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CARRIE BEASLEY Senior Art Director CHRISTOPHER MYERS Advertising Art Director JEREMIAH MATTHEWS BRYAN ROLLINS Graphic Designers JUSTIN RUSHING Advertising Director CARRIE O’GUIN Advertising Operations Manager JERRY D. SWIFT Advertising Director Emeritus KELLI DEWITT, CHIP GOOGE Senior Account Executives ROXY MATTHEWS Sales Assistant DESHAUNE MCGHEE Classified Advertising Manager BRENDA FORD Classified Sales Administrator classifieds@memphisflyer.com LEILA ZETCHI Distribution Manager ROBBIE FRENCH Warehouse and Delivery Manager JANICE GRISSOM ELLISON, ZACH JOHNSON, KAREN MILAM, RANDY ROTZ, LEWIS TAYLOR, WILLIAM WIDEMAN Distribution THE MEMPHIS FLYER is published weekly by Contemporary Media, Inc., 65 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: (901) 521-9000 Fax: (901) 521-0129 www.memphisflyer.com CONTEMPORARY MEDIA, INC. KENNETH NEILL Publisher ASHLEY HAEGER Controller JEFFREY GOLDBERG Director of Business Development BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editorial Director KEVIN LIPE Digital Director ANNA TRAVERSE Director of Strategic Initiatives LEILA ZETCHI Distribution Manager MOLLY WILLMOTT Special Events Director JOSEPH CAREY IT Director MATTHEW PRESTON Social Media Manager CELESTE DIXON Accounting Assistant BRITT ERVIN Email Marketing Manager KALENA MCKINNEY Receptionist

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It was quite a week in Nashville. The biggest news out of the capital city was the horrific mass shooting that took place in a local Waffle House and resulted in the tragic deaths of four young people: Taurean C. Sanderlin, 29; Joe R. Perez, 20; DeEbony Groves, 21; and Akilah Dasilva, 23. All four were people of color; most of them were in college. The shooter, whose name will not be mentioned here, was a fan of white supremacist “philosophy” and right-wing politics and did the killing with — what else? — an AR-15 assault rifle. Same story, new town. God bless America. God shed his grace on thee. The most compelling part of this terrible incident was the bravery displayed by James Shaw Jr., the young man who jumped the assailant while he was reloading and wrestled his weapon away from him. In this case, a good man who was unarmed stopped a bad man with a gun. President Trump and the NRA quickly issued statements praising Shaw and his courageous actions. No, they didn’t. Trump didn’t mention the incident, probably because it involved black victims, a black hero, and didn’t fit a narrative that appeals to his base. Or maybe he was distracted by his legal troubles or maybe because it wasn’t on Fox and Friends. Hard to tell. The NRA’s response was the usual: If others in the Waffle House had had guns, they could have stopped the shooter, because the more guns we have, the safer we all are. They failed to acknowledge the fact that if the shooter had had a larger magazine, which the NRA favors, he wouldn’t have had to reload and could have kept killing until he felt like stopping. Meanwhile, the Tennessee legislature was wrapping up its annual session this week. It was the usual GOP ideological shenanigans, leavened with a couple of sensible moves. They passed a motion to build a monument to “unborn children” on the state capitol grounds. This, of course, in the wake of last week’s measure to strip $250,000 from funds that were to be allocated to Memphis for its bicentennial celebration. It was a vindictive move, meant to punish the city for removing two Confederate statues from city parks, because small government means the state controls everything. Especially statues. On the plus side, the legislature voted to honor Shaw for his brave actions at the Waffle House with a resolution filled with the usual “whereas” clauses. It was a nice gesture, even if it was boiler-plate. The legislators avoided actually doing anything meaningful by refusing to allow out of committee a proposed bill to close the loophole exploited by the Waffle House murderer’s father in giving his son weapons back that had been confiscated from him in another state. The legislators also passed a motion that will allow Tennesseeans to vote in 2020 to remove slavery as a possible punishment for criminal activity. Yes, you read that right: Using slavery as a punishment is still legal in Tennessee. Not likely, admittedly, but legal. Speaking of slavery and the Confederacy, I hope everyone read Jackson Baker’s report on the Flyer website about the debate last weekend between the GOP N E WS & O P I N I O N candidates for the office of Shelby CounTHE FLY-BY - 4 ty mayor. All three candidates expressed NY TIMES CROSSWORD - 5 support for the state legislature’s move to POLITICS - 7 strip $250,000 from the city of Memphis EDITORIAL - 8 for taking down its confederate statues. VIEWPOINT - 9 That’s right. They liked the idea of the COVER - “COIN FLIP” state controlling statues in MemphisBY CHRIS DAVIS - 10 owned parks. And they all want to WE RECOMMEND - 14 be your county mayor, so you should MUSIC - 16 AFTER DARK - 18 remember their names: Terry Roland, CALENDAR - 20 Joy Touliatos, and David Lenoir. BOOKS - 29 And you should remember whose FOOD NEWS - 30 side they’re really on when you enter SPIRITS - 33 the voting booth. I mean, as long we’re FILM - 34 naming names. C L AS S I F I E D S - 36 Bruce VanWyngarden LAST WORD - 39 brucev@memphisflyer.com

CONTENTS

BRUCE VANWYNGARDEN Editor SUSAN ELLIS Managing Editor JACKSON BAKER, MICHAEL FINGER Senior Editors TOBY SELLS Associate Editor CHRIS MCCOY Film and TV Editor ALEX GREENE Music Editor CHRIS DAVIS, MICHAEL DONAHUE MAYA SMITH, JOSHUA CANNON Staff Writers JESSE DAVIS Copy Editor JULIE RAY Calendar Editor

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

OUR 1522ND ISSUE 04.26.18 The weeds keep multiplying in our garden, which is our mind ruled by fear. Rip them out and call them by name. — Sylvia Browne

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THE

f

fly-by

ly on the wall

H8R S It’s not hard to troll the mighty-white Tennessee legislature. It can’t quite bring itself to denounce white supremacy but can always rise to the occasion of punishing a majority AfricanAmerican city for removing the public statue of a slave trader, Grand Wizard, and Confederate general. How can it still be so richly satisfying? Hats off to the author of this Wikipedia edit for Tennessee’s legislature stating, “We got tricked by a city we hate and now we’re mad.” While Wikipedia has removed your fine work, let it always be remembered.

April 26-May 2, 2018

DAM M IT, GAN N ETT An article last week announced the sale of The Commercial Appeal’s Beale Street parking lot and plans to move business operations to a new location. But it also described Memphis’ traditional newspaper of record as something other than a newspaper. According to the article, The Commercial Appeal is “an online news organization that continues to publish a daily, morning newspaper.”

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Questions, Answers + Attitude Edited by Toby Sells

W E E K T H AT W A S By Flyer staff

A Fund-raiser, Liquor, & Trolleys Memphians rally against state lawmakers, Sunday sales to begin, and trolleys come back. G O F U N D TH I S Ideas popped up last week on how to replenish $250,000 taken away from the city’s bicentennial celebration by state lawmakers who punished Memphis for removing Confederate statues. A handful of GoFundMe pages were launched to raise money for the city. As of press time, one page, launched by Brittney Block, had raised about $68,500. Block met with the mayor last week to discuss how the money should be spent. Block’s effort drew the ire of many, who called the campaign “fundamentally flawed” and said that if you donated money to it, “the joke is on you.” STU D E NTS WALK O UT Hundreds of students at about 20 high schools here took a stand against gun violence and other ills in schools last week by participating in a citywide walkout. Some marched, some toted posters with messages against violence, and some held moments of silence. Via social media, using the hashtag #YouthSolutions901, students made suggestions of ways to increase school safety, and the strongest recommendations from students were presented at the school board meeting this week.

