St. Helen — or Booth — described in detail the murder of Lincoln and his own getaway, an escape allegedly made possible by Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and other high officials in Washington. Booth wanted this information made known, because, he said, “I owe it to myself, most of all to my mother … to make and leave behind me for history a full statement of the horrible affair.” Bates was dumbfounded, and admitted, “This story I could not accept as fact without investigation.” And so he began his research into the Lincoln assassination that would last the rest of his life. He soon discovered that every detail St. Helen told him checked out. For instance, St. Helen claimed he had fled the Garrett farm

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY GETT Y IMAGES

St. Helen, it seems, had wandered into town a few years before and professed to be a storekeeper. But he showed no interest in the business he bought, letting his assistant do all the work, and his ignorance of such trade essentials as liquor licenses led him to Bates. It was a meeting that would change the course of Bates’ entire life. Bates found St. Helen, with his luxuriant black hair and moustache, “indescribably handsome” and noted that his poise, dress, and education set him apart from the more uncouth characters who inhabited the region. While others bellowed out bawdy drinking songs in the town tavern, St. Helen would recite Macbeth or Richard III and discourse for hours on Roman history. He was keenly interested in the theatrical news of the day, and whenever a play came to town he was sure to see every performance and befriend the members of the wandering acting troupes. St. Helen had a dark side, Bates soon noted. He observed that his friend and client “had acquired a restless and hunted, worried expression constantly on his face, while the flashes which came from his keen, penetrating black eyes spoke of desperation and capacity for crime.” Months passed. One day, thinking he was dying, St. Helen summoned Bates and gave him a photograph of himself with a curious instruction. If he died, Bates was to deliver the picture of St. Helen to Edwin Booth in Baltimore, and tell the famous actor how he had acquired it. Bates never fulfilled this strange mission, for St. Helen recovered and then made an astonishing revelation: He was Edwin Booth’s brother, the infamous John Wilkes Booth.

hours before the soldiers arrived and had dropped his field glasses in the grass. The official records, which had not been revealed to the public, confirmed that Booth’s field glasses had indeed been found in the yard. Bates was convinced his client had confessed the truth. Apparently deciding that this was a secret that should not be kept, he wrote to the army and urged them to reopen the case. To his dismay he received only a terse reply: The killer of Abraham Lincoln had been captured and shot by the U.S. Army and the case was closed. In the meantime, the mysterious storekeeper named John St. Helen left town one day — and never returned. Several years later, Bates also left Texas and came to Memphis, where he established a law practice and a widespread reputation as a land title attorney. But his real interest was the Booth/St. Helen controversy, and

A 1938 issue of LIFE magazine devoted several pages to the Booth mummy controversy. Here, a carnival worker displays the corpse to spectators, while holding x-ray film that supposedly showed a signet ring marked with a “B” in the mummy’s stomach.

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he refused to let it die. He still had the photograph St. Helen had given him, and he maintained a continuous correspondence with anyone who may have encountered John Wilkes Booth or John St. Helen. Twenty-five years passed, and Bates never gave up his quest. Then, in 1903, a seemingly insignificant tragedy happened in Oklahoma: An itinerant house painter calling himself David E. George committed suicide in the small town of Enid.

G

THE COR PSE

eorge was an odd, friendless old man, without the slightest talent for painting houses. In fact, he botched the one painting job he got during his brief stay in Enid. He much preferred to sit in the lobby of his boarding house and read old copies of theatrical journals. When he was drunk, which was often, he would quote Shakespeare and once lamented to his landlady, “I’m not an ordinary painter. You don’t know who I am. I killed the best man that ever lived.” One night, George went YE A RS PASSED, A ND up to his dreary room and swallowed a fatal dose of poiTHE MUMMY IN THE son. Such a death would have rated only a few lines on the obituary page of the Enid paF UR NITUR E STOR E per, but for one element. On his deathbed, George told BEC A ME A LOC A L the minister that he was John Wilkes Booth. The minister passed that inCUR IOSIT Y, SOMETHING formation on to the local undertaker, who remembered: TO SHOW VISITORS. “Of course, I took special pains with the body after that; I did the best job embalming I’ve ever done. If it was Booth’s body, I wanted to preserve it for the Washington officials when they came.” The good undertaker did his job well and actually succeeded in mummifying the body with arsenic, a not-uncommon method in that day. The Washington officials never came, but Finis Bates did. Newspapers had carried the strange tale of David George as far as Memphis, and Bates hoped this was the missing link he had long needed. When he finally arrived in Enid, he was ushered into the rear of a furniture store where the body was kept. He lifted the cloth from the dead man’s face and cried out, “My old friend! My old friend John St. Helen!” His 25-year search was over. There was no funeral and no burial. No one in Enid wanted to take responsibility for disposing of the body of John Wilkes Booth, so the town leaders waited doggedly for the “Washington officials” to come. Years passed, and the mummy in the furniture store became quite a local curiosity, something to brag about to visitors. Finally, since Bates had at one time been appointed the dead man’s attorney (back when he called himself

^6

^6

John St. Helen), he was allowed to claim his client’s body. In 1904, he took the mummy home to Memphis, where he carefully stored it in a coffin-like box in his home at 50 South Dunlap, later moving it to the garage of his home at 1234 Harbert in Central Gardens. Then Bates decided to tell the world of his discovery. In 1907, he published a remarkable book titled The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth, or The First True Account of Lincoln’s Assassination, Containing a Complete Confession by Booth Many Years After His Crime. (Copies of Bates’ book are still available in the Memphis Room of the Benjamin Hooks Central Library on Poplar, and in the Mississippi Valley Collection at the University of Memphis Library.) In his preface, the author summed up his life’s work: “In preparation of this book I have neither spared time nor money … and present this volume of collated facts, which I submit for the correction of history.” In more than 300 pages, Bates presented his evidence, recounting with considerable (perhaps unbelievable) detail the confessions he had heard from Booth/St. Helen more than 30 years previously. He also included testimonials from some of Booth’s former friends and associates who had come to Memphis, seen the mummy or the St. Helen photograph, and declared it to be Booth. It never occurred to Bates that he might be wrong, and several passages in his book reveal a man desperately trying to make people believe him before his time ran out. “It is to the American people that I appeal,” he wrote, “that they shall hear the unalterable facts, that the death of America’s martyred president was not avenged, as we have been persuaded to believe.” At times, the enormity of the old man’s mission seemed to overwhelm him. “But the truth will be told,” he wrote, “if needs be with tremors and palsied hands, in the triumph of right and the exposure of the guilty ones whose crimes blacken history’s page and to associate their names through all coming centuries with Brutus, Marc Anthony, and Judas Iscariot.” Despite such impressive rhetoric, government officials remained skeptical, and Bates — who just happened to be the grandfather of Oscar-winning actress Kathy Bates — died in 1923 without seeing his dream of “correcting history” fulfilled. He was buried beneath a simple marker in Elmwood. However, enough of his argument rang true for others to consider it, and interest in the case built slowly. Harper’s devoted 17 pages to Bates’ claim in its November 1924 issue, and then the Literary Digest (December 25, 1926) picked up the story, followed by Life magazine (July 11, 1938) and other publications.

I

THE C A R NIVA L

t made good reading, all right, but the “Washington officials” never came to Harbert for the assassin’s body, and the mummy lingered in Bates’ garage. Experts who examined the mummy found a shriveled old man with long white hair and dried skin like parchment paper. They noted a similarity between this

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IN STONE

Aft er

creature and John Wilkes Booth, and scars that Booth carried matched vague marks on the mummy. The left leg was shorter, as if it had once been broken, and the mummy’s right thumb was deformed (Booth had crushed his thumb in a stage curtain gear earlier in his career). The size of the mummy’s foot matched a boot left behind by Booth during his flight. And Chicago doctors who X-rayed the body in 1931 discovered a corroded signet ring in the mummy’s stomach — with the initial “B.” The Booth mummy remained on Harbert for 20 years before Bates’ widow sold it to a carnival for $1,000. Over the next few years it changed hands several times, always bringing bad luck to its owners, so the story goes. At one point, the mummy was displayed on an Idaho farm under the homemade banner, “See the Man Who Murdered Lincoln.” In the 1930s the mummy was a major attraction at Jay Gould’s Million Dollar Spectacle, a carnival traveling the Midwest. Twenty-five cents admission enabled people to inspect the grisly relic, which was dressed in khaki shorts and laid out on an Indian blanket. Ten thousand dollars was promised to anyone who could prove the mummy not genuine — that’s what the signs said anyway — but there were no takers. One rather gruesome feature had been added over the years: A large flap had been cut into the mummy’s back, and customers really wanting their quarter’s worth could peel the skin open and peer inside. No one disputed that it was a real human mummy; the mystery remained whether or not it was John Wilkes Booth. Despite the publicity — or perhaps because of it — serious scholars and historians scoffed at Bates’ claim. It didn’t help that his own accomplishments were somehow (perhaps unintentionally) inflated. Although Life magazine described him as the attorney general for Tennessee, in truth Bates was an assistant district attorney — one of several — for Shelby County in the early 1900s. Even so, the main controversy surrounded the mummy itself. One Lincoln authority who examined the corpse concluded, “The body of the suicide from Enid, Oklahoma, presents some similarities to that of Booth, but lacks other identifying features.” The author of the 1924 Harper’s article, who personally examined the mummy when it was stored in Bates’ garage, wondered, “Could this long gray hair, still curling and plenteous, have been the adornment of that young man who mastered the stage of his day with his talent and physical beauty?” Some 17 pages later, he decided that it simply could not be: “No mystery remains in my mind about the end

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of John Wilkes Booth. The evidence against the Enid legend is simply overwhelming.” As if he still weren’t entirely certain, though, he concluded, “But what a strange story it is!” And the mummy? Known simply as “John” to carnival workers, the mummy was reduced to a two-bit sideshow attraction, never becoming the major historical find that Bates had worked so hard to acquire and preserve. Bates did, however, attract the attention of at least one person who knew something

^6 THE MUMMY WAS R EDUCED TO A TWO-BIT SIDESHOW AT TR ACTION.

^6 about remarkable escapes: After the famous magician’s death in 1926, the library of Harry Houdini was found to contain several copies of Bates’ book.

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F

THE CONCLUSION

inis Bates died a disappointed man, unable to fulfill his dream of “correcting history.” His life’s work was reduced to one sentence in Th e Commercial Appeal obituary, noting that he “had devoted years in obtaining proofs and affidavits of the escape and suicide of John Wilkes Booth” and commenting that “the book he wrote on that subject brought him into prominence as an author.” The Bates’ home and garage on Harbert, the mummy’s last resting place in Memphis, were torn down in the 1960s and replaced by an apartment house. And the mummy itself? In the late 1950s the Circus World Museum tried to buy “John,” and a few years after that the townspeople of Enid, Oklahoma, expressed some interest in getting “their” mummy back as a tourist attraction. No one seemed to know where it was. Last seen at a carnival in the mid-1970s, since then it has vanished. Several years ago, when this story first appeared in Memphis magazine, this writer attempted to locate the missing mummy. Working with other Booth conspiracy theorists — among them a group of forensic pathologists in Memphis, a professor at the contin u ed on page 17 7

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FOLK’S FOLLY PRIME STEAK HOUSE >>> When real estate developer Humphrey Folk opened his namesake restaurant in 1977, friends scoffed at …ˆÃi˜`i>ۜÀ]Ü…i`ÕLLi`…ˆÃyi`}ˆ˜}ÃÌi>Ž…œÕÃi Folk’s Folly. To this day, the restaurant remains a ÌÀÕii“«…ˆÃœÀˆ}ˆ˜>° œ˜ÃˆÃÌi˜ÌÞۜÌi`̅iLiÃÌ

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LUCCHESIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RAVIOLI & PASTA COMPANY, INC. >>> Lucchesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is a family dining tradition, brought to Memphis more than 100 years ago at the dawn of the twentieth century. Homemade, restaurantquality Italian meals are made daily with the freshest of pasta, lasagna, ravioli, Italian spinach, and zesty sauces. Our Take-and-Bake Pizzas are ready for pick up anytime at your convenience. We include all-natural meat (from Claybrook Farm in Covington) in our ingredients and have expanded our brand through our Natural Products gaining placement in Whole Food Markets. Also stop by today at our deli for made-to-order sandwiches on fresh bread. 540 S. Mendenhall at Sanderlin 901.766.9922 | Lucchesis.com

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W. Hamilton (Ham) Smythe IV has been in the passenger transportation business since 1981 when he joined Yellow Cab Company, whose roots in Memphis date back more than 150 years. Smythe added Checker Cab Company in 1989 and Premier Transportation Services in 2000. Yellow Cab and Checker Cab provide 24/7 taxi service to the local community, and Premier Transportation offers scheduled and chartered bus, mini-bus, van and sedan/SUV service. Together, these companies provide a range of solutions designed to get people to where they need to be, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one person

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MORE THAN WORDS >>> Founder and Owner Lee Ann McGhee with her mom Caroline Faquin, Pandora Specialist Capturing the hearts of customers for 16 years, More Than Words has become the "Go To" destination to select unique gifts for all occasions. Lee Ann McGhee has grown her business from creating custom calligraphy designs out of her home into a thriving 5,000 square foot boutique in the heart of Germantown. "More Than Words delivers superior customer service and gifts ranging from hand crafted designer jewelry to one of a kind creations by local artists complete with complimentary gift wrap. Our goal is to delight our customers with unique and meaningful gifts that will inspire them and their loved ones for a lifetime," says Lee Ann. 2123 West Street, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.755.4388 | MoreThanWords.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


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VETERANS' BENEFITS THE BRADLEY LAW FIRM, PLLC >>> J. Anthony Bradley, Attorney, VA Accredited Attorney, LL.M. Taxation, CPA (Retired), is well versed in all practice areas related to Elder Law and Protection, including: Estate Planning, Wills & Trusts, Medicaid Planning, Probate Administration, Conservatorships, Special Needs Planning, Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Trusts, Durable Powers of Attorney, and VA Pension Planning (including service-connected disabilities such as Agent Orange and Brown Water

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WEALTH MANAGEMENT WADDELL & ASSOCIATES, INC. >>>

The mission of Waddell and Associates is to improve the quality of life for their clients by providing financial clarity and confidence. W&A's 22 associates are highly qualified with 12 masters degrees and 31 professional designations across the firm. Each client's unique financial situation, combined with W&A's experience, leads to the construction of a personalized financial strategy and a targeted rate of investment return. This process is dynamic and supported by a

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WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESS TOTAL HEALTH WELLNESS CENTER >>>

After looking fear in the face and waging a brave fight against cancer, Barbara Clenin believes “the greatest wealth is health.” The familiar cliché, “What does not kill us, makes us stronger,” resonates more passionately today in the unique relationship Barbara shares with her clientele. After successfully managing the loss of more than 16,000 pounds and thousands of inches in her wellness center, Barbara seeks to “make a difference” in her dieters' rewarding journey of dramatic size and

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WINE & LIQUOR KIRBY WINES & LIQUORS >>> Left to right: Stephen Newport, Nermin Hodzic, Brian Herrera, and Philip Forman As unique as the award-winning building that houses more than 10,000 wines and liquors, the team at Kirby Wines & Liquors sets the bar just a bit higher than the rest. With 55 years combined experience, we can plan your party or pair the perfect wine for a special dinner. Whether California, Spain, Argentina, Italy, France or the hills of Kentucky and Tennessee — we’ve got the elixir you’re looking for. 2865 Kirby Parkway, Memphis, TN 38119 901.756.1993 | KirbyWines.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


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Ever wonder how some of the South’s best chefs create their unique and signature dishes? If so, you’re not alone. Three of Memphis’s top chefs have the same question. Rather than reinvent the wheel, they turn to Joy Bateman’s book series, The Art of Dining, and take a sneak peek at how their competition creates and infuses cuisine with flavor. Ben Smith, Andrew Adams, and Erling Jensen are big fans of The Art of Dining books, especially those that zero in on Bateman’s hometown, The Art of Dining in Memphis. Her latest: The Art of Dining in New Orleans 2, gives fine food lovers like herself a taste of the Crescent City’s fabled

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c o n t i n u e d f r o m p a g e 15 0 University of the South, and a historian living in Maryland, we contacted the Circus World Museum and even placed ads in various circus- and carnival-related publications. The Sewanee professor, Dr. Arthur Ben Chiddy, succeeded in getting the Booth story featured on the TV series Unsolved Mysteries in 1992. Even so, all those efforts brought in nothing but lots of useless tips. We contacted a tourist attraction in Seattle, Washington, called Ye Olde Curiosity Shoppe, which had a mummified man on display, but it wasn’t Booth. In fact, this poor fellow had been found dead in the desert somewhere in 1892. We tried — without success — to have the body in Baltimore exhumed so scientists could confirm its identity (by matching its

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The Birth of Broad Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Well, sometimes.

by vance lauderdale DEAR VANCE: Around 1905-1915, my grandfather and his two brothers owned a saloon on Broad, somewhere between Hollywood and Collins. Can you give me some information on Binghampton and that stretch of Broad around this time? — d.k., memphis.