TV TYPOS WREG reported that “High Schools Ran By Willie Herenton Will Close June 30th.” Here’s hoping the cutline wasn’t written by a student.

“C R U E L” SYSTE M The U.S. immigration system is “cruel,” according to Manuel Duran, the Hispanic journalist from Memphis now detained at a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement center. A statement from Duran was read at a news conference last week announcing that the Southern Poverty Law Center was working for Duran’s release.

By Chris Davis. Email him at davis@memphisflyer.com.

40 DAYS O F ACTI O N A training session to prepare for the Poor People’s Campaign’s 40 days of nonviolent direct action took place here over the weekend. Memphis is one of many cities across 30 states with residents planning to take part in the Poor People’s Campaign’s National Call for Moral Revival movement, which is aimed to “expose and engage in moral witness against injustice.” The 40 days of action will begin on May 14th and

continue through June 23rd, ending with a mass mobilization in Washington, D.C. S U N DAY LI Q U O R Governor Bill Haslam signed the bill last week making it legal for liquor stores to be open seven days a week and for grocery stores to sell wine on Sundays. Extended liquor store hours begin immediately, while grocery stores won’t be able to sell wine on Sundays until January 2019. TR O LLEYS TO R ETU R N Trolleys will return to Main Street on Monday, April 30th, officials announced last week, and customers can ride for free until May 14th. Trolleys were taken from the rails here nearly four years ago after two of them caught fire in 2014. PAR K R EVAM P David Carnes Park in Whitehaven will get a $5.4 million makeover. A BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee program could bring amenities like a walking track, playground, and a fitness area. R IVE R ARTS F EST R E LO CATI O N The annual fine arts festival, RiverArtsFest, will be moving to the riverfront, beginning this year. For 11 years, RiverArtsFest has been on South Main between Webster and Huling, but with construction ramping up at Central Station and the festival growing larger each year, the two-day festival will now take place on Riverside between Jefferson and Union. Fuller versions of these stories and even more local news can be found on The News Blog at memphisflyer.com.


For Release Saturday, May 6, 2017

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Crossword

Crossword ACROSS 1 One of the Great Lakes 5 Menacing cloud 10 Sony offering 14 Saint’s home, for short 15 Place for a barbecue 16 Rich finish? 17 “Don’t give up” 19 Rather powerful engine 20 Brown 21 Some plants 23 Value 25 Spooky quality 28 Smoothie fruit 29 Popular cookie 31 Taking things for granted on April Fools’ Day and others 32 “Time ___ …” 33 Track, in a sense 34 Not wait for Mr. Right, say 35 Huuuuuuuuge

Edited by Will Shortz

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A C L O A V 1625 TUTWILER K E A F U Z Z Y W Y L E 33 It may be added Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,0 puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). AS I L R E N TOA U S C T I O N |RF O E OD B + D R I NC KS A | C HG I L DE R E NS ’ S A R E A to alcohol Z A R K S T O M A T O E S RAIN 34DATE Pitiful Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com VEGREENLINE.ORG APRIL 29 Must be 21 years or older to gamble or attend events. Know When To Stop Before You Start. A G T O P T W O P E N C E Crosswords for Caesars young nytimes.com/studentc Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2018, Licensesolvers: Company, LLC. All rights reserved. 5 35 Hit the gas Gambling pedalProblem? M E A R Y E L M T R E E S hard

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NEWS & OPINION

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CITY REPORTER B y To b y S e l l s

Memphis Zoo officials admit some things, deny a bunch of things, and are ready for court. The Memphis Zoo denies that a former female employee “was discriminated or retaliated against” because of her gender. Kimberly Terrell, a female conservation biologist, sued the zoo in December. She claimed she was fired from her job as the zoo’s director of research and conservation based on gender discrimination. Her attorneys are suing the zoo for damages in excess of $75,000, including back pay, lost benefits, employment reinstatement, punitive damages, and all court fees. J. Mark Griffee, the attorney for the zoo, responded to Terrell’s original lawsuit in mid-March, saying her claims of discrimination were unfounded. In that original suit, Terrell painted a picture of an ongoing tension that grew between her and zoo president Chuck Brady. She said she’d built a “strong record of success at the zoo,” but Brady increasingly attacked her performance and she felt it was because she was female. The zoo’s attorney refutes this, noting Terrell was giving a “substandard performance of her duties.” It was the reason, he said, Terrell received only standard bonuses and no pay raise one year. “… On November 27, 2017, Dr. Terrell was terminated for failure to perform job duties as instructed,

dereliction of duties, and willful misconduct,” reads the attorney’s answer to Terrell’s complaint. As for direct misconduct, zoo officials said Terrell “willfully disobeyed a clear, written, and direct order in September 2017” regarding the planned artificial insemination of one of the zoo’s elephants. The zoo’s attorney said Terrell created a hostile work environment when she “fired or forced the resignation of multiple employees.” Though, Terrell claimed her employees had “cordial relationships.” The zoo denied a long list of accomplishments Terrell claimed in her two years with the zoo, including 15 new science projects and partnerships with groups like the University of Memphis, and the Omaha Zoo. The zoo refuted the claim that Brady did not give Terrell regular performance reviews until she suggested his treatment of her was related to her gender. Also,

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the zoo’s attorney said Brady did take notes during the meetings, provided “pages” of feedback during subsequent performance reviews, and did give those notes to Terrell when she asked for them. However, the zoo admitted Brady called Terrell “emotional” at one point. But Brady said it was because Terrell demanded he fire all three of her employees. Terrell claimed Brady “repeatedly” called her “emotional” when “she expressed an opinion with which Dr. Brady did not agree.” The zoo also admitted Brady once described an internal conflict between Terrell and a colleague as “cat fighting.” Terrell said, though, Brady tempered the remarks by adding that “cat fight” wasn’t about gender because cats can be male or female. However, the zoo attorney dismissed Terrell’s claims that Brady ever said, “there’s always some kind of drama going on that hen house,” in reference to the zoo’s marketing building. The zoo also denied Brady ever said (about women in the marketing department), “you know how women are. I can’t control those hens.” U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla ordered the case to be heard in a jury trial on January 14, 2019. The trial is expected to last four days in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee Western Division.

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David Weatherspoon (l) with campaign finance chair Ed Roberson A major fracas of sorts has erupted in the District 8 county commission Democratic primary to determine a successor to the venerable Walter Bailey.  The controversy revolves around veteran lawyer and former Commissioner Julian Bolton, who has been under contract to represent members of the commission as an advisor and who has been championed by the commissioners, in the face of official resistance from Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration, to be the commission’s fully fledged full-time lawyer. Bolton has been supporting another lawyer, J.B. Smiley, in the multi-candidate District 8 primary race, as has the departing Bailey. Simultaneously, three Democratic Commissioners — Reginald Milton, Van Turner, and Willie Brooks — are backing the campaign of candidate Mickell Lowery, son of former longtime Memphis City Councilman Myron Lowery. Tempers have frayed to the point that at least one of the Lowery supporters has intimated that Bolton may see his commission contract at risk if Smiley fails to win. “I’m not worried,” Bolton says. “I’ve helped all those members with their races in the past, and they’ll like J.B. just fine if he wins. It’d be good to have his legal expertise on the commission.”