The Kearney Brothers saloon around 1908. James is standing in the middle, wearing the apron.

The photograph you furnished looks like a scene out of the Wild West — a bunch of tough-looking characters hanging around an old-timey saloon, complete with hand-painted beer signs, wooden-plank sidewalks, and dirt street. Hitching posts and six-shooters would have made it picture-perfect, so it’s hard to believe that in the early 1900s this establishment actually stood in what is today the heart of Midtown. Any discussion of Binghampton usually provokes brawls about whether the town — and it was originally established as a separate city from Memphis — has a “p” in its name. Old records and maps spell it as “Binghamton,” city directory listings clearly identify various folks over the years as “Mayor of Binghamton,” and the last time I checked, the post office (always a stickler for these things) called its own station “Binghamton.” So I’m not sure how the “p” dropped in, or why, and even though the Binghampton Development Council spells it with a “p” I’m an old coot writing about old things, so I’m going with the old spelling. But back to the question at hand. My friend D.K. has already told me that his family originally came from DEAR D.K.:

Ireland and settled in Kentucky in the 1800s. Most of them made their homes near Lexington, one group stayed in a Kentucky town with the remarkable name of Dog Fennel, and the rest moved to Memphis. The original plan, it seems, was to establish themselves here as farmers. But three of those brothers — William, Henry, and James — had other ideas. Sometime around 1905, they found employment at a lively bar at Broad and Bingham called Sailors, after the two brothers who owned it. The Sailors weren’t in the Navy or anything; that was their last name. These Kearneys were obviously ambitious fellows, because in 1907, they opened their own place just a few doors down from Sailors, and they called it Kearney Brothers. William and Henry owned it, and James worked there as the barkeeper, according to old city directories. The photo here, in fact, shows the saloon as it appeared in 1908. I know this because D.K. told me so (he recognized his great-uncle James standing out front, wearing the long apron), but he confirmed the exact date using very impressive detective skills. He noticed a poster in the window of the bar (barely visible here) advertising a “Moonlight Excursion” on “Wednesday Evening, May 20.” Using one of those perpetual calendars, he determined that May 20th fell on a Wednesday in 1903, 1908, and 1914. Knowing what we do now about James’ connection with this saloon (more about this later), it’s a safe bet the photo was taken in 1908. Binghamton at the time was a rather sleepy rural community, populated by both whites and blacks, with a dozen small businesses clustered around the intersection of Broad and Bingham. Kearney Brothers, located at 233 Broad (this was the old street numbering, before the area was annexed by Memphis), was a good location to start a business. Along that same block you could find Hanover Dry Goods, Mr. Bowers’ Grocery #40, Hicks and Company Dry Goods, the Davis Confectionery, Howard Perkins’ soft drinks establishment (probably a lunch room), Charles Wells butcher shop, Hyman Hardware, the meeting hall for the fraternal group called the International Order of Odd Fellows, and even two doctors: Dr. Lyman Chapman and Dr. Hiram B. Everett. Just down the street was the William C. Harrell Company, described in ads as “staple and fancy grocers.” Harrell was a prominent businessman in the community and also served as the town’s mayor, living in a nice residence over on Harvard Street. Among the residents of the growing town were Hillman and Freeman Brumbelow, and I men-

PHOTOGRAPH OF SALOON AND PHOTO OF JAMES KEARNEY FAMILY (OPPOSITE) COURTESY DON KOEHLER FAMILY ARCHIVES

ASK VANCE

178 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • A P R I L 2 0 1 5

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3/24/15 9:06 AM


BROAD AVENUE PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY MEMPHIS AND SHELBY COUNT Y ROOM, BENJAMIN HOOKS CENTRAL LIBRARY

tion them here only because I like saying their name: Brumbelow. They were carpenters, by the way. And bars were booming in the early 1900s. Memphis city directories for the time list more than 560 saloons, most of them just named for their proprietors, but some with enticing (and intriguing) names: the Horseman’s Club, the Green Tree House, the Iron Mountain Exchange, Café Royal. But back to the Kearneys. For reasons I don’t understand, Kearney Brothers stayed in business using that name only two years. Brother Henry dropped out of the picture, leaving behind an establishment now called William L. Kearney, with James as a co-owner, and another Kearney, Daniel, showed up in Memphis to work there as a barkeeper. And that business changed its name the very next year. In 1912, it became known as J.D. Kearney, with James now as the sole owner (apparently) and Daniel still working as a barkeeper/clerk there. So where did William go? Well, he moved on to loftier things, taking a job as a justice of the peace, with nice offices downtown on Adams. And brother Henry stepped back into the picture, with city directories now showing him working as a dairy inspector with the Shelby County Board of Health. My, that family did get around. And they got turned around, too. By 1913, the two Kearneys still working on Broad had switched positions. It was now Daniel A. Kearney running a “soft drinks” establishment at 233 Broad, and James D. was a clerk there. Despite all the complicated family involvement, and what seemed (to me, at least) to be a good location, by 1915 the Kearneys were out of business on Broad. Daniel joined brother Henry as an inspector with the Shelby County Board of Health. James was still listed in the phone books, but they didn’t mention his occupation. Meanwhile, William continued working away downtown as a justice of the peace — though much bigger things were headed his way. The Kearneys left Broad just as the community really started to grow. The Memphis Street Railway Company extended a trolley line through Overton Park and straight down the middle of Broad, where it stretched eastward until finally turning north onto National. The American Car and Foundry Company located a big factory in Binghamton, building railroad cars, finally bringing industry to the area. Located right across the street from the Kearneys’ bar, it would have provided a stream of thirsty foundry workers, it seems to me. And one by one, the vacant stretches of Broad became filled with an assortment of homes and businesses. Clarence Saunders opened one of his Piggly Wiggly stores on Broad, and the street also welcomed the Palace Drug Store, the Binghamton Furniture Company, and the Mississippi Elevator Company. (In later years, Broad became home to our city’s much-beloved Merrymobile ice-cream company, and Sears opened a regional repair and distribution center there.) And what became of the Kearneys’ little saloon shown in the 1908 picture? Well, the year after they left it, a fellow named David Dent converted the building into a dry cleaners. In 1921, Rufus Young opened a barber shop there. But wait, the Kearneys weren’t quite done with Broad. Remember young Daniel? Well, in the mid-1920s,

he teamed up with another businessman and opened Baker and Kearney Billiards Parlor, at 225 Broad, just a few doors west from the old saloon. After the city annexed this area in 1919, the post office (or whoever does these things) provided all-new street numbers to every single home and business in Binghamton. The address of the saloon became 2559 Broad. If that sounds familiar, well … be patient. Now, I suppose I could fill the rest of these pages, showing you the changes that took place year by year along Broad, or the different jobs held year by year by all these Kearneys. But good gosh-a-mighty, that seems like an awful amount of work, doesn’t it? So let’s just cut

to the chase. If you’re really interested, you can drive down Broad for yourself and see how much it’s changed since the days of the old photos. But I hinted that big things were in store for William L. Kearney. He eventually became director of the Shelby County Work House, when it was located outside the city on Jackson, and then took over the operation of the old Shelby County Penal Farm before he passed away in 1943. James and Daniel worked in various places for the rest of their long lives, James passing away in 1972 at age 91, and Daniel dying in 1974 at age 88. And Daniel’s old billiards parlor at 2549 Broad? For years a fellow named E.E. Baker sold “general merchandise” there. Later Paul’s Upholstery Shop moved in, then a plastic manufacturing company, and other odd businesses. Today it’s home to the spiffy Victory Bicycle Studio. The old saloon at 2559 Broad went through various owners: Lowry and Tutt Grocers, then Howard’s Restaurant. It stood vacant for years, and then Daniel Kearney — I have no idea where he’d been all this time ­— came back and opened a second-hand furniture store there. By the 1940s, he had moved out (again!), and Nick and Paul’s Grill opened there, followed by a string of other restaurants that few people remember. But the building is still standing after all these years, and I know many men and woman who have had wonderful times there, because it’s come full circle back to its original use. These days, you and I know it as The Cove, famous for its food, drinks, and nautical embellishments rescued from Anderton’s East. If only the Kearneys could see it now. 

The Broad Avenue trolley (left) crossed Cypress Creek on a rickety wooden bridge, and James D. and Helen Kearney (above) pose with their children in these photos from the early 1900s.

The building is still standing after all these years, and I know men and women who have had wonderful times there, because it’s come full circle back to it original use.

Got a question for vance? EMAIL: askvance@memphismagazine.com

MAIL: Vance Lauderdale, Memphis magazine,

460 Tennessee Street #200, Memphis, TN 38103 BLOG: www.memphismagazine.com/Blogs/Ask-Vance

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BOOKS

A Double Life A debut novel examines parallel lives: what makes you you?

by leonard gill

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oriah McStay’s debut novel is aimed at young adults, but no reason grownups can’t enjoy it — and profit from it — too; plus, a cookbook by the Knipples for lovers of catfish. Every life is a series of what-ifs. In the case of Fiona Doyle, the earliest what-if happened when she was just 5 years old: What if Fiona had not run into a popcorn cart at the Memphis Zoo? What if that cart had not overturned? And what if hot oil hadn’t spilled out and damaged one side of her face? The many operations Fiona underwent growing up didn’t hide the scars that the girl lived with throughout grade school and high school. But she’s hiding something else: a real talent for songwriting and singing, and

only Fiona knows it. Given the chance to perform those songs on open-mic night at Otherlands coffeehouse in Midtown, she turns that chance down. But Fiona dreams of going to Northwestern University outside Chi-

Moriah McStay

cago to study creative writing and music, and that she does after a new surgical procedure helps to alleviate some of the girl’s deep-seated self-doubts. The question, however, remains: What if Fiona had never had that early accident in the first place? Meet Fi Doyle. She’s a fiercely competitive high-school lacrosse player, and she leads the city of Memphis in goals. In fact, she’s ranked number one in Tennessee. That should give her a good shot at a sports scholarship to her dream school, Northwestern, one of the leading colleges in the country for women’s lacrosse. But an ankle injury causes Fi to have a serious setback. More serious is the declining health and uncertain future of Fi’s boyfriend, Marcus. Fi, it turns out, doesn’t apply to Northwestern. She stays in Memphis to look after Marcus and to attend (and play sub-championship lacrosse) at a college a lot like Rhodes. What if Fi did, though, agree to go to Northwestern’s summer lacrosse camp? And what if she does well enough there to win admission to the school? Who knows what might happen? Readers won’t know, because that’s where Everything That Makes You (Katherine Tegen Books/ HarperCollins) by Memphian Moriah McStay ends. Or comes close to ending. The final scene in this ambitious debut novel for young adults is back inside Otherlands, where many scenes have already taken place. Fiona Doyle makes it (nervously) onto the coffee shop’s modest stage. She finally performs her own songs before friends and family. And the dreaded ordeal behind her, life resumes. McStay — who grew up in

With Everything That Makes You, McStay has written not one but two novels under one title. Both storylines share the same major characters. Memphis, graduated from Northwestern with a degree in economics, then followed that up with degrees from the University of Chicago — lives today back in her hometown with her husband and three daughters, but she’s traded an outside career for writing full-time. And with Everything That Makes You, she’s written not one but two novels under one title. Both storylines share the same major characters. Both storylines trace the fortunes and misfortunes (in alternating chapters) of Fiona/ Fi Doyle. And that’s a strategy to challenge the skills of even a seasoned writer. But readers of this debut novel — once they grow used to the book’s parallel narratives — will find that McStay pulls it off with confidence. And that goes not only for

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young-adult readers, the publisher’s intended audience with Everything That Makes You. The characters here are too sharply drawn and the action too accurately observed to limit that audience to young people alone. What, finally, makes you you? Everything you live through, according to McStay’s title, and that includes every obstacle, chance occurrence, and accomplishment. No harm in reminding grownups of that life lesson too.

I

f you think catfish is only for deep frying, you don’t know Catfish, a handy new cookbook in the “Savor the South” series published by the University of North Carolina Press. It’s co-authored by Memphis food writers Paul and Angela Knipple, and yes, they start with the basics: how to fry catfish (whole, steak, fillet, and popcorn) and how to put together the classic sides: hushpuppies, coleslaw, white beans, and pickled green tomatoes. There’s a whole lot more to this bewhiskered bottom feeder of the South’s waterways, lakes, and “farms,” however. The Knipples go international with recipes using catfish in baba ghanoush, empanadas, and samosas. They have instructions here for Nigerian, Indonesian, and Szechuan catfish stews. Salads, po’boys, and tacos are included too. And as for entrees, think Hungarian-Style Catfish Paprika with Sour Cream Noodles, Moroccan Catfish Tagine, Thai Green Catfish Curry, and, for a stateside taste of Woodstock nation, there’s Cross-Eyed Catfish with Wavy Gravy. But for a taste of catf ish Memphis style, the Knipples name-check a number of locally run eateries familiar to many Memphis diners.