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Very soon, with the completion of the May 1st Shelby County election, local political attention will shift to the forthcoming Round Two election on August 2nd, when the county general election takes place, along with primary voting for state and federal positions. Some of the races may reflect the same bipartisan impulse that was spoken to last week in a forum for Republican county mayor candidates. All three GOP hopefuls — Terry Roland, David Lenoir, and Joy Touliatos — expressed a preference for reverting to the pre-1994 status quo, when there were no primaries for county offices and candidates typically had support from both sides of the party line. Party primaries for countywide offices came into being because the parties petitioned the Election Commission to allow them, of course, and it would take action by the self-same parties to revert to the older, nonpartisan system. Meanwhile, the ties of strict party affiliation are loosening somewhat on their own. At the statewide level, retiring U.S. Senator Bob Corker generated a lot of attention last week when he let it be known that, while he formally supported fellow Republican Marsha Blackburn’s bid to succeed him in the Senate, he would not be campaigning for her, and he said a number of flattering things about former Governor Phil Bredesen, Blackburn’s future Democratic opponent, calling him a “friend” and expressing his confidence that Bredesen, if elected, would do a creditable job as the Senator, as he had in earlier stints as Nashville mayor and governor. At least two Democrats running for local office are getting the same sort of support from influential figures with wellknown histories of backing Republican candidates and causes. Ed Roberson, who has served as campaign finance director for several GOP candidates — notably former Senators Bill Frist and Fred Thompson — is enthusiastic about Democratic state Senate candidate David Weatherspoon, who is competing with fellow Democrat Gabby Salinas for the right to oppose GOP state Senator Brian Kelsey in the fall. Roberson, who agreed to serve as Weatherspoon’s finance director, believes that Weatherspoon, who serves as chaplain

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7


E D ITO R IAL

Waffle House (and Senate) The odyssey from his home state of Illinois to Tennessee of Travis Reinking, the armed assailant who killed four people at a Nashville-area Waffle House early Sunday morning is instructive, especially considering information

April 26-May 2, 2018

given to the media from Nashville police chief Steve Anderson after a manhunt resulted in Reinking’s capture on Monday. As Anderson explained things, Reinking had been violating no Tennessee laws until he started pulling the trigger in the wee hours of Sunday morning. This was despite the fact that Reinking was on record as having violated firearms laws in his home state of Illinois and had been dispossessed of four different weapons after a series of misadventures both there and in Washington, D.C. On a visit to the nation’s capital, the obviously disturbed young man had been arrested by secret service agents when, bearing the aforementioned firearms, he attempted to enter the White House for a “meeting” with the president. After the White House incident, Illinois state police revoked Reinking’s license to own firearms and confiscated his four weapons. They were turned over to Reinking’s father, who seems to have compounded the prior violation of Illinois law by returning the guns to his son. They were in young Reinking’s possession when he subsequently moved into Nashville, the capital city of a state whose legislature has in the last decade struck down virtually every known and every possible restriction on possession and use of firearms. Most recently the General Assembly, where the National Rifle Association’s word is the closest thing to holy writ, has given serious consideration to a “Consitutionalcarry” bill that would allow any citizen to carry weapons about his person at will, and, failing that, to legislation that would recognize as valid in Tennessee such gun-

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carry rights as may have been granted an individual by the laws of any other state. As of now, however, if Chief Anderson is correct, transgressions of law in other states seem not to be honored within Tennessee’s boundaries. Whenever gun violence erupts somewhere, opponents of gun regulation legislation, in Tennessee and elsewhere, have learned to shift attention away from such sensible restrictions as strengthening background checks and, in particular, closing the infamous gun-show loophole, which allows unimpeded over-the-counter sales of firearms. One of the gun lobby’s favorite diversionary tactics has been to change the subject, usually to pretend grave concern for the mentally ill, blaming all eruptions of deadly violence not on the weapon that accomplished them but on the mental state of the perpetrator. After the Waffle House shooting in Antioch, Democrats in the Tennessee legislature called this particular bluff, attempting to offer legislation in the closing days of the current General Assembly that would make it difficultto-impossible for someone diagnosed as mentally ill to possess a deadly weapon. Did the Republican majority, many of whose spokespersons in office have invoked “mental illness” rhetoric whenever a gun is fired in anger, consider the legislation? They did not. Instead they blocked any such legislation from consideration as the legislature prepared to adjourn for the year. The site of the shooting in Antioch is not the only place where the word “waffle” deserves to be in the title.

C O M M E N TA R Y b y G r e g C r a v e n s


VI EWPO I NT By Juan Williams

GOP Schism Whether or not to protect Special Counsel Bob Mueller has split Republican Senate opinion. Cavuto. But McConnell remains opposed to even bringing any legislation to insulate Mueller to the Senate floor for a vote. That imperious position is responsible for the first cracks in the GOP congressional stonewall defense of Trump. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, a strong Trump supporter until now, is splitting from McConnell by scheduling a vote on the measure later this week in the committee. “Obviously, the majority leader’s views are important to consider, but they do not govern what happens here in the Judiciary Committee,” Grassley told reporters. Two Republicans on Grassley’s Committee are spearheading the bipartisan legislative push to protect Mueller. In addition to Tillis, South Carolina Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, is also a sponsor of the measure. He is on record as saying that if Trump fires Mueller, it will “be the beginning of the end of his presidency.” 

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There is also the argument that Trump will veto any law protecting Mueller, so why bother? But Senator Jeff Flake (RAriz.) has countered that, even if Trump vetoes the bill, the purpose of putting it on his desk is “to send a message to the president … the message needs to be that we take this very seriously.” McConnell and Ryan don’t have an answer to the obvious flaw in their logic. If there is no danger of Trump firing Mueller, then what is the harm in passing legislation to protect him? If McConnell and Ryan are right that Trump won’t fire Mueller, they have nothing to lose and everything to gain by protecting fellow Republicans and shutting down critical Democrats. The reality is that if Trump fires Mueller, the midterms could be even worse than the most pessimistic prognosticators imagine. The harsh reality of extensive political turmoil leading to riots if Mueller is fired is already of concern to police. The Pittsburgh police chief told his officers to be prepared for just that scenario in a department-wide memo last week. How far we have come since the Republican National Convention that nominated Trump in 2016 adopted a party platform that read “the next president must restore the public’s trust in law enforcement and civil order by first adhering to the rule of law himself.” Juan Williams is an author and a political analyst for Fox News Channel.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

McConnell and Ryan don’t have an answer to the obvious flaw in their logic.

NEWS & OPINION

What are we to make of arch-conservative Republican Senator Thom Tillis of North Carolina taking a stand against President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell? Tillis is among a surprising group of Senate Republicans backing a bill to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller in case Trump fires him. Here is Tillis, who votes with Trump 96 percent of the time, sending the message to his fellow Trump backers: “The same people who would criticize me for filing this bill would be absolutely angry if I wasn’t pounding the table for this bill if we were dealing with Hillary Clinton,” he said last week. “So, spare me your righteous indignation.” Well, that’s a first — one of the president’s strongest supporters telling other Trump supporters they are wrong to blindly back Trump. The key here is that Tillis isn’t up for reelection until 2020. I suspect that Tillis is getting a jump on distancing himself from the president in 2020. That is when Tillis’ name will appear below Trump’s name on the ballot (or if Trump is gone, below the name of Trump’s tainted-by-proximity vice president, Mike Pence). With less than seven months until the midterm elections, the most politically savvy Republicans are drawing the obvious conclusion from current polls: If the election were held today, they would lose the House and possibly the Senate because of Trump. The latest NBC News/ Wall Street Journal poll last week found Trump underwater, with a 39 percent approval and 57 percent disapproval rating. Trump’s approval rating is down 4 points since last month. A Quinnipiac poll — taken before the raid on Trump attorney Michael Cohen’s office this month — found that 69 percent of Americans oppose Trump firing Mueller. Just 13 percent think Trump should fire him. Even with those strong poll numbers backing Mueller, the top Republicans in the Senate and House remain protective of Trump. They are politically paralyzed, displaying a “deer-in-the-headlights” inability to stand up to Trump for fear of angering the president’s small but fevered base of supporters. Trump calls the probe a “hoax.” Speaker Paul Ryan has said he does not think legislation to protect Mueller is necessary because he does not believe Trump will fire the special counsel. McConnell is taking the same stand in opposition to a bill that would give Mueller a 10-day period for judicial review of any dismissal. “I don’t think [Trump] should [fire Mueller] and I don’t think he will,” McConnell told my Fox News colleague Neil

come early STAY LATE turn up

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COIN FLIP Wealth, poverty, and race in Memphis — the myths and misconceptions.

The Justice Project: Injustice is a problem in Memphis — in its housing, its wealthgap, its food deserts, its justice system, its education system. In 2018, the Flyer is going to take a hard look at these issues in a series of cover stories we’re calling The Justice Project. The stories will focus on reviewing injustice in its many forms here and exploring what, if anything, is being done — or can be done — to remedy the problems.

Nathaniel Crawford, LITE fellow and owner of Party Hardy

April 26-May 2, 2018

COVER STORY BY

CHRIS DAVIS …

N

Justice Project

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athaniel Crawford has a lot going on. The 17-yearold senior at the Memphis Academy of Science and Engineering is a South Memphis native who grew up in the Glenview neighborhood before moving to East Memphis, where he lives with his mom and younger sister. Crawford’s a competitive athlete who boxes and runs track. He recently enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserve and is getting accustomed to the idea that he’s leaving for Murfreesboro this fall to enroll as a freshman at Middle Tennessee State University.

In addition to all of this, Crawford runs an event-planning business called Party Hardy, and with the help of a group called LITE Memphis, he’s looking to grow his brand and meet potential clients and investors. “I’m playing chess, not checkers,” he says, and you only have to hear a little of his spiel about combating negativity with entertainment to know he means it. In some ways LITE — an acronym for Let’s Innovate Through Education — is similar to other business accelerators and incubator programs that exist primarily to advise and guide startups. One thing that sets the four-year-old organization apart is that it was born in a Teach for America classroom and nurtured in an environment sensitive to the invisible barriers excluding communities of color. LITE’s clearly stated, highly ambitious vision is to help “African-

American and Latinx students close the racial wealth gap [in Memphis] by becoming entrepreneurs and securing high-wage jobs.” Working under the principle that business needs talent and talent needs access, the organization identifies and addresses historic obstacles to inclusive urban growth during the course of eight-year fellowships. The longrange goal of a process that includes high-level internship opportunities and project microfunding is to see 25 percent of the students start businesses employing two or more people, and for the remaining 75 percent to attain highpaying jobs. On Thursday, May 3rd, 34 students, including Crawford, get to show off what they’ve learned about selling their brightest ideas when LITE hosts its annual Pitch Night at Clayborn Temple. Crawford’s Party Hardy brand will compete against other students’


Freeze this picture of hope and hold it in your mind for a minute. It’s inspiring news — a genuinely uplifting story about a bunch of great kids and a forward-thinking program where 100 percent of the participants go to college. That last detail is important, because people who obtain a bachelor’s degree or higher typically earn 78 percent more than non-graduates. Additionally, should Crawford continue to pursue an entrepreneurial path, the good news is that AfricanAmerican business owners tend to have a net worth 12 times greater than nonbusiness-owners. But the truth is, it’s going to take lots of programs creating lots of Nathaniel Crawfords and even more systemic change to close the wealth gap in the United States. Black households in the U.S. possess only one-tenth the median net worth of white households, and have almost zero liquidity. Education and entrepreneurship are frequently identified as the surest ways to eliminate racial-wealth inequality, but the latest poverty report authored by University of Memphis associate professor of sociology Elena Delavega paints a complicated and troubling picture that challenges conventional wisdom.

“People talk about pulling yourself up by the bootstraps, but there are no boots,” Delavega says. “So I think, as a society, what we need to do is to create boots. We need to create the basis for the opportunity to exist.” Memphis has the highest rate of child poverty in America, and it’s only getting worse. Currently, 48.3 percent of all African-American children in Memphis live with scarcity and, according to Delavega, there’s a fairly straightforward reason for that unfortunate statistic. “The children are poor because they have poor mothers,” she explained at an MLK50affiliated Poverty Forum, where the National Civil Rights Museum rolled out “Memphis Since MLK,” a comparative 50year poverty survey.

Wealth, of course, is about what’s handed down, not what’s earned, but these kinds of income gaps also create credit gaps. “This is not about marriage either,” she continued, dismissing popular narratives rooting social ills in the dissolution of nuclear families. “Poverty among married people has increased three times as fast as poverty for single mothers.” Delavega then made a request of the panel and audience: She asked everyone to hold an image in their minds: “If you see a [black] child in the street, you can flip a coin,” she said, illustrating the percentage — the yesor-no nature — of economic security in Memphis. It was a dramatic moment in the presentation, but hardly the most alarming statistic in her report. There is some good news: African-

American poverty in Memphis has decreased from its peak in 1960. The bad news? The rate’s still 2.5 times greater than that of white Memphians. And, from decade to decade, earnings for African-Americans have consistently remained about half that of whites. Today, the median household income for non-hispanic whites in Memphis is $71,158, or about 11.2 percent higher than the national median. For black households it’s $35,632. Wealth, of course, is about what’s handed down, not what’s earned, but these kinds of income gaps also create credit gaps. Similar disparities are evident in black home-ownership and the average net-worth of blackowned businesses. Compounding all the bad news in Memphis’ 50-year poverty survey was a single wicked fact that contradicts a deeply held article of faith about poverty and education. The 50-year income gap remained consistent, in spite of improved high school graduation rates among African Americans, and despite the fact that, proportionally, a higher percentage of African Americans are obtaining college degrees. “We are told all the time: Go to school, get your degree, and your income is going to follow,” Delavega noted. “How can we look kids in the eye and say, ‘Make an effort, do what you’re supposed to do, and it will be fine,’ — when it’s just not true.” News that gains in education for African Americans did nothing to narrow the income gap pairs distressingly with another number that Memphis journalist and MLK50 founder Wendi Thomas mined from the 2015 federal survey: Blacks comprise 51 percent of Memphis’ workforce. Whites make up 88 percent of Memphis’ executive and senior

management personnel. Coincidently, a 2016 study found that 88 percent of Shelby County contracts are awarded to white-owned firms. On the night Delavega unveiled her 50-year report, poverty forum panelist Bradley Watkins, Executive Director of Mid-South Peace and Justice, turned his attention to Crosstown, where he described conventional wisdom regarding the enormous redevelopment project, as “the personification” of the poverty study’s findings. In doing so, Watkins described how conflicting public policy dynamics help keep the economic mobility gap in place. “We have a city that’s said yes to any expense for Crosstown for years now, but in the same breath it has cut the [MATA] 31 Crosstown bus that connects north and south Memphis to that redevelopment,” Watkins said. “There is no implication here; that’s design. We are constantly being asked to embrace a fairytale of false positivity.” The stories we tell ourselves about poverty and success matter. It’s difficult to change public priorities when so much of the public believes that the majority of poor people live in subsidized housing (false), receive welfare checks (false), and food stamps (false), and that poverty itself is the earned, punitive result of bad decision-making. It’s harder still when economic mobility isn’t factored into projected images of what successful cities should like.   Travel writers love Nashville. Glowing writeups about everything from live music to locally produced liquor go viral on the regular, and in the past year, reporters have described Tennessee’s capital as one of the country’s “hottest cities” and a “city on the rise.” continued on page 12

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

businesses plans, including a moisturizer company, an app that connects people to an appropriate church, a multimedia marketing group scaled to accommodate small businesses, and several others. The winning company picks up a $2,500 prize to invest in the business. Crawford says he’s more interested in the opportunity to get his ideas in front of people. “Winning isn’t the best thing that could happen on Pitch Night,” he says. “The best that could happen is I could meet an investor.”