Catfish Pudding? The authors’ recipe is a variation on the fish pudding (using cod) served at the annual Lenten Waffle Shop at Calvary Episcopal Church. Cajun Cabbage, to go with your catfish? It’s on the menu at Soul Fish, and though it may not be a traditional side in these parts, “it’s perfect even for the anticabbage crowd.” Casablanca restaurant is the source for the baba ghanoush recipe, but instead of shrimp, the Knipples substitute farm-raised catfish for its firmness and sweetness. And for a Mediterranean specialty with a Southern twist, see the makings for cold-smoke catfish from Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen. If all this sounds a little too fancy, consider what the Knipples call “the most difficult recipe in this book.” Food writer John T. Edge once called the same recipe, in an article he wrote for Garden & Gun magazine, among the “100 Southern Foods You Absolutely, Positively Must Eat Before You Die.” It’s fried catfish. But it’s not the easier to prepare, thick-sliced catfish. It’s thin-sliced (“a far more unusual beast,” according to the Knipples), and it’s a signature dish at Middendorf’s Restaurant in Manchac, Louisiana. To make it yourself, you’ll need a sharp knife and a steady hand to cut the fillets evenly and just so. You’ll know you’ve done right if, as the Knipples write, “the catfish comes out looking like huge flower petals practically floating on the plate.” That’s a far cry from rag-bologna bait and an uncle’s trotlines that Angela and Paul Knipple recall from their childhoods, which they describe in their introduction to Catfish. A far cry too from the hum-

ble fish that, the authors tell us, inspired songs by Bob Dylan, Muddy Waters, and, one might say, the music of George Gershwin — Porgy and Bess, remember, takes place on Charleston’s Catfish Row. It inspired a boy on a river raft too: “About the first thing we done was to bait one of the big hooks with a skinned rabbit and set it and catch a cat-fish that was as

big as a man. ... He would a been worth a good deal over at the village. They peddle out such a fish as that by the pound in the market house there; everybody buys some of him; his meat’s as white as snow and makes a good fry.” The boy who knows as well as anybody that catfish meat is not only snow-white but makes “a good fry”? He’s Huckleberry Finn. 

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DINING OUT

Off Menu Chef Erling Jensen streamlines fine dining with more casual and affordable plates.

Erling Jensen by pamela denney | photographs by justin fox burks

O

n the first Wednesday evening in March, during the surprise finale of winter, my husband and I drove through sleet and snow to introduce a friend from Washington, D.C., to Erling Jensen, the celebrated restaurant in East Memphis tucked away on South Yates. With its white cloth etiquette and exquisite continental cuisine, the restaurant is a Memphis favorite for impressing family and out-of-towners, and we weren’t going to let a little snow storm keep us away. PAM’S PICS

The only foolhardy guests in the restaurant for an hour or so, we settled into a bar table, munched on pork rinds dressed up with crispy kale, and ordered drinks: an icy martini to mimic the weather and Wiseacre IPAs served in pretty Pilsner glasses. Next we thought about food, scanning three different menus for entrees starring elk, escargot, or wild salmon; memorable bar specials like duck confit pizza or a lobster sandwich; and smaller bar plates introduced three years ago when the restaurant remodeled. Still, despite the bravura we could use to mix and match dishes, we settled quickly on two choices. For me, beef bourgignon on risotto, so thick and scrumptious

TOP THREE TO TRY

CRISPY CORNMEAL DUSTED OYSTERS: Long live the marriage of cornmeal and plump oysters that are fried crispy, plated on a boat of arugula, and dipped into lemon caper remoulade served in a petite bowl.

BRONZINI: With its crudo of pastel vegetables spinning like a pinwheel in spring, Bronzini, America’s new favorite fish, gets the star treatment; seared to perfection, plated on creamy risotto the color of new moss, and topped with lemon butter.

CHAI TEA CRÈME BRÛLÉE: A sublime touchstone of French desserts, this spin gets its flavor from steeped chai tea. Held in place by a crunchy sugar top hat, the brûlée is still creamy enough to wiggle a little in the center of its plate.

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sistency, persistence, and vigilance in the kitchen. “I’m here every day,” he says, cooking alongside Justin Young and Keith Clinton, the restaurant’s other chefs. “I know you can’t be complacent. You have got to be awake.” In keeping with his energy, Jensen orchestrates new weekly menus for three-course Sunday dinners that are hugely popular, especially on the first Sunday of the month when there are no corkage fees. On a recent visit, we found a fun and bustling crowd, toting in bottles of wine and chatting between tables. Little wonder the mood was festive. For $38 each, we reveled in elegant service and memorable small touches, like a tuna tartare amuse bouche to start, and to finish, an adorable pair of pistachio cookies capped with chocolate. it was served on a plate instead of in a bowl. For the In between, each course was refined and stylishly others, dinner had a singular purpose: half-price bison plated: sweetbreads breaded, fried, and then lightened burgers served with a cascade of skinny, skin-on fries. up with olive tapenade and arugula; roasted carrot In a restaurant where lemon-lime sorbet comes becoriander soup with a frangrance that lingers like the tween courses, the idea of a gourmet burger for $7.50 memory of a favorite perfume; Wagyu strip loin, flaton Wednesday nights made us a little giddy. Seasoned tened, seared, and sliced and served with golden potato with blackened spices, the burger’s preparation was puree; and Loup de Mer, another name for Bronzini, thoughtful and satisfying, anchoring a tower of Bencooked only on its skin side and plated with basil ricotta ton bacon, caramelized onions, and risotto (flawless!), lemon butter, and Stilton aioli held together with a a frond of fennel. skinny bamboo pick. “Most people Next year, the restaurant will can’t finish it,” our server said. celebrate its 20th anniversary, and The next day, debating whether Jensen is planning a refurbished to warm up leftovers for breakfast dining room and a second expanor lunch, I thought about the fine sion for the restaurant’s bar, addmeals I had eaten at Erling Jensen ing space for customers who like more than a decade ago and how more casual dining. The menu and bar specials are already in my culinary affections had wanplace, and on subsequent visits, dered to the city’s more visible we tried a half-dozen different farm-to-table chefs. Why did I stray, dishes and were impressed with especially when Erling Jensen’s additional menus break the implicit each one. Some smaller plates, like rule that links classical fine dining the truffle mac and cheese made to sticker shock? with old-fashioned macaroni, were Certainly, Jensen’s accomplishboth fun and decadent, layering in In a restaurant where lemonflavor and texture with two cheesments give him free rein. A native of Denmark, he has been part of the es (Beemster and Parmesan) and lime sorbet comes between city’s culinary elite since 1989, when chunks of lump crab. courses, the idea of a gourmet he arrived in Memphis to helm the Other dishes incorporated tradiburger for $7.50 on Wednesday former La Tourelle, Glenn Hayes’ tional Danish recipes, like the martouted French restaurant located zipan blueberry cobbler served in a nights made us a little giddy. in the Midtown bungalow where skillet sizzling hot, or made friendly Kelly English now operates Restaurant Iris. In 1996, companions for drinks after work. One of three cheese he opened the restaurant on Yates, earning a “Best plates on the bar menu, the Barely Buzzed Cheese Restaurant” win from Memphis magazine readers the rubbed with espresso and lavender, stood out. With its following year. For the next decade, readers continued floral taste and delectable rind, the cheese was so good to name Erling Jensen the best restaurant in Memphis. that we skipped bread and mustard for the candied Jensen describes his food as “old school cooking that walnuts and miniscule cornichons marching around is not old school” and attributes his longevity to conthe plate.  

ERLING JENSEN 1044 S. Yates 901.763.3700 STARS: e

eee

FOOD: Seasonal ingredients update

fine dining and small plates. PRICES: Menus offer bar plates ($8

to $18), bar specials ($16 to $19), appetizers and salads ($9 to $19), and entrees ($37-$48). DRINKS: Bartenders shake expert martinis, or you can try one of 36 wines by the glass from an exceptional list. EXTRAS: Don’t miss the threecourse Sunday night special ($38) or the Friday night dinner and wine pairing ($75). ATMOSPHERE: The restaurant is grown-up but not stuffy, and dinner guests still get a little dressed up. SERVICE: Expert staff gets it all right. NOISE LEVEL: The dining rooms hum along nicely, so conversations from nearby tables fade away. RESERVATIONS: Reservations are recommended for the dining room. Reserve special dinners well ahead. OPEN: Serving nightly from 5 to 10 p.m.

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CITY DINING

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

OU R I N-DE P T H GU I DE T O M E M P H I S-A R E A R E STAU R A N T S

TIDBITS

Rizzo’s Diner

by pamela denney

T

Chef Michael Patrick is updating American classics for lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch in a charming new location for Rizzo’s Diner on South Main Street. The restaurant’s dishes are both opulent (triple chocolate layer cake, pictured above) and more refined for contemporary tastes (a trio of zucchini cakes with tomato creole sauce).

he tables filled quickly during the first Saturday night at the new Rizzo’s Diner, with Grizzlies fans eating quickly before the game and others settling in for a couple of hours. No liquor license yet? No problem. Customers brought their own wine — reds, whites, and sparkling — to match robust favorites such as chorizo meatloaf or lobster pronto pups, and lighter fare, like crispy zucchini cakes plated with creole tomato sauce and crumbled Cotija cheese, fresh and salty. Located on South Main Street near the National Civil Rights Museum, the restaurant is a coming-of-age for Chef Michael Patrick, who opened the first Rizzo’s three years ago in a cramped seven-table space around the corner. A popular chef in Memphis with an impressive resume, Patrick wanted more control and space, so he closed the first Rizzo’s in late October to focus on the new place. The work and the wait paid off handsomely. Rizzo’s exposed brick walls, rich wood paneling, and apple-green accents tie together the bar, dining room, and elevated lounge with a banquette for watching people walk by. Moreover, the restaurant’s modernized rustic makeover by Memphis-based designer Ann Parker makes an appetizing setting for Patrick’s dressed up Southern cooking, a combination of comfort foods with more trendy ingredients like hemp seed (it encrusts the salmon), lamb belly (it fills the tacos), and hanger steak locally sourced from Claybrook Farms. Vegetables and gluten-free dishes also earn their rightful place as leading ladies for lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch. More than half-a-dozen veggie sides change daily, as well, an apt consideration when headed for a heavenly slice of dark chocolate cake layered with chocolate chipotle filling, iced with milk chocolate buttercream, drizzled with chocolate sauce, and topped with a single plump strawberry. Rizzo’s Diner, 492 S. Main (901-304-6985) $-$$