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April 26-May 2, 2018

continued from page 11

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The less frequently repeated story is how the same things that made Music City, U.S.A. such a great place to live — the soaring property values, cool celebrities, hot chicken, and endless media hype — have the combined effect of making Davidson County one of the hardest places in America for poor people to become middle-class. The Brookings Institute’s Metro Policy Program released a paper last fall showing how 26 of Nashville’s top 50 occupations — 40 percent of all jobs regionally — didn’t pay employees enough to afford fair-market rent. “The number of workers spending more than 30 percent of their income on rent could fill five Nissan stadiums,” the report stated. For people struggling to survive in Nashville’s metro, living in an exciting and innovative “it” city means fair housing, transportation, employment, and high-performing schools are often beyond reach. According to The New York Times’ “Best and Worst Places to Grow Up,” an interactive map built around economic mobility indicators, only 12 percent of America’s metros are worse than Nashville. Memphis is part of that 12 percent. Only 9 percent of America’s metros underperform Shelby County, where the number of people paying more than 30 percent of their income on housing would fill 10 FedExForums — with a long line still waiting to get in. In 2010, in the wake of the housing market crash, The New York Times published an article titled “Blacks in Memphis Lose Decades of Gains.” At

Talia Owens, LITE fellow and sophomore at DePaul University about the same time, five million more Americans moved out of secure living situations and into neighborhoods of concentrated poverty. “Housing that is inexpensive attracts the people with the fewest resources,” Delavega says, offering a primer on how we create disconnected communities. The story she tells has a familiar ring: High housing costs near employment centers and good schools drive people earning lower incomes to shelter-shop in depressed areas further from good jobs and better schools. Her story mirrors the the Brookings study, “Committing to Inclusive Growth,” which shows how economic mobility is most heavily suppressed in segregated communities with poor transit.

Higher housing costs near employment centers and good schools drive people earning lower incomes to shelter-shop in depressed areas. “I go back to public transportation in Memphis again and again and again, because it’s fundamental,” Delavega says, placing physical mobility near the top of a wishlist that includes: higher wages, fairly distributed housing, low-cost microcredit for minority and women’s businesses, and better access to schools


are sometimes forced to choose between paying the rent, the utility bill, the car note, or catching up somewhere else. The smallest barriers can have an enormous impact on decision-making. And nowhere is this truth more evident than the story of how Memphis became America’s bankruptcy capital and a process built to foster forgiveness and renewal became an efficiently maintained system for keeping people in debt.

It’s going to take change to solve Memphis’ wealthgap problems. Entrepreneurship programs won’t get the job done alone. In September 2017, Pro Publica, a nonprofit online news resource, published a detailed report showing how debt-strapped African Americans in Memphis were more likely to file Chapter 13 bankruptcy than Chapter 7, even though the former is more expensive and the latter frees the filer from debt. According to ProPublica, the crucial difference is that attorneys charge $1,000 up front to file Chapter 7. Chapter 13 filings may require multi-

year debt repayment plans and can cost three times as much in fees spread out over time, but a “no money up front” filing option makes it more attractive. Most filers failed to meet repayment schedules in the first year. Many become serial filers. ProPublica’s report also noted MLGW’s unusually high number of annual utility cutoffs (about one cutoff per four users) and listed a utility debt of about $1,100 as a common driver of bankruptcy filings. It also quoted West Tennessee Judge Jennie Latta: “The way we have it set up, our culture has a lot of unintended consequences.” “In every conversation about wealth, income disparity, and justice, we need to talk about wages,” Delavega insists, pointing to an Economic Policy Institute finding that a family of four in Memphis requires a minimum of $37,000 annually to get by — about 1 percent more than the current median income for AfricanAmerican families. “If someone were to work for $18 an hour without taking any time off, 40 hours a week for 52 weeks, that comes to a little over $37,000,” she says. “So when the city approves PILOT programs on the premise that they'll bring us jobs that pay $12-an-hour, we’re not doing what we’re supposed to do.” As the Brookings report says: No real progress can be made “if you create access to poor paying jobs or create middle wage jobs excluded communities

can’t access.” Now freeze this image in your mind and let’s return to a happier story. Talia Owens makes her desire to create a positive change part of her pitch to potential investors. The LITE fellow and sophomore at DePaul University wants people to know she’s from Memphis, a majority African-American city where a disproportionately small percentage of all revenue comes from businesses owned by people of color. “My dream is to change all that,” she says, introducing her plan to “disrupt the fashion industry” with Laude, a company that makes designer handbags accessible to people on a budget. Owens, who describes herself as a cheerleader who loves computer coding, came up with the idea when her roommate blew all of her rent money on an expensive purse. After developing the plan with LITE, she’s preparing for a soft launch of the new venture this week.   “I didn’t want to be just a person who worked a job,” Owens says. “I wanted to create jobs.” It’s going to take change to solve Memphis’ wealth gap problems. Entrepreneurship programs and affordable handbags won’t get the job done, alone. But, like Crawford, Owens inspires. And, difficult as the circumstances are, a little inspiration can’t possibly hurt.

http://www.memphis.edu/amum/ 901.678.2224 / artmuseum@memphis.edu AMUM is open 9am-5pm, Monday - Saturday.

Exhibition on view March 25 - July 28, 2018 Art Museum of the University of Memphis, 3750 Norriswood Dr. 142 Communication & Fine Art Building, Memphis, TN 38152

Monster Marks

Awe-inspiring, thought-provoking, and sometimes disturbing, works featured from Memphis collections make us think about how we define monsters. To commemorate MLK50, a selection of works shows how contemporary artists use monstrosity to explore ideas and emotions relating to race and racism. Curator: Sherry CM Lindquist, Dorothy Kayser Hohenberg Chair of Excellence in Art History

COVER STORY m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

and childcare for poor mothers. “Every child who has the parents with financial resources to move to a wealthier area will do so,” Delavega says, elaborating on how the cycle works. “And every child whose parents have the time, education, or motivation to apply for a charter school or an optional school or a private school will do so, too. So who remains? The children with the greatest needs and the fewest resources — and they are now completely abandoned. So now we have this concentration of high-need [families and children] and then we say this school is failing.” Optional programs may allow motivated families to move their children into a more favorable educational environment, but the easiest way to get your kids into a high-performing school is still to obtain property in a district where housing costs, on average, 2.4-times more than housing in lower performing school districts. As one Memphis realtor put it: “Rents in the Houston or White Station districts are going to be much higher on average than those near Melrose.” There’s more to enrolling in a school of choice than just filling out the paperwork. And each additional step is a filter that is magnified in disconnected communities, where food insecurities pile on top of housing insecurities, and cash-strapped people

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steppin’ out

We Recommend: Culture, News + Reviews

Blinded by Science

Weird science

By Susan Ellis

Parmvir Bahia found herself frustrated by social media. Bahia works in the department of molecular pharmacology & physiology at the University of Southern Florida. What she was finding online was often alarmist or fraught with stereotypes. She tried to do battle, but then it occurred to her: “You can’t have a discussion on social media.” Face to face is much better, she says. So Bahia went on to found Taste of Science, a festival that brings scientists out of the lab and in front of the public. It is currently in 16 cities, including Memphis. Events began earlier this week. There was a conservation talk at Growlers, an event on pollution at Cafe Eclectic, and speed mentoring, also at Cafe Eclectic. This Thursday, it’s Comedy of Science at Belle Tavern. Comedy of Science will feature comedian/St. Jude scientist Mark Brimble. A Getting Social event will be held on Friday at 7 p.m. at the Corner Bar at the Peabody hotel. Daniel Bastardo Blanco is a scientist who studies how T-cells consume nutrients. He’s involved with the Memphis arm of Taste of Science. He says Taste of Science is a chance for scientists to relax and do a bit of community outreach. The events, he says, are ideal for students and graduate students. “It’s been a great success,” he says.

April 26-May 2, 2018

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

TASTE OF SCIENCE, VARIOUS LOCATIONS, APRIL 26TH-27TH, TASTEOFSCIENCE.ORG

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Return to the Worst Gig Ever The Last Word, p. 39

Robert Bly’s More Than True Books, p. 29

THURSDAY April 26

FRIDAY April 27

Trails and Tails Memphis Botanic Garden, 6 p.m. Guests are invited to walk their dogs along the trail. Part of the Garden’s 30 Sunsets series.

August: Osage County Theatre Memphis, 8 p.m., $25 Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer-winning play about a dysfunctional family.

Steak N’ Burger Graceland, 6 p.m., $200 The kids enjoy the steak, while the adults get the burgers during this event benefiting the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis. Coach Mike Norvell serves as this year’s guest speaker.

Black Violin The Orpheum, 7:30 p.m., $20-$40 Classically trained violinists perform music spanning multiple genres. SpringLoaded Germantown Performing Arts Center, 7 p.m. New Ballet Ensemble’s annual spring concert featuring flamenco numbers and new dances, including Petrushka ReMix.

Slice of Soul — Memphis’ new rock-and-soul-flavored pizza parlor Food News, p. 30 SATURDAY April 28 A Serving for Tennis Propcellar, 7:30-11 p.m., $75 A benefit for Tennis Memphis’ National Junior Tennis and Learning programs. Incudes food and cocktails. Trap. Drank. Paint. 901! The 1524 (1524 Madison), 7-9 p.m. Painting event hosted by Mr. Darius, PhatMack, Clayton, and DJ Koopsta. Bret Michaels Horseshoe Casino, 8 p.m., $57-$95 Bret Michaels brings his Rockfest to Tunica with Firehouse.

Independent Bookstore Day Burke’s Book Store, all day Celebrating independent bookstores. Colson Whitehead’s book, The Underground Railroad, will be on sale, as will the children’s title, Maisy Goes to the Local Bookstore. Mid-South Food Truck Festival Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sample the fare from food trucks from around the region.


MIDWIFERY GYNECOLOGY

Ready player fun

Keeping It Real By Susan Ellis Bluff City Virtual Reality opened about two months ago. Guests can rent a room for $29 per half hour ($10 more for a full hour) to get a headset and play a virtual reality game. These are single-player, first-person games. They’ve got shooter games, which owner David Callahan describes as sort of like The Walking Dead, and a James Bond game where players solve a puzzle. There’s an outer space experience and an underwater experience. You can fight fantasy creatures with a sword and shield or shoot a sci-fi bow and arrow. You can paint, or walk a plank on a skyscraper, or play a guitar using light sabers. Callahan says the reaction to the games is across-the-board, “Oh, wow!” He notes that comparing virtual reality with your everyday TV game console is like comparing an ’80s Nintendo to the modern-day Xbox. Callahan recently introduced a Friday night Date Night. As one person plays the game, his date sits on a couch and can watch what the person is seeing on a TV screen. There is a gift basket involved. It contains bath bombs. “It’s like being inside a different world,” says Callahan. “It’s 1,000-times better than you can believe,” he says.

ABORTION FREE IUDS

CHO CES

Memphis Center for Reproductive Health

1726 Poplar Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901.274.3550 MemphisChoices.org

VR GAMING DATE NIGHT AT BLUFF CITY VIRTUAL REALITY (1026 GERMANTOWN PARKWAY), FRIDAYS, 6-10 P.M. $20

Memphis Mineral, Fossil, & Jewelry Show Agricenter International, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., $5 If you’ve ever wanted to see a table laid out with food that is actually rocks, now’s your chance. Also includes a fossil dig and geode bowling.

V&E Artwalk V&E Greenline, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Includes a large artists’ market, local food and beer, live music, and more. Benefiting the Greenline. Breakfast for Dinner First Congregational Church, 6 p.m., $10-$20 Breakfast casseroles, pastries, and Nutella-stuffed pancakes will be available during this breakfastcentric fund-raiser for Room in the Inn.

Stax Music Academy Spring Concert Clayborn Temple, 4-6 p.m. A presentation of “Send Peace & Harmony Home: Stax in 1968” featuring music from the era and originals by the students. Dishes for Wishes Felicia Suzanne’s, 5-8 p.m., $200 A tasting event to raise money for Make-A-Wish Mid-South. Wrestling Is Funny Hi-Tone, 7 p.m. A comedy show focused on wrestling with comedian/wrestler Jake Manning, Katrina Coleman, Reggie Junior, and Benny Elbows. Featuring HEELS.

We Saw You.

with MICHAEL DONAHUE memphisflyer.com/wesawyou

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SUNDAY April 29

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Joaquin Phoenix (front) and Ekaterina Samsonov star in writer/director Lynne Ramsay’s You Were Never Really Here. Film, p. 34

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M U S I C F E AT U R E B y M a r k R i c h e n s

Sweet Home ... Memphis

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and beat programming, including guitarists Ed Finney and Christopher Jones and tenor saxophonist Zach McElwain. Their contributions add warmth and immediacy that could boost Cerebral Hemispheres’ appeal to jazz lovers and other audiences beyond Heard’s core fans. “I did want to get some human help and human interaction in there,” he says. “That’s where I come from: a band with all humans and no computer. It’s tricky to do that these days, but anything you can get, it makes a world of difference.” Work on Cerebral Hemispheres began in 2016. Other commitments intervened, however, including a series of live performances at big festivals from Mexico to Ireland, Finland to Australia. For those gigs, Heard was joined on stage by Memphis vocalist/producer Chad White (aka Mr. White), with whom he recorded the 2006 single “You Rock Me”/“The Sun Can’t Compare,” rated one of the Top 100 releases of the ’00s by leading dance-music site Resident Advisor. “It took a long time because it was a stop-and-go process,” Heard says of the new album. “We were going in and out for the outings. Coming back and trying to get your motivation to where it was before you left can be tricky. “The public and the fans have been asking when something’s coming out for years, and I couldn’t really tell them anything, so I had to duck and dodge and hide from folks. I think I got engrossed in doing DJ gigs and doing remixes and all these things that are kind of temporary. I needed to invest time in things that have a longer-lasting effect. You kind of see the pattern where you’re traveling back and forth and you can’t switch yourself on and off like an appliance and get an honest, sincere feel. You don’t want to get in [the studio] and just be going through the motions.”

April 26-May 2, 2018

hen dance music fans around the world hear the name Larry Heard, they think of Chicago. As in “Chicago house,” the pulsating electronic style that Heard helped develop in the 1980s, and of which he is one of the best-known and most influential practitioners. What they might not realize is that, since 1997, Heard has made his home and created his music in Memphis. “I needed to get out of Chicago,” says Heard, 56. “It was too busy, too nonstop. I didn’t have room to breathe and think and just really focus, because everything was moving so fast. People think you have some magic attached to you — like it was nothing to do with just working hard and being consistent about being in front of the public with your creative work.” Heard has continued a steady output of recordings since the move to Memphis, while maintaining a relatively low profile for an artist hailed as a “godfather” and “legend” by fans, journalists, and fellow producers. He has released dozens of 12-inch singles by himself and others on his own Memphis-based Alleviated Records label, as well as contributing scores of remixes for various artists. But his new album, Cerebral Hemispheres, released on April 13th, is his first full-length project since 2005’s Soundtrack from the Larry Heard Duality Double-Play, released under the moniker Loose Fingers (one of several aliases he uses for recordings, in addition to his given name). Cerebral Hemispheres collects 18 tracks sprawling nine albums. And the people who are following me over two CDs (or three LPs). Ambitious in scope and noticed the absence,” says Heard. “The true hardcore sound, the collection comprises jazzy instrumental fans, they were the ones right after the 2005 album jams, intimate digital soul, and acid-flavored dancewho were asking, ‘When is the next album coming floor workouts. out?’” “For nine years, I had been doing at least one Heard brought in some local instrumental album per year, prior to that. So, in a way, I missed collaborators to flesh out his keyboard arrangements

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AQUARIAN BLOOD FRIDAY, APRIL 27TH BAR DKDC

BOYS & GIRLS CHOIR OF MEMPHIS: MUSIC FOR MARTIN THURSDAY, APRIL 26TH CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

LOS CANTADORES SUNDAY, APRIL 29TH HARBOR TOWN AMPHITHEATER

After Dark: Live Music Schedule April 26 - May 2 Sundays, 9:30 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Patio 162 BEALE 521-1851

Club 152 152 BEALE 544-7011

Alfred’s 197 BEALE 525-3711

Gary Hardy & Memphis 2 Thursdays-Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Thursdays, TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. and Sundays-Mondays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Mandi Thomas Fridays, Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.; The 901 Heavy Hitters Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.; Flyin’ Ryan Fridays, Saturdays, 2:30 a.m.; Memphis Jazz Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.