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

M

CIT Y DINING LIST

emphis magazine offers this restaurant listing as a service Wed. 4715 Church Rd. W. (Nesbit, MS). 662-781-5100. D, X, to its readers. The directory is not intended as a recommendation of the estab- $-$$$ BOOKSELLERS BISTRO—Serves soups, sandwiches, lishments included, nor does it list every restaurant in town. It does, however, quiche, salads, pasta, and seafood, including shrimp polenta; a include most of the city’s finer restaurants, many specialty restaurants, and a representative specialty is Alpine chicken salad.  The Booksellers at Laurelwood, 387 Perkins Extd. 374-0881. B, L, D, WB, X, sampling of other Bluff City eating establishments. No fast-food facilities or cafeterias $-$$ are listed, nor have we included establishments that rely heavily on take-out business. BOSCOS SQUARED—Serves pasta, seafood, steaks, burgers. sandwiches, and pizza cooked in a wood-fired oven; Restaurants are included regardless of whether they advertise in Memphis magazine. a variety of freshly brewed beers. 2120 Madison. 432-2222.   The guide is updated regularly, but we recommend that you call ahead to check on hours, also L, D, SB (with live jazz), X, MRA, $-$$ prices, and other details. Suggestions from readers are welcome; please contact us. BOUNTY ON BROAD—Offering family-style dining, Bounty serves small plates and family-sized platters, with such Email dining@memphismagazine.com. specialties as pork shank and stuffed quail. Closed Mon.Tues.  2519 Broad. 410-8131. D, SB, X, $-$$ ABUELO’S MEXICAN FOOD EMBASSY—Mejores de BAR LOUIE—Serves small plates, flatbreads, sandwiches, la casa — beef and stuffed shrimp — is a specialty here, along salads, and such large plate entrees as Tuscan chicken BOZO’S HOT PIT BAR-B-Q— Barbecue, burgers, with tilapia Veracruz, quesadillas, chili rellenos, and chicken pasta.  2125 Madison. 207-1436. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ sandwiches, and subs.  342 Hwy 70, Mason, TN. 901-294medallions.  8274 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 672-0769. L, D X, 3400. L, D, $-$$ BAR-B-Q SHOP—Dishes up barbecued ribs, spaghetti, $-$$ bologna; also pulled pork shoulder, Texas toast barbecue BRASS DOOR IRISH PUB—Irish and New-American ABYSSINIA RESTAURANT—Ethiopian/Mediterranean sandwich, chicken sandwich, and salads. Closed Sun. 1782 cuisine includes such entrees as fish and chips burgers, menu includes beef, chicken, lamb, fish entrees, and vegetarian Madison. 272-1277. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ sandwiches, salads, and daily specials. 152 Madison. 572-1813. dishes; also a lunch buffet. 2600 Poplar. 321-0082. L, D, X, $-$$ L, D, SB, $ BARDOG TAVERN—Classic American grill with Italian ACRE—Features seasonal modern American cuisine in a stylish influence, Bardog offers pasta specialties such as Grandma’s NJ BROADWAY PIZZA HOUSE—Serving a variety of setting using locally sourced products; also small-plates/bar. Meatballs, as well as salads, sliders, sandwiches, and daily pizzas,including the Broadway Special, as well as sandwiches, Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 690 S. Perkins. 818-2273. specials.  73 Monroe. 275-8752. B (Mon.-Fri.), L, D, WB, X, salads, and wings; now offering homemade cakes.  2581 Broad. $-$$ L, D, X, $$-$$$ 454-7930; 627 S. Mendenhall. 207-1546. L, D, X, $-$$ ALCHEMY—Southern fusion, locally grown cuisine features BARI RISTORANTE ENOTECA—Authentic BROOKLYN BRIDGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT— small and large plates; among the offerings is the pan-seared Southeastern Italian cuisine (Puglia) emphasizes lighter entrees. Specializing in such homemade entrees as spinach lasagna and hanger steak with duck-fat-roasted fingerling potatoes; also Serves fresh fish and beef dishes and a homemade soup of the lobster ravioli; a seafood specialty is horseradish-crusted salmon. handcrafted cocktails and local craft beers. Closed for dinner day. 22 S. Cooper. 722-2244. D, X, MRA, $-$$$ Closed Sun. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 755-7413. D, X, MRA, $-$$$ Sun.  940 S. Cooper. 726-4444. D, SB, X, $-$$ BAYOU BAR & GRILL—Cajun fare at this Overton Square BROTHER JUNIPER’S—Breakfast ALDO’S PIZZA PIES—Serving gourmet pizzas — including eatery includes jambalaya, gumbo, is the focus here, with specialty omelets, D I N I N G S Y M B O L S Mr. T Rex — salads, and more in a chic downtown setting; also 30 catfish Acadian, shrimp dishes, red beans including the open-faced San Diegan and rice, and muffalettas. 2094 beers, bottled or on tap.  100 S. Main. 577-7743. L, D, X, $-$$ omelet; also daily specials, and B — breakfast Madison. 278-8626. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ homemade breads and pastries. Closed AMERIGO—Traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine L — lunch Mon.  3519 Walker. 324-0144. B, X, BEAUTY SHOP—Modern American includes pasta, wood-fired pizza, steaks, and cedarwood-roasted MRA, $ cuisine with international flair served in D — dinner fish. 1 239 Ridgeway, Park Place Mall. 761-4000. L, D, SB, X, a former beauty shop. Serves steaks MRA, $-$$$ THE BRUSHMARK—New SB — Sunday brunch salads, pasta, and seafood, including American cuisine with a menu that ANDREW MICHAEL ITALIAN KITCHEN—Traditional WB — weekend brunch pecan-crusted golden sea bass. Closed changes seasonally; offers sandwiches, Italian cuisine with a menu that changes seasonally with such X — wheelchair accessible for dinner Sunday. 966 S. Cooper. salads, soups, pastas, and crepes. Closed entrees as Maw Maw’s ravioli. Closed Sun.-Mon. 7 12 W. MRA — member, Memphis 272-7111. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ Mon. and Tues. Brooks Museum, Brookhaven Cl. 347-3569. D, X, $$-$$$ Overton Park, 1934 Poplar. 544-6225. BELLE-A SOUTHERN Restaurant Association ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE—Offering several L, WB, X, $-$$ BISTRO—Brisket in a bourbon brown varieties of eggs benedict, waffles, omelets, pancakes, beignets, and $ — under $15 per person without sugar glaze, and chicken with basmati BRYANT’S BREAKFAST—Threeother breakfast fare; also burgers,sandwiches, and salads. . 6063 drinks or desserts rice are among the specialties; also egg omelets, pancakes, and The Sampler Park Ave. 729-7020. B, L, WB, X, $ $$ — under $25 seafood entrees and such vegetables as Platter are among the popular entrees THE ARCADE—Possibly Memphis’ oldest cafe. Specialties blackened green tomatoes. Closed for here. Closed Tuesday. 3 965 Summer. $$$ — $26-$50 include sweet potato pancakes, a fried peanut butter and banana dinner Sun. and all day Mon.  117 Union 324-7494. B, L, X, $ $$$$ — over $50 sandwich, and breakfast served all day. 5 40 S. Main. 526-5757. Ave. 433-9851. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ BUCKLEY’S FINE FILET B, L, D (Thurs.-Sat.) X, $ SHADED — new listing BENIHANA—This Japanese steakhouse GRILL—Specializes in steaks, seafood, AREPA & SALSA— Offering Venezuelan dishes such as the serves beef, chicken, and , and seafood and pasta. (Lunchbox serves entree namesake arepa (a corn-based dish with a variety of fillings) and grilled at the table; some menu items change monthly; sushi bar also salads, burgers, and more.) 5355 Poplar. 683-4538; 919 S. tostones with shredded pork or black beans. Closed Sunday. 662 featured. 912 Ridge Lake. 767-8980. L, D, X, $$-$$$ Yates (Buckley’s Lunchbox), 682-0570. L (Yates only, M-F), Madison. 949-8537. L, D, X, $ D, X, MRA, $-$$ BHAN THAI—Authentic Thai cuisine includes curries, pad ASIAN PALACE—Chinese eatery serves seafood, vegetarian Thai noodles, and vegetarian dishes, as well as seafood, pork, THE BUTCHER SHOP—Serves steaks ranging from 8-oz. items, dim sum, and more. 5266 Summer Ave. 766-0831. L, D, X, and duck entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. and all day fillets to a 20-oz. porterhouse; also chicken, pork chops, fresh $-$$ Mon.  1324 Peabody. 272-1538. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ seafood.  107 S. Germantown Rd. (Cordova). 757-4244. L A-TAN—Serves Chinese and Japanese hibachi cuisine, complete (Fri. and Sun.), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ BLEU—This eclectic restaurant features American food with with sushi bar. A specialty is Four Treasures with garlic global influences and local ingredients. Among the specialties are CAFE 1912—French/American bistro serving such seafood sauce. 3445 Poplar, Suite 17, University Center. 452-4477. L, a 14-oz. bone-in rib-eye and several seafood dishes. 221 S. entrees as grouper and steamed mussels: also crepes, salads, and D, X, $-$$$ Third, in the Westin Memphis Beale St. Hotel. 334-5950. B, French onion soup, 243 S. Cooper. 722-2700. D, SB, X, MRA, AUTOMATIC SLIM’S— Longtime downtown favorite L, D, X, $$-$$$ $-$$ specializes in contemporary American cuisine emphasizing local BLUE DAZE BISTRO—Serving American cuisine with Cajun CAFE ECLECTIC—Spanish omelets, and chicken and waffles ingredients; also extensive martini list. 83 S. Second. 525-7948. L, flair; lunch entrees include the Black & Bleu Salad and a crab cake are among menu items, along with sandwiches, wraps, and D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ sandwich; dinner entrees range from salmon to Cajun cream burgers.  603 N. McLean. 725-1718; 111 Harbor Town Square. BABALU TACOS & TAPAS—This Overton Square eatery penne pasta. Closed for dinner Sun., and all day Mon.-Wed.  221 590-4645; 510 S. Highland. 410-0765. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $ dishes up Spanish-style tapas with Southern flair; also taco and E. Commerce St. Hernando (MS). 662-469-9304. L, D, SB, X, CAFE FONTANA— Hearty Italian cuisine features pizzas, enchilada of the day; specials change daily. 2115 Madison. 274$-$$$ pasta, and several seafood dishes, including pesce al forno and 0100. L, D, X, $-$$ BLUEFIN RESTAURANT & SUSHI LOUNGE— fish of the day special. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day BAHAMA BREEZE—Baby back ribs, Jamaican chicken Serves Japanese fusion cuisine featuring seafood, duck, and Mon.  8556 Macon Rd. 529-7526. L, D, SB, $-$$ wings, and coconut shrimp are among the entrees at this steaks, with seasonally changing menu; also, a sushi bar and CAFE KEOUGH—European-style cafe serving quiche, Caribbean-fusion restaurant. 2830 N. Germantown Pkwy. flatbread pizza. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 1 35 S. Main. 528paninis, salads, and more.  12 S. Main. 509-2469. B, L, D, X, $ (Cordova). 385-8744. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ 1010. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE OLE—Now under new ownership, this 23-year-old BANGKOK ALLEY—Thai fusion cuisine includes noodle and BOMBAY HOUSE—Indian fare includes lamb korma and eatery specializes in authentic Mexican cuisine; one specialty is curry dishes, chef-specialty sushi rolls, coconut soup, and duck chicken tikka; also, a daily luncheon pan-seared grouper in mango salsa. 959 S. Cooper. 343-0103. L, and seafood entrees. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. at buffet. 1727 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-4114. L, D, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ Brookhaven location; call for hours. 121 Union Ave. 522-2010; X, $-$$ CAFE PALLADIO—Serves gourmet salads, soups, 2150 W. Poplar at Houston Levee (Collierville). 854-8748; 715 BONEFISH GRILL—Serves wood-grilled fish,as well as sandwiches, and desserts in a tea room inside the antiques shop. W. Brookhaven Cl. 590-2585. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ steaks, chicken and pork entrees. 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. Closed Sun. 2169 Central. 278-0129. L, X, $ BAR DKDC— Features an ever-changing menu of (Cordova). 753-2220; 4680 Merchants Park Circle, Carriage CAFE PIAZZA BY PAT LUCCHESI—Specializes in international “street food,” from Thai to Mexican, Israeli to Crossing (Collierville). 854-5822. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, SB, X, $-$$$ gourmet pizzas (including create-your-own), panini sandwiches, Indian, along with specialty cocktails. Closed Sun.-Mon. 964 S. BONNE TERRE—This inn’s cafe features American cuisine and pasta. Closed Sun. 139 S. Rowlett St. (Collierville). 861Cooper. 272-0830. D, X, $ with a Southern flair, and a seasonal menu that changes monthly. 1999. L, D, X, $-$$ Offers Angus steaks, duck, pasta, and seafood. Closed Sun.-

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CIT Y DINING LIST CAFE PONTOTOC—Serves a variety of internationally inspired small plates, as well as salads and sandwiches. Closed Mon.  314 S. Main. 249-7955. D, WB, X, $-$$ CAFE SOCIETY—With Belgian and classic French influences, serves Wagyu beef, chicken, and seafood dishes, including bacon-wrapped shrimp, along with daily specials and vegetarian entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 212 N. Evergreen. 722-2177. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ CAPITAL GRILLE—Known for its dry-aged, hand-carved steaks; among the specialties are bone-in sirloin, and porcinirubbed Delmonico; also seafood entrees and seasonal lunch plates. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  Crescent Center, 6065 Poplar. 683-9291. L, D, X, $$$-$$$$ CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE— Offers prime steaks, fresh seafood (lobster tails, grouper, mahi mahi), pasta, and several northern Italian specialties. 149 Union, The Peabody. 529-4199. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$-$$$$ CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL—Serves chicken Bryan, calamari, various pastas, and other “old-world” Italian entrees. 4600 Merchant’s Park Cl., Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 854-0200; 5110 Poplar. 685-9900. L (Sat.Sun.), D, X, $-$$$ CASABLANCA— Lamb shawarma is one of the fresh, homemade specialties served at this Mediterranean/Moroccan restaurant; fish entrees and vegetarian options also available. 5030 Poplar. 725-8557. L, D, X, $-$$ CELTIC CROSSING—Specializes in Irish and American pub fare. Entrees include shepherd’s pie, shrimp and sausage coddle, and fish and chips. 903 S. Cooper. 274-5151. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ CENTRAL BBQ—Serves ribs, smoked hot wings, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken, turkey, nachos, and portobello sandwiches. Offers both pork and beef barbecue. 2249 Central Ave. 2729377; 4375 Summer Ave. 767-4672; 147 E. Butler. 672-7760. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CHEZ PHILIPPE— Classical/contemporary French cuisine presented in a luxurious atmosphere with a seasonal menu focused on local/regional cuisine. Afternoon tea served Wed.-Sat, 1-3 p.m. (reservations required). Closed Sun.-Mon.-Tues. T he Peabody, 149 Union. 529-4188. D, X, MRA, $$$$ CHIWAWA—American-Mexican street food includes tacos made with hand-pressed tortillas, bacon-wrapped deep-fried hot dogs, and “Juan-tons” stuffed with smoked chorizo and cream cheese. 2 059 Madison. 207-1456. L, D, WB, X, $ CIAO BELLA—Among the Italian and Greek specialties are lasagna, seafood pasta, eggplant rolotini, gourmet pizzas, and vegetarian options. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 565 Erin Dr., Erinway Shopping Center. 205-2500. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CITY GROCERY—Southern eclectic cuisine; shrimp and grits is a specialty. Closed for dinner Sunday. 152 Courthouse Square (Oxford, MS). 662-232-8080. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ COLETTA’S—Longtime eatery serves such specialties as homemade ravioli, lasagna, and pizza with barbecue or traditional toppings. 2850 Appling Rd. (Bartlett). 383-1122; 1063 S. Parkway E. 948-7652. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CORKY’S—Popular barbecue emporium offers both wet and dry ribs, plus a full menu of other barbecue entrees. Wed. lunch buffets, Cordova and Collierville. 5259 Poplar. 685-9744; 1740 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-1911; 743 W. Poplar (Collierville). 405-4999; 6434 Goodman Rd., Olive Branch. 662-893-3663. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ COZY CORNER—Serving up ribs, pork sandwiches, chicken, spaghetti, and more. Closed Sun.-Mon. 7 45 N. Parkway. 5279158. L, D, $ THE CRAZY NOODLE—Korean noodle dishes range from bibam beef noodle with cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables, to curry chicken noodle; also rice cakes served in a flavorful sauce. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  2015 Madison. 272-0928. L, D, X, $ DEJAVU—Serves Creole, soul, and vegetarian cuisine. Closed Sat.-Sun. Florida St. location. 9 36 Florida St. 942-1400; 51 S. Main. 505-0212. L,D (S. Main), SB (S. Main), X, $-$$ DERAE RESTAURANT—Ethiopian and Mediterranean fare includes fuul, or fava beans in spices and yoghurt, goat meat and rice, and garlic chicken over basmati rice with cilantro chutney; also salmon and tilapia. Closed Monday.  923 S. Highland. 552-3992. B, L, D, $ ECCO—Mediterranean-inspired specialties range from rib-eye steak to seared scallops and to linguini with Kale pesto and a grilled vegetable plate; also wild Alaskan salmon. Closed Sun.Mon.  1585 Overton Park. 410-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ EDO—Traditional Japanese cuisine includes shrimp tempura, nagiri, and chicken teriyaki. Closed Mon. 4792 Summer. 7677096. D, X, $ EIGHTY3—Contemporary menu of steaks and seafood offers a variety of eclectic specialties; also weekly specials, small plates,

LOCALITY GUIDE Joe’s Crab Shack BARTLETT Logan’s Roadhouse Abuelo’s Moe’s Southwest Grill Applebee’s T.J. Mulligan’s Cajun Catfish Company O’Charley’s Coletta’s Olive Garden Colton’s Steakhouse On the Border Dixie Cafe Osaka Japanese El Porton Outback Steakhouse Exlines’ Best Pizza Pasta Italia Firebirds Pei Wei Asian Diner Gridley’s The Presentation Room Hadley’s Pub Pyro’s Fire Fresh Pizza La Playita Mexicana Rafferty’s O’Charley’s Red Lobster Ruby Tuesday Romano’s Macaroni Grill Sekisui Sekisui Side Car Cafe Shogun Side Porch Steakhouse Skimo’s Tops Bar B-Q CHICKASAW GARDENS/ Tannoor Grill Zaytos UNIV. OF MEMPHIS DOWNTOWN A-Tan Aldo’s Pizza Pies Brother Juniper’s Alfred’s Cheffie’s The Arcade Derae Automatic Slim’s El Porton Bangkok Alley The Farmer Bardog Tavern Just for Lunch B.B. King’s Blues Club La Baguette Belle — A Southern Bistro Los Compadres Bleu Lost Pizza Blind Bear Speakeasy Medallion Blue Monkey Osaka Japanese Bluefin Pete & Sam’s Blue Plate Cafe R.P. Tracks Blues City Cafe Woman’s Exchange COLLIERVILLE/WEST TN. Bon Ton Cafe Brass Door Irish Pub (ARLINGTON, COVINGTON, Cafe Eclectic MILLINGTON, OAKLAND) Cafe Keough Bangkok Alley Cafe Pontotoc Bonefish Grill Capriccio Bozo’s Hot Pit Bar-B-Q Central BBQ Cafe Piazza Chez Philippe Cajun Catfish Company City Market Carrabba’s Italian Grill Cozy Corner Chili’s Dejavu Corky’s Double J Smokehouse & Crepe Maker Saloon El Mezcal Earnestine & Hazel’s El Porton Eighty3 Firebirds Felicia Suzanne’s Ronnie Grisanti’s Italian Ferraro’s Pizzeria Restaurant Flight Gus’s Fried Chicken Flying Fish Huey’s Flying Saucer Jim’s Place Grille T.G.I. Friday’s Mulan Grawemeyer’s O’Charley’s Gus’s Osaka Japanese Happy Mexican Memphis Pizza Cafe Hard Rock Cafe Pig-N-Whistle Havana’s Pilon Sekisui Huey’s Silver Caboose Itta Bena Stix King’s Palace Cafe Vinegar Jim’s Kooky Canuck Wolf River Cafe Little Tea Shop CORDOVA Local Bahama Breeze McEwen’s on Monroe Bombay House The Majestic Bonefish Grill Marmalade Butcher Shop Mesquite Chop House Cafe Fontana Mollie Fontaine Lounge Cheddar’s The Office@Uptown Chili’s Onix Corky’s Oshi Burger Bar East End Grill Paulette’s El Mezcal Pearl’s Oyster House El Porton Rendezvous T.G.I. Friday’s Rizzo’s Diner Flying Saucer Rum Boogie Cafe Green Bamboo Silky O’Sullivan’s Gus’s South of Beale Happy Mexican Spaghetti Warehouse Hunan Palace Spindini Huey’s The Terrace J. Alexander’s Texas de Brazil Jerry Lee Lewis’ Cafe Tugs & Honky Tonk Twilight Sky Terrace Jim N Nick’s Bar-B-Q Westy’s

EAST MEMPHIS Acre Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen Asian Palace Bangkok Alley Belmont Grill Blue Plate Cafe Booksellers Bistro Broadway Pizza Brookhaven Pub & Grill Buckley’s Fine Filet Grill Carrabba’s Italian Grill Casablanca Central B B Q Chili’s Ciao Bella City East Corky’s Dixie Cafe El Mezcal El Porton Folk’s Folly Fox & Hound Fratelli’s The Grove Grill Half Shell Hog & Hominy Houston’s Huey’s Interim Erling Jensen Jim’s Place Las Delicias Lynchburg Legends Dan McGuinness Pub Marciano Mayuri Indian Cuisine Mellow Mushroom Memphis Pizza Cafe Mortimer’s Mosa Asian Bistro Napa Cafe Neil’s New Hunan Old Venice On the Border One & Only BBQ Patrick’s Porcellino’s Craft Butcher Rafferty’s Sekisui Pacific Rim Skewer Soul Fish Cafe Taziki’s Mediterranean Cafe Three Little Pigs Whole Foods Market GERMANTOWN Belmont Grill Chili’s City East Elfo Grisanti‘s El Porton Exlines’ Best Pizza Germantown Comm. Maui Brick Oven Mellow Mushroom Memphis Pizza Cafe Mesquite Chop House New Asia Petra Cafe Royal Panda Russo’s New York Pizzeria & Wine Bar Sakura Soul Fish Cafe West Street Diner MEDICAL CENTER Arepa & Salsa The Cupboard Evelyn & Olive Kudzu’s Tops Bar-B-Q Trolley Stop Market MIDTOWN Abyssinia Alchemy Alex’s Applebee’s

Babalu Tacos and Tapas Bar DKDC Bar Louie Bar-B-Q Shop Bari Barksdale Restaurant Bayou Bar & Grill Beauty Shop Belly Acres Bhan Thai Boscos Squared Bounty on Broad Broadway Pizza House The Brushmark Cafe 1912 Cafe Eclectic Cafe Ole Cafe Palladio Cafe Society Celtic Crossing Central B B Q Chiwawa The Cove Cozy Corner The Crazy Noodle The Cupboard Dino’s Ecco El Mezcal Evergreen Grill Fino’s from the Hill Frida’s Fuel Cafe Golden India Greencork Huey’s Imagine Vegan Cafe India Palace Jasmine Thai Java Cabana Lafayette’s Music Room LBOE Le Chardonnay Local Memphis Pizza Cafe Midtown Crossing Grille Molly’s La Casita Mulan Chinese Bistro Murphy’s Old Zinnie’s Otherlands Outback Steakhouse P & H Cafe Pei Wei Asian Diner Pho Binh Pho Saigon Restaurant Iris Robata Ramen & Yakitori Bar Saigon Le Schweinehaus The Second Line Sekisui The Slider Inn Soul Fish Cafe Stone Soup Strano Sicilian Kitchen Sweet Grass Tart Three Angels Diner Tsunami Young Avenue Deli NORTH MISSISSIPPI Ajax Diner Applebee’s Blue and White Blue Daze Bistro Bonne Terre Chili’s City Grocery Colton’s Steakhouse Como Steakhouse Corky’s Fox & Hound Huey’s Lee’s Family Restaurant Logan’s Roadhouse Lost Pizza McEwen’s Memphis Barbecue Company Memphis Pizza Cafe

Mesquite Chop House Nagoya O’Charley’s Olive Garden Oska Japanese Cuisine Outback Steakhouse Ravine Red Lobster Sekisui Wadford’s Grill and Bar PARKWAY VILLAGE/ FOX MEADOWS Blue Shoe Bar & Grill Leonard’s Jack Pirtle’s Chicken Three Little Pigs Bar-B-Q POPLAR/I-240 Amerigo Benihana Blue Plate Cafe Brooklyn Bridge Capital Grille, The P.F. Chang’s Chipotle Exlines’ Best Pizza 4Dumplings Fleming’s Frank Grisanti’s Happy Mexican Mister B Olive Garden One & Only BBQ Owen Brennan’s Pyro’s Fire-Fresh Pizza Red Koi River Oaks Rock’n Dough Pizza Ruth’s Chris Salsa Seasons 52 Sekisui Wang’s Mandarin House RALEIGH Exline’s Best Pizza SOUTH MEMPHIS Coletta’s The Four Way Interstate Bar-B-Q Jack Pirtle’s Chicken SUMMER/BERCLAIR Bryant’s The Cottage Edo Elwood’s Shack High Pockets High Point Pizza La Taqueria Guadalupana Lotus Nagasaki Inn Orr Restaurant Pancho’s Panda Garden Tops Bar-B-Q WEST MEMPHIS/ EASTERN ARK. The Cupboard Pancho’s Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar & Grill WHITEHAVEN Hong Kong Marlowe’s WINCHESTER Cheddar’s East End Grill Formosa Half Shell Happy Mexican Huey’s Logan’s Roadhouse Olive Garden Red Lobster Ruby Tuesday T.G.I. Friday’s T J Mulligan’s Tops Bar-B-Q Tycoon

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From Beale Street night spots to neighborhood bars/grills, these places dish out a variety of food. Many offer live entertainment, and patrons can’t miss the largescreen TVs. ALEX’S TAVERN— 1445 Jackson. 278-9086. ALFRED’S—197 Beale. 525-3711. MRA. B.B. KING’S BLUES CLUB— 143 Beale. 524-5464. MRA. BEALE STREET TAP ROOM—168 Beale St. 576-2220. BELMONT GRILL—4970 Poplar. 7670305; 9102 Poplar Pike (Germantown). 624-6001. MRA. BLIND BEAR SPEAKEASY— 119 S. Main, Pembroke Square. 417-8435. BLUE MONKEY—2012 Madison. 272-2583; 513 S. Front. 527-6665. BLUES CITY CAFE—138 Beale at Second. 526-3637. MRA. BROOKHAVEN PUB & GRILL—695 W. Brookhaven Circle. 680-8118. MRA. BUFFALO WILD WINGS—3448 Poplar. 324-9225; 3770 Hacks Cross Rd. 737-9463; 7188 Airways (Southaven). 662349-7776; 8385 Highway 64. 380-9294. DOUBLE J SMOKEHOUSE & SALOON—124 E. G.E. Patterson. 3472648. EARNESTINE & HAZEL’S— 531 S. Main. 523-9754. MRA. EAST END GRILL—7547 Highway 64. 937-1392; 7956 Winchester Rd. 4324256. MRA.

FLYING SAUCER DRAUGHT EMPORIUM—130 Peabody Place. 523-7468; 1400 Germantown Pkwy. 7555530. MRA. FLYNN’S RESTAURANT & BAR— 159 Beale St. 523-1940. FOX AND HOUND ENGLISH PUB & GRILL—847 Exocet Dr. 6249060; 5101 Sanderlin Ave. 763-2013; 6565 Town Center Crossing (Southaven). 662536-2200. GRAWEMEYER’S—520 S. Main. 800-1553. HADLEY’S PUB—2779 Whitten Rd. 266-5006. HARD ROCK CAFE— 126 Beale. 529-0007. HIGH POINT PUB—477 High Point Terrace. 452-9203. HUEY’S—1927 Madison. 726-4372; 1771 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 527-2700; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Malco Blvd. (Southaven). 662-3497097; 7825 Winchester. 624-8911; 4872 Poplar. 682-7729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. (Germantown). 318-3030. MRA. JERRY LEE LEWIS’ CAFE & HONKY TONK—310 Beale St. 6545171. KING’S PALACE CAFE— 162 Beale. 521-1851. MRA. KUDZU’S—603 Monroe. 525-4924. MRA. MEMPHIS SPORTS PUB— 5012 Park Ave. 767-8632. MIDTOWN CROSSING GRILLE—394 N. Watkins. 443-0502.

and appetizers. 83 Madison Ave. 333-1224. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ EL MEZCAL—Serves burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, and other Mexican cuisine, as well as shrimp dinners and steak. 402 Perkins Extd. 761-7710; 694 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-1447; 1492 Union. 274-4264; 11615 Airline Rd. (Arlington). 867-1883; 9045 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 3834219; 7164 Hacks Cross Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-3337; 8834 Hwy. 51 N. (Millington). 872-3220; 7424 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 417-6026; 9947 Wolf River (Collierville) 853-7922. L, D, X, $ EL PORTON—Fajitas, quesadillas, and steak ranchero are just a few of the menu items. 2095 Merchants Row (Germantown). 754-4268; 8361 Highway 64. 380-7877; 65 S. Highland, Poplar Plaza. 452-7330; 1805 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 624-9358; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-5770. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ELFO GRISANTI’S—Specializing in homemade northern Italian cuisine, including pasta, fish, beef and nightly specials. Closed Sun. 2285 S. Germantown Rd. 753-4017. D, X, $-$$$ ERLING JENSEN—Presents “globally inspired” cuisine: specialties are rack of lamb, big game entrees,and fresh fish dishes. 1044 S. Yates. 763-3700. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ EVELYN & OLIVE—Jamaican/Southern fusion cuisine includes such dishes as Kingston stew fish, Rasta Pasta, and Jamaican jerk wings. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun.Mon.  630 Madison. 748-5422. L, D, X, $ EXLINES’ BEST PIZZA—Serves pizza, Italian dinners, sandwiches, and salads.  2935 Austin Peay. 388-4711; 6250 Stage Rd.(Bartlett). 382-3433; 2801 Kirby Parkway. 7540202; 7730 Wolf River Blvd.(Germantown). 753-4545; 531 W. Stateline Rd. 662-342-4544 (check online for additional locations). L, D, X, $ 4DUMPLINGS—Chicken with celery and pork with Napa cabbage are among the hand-made dumpling varieties; also serves Asian tacos, and noodle and rice meals. Closed Sunday.  6515 Poplar. 762-4184. L, D, X, $ THE FARMER—Serving upscale Southern cuisine, with a focus on locally grown ingredients. Among the specialties are pan-seared catfish, slow-cooked pot roast, and braised greens. Closed for dinner Sun.-Mon. 262 S. Highland. 324-2221. L, D, X, $-$$$

MURPHY’S—1589 Madison. 726-4193. MRA. NEIL’S MUSIC ROOM—5727 Quince Rd. 682-2300. OLD ZINNIE’S— 1688 Madison. 726-5004. PATRICK’S— 4972 Park Ave. 682-2852. MRA. P & H CAFE—1532 Madison. 726-0906. ROCKHOUSELIVE—2586 Poplar. 324-6300. 5709 Raleigh LaGrange. 3867222. R.P. TRACKS— 3547 Walker. 327-1471. RUM BOOGIE CAFE— 182 Beale. 528-0150. SAMMY HAGAR’S RED ROCKER BAR & GRILL—Southland Park, 1550 North Ingram Blvd. (West Memphis). 872-735-3670. SILKY O’SULLIVAN’S— 183 Beale St. 522-9596. MRA. THE SILLY GOOSE— 100 Peabody Place. 435-6915. THE SLIDER INN— 2117 Peabody. 725-1155. SOUTH OF BEALE— 361 S. Main. 526-0388. T J MULLIGAN’S—6534 Quince. 753-8056; 8071 Trinity Rd. (Cordova). 756-4480; 2821 N. Houston Levee Rd. 3779997; 1817 Kirby Pkwy. 755-2481. UBEE’S—521 S. Highland. 323-0900 WADFORD’S GRILL & BAR—474 Church Rd. (Southaven). 662-510-5861. WESTY’S—346 N. Main. 543-3278 . THE WINDJAMMER— 786 E. Brookhaven Cl. 683-9044.

FELICIA SUZANNE’S—Southern cuisine with lowcountry, Creole, and Delta influences, using regional fresh seafood, local beef, and locally grown foods. Entrees include shrimp and grits. Closed Sun. and Mon. Brinkley Plaza, 80 Monroe, Suite L1. 523-0877. L (Fri. only), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FERRARO’S PIZZERA & PUB—Rigatoni bolognese and capellini pomodoro are among the pasta entrees here, along with pizzas (whole or by the slice), with a variety of toppings.  111 Jackson. 522-2033. L, D, X, $-$$ FIREBIRDS—Specialties are hand-cut steaks, slow-roasted prime rib, and wood-grilled salmon and other seafood, as well as seasonal entrees. 8470 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 379-1300; 4600 Merchants Circle, Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 8501637. L, D, X, $-$$$ FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE—Serves wet-aged and dry-aged steaks, prime beef, chops, and seafood, including salmon, Australian lobster tails, and a catch of the day. 6245 Poplar. 761-6200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FLIGHT RESTAURANT & WINE BAR—Serves steaks and seafood, along with such specialties as pork rib-eye and roasted duck, all matched with appropriate wines; also gourmet plate lunches. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 3 9 S. Main. 521-8005. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ FLYING FISH—Serves up fried and grilled versions of shrimp, crab, oysters, fish tacos, and catfish; also chicken and burgers. 105 S. Second. 522-8228. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ FOLK’S FOLLY ORIGINAL PRIME STEAK HOUSE—Specializes in prime steaks, as well as lobster, grilled Scottish salmon, Alaskan king crab legs, rack of lamb, and weekly specials. 551 S. Mendenhall. 762-8200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FORMOSA—Offers Mandarin cuisine, including broccoli beef, hot-and-sour soup, and spring rolls. Closed Monday. 6685 Quince. 753-9898. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE FOUR WAY—Legendary soul-food establishment dishing up such entrees as fried and baked catfish, chicken, and turkey and dressing, along with a host of vegetables and desserts. Closed Monday.  998 Mississippi Blvd. 507-1519. L, D (call to check hours.), $ FRATELLI’S—Serves hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts, all with an Italian/Mediterranean flair. Closed Sunday.  750 Cherry Rd., Memphis Botanic Garden. 7669900. L, X, $