B.B. King’s Blues Club 143 BEALE 524-KING

The King Beez Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.; B.B. King’s All Stars Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m.; Will Tucker Band Fridays, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s Pic’s Band Saturdays, Sundays, 12:30 p.m.; Blind Mississippi Morris Sundays, 5 p.m.; Memphis Jones Sundays, Wednesdays 5:30 p.m.; Doc Fangaz and the Remedy Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m.

Blue Note Bar & Grill 341-345 BEALE 577-1089

Queen Ann and the Memphis Blues Masters Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Blues City Cafe

April 26-May 2, 2018

138 BEALE 526-3637

18

Blind Mississippi Morris Fridays, 5 p.m. and Saturdays, 5:30 p.m.; Brad Birkedahl Band Thursdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.; Earl “The Pearl” Banks Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and Tuesdays, 7 p.m.; Brandon Cunning Band Sundays, 6 p.m., and Mondays, 7 p.m.; FreeWorld

Sean “Bad” Apple Thursdays, Sundays, 5 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 4 p.m.; Live Music Thursdays-Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; The Blues Players Club Thursday, April 26, 8 p.m. and Sunday, April 29, 8 p.m.; The Bonfire Orchestra Friday, April 27, 7 p.m.; DJ Ron Fridays, 11 p.m.; Super 5 Saturday, April 28, 7 p.m.; DJ DNyce Saturdays, 11 p.m.

Sonny Mack Mondays-Fridays, 2-6 p.m.; Cowboy Neil Mondays, Thursdays, 7-11 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 2-6 p.m.; Sensation Band Tuesdays, Fridays, 7-11 p.m.; Fuzzy and the Kings of Memphis Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.; Chic Jones and the Blues Express Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; North and South Band Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.

King’s Palace Cafe Tap Room

191 BEALE STREET

Chris Tomlin Thursday, April 26, 7 p.m.

Handy Bar 200 BEALE 527-2687

The Amazing Rhythmatics Tuesdays, Thursdays-Sundays, 7 p.m.-1 a.m.

Itta Bena 145 BEALE 578-3031

Nat “King” Kerr Fridays, Saturdays, 9-10 p.m.

Big Don Valentine’s Three Piece Chicken and a Biscuit Blues Band Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Cowboy Neil Friday, April 27, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Myra Hall Band Saturday, April 28, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

159 BEALE

Chris Gales Solo Acoustic Show Mondays-Saturdays, noon-4 p.m.; Eric Hughes solo/acoustic Thursdays, 5-8 p.m.; Karaoke Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.; Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m.

182 BEALE 528-0150

123 S. MAIN AT PEABODY TROLLEY STOP 525-3655

Silky O’Sullivan’s 183 BEALE 522-9596

Dueling Pianos Thursdays, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., and Sundays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.

Dixie Dregs Friday, April 27, 7 p.m.; Parkway Drive Sunday, April 29, 7 p.m.

Young Petty Thieves Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight; FreeWorld Friday, April 27, 8 p.m.-midnight and Saturday, April 28, 8 p.m.midnight; Eric Hughes Band Mondays, 8 p.m.-midnight; Gracie Curran Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Cowboy Neil Band Tuesday, May 1, 8 p.m.-midnight; Plantation Allstars Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

King’s Palace Cafe 162 BEALE 521-1851

Clayborn Temple 294 HERNANDO

Stax Music Academy Spring Concert Sunday, April 29, 4-6 p.m.

Dirty Crow Inn 855 KENTUCKY

Nancy Apple Thursdays, 8 p.m.; The Wampus Cats Friday, April 27, 9 p.m.; Broke Tall Folk Saturday, April 28, 9 p.m.; Bobbie Stacks and friends Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

Earnestine & Hazel’s 531 S. MAIN 523-9754

330 BEALE 525-8981

182 BEALE 528-0150

D&G Boggie Band Saturday, April 28, 8-11 p.m.

Amber Rae Dunn Hosts: Earnestine & Hazel’s Open Mic Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m.

New Daisy Theatre

Rum Boogie Cafe

King Jerry Lawler’s Hall of Fame Bar & Grille

Center for Southern Folklore

Memphis Bluesmasters Thursdays, Sundays, 8 p.m.midnight; Vince Johnson and the Plantation Allstars Fridays, Saturdays, 4-8 p.m. and Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; Little Boy Blues Friday, April 27, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Fuzzy Saturday, April 28, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sensation Band Monday, April 30, 8 p.m.-midnight; Chris McDaniel Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

168 BEALE 576-2220

FedExForum

Rum Boogie Cafe Blues Hall

Belle Tavern 117 BARBORO ALLEY 249-6580

Bourbon and Jazz with Quelude Sundays, 2:30-5:30 p.m.

Brass Door Irish Pub 152 MADISON 572-1813

Live Music Fridays; Carma Karaoke with Carla Worth Saturdays, 9-11 p.m.

Cannon Center for the Performing Arts 255 N. MAIN 576-1200

Music for Martin Thursday, April 26.

David Bowen Thursdays, 5:309:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Harbor Town Amphitheater 740 HARBOR BEND ROAD

River Series featuring Los Cantadores with Mark Edgar Stuart Sunday, April 29, 3-6 p.m.

Huey’s Downtown 77 S. SECOND 527-2700

The Voodoo Fix Sunday, April 29, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Paulette’s RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN SQUARE 260-3300

Talent Development Complex 119 S. MAIN 435-6509

Lunch & Listen with Shey Rose Friday, April 27, 1-2 p.m.

The Peabody Hotel 149 UNION 529-4000

Peabody Rooftop Parties Thursdays, 6-10 p.m.

The Vault 124 GE PATTERSON

Alexis Taylor Friday, April 27, 8 p.m.; Kim Kennedy Saturday, April 28, 8 p.m.

Medical Center Bat Cave 654 MONROE EXT 626-6763

Decibel featuring Tia Henderson Saturday, April 28, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.

South Main Loflin Yard 7 W. CAROLINA

Electric Church Sundays, 2-4 p.m.

Pontotoc Lounge 314 S. MAIN 207-7576

Ragtime Tea Party with DJ Mark Richens Sunday, April 29, 4-8 p.m.

South Main Sounds 550 S. MAIN 494-6543

Bailey Bigger, Erin O’Dowd, Alexis Taylor, Jessie Jordan Friday, April 27, 7-9 p.m.

Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, 5:30-9 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and Mondays-Wednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.

FOO FIGHTERS THURSDAY, MAY 3

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WWE SMACKDOWN LIVE TUESDAY, JUNE 12

MARTIN LAWRENCE SATURDAY, JUNE 16

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Two of the world’s greatest rock bands are teaming up for a massive co-headlining tour at FedExForum. Tickets available!

Witness your Smackdown Superstars broadcast to the world live from Memphis the first time in over a year. Tickets available!