FRIDA’S—Mexican cuisine and Tex-Mex standards, including chimichangas, enchiladas, and fajitas; seafood includes shrimp and tilapia.  1718 Madison. 244-6196. L, D, X, $-$$ FUEL CAFE—Focus is on natural “Americana” dishes with such specialties as bison burgers, grass-fed beef dishes, and wild-caught fish; also vegan and gluten-free entrees. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1761 Madison. 725-9025. L, D, X, $-$$ GERMANTOWN COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches; Mon.-night all-you-can-eat ribs. 2290 S. Germantown Rd. S. (Germantown). 754-5540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ GOLDEN INDIA—Northern Indian specialties include tandoori chicken as well as lamb, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian dishes. 2 097 Madison. 728-5111. L, D, X, $-$$ GREEN BAMBOO—Pineapple tilapia, pork vermicelli, and the soft egg noodle combo are Vietnamese specialties here.  990 N. Germantown Parkway, #104 (Cordova). 753-5488. L, D, $-$$ GREENCORK—Wine-on-tap bar serves seasonal menu of modern Southern cuisine. Specialty is the picnic basket, which includes cheese truffles and daily selections of premium meats. Closed Sun.-Mon.  2156 Young Ave. 207-5281. D, X, $-$$ GRIDLEY’S—Offers barbecued ribs, shrimp, pork plate, chicken, and hot tamales; also daily lunch specials. Closed Tues. 6842 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 377-8055. L, D, X, $-$$ FRANK GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Northern Italian favorites include pasta with jumbo shrimp and mushrooms; also seafood, fillet mignon, and daily lunch specials. Closed for lunch Sunday. Embassy Suites Hotel, 1022 S. Shady Grove. 761-9462. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— This Memphis institution serves some family classics such as Elfo’s Special and chicken ravioli, along with lighter fare and changing daily chef selection. Closed Sun.  Sheffield Antiques Mall, 684 W. Poplar (Collierville). 850-0191. L (Mon.-Sat.), D (Thurs.Sat.), X, $-$$$ THE GROVE GRILL—Offers steaks, chops, seafood, and other American cuisine with Southern and global influences; entrees include crab cakes, and shrimp and grits. 4550 Poplar. 818-9951. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN—Serves chicken with signature spicy batter, along with homemade beans, slaw, and pies. 310 S. Front. 527-4877; 215 S. Center St. (Collierville). 853-6005; 2965 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 373-9111; 730 S. Mendenhall. 767-2323; 505 Highway 70 W., Mason, TN. 901-294-2028. L, D, X, MRA, $ HALF SHELL—Specializes in seafood, such as King crab legs; also serves steaks, chicken, pastas, salads, sandwiches, a ”voodoo menu,” and weekend brunch; oyster bar at Winchester location. 688 S. Mendenhall. 682-3966; 7825 Winchester. 737-6755. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HAPPY MEXICAN—Serves quesadillas, burritos, chimichangas, vegetable and seafood dishes, and more. 385 S. Second. 529-9991; 6080 Primacy Pkwy. 683-0000; 7935 Winchester. 751-5353. L, D, X, $ HAVANA’S PILON—Tiny eatery serving Cuban cuisine, including fried plantains in a pilon topped with shrimp, ropa vieja (shredded beef in tomato sauce), roasted pork, and a Cuban sandwich. Closed Sunday.  143 Madison. 527-2878. L, D, X, $ HIGH POINT PIZZA—Serves variety of pizzas, subs, salads, and sides. Closed Monday.  477 High Point Terrace. 452-3339. L, D, , X $-$$ HOG & HOMINY—The casual sister to Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen serves brick-oven-baked pizzas and small plates with everything from meatballs to beef and cheddar hotdogs; also offers house-made sausages, and local veggies. Closed for lunch Mon. 707 W. Brookhaven Cl. 207-7396. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ HONG KONG—Cantonese and Mandarin standards are sweet-and-sour chicken, and pepper beef. Closed Sunday. 3966 Elvis Presley. 396-0801. L, D, X, $ HOUSTON’S—Serves steaks, seafood, pork chops, chicken dishes, sandwiches, salads, and soups,  5000 Poplar. 683-0915. L, D, X $-$$$  IMAGINE VEGAN CAFE—Dishes range from salads and sandwiches to full dinners, breakfast items served all day. 2299 Young. 654-3455. L, D, SB, X, $ INDIA PALACE—Tandoori chicken, lamb shish kabobs, chicken tikka masala are among the entrees; also, vegetarian options and a daily lunch buffet. 1720 Poplar. 278-1199. L, D, X, $-$$ INTERIM—Offers American-seasonal cuisine with emphasis on local foods and fresh fish; macaroni and cheese is a house specialty. Closed for lunch Sat. 5040 Sanderlin, Suite 105. 818-0821. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 187

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CIT Y DINING LIST

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CASUAL DINING

These establishments offer American cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere. While some serve ethnic entrees, the emphasis is on steaks, salads, sandwiches, pasta, fish and seafood. Also some soulfood and homestyle cooking. J. ALEXANDER’S—2670 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 381-9670. APPLEBEE’S—2114 Union Ave. 7257136; 2890 Bartlett Blvd. (Bartlett). 2135034; 710 DeSoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662-772-5914; 7515 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch, MS). 662-893-7555. AJAX DINER— 188 Courthouse Sq., Oxford, MS. 662-232-8880. BELLY ACRES—2102 Trimble Pl, 529-7017.. BLUE AND WHITE RESTAURANT—1355 US 61. Tunica, MS. 662-363-1371. BLUE PLATE CAFE—5469 Poplar. 761-9696; 113 S. Court. 523-2050. BLUE SHOE BAR & GRILL—Hotel Memphis, 2625 Thousand Oaks Blvd. 362-6200. BON TON CAFE—150 Monroe. 525-0883. CAJUN CATFISH COMPANY—1616 Sycamore View Rd. 383-8958; 336 New Byhalia Rd. Collierville. 861-0122 CHEDDAR’S—7684 Winchester. 624-8881; 2147 N. Germantown Pkwy. 380-1119. CHILI’S—7810 Poplar (Germantown). 756-5203; 4609 Poplar. 685-2257; 8100 Giacosa Pl. 372-3132; 287 W. Goodman

Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-7002; 237 Market Blvd. (Collierville). 853-7520; 1260 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 756-7771; 8526 Highway 51 (Millington). 872-0555. COLTON’S STEAKHOUSE—8030 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 383-8445; 8051 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-8904142. COMO STEAKHOUSE—203 Main St. Como, MS. 662-526-9529. THE COVE—2559 Broad Ave. 7300719. THE CUPBOARD—1400 Union. 276-8015. EVERGREEN GRILL—1545 Overton Park. 249-2393. T.G.I. FRIDAY’S—185 Union, Double Tree Hotel. 523-8500; 176 E. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-4223; 7733 Winchester Rd. 752-1369; 8325 Highway 64. 372-2539.. KEM’S RESTAURANT—2751 New Brunswick Rd., Holiday Inn & Suites. 2661952. LBOE—2021 Madison Ave. 725-0770. LOGAN’S ROADHOUSE—2710 N. Germantown Parkway. 381-5254; 5901 Poplar. 684-2272; 7755 Winchester Rd. 759-1430; 6685 Airways Blvd. (Southaven). 662-772-5015. MIDTOWN CROSSING GRILLE—394 N. Watkins. 443-0502. O’CHARLEY’S—6045 Stage Rd., #74. 373-5602 (Bartlett); 1040 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-6201; 357 W. Goodman Rd. 662-349-6663 (Southaven); 656 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-5811.

INTERSTATE BAR-B-Q—Specialties include chopped pork-shoulder sandwiches, ribs, hot wings, spaghetti, chicken, and turkey. 2 265 S. Third. 775-2304; 150 W. Stateline Rd. (Southaven). 662-393-5699. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ITTA BENA—Southern and Cajun-American cuisine served here; specialties are filet Oscar and shrimp and grits, along with steaks, chops, seafood, and pasta. 145 Beale St. 578-3031. D, MRA, X, $$-$$$
 JASMINE THAI AND VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT—Entrees include panang chicken, green curry shrimp,and pad thai (noodles, shrimp, and peanuts); also vegetarian dishes. Closed Mon.-Tues. 916 S. Cooper. 725-0223. L, D, X, $ JIM ’N NICK’S BAR-B-Q—Serves barbecued pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, and fish, along with other homemade Southern specialties. 2 359 N. Germantown Pkwy. 388-0998. L, D, X, $-$$ JIM’S PLACE/JIM’S PLACE GRILLE—Features American, Greek, and Continental cuisine with such entrees as pork tenderloin, several seafood specialties, and hand-cut charcoal-grilled steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 518 Perkins Extd. 766-2030; 3660 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-5000. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ JOE’S CRAB SHACK—Serves a variety of seafood, along with chicken, steak, and pasta. 7990 Horizon Center Blvd. 384-7478. L, D, X, $-$$$ JUST FOR LUNCH—Serves sandwiches, quiche, salads, fresh fish including fried oysters, daily specials, and homemade rolls. Closed Sunday. 3092 Poplar, Chickasaw Oaks Plaza. 3233287. L, D (Thurs. only), X, MRA, $-$$ KOOKY CANUCK— Offers prime rib, catfish, and burgers, including the 4-lb. “Kookamonga”; also late-night menu. 97 S. Second. 578-9800; 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. 1-8002453 L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ LA BAGUETTE—An almond croissant and chicken salad are among specialties at this French-style bistro. Closed for dinner Sun.  3088 Poplar. 458-0900. B, L, D (closes at 7), X, $ LA PLAYITA MEXICANA—Specializes in seafood and Mexican entrees, including red snapper, tilapia, oysters, chimichangas, tostados, and taco salad. 6194 Macon (Bartlett). 377-2282. L, D, X, $-$$

THE OLIVE GARDEN—7778 Winchester. 624-2003; 8405 Highway 64, Wolfchase Galleria (Cordova). 377-3437; 6615 Airways (Southaven). 662-536-3350; 5679 Poplar, #1. 761-5711. OSHI BURGER BAR—94 s. Main. 341-2091. OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE— 1110 N. Germantown Parkway. 751-9800; 2255 Union Ave. 7285100; 125 W. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-7488. MRA. RAFFERTY’S—4542 Poplar. 374-0096; 505 N. Germantown Pkwy. 755-4799. RUBY TUESDAY—1653 Sycamore View. 382-9280;7535 Winchester. 7556570. SIDECAR CAFE—2194 Whitten. 388-0285. SILVER CABOOSE—132 E. Mulberry (Collierville). 853-0010. SKIMO’S—1166 N. Houston Levee. 756-5055. MRA. SOUL FISH CAFE—862 S. Cooper. 725-0722; 3160 Village Shops Dr.(Germantown). 755-6988. 4720 Poplar. 590-0323. MRA. SPAGHETTI WAREHOUSE ITALIAN GRILL—40 W. Huling. 521-0907. TUGS—River Inn, 51 Harbor Town Square. 260-3344. MRA. VINEGAR JIM’S—12062 Forrest (Arlington). 867-7568. WOLF RIVER CAFE—460 Main St. (Rossville). 853-2586.

LA TAQUERIA GUADALUPANA—Fajitas and quesadillas are just a few of the authentic Mexican entrees offered here. 4 818 Summer. 685-6857. L, D, $ LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM—Popular in the 1970s for bringing name musical acts to Memphis (including Billy Joel), Lafayette’s reopens, serving such Southern cuisine as po boys and shrimp and grits, as well as wood-fired pizzas.  2119 Madison. 207-5097. L, D, X, $ LAS DELICIAS—Popular for its guacamole, house-made tortilla chips, and margaritas, this restaurant draws diners with its chicken enchiladas, meat-stuffed flautas, and Cuban torta with spicy pork. Closed Sunday. 4002 Park Ave. 458-9264; 5689 Quince. 800-2873. L, D, X, $ LAS TORTUGAS DELI MEXICANA—Authentic Mexican food prepared from local food sources; specializes in tortugas — grilled bread scooped out to hold such fillings as brisket, pork, and shrimp; also tingas tostados and such sides as steamed corn. Closed Sunday. 1215 S. Germantown Rd. 7511200. L, D, X, $-$$ LE CHARDONNAY—Offers pasta, wood-fired pizzas, steaks, and seafood. 2094 Madison. 725-1375. D, X, $-$$ LEONARD’S—Serves wet and dry ribs, barbecue sandwiches, spaghetti, and catfish; also a lunch and dinner buffet. 5465 Fox Plaza. 360-1963. L, D (Fri.-Sat.), X, MRA, $-$$ THE LITTLE TEA SHOP— Downtown institution serves up Southern comfort cooking, including meatloaf and such veggies as turnip greens, yams, okra and tomatoes. Closed Sat.Sun.  69 Monroe. 525-6000, L, X, $ LOCAL GASTROPUB—Eclectic entrees with a focus on locally grown products include lobster mac-and-cheese and double-cut pork loin. 95 S. Main. 473-9573; 2126 Madison. 725-1845. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LOS COMPADRES—Serves enchiladas, burritos, tamales, tacos, and vegetarian dishes; also Cuban entrees. 3295 Poplar. 458-5731. L, D, X, $-$$ LOST PIZZA—Offering pizzas (with dough made from scratch), pasta, salads, sandwiches, tamales, and more.  2855 Poplar. 572-1803; 5960 Getwell, Southaven. 662-892-8684. L, D, X, $-$$ LOTUS—Authentic Vietnamese-Asian fare, including lemongrass chicken and shrimp, egg rolls, Pho soup, and spicy Vietnamese vermicelli. 4970 Summer. 682-1151. D, X, $

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CIT Y DINING LIST COFFEEHOUSES/BOOKSTORE CAFES

In addition to gourmet coffees and drinks, these eateries generally serve pastries, sandwiches, soups, and salads, and some have a wider range of menu items. AVENUE COFFEE—786 Echles. 454-3348. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS— 2774 N. Germantown Pkwy. 386-2468; 4610 Merchants Park Cl. (Collierville). 853-3264. BELLA CAFFE—Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. 3206320 BLUFF CITY COFFEE—505 S. Main. 405-4399. THE BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD— 387 Perkins Extd. 683-9801. CARITAS VILLAGE COFFEE SHOP— 2509 Harvard. 327-5246. CENTER FOR SOUTHERN FOLKLORE— 123 S. Main at Peabody Trolley Stop. 525-3655.

LYNCHBURG LEGENDS—This restaurant with a Jack Daniels’ theme and Southern cuisine serves such entrees as Bourbon Street salmon, buttermilk-fried chicken, and grilled steak and wild mushroom salad. D  ouble Tree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin. 969-7777. B, L, D, X, $- $$$ THE MAJESTIC GRILLE—Housed in a former silentpicture house, features aged steaks, fresh seafood, and such specialties as roasted chicken and grilled pork tenderloin; offers a pre-theatre menu and classic cocktails. 1 45 S. Main. 522-8555. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MARCIANO MEDITERRANEAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE—Rack of lamb with roasted potatoes and demiglaze is among the entrees; also steaks, seafood, and gourmet pizza.  780 Brookhaven Cl. 682-1660. D, X, $-$$
 MARLOWE’S—In addition to its signature barbecue and ribs, Marlowe’s serves Southern-style steaks, chops, lasagne, and more.  4381 Elvis Presley Blvd. 332-4159. D, X, $-$$ MARMALADE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE— Southern homestyle entrees include catfish, honey-baked ham, steaks, and shrimp, all with a choice of three vegetables. Closed Sun. and Mon. 153 G.E. Patterson. 522-8800. D, X, $ MAUI BRICK OVEN— Serving an all-gluten-free menu with grain bowls, pizzas, and more. Among the specialties: the vegan Barefoot Bowl and the Paradise Pesto Pizza. 7850 Poplar. 505-2525. L, D, X, $-$$ MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE—Serves tandoori chicken, masala dosa, tikka masala, as well as lamb and shrimp entrees; also a daily lunch buffet, and dinner buffet on Fri.-Sat. 6524 Quince Rd. 753-8755. L, D, X, $-$$ MCEWEN’S ON MONROE—Southern/American cuisine with international flavors; specialties include steak and seafood, sweet potato-crusted catfish with macaroni and cheese, and more. Menus and hours vary at each location. 120 Monroe. 527-7085; 1110 Van Buren (Oxford). 662-234-7003. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ DAN MCGUINNESS PUB—Serves fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, burgers, and other Irish and American fare; also lunch and dinner specials. 4698 Spottswood. 761-3711; 3964 Goodman Rd. 662-890-7611. L, D, WB (Spottswood), X, $ MEDALLION—Offers steaks, seafood, chicken, and pasta entrees. Closed for dinner Sunday. 3700 Central, Holiday Inn (Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality). 678-1030. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MELLOW MUSHROOM—Large menu includes assortment of pizzas, salads, calzones, hoagies, vegetarian options, and 50 beers on tap. 9155 Poplar, Shops of Forest Hill (Germantown). 907-0243; 5138 Park Ave. 562-1211. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS BARBECUE COMPANY—Offers spare ribs, baby backs, and pulled pork and brisket, along with such sides as mac and cheese, grits, and red beans.  709 Desoto Cove, Horn Lake (MS). 662-536-3762. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS PIZZA CAFE—Homemade pizzas are specialties; also serves sandwiches, calzones, and salads. 2087 Madison. 726-5343; 5061 Park Ave. 684-1306; 7604 W. Farmington (Germantown). 753-2218; 797 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-7800; 5627 Getwell (Southaven). 662-5361364. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE—The focus here is on steaks, including prime fillet, rib eyes, and prime-aged New York strip; also, some seafood options. 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662890-2467; 88 Union. 527-5337; 3165 Forest Hill-Irene (Germantown). 249-5661. D, SB (Germantown), X, $$-$$$ MISTER B—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 6655 Poplar, #107. 7515262. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$

JAVA CABANA—2170 Young. 272-7210. MUDDY’S GRIND HOUSE—585 S. Cooper. 683-8844. OTHERLANDS—641 S. Cooper. 278-4994. MRA. QAHWA COFFEE BAR—Claridge House, 109 N. Main.800-2227. REPUBLIC COFFEE—2924 Walnut Grove. 590-1578. SQUARE BEANS ESPRESSO + GELATO— 103 N. Center St. (Collierville). 854-8855. STARBUCKS—1850 Union Ave. 729-4288; 3388 Poplar. 320-1021; 5201 Poplar. 818-9954; 2955 Kirby Whitten (Bartlett), 266-2497; 180 Goodman Rd. E. (Southaven). 662-349-0342; 8140 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-9507. For more listings, check online. TAMP & TAP—122 Gayoso. 207-1053 THE UGLY MUG— 4610 Poplar. 552-3165.

MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE—Specializes in tapas (small plates) featuring global cuisine. Closed Sun.-Tues. 679 Adams Ave. 524-1886. D, X, MRA, $ MOLLY’S LA CASITA—Homemade tamales, fish tacos, a vegetarian combo, and bacon-wrapped shrimp are a few of the specialties. 2006 Madison. 726-1873. L, D, X, MRA, $ MORTIMER’S—Contemporary American entrees include trout almondine, several chicken dishes, and hand-cut steaks; also sandwiches, salads, and daily/ nightly specials. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  590 N. Perkins. 761-9321. L, D, X, $-$$ MOSA ASIAN BISTRO—Specialties include sesame chicken, Thai calamari, rainbow panang curry with grouper fish, and other Pan Asian/fusion entrees.  850 S. White Station Rd. 683-8889. L, D, X, $ MULAN—Hunan Chicken, tofu dishes, and orange beef served here; some sushi, too. 2059 Houston Levee (Collierville). 850-5288; 2149 Young. 347-3965. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGASAKI INN—Chicken, steak, and lobster are among the main courses; meal is cooked at your table. 3951 Summer. 4540320. D, X, $$ NAGOYA—Offers traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi bar; specialties are teriyaki and tempura dishes. 7075 Malco Blvd., Suite 101 (Southaven). 662-349-8788. L, D, X, $-$$$
 NAM KING—Offers luncheon and dinner buffets, dim sum, and such specialties as fried dumplings, pepper steak, and orange chicken.  4594 Yale. 373-4411. L, D, X, $
 NAPA CAFE—Among the specialties are scallops with oxtail dumplings; focus on organic meat and seafood. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 122. 683-0441. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ NEW ASIA—Specializing in authentic Chinese food, including roast Peking duck. 2075 Exeter, Suite 90. 758-8388. L, D, X, $ NEW HUNAN—Chinese eatery with more than 80 entrees;also lunch/dinner buffets. 5052 Park. 766-1622. L, D, X, $ THE OFFICE@UPTOWN— Offering sandwiches, wraps, pizza, soups, salads, and several vegetarian options. Closed Sunday. 594 N. Second St. 522-1905. B, L, D, X, $ OLD VENICE PIZZA CO.— Specializes in “eclectic Italian,” from pastas, including the “Godfather,” to hand-tossed pizzas, including the “John Wayne”; choose from 60 toppings. 368 Perkins Ext. 767-6872. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ ON THE BORDER—Dishes out such Tex-Mex specialties as fajitas and Southwest chicken tacos; also fresh grilled seafood specials. 8101 Giacosa Pl. (Cordova).881-0808 ; 4552 Poplar. 763-0569; 6572 Airways (Southaven). 662-655-4750. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $ ONE & ONLY BBQ—On the menu are pork barbecue sandwiches, platters, wet and dry ribs, smoked chicken and turkey platters, a smoked meat salad, barbecue quesadillas, and more.   1779 Kirby Pkwy. 751-3615; 567 Perkins Extd. 2494227. L, D, X, $ ONIX RESTAURANT—Serves American seafood and pasta dishes. Closed for lunch Sat., all day Sun., and for dinner Mon. 412 S. Main. 552-4609. L, D, X, $-$$ ORR RESTAURANT—Serves Mediterranean/African cuisine, such as lamb Kowzi flavored with raisins and roasted nuts and served with white bean soup. 661 N. Mendenhall, Suite 101. 275-8692. L, D, X, $-$$ OSAKA JAPANESE CUISINE— Featuring an extensive sushi menu as well as traditional Japanese and hibachi dining. Hours vary for lunch; call.  3670 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-4309; 3402 Poplar. 249-4690; 7164 Hacks Cross. 662-

890-9312; 2200 N. Germantown Pkwy. 425-4901. L, D, X, $-$$$   OWEN BRENNAN’S—New Orleans-style menu of beef, chicken, pasta, and seafood; jambalaya, shrimp and grits, and crawfish etouffee are specialties. Closed for dinner Sunday. The Regalia, 6150 Poplar. 761-0990. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PANCHO’S—Serves up a variety of Mexican standards, including tacos, enchiladas, and mix-and-match platters; also lunch specials. 3600 E. Broadway (West Memphis). 870-7356466. 717 N. White Station. 685-5404. L, D, X, MRA, $ PANDA GARDEN—Sesame chicken and broccoli beef are among the Mandarin and Cantonese entrees; also seafood specials and fried rice. Closed for lunch Saturday. 3735 Summer. 3234819. L, D, X, $-$$ PASTA ITALIA—Northern Italian cuisine features homemade stuffed pastas; a specialty is rosetta al forno; also serves fish and steaks. Closed Sun.-Mon.  8130 Macon Station Dr., Suite 106. 751-0009. D, X, $$$-$$$$ PAULETTE’S—Presents fine dining with a Continental flair, including such entrees as filet Paulette with butter-pepper cream sauce and the famous K-pie; also changing daily specials. River Inn. 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3300. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEARL’S OYSTER HOUSE—Downtown eatery serving seafood, including oysters, crawfish, and stuffed butterfly shrimp, as well as beef, chicken, and pasta dishes. 299 S. Main. 5229070. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEI WEI ASIAN DINER—Serves a variety of Pan-Asian cuisine, including Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Thai. Noodle and rice bowls are specialties; a small plates menu also offered. 1680 Union Ave., #109. 722-3780; 2257 N. Germantown Pkwy. 382-1822. L, D, X, $-$$
 PETE & SAM’S—Serving Memphis for 60-plus years; offers steaks, seafood, and traditional Italian dishes, including homemade ravioli, lasagna, and chicken marsala. 3886 Park. 458-0694. D, X, $-$$$ PETRA CAFÉ—Serves Greek, Italian, and Middle Eastern sandwiches, gyros, and entrees. Hours vary; call. 6641 Poplar Ave. (Germantown). 754-4440; 9155 Poplar (Germantown). 755-5440; 1560 Union. 505-2812. L, D, X, $-$$ PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Specialties are orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef, and chicken in lettuce wraps; also vegetarian dishes, including spicy eggplant. 1181 Ridgeway Rd., Park Place Centre. 818-3889. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ PHO BINH—Vietnamese, vegetarian, and Cantonese specialties include lemon tofu and spring rolls. Closed Sunday. 1615 Madison. 276-0006. L, D, $ PHO SAIGON—Vietnamese fare includes beef teriyaki, roasted quail, curry ginger chicken, vegetarian options, and a variety of soups. 2 946 Poplar. 458-1644. L, D, $ PIG-N-WHISTLE—Offers pork shoulder sandwiches, wet and dry ribs, catfish, nachos, and stuffed barbecue potatoes.  6084 Kerr-Rosemark Rd. 872-2455. L, D, X, $ PORCELLINO’S CRAFT BUTCHER—Small plates, charcuterie selections, house-made pastries, and innovative teas and coffees are offered at this combination butcher shop and restaurant featuring locally sourced menu items.  1711 W. Brookhaven Cl. 762-6656. B, L, X $-$$ PRESENTATION ROOM, THE—American bistro run by the students of L’Ecole Culinaire. Menu changes regularly; specialties may include such items as a filet with truffle mushroom ragu. Closed Fri.-Sun. 1245 N. Germantown Pkwy (Cordova). 754-7115. L, D, X, $-$$ PYRO’S FIRE-FRESH PIZZA—Serving gourmet pizzas cooked in an open-fire oven; wide choice of toppings; large local and craft beer selection. 1 199 Ridgeway. 379-8294; 2035 Union Ave. 208-8857; 2286 N. Germantown Pkwy. 207-1198. B, L, D, X, $ RAVINE—Serves contemporary Southern cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, locally grown foods and a menu that changes weekly. Closed Mon.-Tues. 53 Pea Ridge/County Rd. 321 (Oxford, MS). 662-234-4555. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ RED KOI—Classic Japanese cuisine offered at this family-run restaurant; hibachi steaks, sushi, seafood, chicken, and vegetables.  5847 Poplar. 767-3456. L, D, X $-$$ RED LOBSTER—Specializes in crab legs, lobster, and shrimp dishes; also pastas, salads, steaks, and chicken. 8161 Highway 64 (Cordova). 387-0056; 6535 Airways (Southaven). 662536-1960; 7750 Winchester. 759-9045. L, D, X, $-$$ RENDEZVOUS—Menu items include barbecued ribs, cheese plates, skillet shrimp, red beans and rice, and Greek salads. Closed Sun.-Mon.  52 S. Second. 523-2746. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, X, MRA, $-$$ RESTAURANT IRIS— French Creole cuisine includes shrimp and delta-grind grits, and New York strip stuffed with fried A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 189

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CIT Y DINING LIST F A S T- C A S U A L

Fresh cuisine prepared while you wait and served in an upscale setting. Not your typical fast-food restaurants, most serve beer, wine, and liquor.

COOK. CREATE. CELEBRATE. 2015 Culinary Weekends hosted by The Alluvian and The Viking Cooking School

ROB MCDANIEL

General Manager and Executive Chef of SpringHouse Restaurant (Alexander City, AL) April 24-26

RYAN PREWITT

Chef and Partner of Pêche Seafood Grill (New Orleans, LA) June 5-7

JOSH PERKINS

Chef and Partner of Flight Restaurant and Wine Bar (Memphis, TN) August 28-30

One and two night packages available, starting at $650 double occupancy. For more information, please call 662.451.1180 to book your weekend culinary getaway.

325C Howard Street • Greenwood, Mississippi • vikingcookingschool.com

Happily Ever After Begins at Acre Celebrating weddings and receptions Where cuisine, ambience & service are second to none.

901 818-ACRE 690 S Perkins Rd. Memphis, TN acrememphis.com

BONEHEADS—555 Perkins Extd. 746-8867. CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL—5865 Poplar, Ridgeway Trace. 416-1944. CREPE MAKER—4630 Merchants Park Cir., #731 (Collierville). 861-1981. GENGHIS GRILL—2362 N. Germantown Parkway. 584-0412; 7706 Winchester. 522-5048; 5849 Poplar, #117, Ridgeway Trace. 308-4040. HUMDINGERS—6300 Poplar. 260-8292; 1134 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 271-2912. MOE’S SOUTHWEST GRILL— 465 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 737-5058. 6300 Poplar Ave., #108. 685-5685; 3660 S. Houston Levee (Collierville). 457-7227. SWANKY’S TACO SHOP—6641 Poplar (Germantown). 737-2088. 4770 Poplar. 730-0763. MRA. TAZIKI’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE— 540 S. Mendenhall. 290-1091.

T UNICA TA BLES CHICAGO STEAKHOUSE AT THE GOLDSTRIKE—1010 Casino Center Dr., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-24KSTAY /662-357-1225. DON B’S STEAKHOUSE AT THE FITZ —711 Lucky Ln., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-766-LUCK, ext 6501. FAIRBANKS AT THE HOLLYWOOD—1150 Casino Strip Blvd., Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-871-0711 JACK BINION’S STEAK HOUSE AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. oysters and blue cheese. Closed Sun. 2146 Monroe. 590-2828. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ RIVER OAKS—A French-style bistro serving seafood and steaks, with an emphasis on fresh local ingredients. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5871 Poplar Ave. 683-9305. L, D, X, $$-$$$ RIVERFRONT BAR & GRILL—Beale Street Landing eatery serves Southern American specialties, including Tom Lee Catfish, and Tennessee Caviar, a fresh veggie salsa of black-eyed peas and cilantro with pimento cheese and toast points. Closed Monday.  251 Riverside Dr. 524-0817. L, X, $ RIZZO’S DINER—Chorizo meatloaf, lobster pronto puff, and brisket are menu items at this upscale diner, Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon.  492 S. Main. 304-6985. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ ROBATA RAMEN & YAKITORI BAR— Serves ramen noodle bowls and Yakitori skewers as well as rice and noodle dishes.  2116 Madison. 410-8290. D, WB, X, $-$$ ROCK’N DOUGH PIZZA CO.—Specialty and custom pizzas made from fresh ingredients; wide variety of toppings. 1243 Ridgeway. 435-6238. L, D, X, $$ ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL—Serves Mediterranean-Italian cuisine, including hand-crafted pasta Milano and penne rustica, and create-your-own pasta; also steaks, seafood, and salads. 2859 N. Germantown Pk wy. (Cordova). 266-4565. L, D, X, $-$$ ROYAL PANDA—Hunan fish, Peking duck, Royal Panda chicken and shrimp, and a seafood combo are among the specialties.  3120 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 756-9697. L, D, X, $-$$ RUSSO’S NEW YORK PIZZERIA AND WINE BAR—Serves gourmet pizzas, calzones, and pasta, including lasagna, fettucine Alfredo, scampi, and more. 9087 Poplar, Suite 111. 755-0092. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE—Offers prime steaks cut and aged in-house, as well as lamb, chicken, and fresh seafood, including lobster. 6120 Poplar. 761-0055. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ SAIGON LE—Vietnamese/Chinese specialties include calamari with ginger, and pork chops with mushrooms; vegetarian options too. Closed Sunday. 51 N. Cleveland. 276-5326. L, D, X, $-$$ SAKURA—Sushi, tempura, and teriyaki are Japanese specialties here. 2060 West St. (Germantown). 758-8181. 4840 Poplar. 572-1002. L, D, X, $-$$ SALSA—Mexican-Southern California specialties include carnitas, enchiladas verde, and fajitas; also Southwestern seafood

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CIT Y DINING LIST DELI DISH

Serving sandwiches and salads, burgers and bagels, wings and chicken, these are popular spots. BOGIE’S—715 S. Mendenhall. 761-5846. MRA; 2098 LaSalle Place. 272-0022. MRA; 80 Monroe. 525-6764; 2028 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-8555. CHEFFIE’S — 483 High Point Terrace. 343-0488. CITY EAST BAGEL & GRILLE—6698 Poplar at Kirby. 754-2660. CITY MARKET— 66 S. Main. 729-6152. CORDELIA’S TABLE—737 Harbor Bend Rd. 526-4772. ELWOOD’S SHACK— 4523 Summer. 761-9898. FINO’S FROM THE HILL—1853 Madison. 272-3466. MRA. HOLIDAY HAM—2087 Union. 881-6433; 585 Erin Dr. 7634499; 7652 Poplar (Germantown). 869-6650; 3750 Hacks Cross Rd. 624-4848 JASON’S DELI—1213 Ridgeway. 685-3333; 1585 Chickering (Cordova). 844-1840; 3473 Poplar. 324-3181. KWIK CHEK—2013 Madison. 274-9293. LENNY’S SUB SHOP—2893 Poplar. 320-0022; 7424 Stage Rd. 937-0800; 22 N. Front. 543-9230; 521 S. Highland. 454-7077; 2095 Exeter, Suite 30 (Germantown). 755-0750; 4970 Raleigh-LaGrange. 371-9979; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-8299; 4726 Spottswood. 202-4800; 4740 Showcase. 3684215; 8950 Hwy. 64 (Lakeland). 12 S. Cooper. 6300 Poplar, #111. 761-2403. MRA. LETTUCE EAT SALAD COMPANY—6641 Poplar, Suite 106. (Germantown), 552-5604. LUNCHBOX EATS—288 S. Fourth. 526-0820. LUCCHESI’S RAVIOLI—540 S. Mendenhall. 766-9922. MCALISTER’S DELI—3482 Plaza Ave. 452-6009; 7990 Trinity Rd. (Cordova). 737-7282; 7710 Poplar (Germantown). 753-1507; 975 580 S. Mendenhall. 763-2711; 3855 Hacks Cross. 881-6068; 6600 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 213-3311. 9091 Poplar (Germantown) 756-5292. PANERA BREAD—714 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-5813; 4530 Poplar. 767-3116; 5865 Poplar, Ridgeway Trace. 683-9384; 7850 Poplar. 759-1439; 7501 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-1985. PARADISE CAFE—6150 Poplar, Suite 120. 821-9600. JACK PIRTLE’S FRIED CHICKEN—3571 Lamar. 7941254; 2520 Mt. Moriah. 565-0203 SCHLOTZSKY’S DELI—4758 Poplar. 763-0741. UNCLE LOU’S FRIED CHICKEN—3633 Millbranch. 332-2367. WHOLE FOODS MARKET— 5014 Poplar. 685-2293. YOUNG AVENUE DELI—2119 Young. 278-0034. dishes such as snapper verde. Closed Sun. Regalia Shopping Center, 6150 Poplar, Suite 129. 683-6325. L, D, X, $-$$ SCHWEINEHAUS— Serving Bavarian-influenced fare with a Southern twist; includes wurst platters, pork schnitzel, sauerbraten, and more; also a wide variety of beers. 2110 Madison. 347-3060. L, D, X, $-$$ SEASONS 52—This elegant fresh grill and wine bar offers a seasonally changing menu using fresh ingredients, wood-fire grilling, and brick-oven cooking; also a large international wine list and nightly piano bar. C rescent Center, 6085 Poplar. 6829952. L, D, X, $$-$$$ THE SECOND LINE—Kelly English brings “relaxed Creole cuisine” to his new eatery; serves a variety of po-boys and such specialties as barbecue shrimp, and andouille, shrimp, and pimento cheese fries.  2144 Monroe. 590-2829. L (Sat.-Sun. only), D, WB, X, $-$$ SEKISUI—Japanese fusion cuisine, fresh sushi bar, grilled meats and seafood, California rolls, and vegetarian entrees. Poplar/Perkins location’s emphasis is on Pacific Rim cuisine. Menu and hours vary at each location. 2 5 Belvedere. 725-0005;1884 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 309-8800; 4724 Poplar (between Perkins & Colonial). 767-7770; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-0622; 1255 Goodman Rd. (Horn Lake). 662-536-4404; 2990 Kirby-Whitten (Bartlett). 377-2727; 6696 Poplar. 747-0001. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT—Entrees include tempura, teriyaki, and sushi, as well as grilled fish and chicken entrees. 2 324 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 384-4122. L, D, X, $-$$ SIDE PORCH STEAK HOUSE—In addition to steak, the menu includes chicken, pork chops, and fish entrees; homemade rolls are a specialty. Closed Sun.-Mon. 5689 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 377-2484. D, X, $-$$

SKEWER—Japanese yaikitori cuisine features bite-sized meat and vegetables served with dipping sauce, along with sushi, ramen, and donburi — rice bowls topped with a variety of foods. Closed Monday. 5101 Sanderlin, #105. 682-9919. L, D, X, $-$$$ SPINDINI—Italian fusion cuisine with such entrees as woodfired pizzas, gorgonzola stuffed filet, and fresh seafood; pizza specials on Mon.; large domestic whiskey selection.  383 S. Main. 578-2767. D, X, $$-$$$ STIX—Hibachi steakhouse with Asian cuisine features steak, chicken, and a fillet and lobster combination, also sushi. A specialty is Dynamite Chicken with fried rice.  4680 Merchants Park Circle, Avenue Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 8543399. L, D, X, $-$$ STONE SOUP CAFE— Cooper-Young eatery serving soups, salads, quiche, pizza, and daily specials such as Italian roast beef. Closed Monday. 993 S. Cooper. 922-5314. B, L, SB, X, $ STRANO SICILIAN KITCHEN & BAR—Presenting a Sicilian/Mediterranean mix of Arab, Spanish, Greek, and North African fare, Strano serves small plates, hand-tossed pizzas, wood-grilled fish, and other specialties. Closed Mon.  948 S. Cooper. 275-8986. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ SWEET GRASS—Low-country coastal cuisine includes such specialties as shrimp and grits. Closed Mon. The restaurant’s “sister,” Sweet Grass Next Door, open nightly, serves lunch Sat.Sun.  937 S. Cooper. 278-0278. D, SB, X, $-$$$ TANNOOR GRILL—Brazilian-style steakhouse with skewers served tableside, along with Middle Eastern specialties; vegetarian options also available.  830 N. Germantown Pkwy. 443-5222. L, D, X, $-$$$ TART—Combination patisserie, coffeehouse, and restaurant serving rustic French specialties, including baked eggs in brioche, topped with Gruyere, and french breads and pastries.  820 S. Cooper. 725-0091. B, L, WB, X, $ TERRACE—Creative American and Continental cuisine includes such entrees as filet mignon, beef or lamb sliders, five-spice salmon, and grilled vegetarian eggplant; also small plates. Rooftop, River Inn of Harbor Town, 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3366. D, X, $-$$ TEXAS DE BRAZIL—Serves beef, pork, lamb, and chicken dishes, and Brazilian sausage; also a 60-item gourmet salad area.  150 Peabody Place, Suite 103. 526-7600. L (Wed.-Fri.), D, SB, X, $$-$$$ THREE ANGELS ON BROAD—Global cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, local ingredients; menu includes sandwiches burgers, pastas, seafood, and steaks. Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon.  2617 Broad Ave. 452-1111. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ THREE LITTLE PIGS—Pork-shoulder-style barbecue with tangy mild or hot sauce, freshly made cole slaw, and baked beans.  5145 Quince Rd. 685-7094. B, L, D, X, $ TOPS BAR B-Q—Specializes in pork barbecue sandwiches and sandwich plates with beans and slaw; also serves ribs, beef brisket, and burgers.  1286 Union. 725-7527. 4183 Summer. 324-4325; 5391 Winchester. 794-7936; 3970 Rhodes. 3239865; 6130 Macon. 371-0580. For more locations, go online. L, D, X, $ TROLLEY STOP MARKET—Serves plate lunches/dinners as well as pizzas, salads, and vegan/vegetarian entrees; a specialty is the locally raised beef burger. Also sells fresh produce and goods from local farmers. Saturday brunch; closed Sunday.   704  Madison. 526-1361. L, D, X, $ TSUNAMI—Features Pacific Rim cuisine (Asia, Australia, South Pacific, etc.); also a changing “small plate” menu. Specialties include Asian nachos and roasted sea bass. Closed Sunday.  928 S. Cooper. 274-2556. D, X, $$-$$$ TWILIGHT SKY TERRACE—Offers small plates of tostados, nachos, flatbreads, paninis; also hand-crafted cocktails and sweeping rooftop views of the downtown Memphis skyline. Open, weather permitting.  The Madison Hotel, 79 Madison. 333-1224. L (Sat.-Sun.), D, WB.X, $ TYCOON—Among the Asian entrees are spicy garlic shrimp, Thai gumbo, and special house noodle soup. 3307 Kirby Parkway. 362-8788. B, L, D, X, $ WANG’S MANDARIN HOUSE—Offers Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, and spicy Hunan entrees, including the golden-sesame chicken; next door is East Tapas, serving small plates with an Asian twist.  6065 Park Ave, Park Place Mall. 763-0676. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM—Chicken-salad plate, beef tenderloin, soups-and-sandwiches, and vegetable plates are specialties; meal includes drink and dessert. Closed Sat.-Sun. 88 Racine. 327-5681. L, X, MRA, $ ZAYTOON—Serves such Mediterranean cuisine as shish kebabs, falafel, hummus, and gyros. 694 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-6366. L, D, X, $       

concert

Les Musiciennes sunday, april 26, 2015, 3:00 p.m. at 1560 Central Avenue Memphis 38104 The Excelsa Quartet, prize-winning ensemble from the University of Maryland — violinists Laura Colgate and Audrey Wright; violist Valentina Shohdy, and cellist Kacy Clopton, performing quartets by Haydn, Thomas Adès, and Smetana.

for ticket info, call:

901.758.0150

Ask for Lucy

Hadskey!

958 Reddoch Cove • Memphis, TN 38119 901.405.1296 Styling and UpDo’s Hair Extensions Keratin Complex Color/Color Correction Bridal Parties A P R I L 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 191

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LAST STAND

Time in a Bottle Tomorrow’s past today.

by eileen townsend

I

once knew a man who was from a different dimension. Or, at least, that was how he put it: “We are so dimensionally separated,” he told me. “It is like we are from a whole different dimension.” My friend didn’t mean that in the science-fictional sense, though we’d spent the afternoon discussing everything from space-age architecture to hydraulic elevators. What Ephraim Horowitz meant was that he was 95 years old, almost 70 years my senior. He would try to make himself understood to me, but it was probably a lost cause — our experiences were irreconcilably separated by time.

I’d met Ephraim through a half-realized oral history project that I undertook in my senior year of college in New York City. I was researching the New York World’s Fairs, massive international events that took place in 1939 and 1964 in Queens. I’d gotten hooked on the lore of the Fairs the summer before, when I’d visited Flushing Meadows to see the funky mid-century monuments originally built for the expositions. I’ve always loved anything that recalls the “future of the past” and Flushing Meadows is rife with this kind of visionary junk: geodesic domes built by Buckminster Fuller, weird heliopad towers, and a building called “The New York Hall of Science” made of concrete bent into wavy cylinders, like a giant, unraveling paper-towel roll. More specifically, my goal was to interview amateur archivists and collectors of World’s Fair memorabilia. By the time I met Eph, I’d spent months rooting through the basements of (mostly) older bachelors in the outer boroughs of the city, asking questions like, “How do you think the year 1964 changed America?” or “Where did you get this ashtray?” These folks, like me, thought the dilapidated mid-century artifacts were neat and should be preserved. Over the months, this small community of World’s Fair enthusiasts introduced me to the

strange and colorful history of the most optimistic moments of the American twentieth century, the Fairs. They asked for nothing in return, save my interest. They also introduced me to Ephraim. Ephraim was an amateur archivist of the best sort — a doit-yourself filmmaker who’d hauled heavy cameras to both the 1939 and 1964 World’s Fairs. His full-color home movies, shot in Kodachrome, were some of the first of their kind. He also made short narrative features: wry takedowns of daily life in New York, full of lovingly descriptive shots of his Queens neighborhood. You can watch one of Horowitz’s narrative films online. The Deceptive Nines is available on the website of The American Motion Picture Society. It opens with a shot of Eph in his basement, reading obituaries in The New York Times, and explaining, in voiceover, that most of his generation is already dead. When I interviewed him on a sunny October afternoon in 2012, Eph was in a genial-yet-ornery mood. We sat in his basement

and he talked over the old reels of World’s Fair footage: “Dead, dead, dead,” he said, pointing to people on the screen, laughing and scowling at once. “My movies are like a parade of the dead.” We put on footage from the 1964 Fair and watched as beehived women and carefully dressed men, their faces fuzzy, walked in and out of each frame, stopping to pose in front of the Fair’s futuristic monuments. In one scene, two young women pause at a bench, take their shoes off, and rub their feet. Horowitz told me, “That’s my wife and her sister. I had them sit on a bench

and take off their shoes and moan about how much their feet hurt because there was so much walking at the Fair. Bill Moyers heard about this stuff and he paid me 200 bucks to use some of this footage in a movie called A Walk Through the 20th Century.”

The 1939 Fair was what first sparked Eph’s interest in film: “I spent the entire final day of the Fair shooting. I saved the 100 feet of high-speed film, because they were having a fireworks display on the last night.” There were thousands upon thousands of people in attendance. “You had to get yourself a good place to observe this thing.” Ephraim passed away a few months after I met him. I finished my paper for class and kept up halting contact with the World’s Fair community until the next year, when I moved back to Tennessee and lost touch. I happened upon the printed-out transcripts of my World’s Fair interviews last month while I was packing to move into a new house. I thought about throwing them away. After all, what will I ever do with a 15-page description of the 1939 World’s Fair, as told by a man I barely knew? I’m not sure what my responsibility was. Ephraim and I were dimensionally separated; our lives barely touched. But I have part of his story, roughly 10,000 words of it. I didn’t throw the pages away. I went online and watched The Deceptive Nines. Then I thought: Maybe I could write about it, and a few people would read it, and they might go look up Ephraim’s movies. I could share this story across dimensions, just as he had shared his once-futuristic tale with me.   Eileen Townsend is the arts editor of the Memphis Flyer, and a contributing editor for Memphis magazine.

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24/7 Excitement Pearl River Resort is the Southâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier gaming and entertainment destinationâ&#x20AC;¦a place where \RX·OOÃ&#x20AC;QGIXQLQHYHU\FRUQHUDQGIULHQGO\VHUYLFHWRPDNH\RXIHHOZHOFRPH3HDUO5LYHU5HVRUW LVORFDWHGLQ&KRFWDZ0LVVLVVLSSLMXVWQRUWKRI -DFNVRQ06DQGLVRZQHGDQGRSHUDWHGE\WKH 0LVVLVVLSSL%DQGRI &KRFWDZ,QGLDQV

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Follow Us! Pearl River Resort â&#x20AC;¢ Choctaw, MS near Philadelphia â&#x20AC;¢ 1.866.44PEARL(1.866.447.3275) â&#x20AC;¢ www.pearlriverresort.com A development of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians


Profile for Contemporary Media

Memphis Magazine April 2015  

In this issue: Faces of the Mid-South 2015, Jamie Harmon, The Mummy Mystery, the birth of Broad Avenue, and a whole lot more!

Memphis Magazine April 2015  

In this issue: Faces of the Mid-South 2015, Jamie Harmon, The Mummy Mystery, the birth of Broad Avenue, and a whole lot more!