Laugh along with Martin Lawrence and comedians Jay Pharoah, Adele Givens, Bruce Bruce, Deon Cole and more. Tickets available!

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After Dark: Live Music Schedule April 26 - May 2

Celtic Crossing 903 S. COOPER 274-5151

Jeremy Stanfill and Joshua Cosby Sundays, 6-9 p.m.; Candy Company Mondays.

2160 CENTRAL

Live Band Karaoke with Public Record Wednesdays, 7 p.m.

The Tower Courtyard at Overton Square 2092 TRIMBLE PLACE MEMPHIS, TN 38104

Acoustic Courtyard Last Thursday of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

East Memphis

6-10 p.m.; Elmo and the Shades Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.

Cecil Yancy Sunday, April 29, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Huey’s Poplar

Summer/Berclair

Collierville

4872 POPLAR 682-7729

The Settlers Sunday, April 29, 4-7 p.m.; Five O’Clock Shadow Sunday, April 29, 8-11:30 p.m.

Laurelwood Shopping Center 422 S. GROVE PARK 682-8436

Cheffie’s Cafe

Huey’s Collierville

483 HIGH POINT TERRACE 202-4157

2130 W. POPLAR 854-4455

Songwriter Night hosted by Leigh Ann Wilmot and Dave “The Rave” Saturdays, 5-8 p.m.

Dancin’ Jimmy Thursday, April 26, 6-8 p.m.

Huey’s Cordova Bluff City Soul Collective Sunday, April 29, 8:30 p.m.midnight.

2559 BROAD 730-0719

Jazz with Ed Finney, Deb Swiney, and David Collins Thursday, April 26, 8 p.m.; Short in the Sleeve Friday, April 27, 9 p.m.; The Skitch Saturday, April 28, 5:30 p.m.; Hope Clayburn & the Soul Scrimmage Saturday, April 28, 10 p.m.; David Collins & Frog Squad Sunday, April 29, 6-9 p.m.; Karaoke Wednesdays, 9 p.m.

T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova 8071 TRINITY 756-4480

The Southern Edition Band Tuesdays.

Frayser/Millington Huey’s Millington 8570 US 51 NORTH,

Kevin Carson Trio Sunday, April 29, 6-9 p.m.

Growlers

Old Millington Winery

1911 POPLAR 244-7904

Eagle Claw with Devil’s Right Hand & Admiral Longtooth Thursday, April 26, 7 p.m.; Whores. with Bummer & Pressed Friday, April 27, 8 p.m.; Walter Trout Saturday, April 28, 8 p.m.; Obscura: Smoke & Mirrors Saturday, April 28, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.; Obscura: A Gothic Affair Sunday, April 29, 9 p.m.; The Nude Party Tuesday, May 1, 7 p.m.; Crockett Hall Tuesdays with the Midtown Rhythm Section Tuesdays, 9 p.m.; CF is Lame Wednesday, May 2, 7 p.m.

6748 OLD MILLINGTON 873-4114

Dr. David Evans and Elmo Lee Thomas Sunday, April 29, 3-6 p.m.

Toni Green’s Palace 4212 HWY 51 N

Toni Green’s Palace MondaysSundays, 7 p.m.; Live DJ Thursdays, Fridays, 7 p.m.

Germantown Huey’s Germantown 7677 FARMINGTON 318-3034

Hi-Tone

Soul Shockers Sunday, April 29, 8-11:30 p.m.

412-414 N. CLEVELAND 278-TONE

Huey’s Midtown 1927 MADISON 726-4372

The Chaulkies Sunday, April 29, 4-7 p.m.; Fingertrick Sunday, April 29, 8:30 p.m.-midnight.

Indian Pass Raw Bar Memphis 2059 MADISON 207-7397

Paul Taylor Quintet Thursday, April 26, 7-10 p.m.; Papa Tops Friday, April 27, 7-10 p.m.; Bluff City Backsliders Saturday, April 28, 7-10 p.m.

Lafayette’s Music Room 2119 MADISON 207-5097

Josh Okeefe Thursday, April 26, 6 p.m.; Gun Hill Royals Thursday, April 26, 9-11:30 p.m.;

Cordova 1771 N. GERMANTOWN PKWY. 754-3885

The Cove

The Old Paints, Small, the Mediators Thursday, April 26, 8 p.m.; Coast 2 Coast Mixtapes Thursday, April 26, 9 p.m.; One Night Only: Tom Foolery Reunion Show Friday, April 27, 6 p.m.; Church Tongue, Wolf King Saturday, April 28, 9 p.m.; Wrestling Is Funny: A comedy show about wrestling Sunday, April 29, 7 p.m.; Faux Killas, Sweaters Together, Allison Kasper Sunday, April 29, 9 p.m.; Turnstile, Touche Amore, Culture Abuse, Razorbumps Monday, April 30, 6 p.m.; L.A. Witch, Hot Garbage Tuesday, May 1, 9 p.m.; Them Evils, the Wild! Wednesday, May 2, 8 p.m.

The Heart Memphis Band Sunday, April 29, 8-11:30 p.m.

North Mississippi/ Tunica Dan McGuinness 3964 GOODMAN, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-890-7611

Acoustic Music Tuesdays.

Gold Strike Casino 1010 CASINO CENTER IN TUNICA, MS 1-888-245-7829

Wednesday, May 2, 8 p.m.

Midtown Crossing Grill 394 N. WATKINS 443-0502

Natalie James and the Professor Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; “The Happening” Open Songwriter Showcase Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

UrbanArt Commission 422 N. CLEVELAND 454-0474

Bring Your Soul Block Party Thursday, April 26, 4-8 p.m.

Young Avenue Deli 2119 YOUNG 278-0034

White Animals and Walrus Saturday, April 28, 9 p.m.

P&H Cafe 1532 MADISON 726-0906

Rock Starkaraoke Fridays; Open Mic Music with Tiffany Harmon Mondays, 9 p.m.midnight; Taillight Rebellion Tuesday, May 1.

6069 PARK 685-9264

Lee Gardner Fridays, 6:30-9 p.m.; Randal Toma, Solo Guitar Tuesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.; Eddie Harrison Tuesdays, 6:30-9 p.m.

Poplar/I-240 6069 PARK 767-6002

2080 POPLAR

Park Friends Spring Music Series Wednesday, May 2, 6-8 p.m.

Wang’s East Tapas

East Tapas and Drinks

Overton Park Golf Shack

University of Memphis The Bluff 535 S. HIGHLAND

Memphis LIVE MondaysSundays, 8 p.m.-midnight; DJ Ben Murray Thursdays, 10 p.m.; Bluegrass Brunch with the River Bluff Clan Sundays, 11 a.m.

Will Champlin, Megan Ruger, Ryan Whyte Maloney, and Cali Tucker Saturday, April 28, 8 p.m.

Eddie Harris Thursdays, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Van Duren Solo Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m.

Neil’s Music Room 5727 QUINCE 682-2300

Bar Misfits Thursday, April 26, 6-11 p.m.; Eddie Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; Memphis Soul Remedy Friday, April 27, 9 p.m.; Brian Johnson Band Saturday, April 28, 8 p.m.; Mo Boogie Sunday, April 29, 6-10 p.m.; Debbie Jamison & Friends Tuesdays,

Bartlett Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center 3663 APPLING 385-6440

Theatrestage: First Baptist of Ivy Gap Friday, April 27, 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 28, 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 29, 2:30 p.m.

Hadley’s Pub

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel AT CASINO CENTER, SOUTH OF MEMPHIS, NEAR TUNICA, MS 1-800-303-SHOE

Bret Michaels Friday, April 27.

Huey’s Southaven 7090 MALCO, SOUTHAVEN, MS 662-349-7097

Young Petty Thieves Sunday, April 29, 8 p.m.-midnight.

2779 WHITTEN 266-5006

Raleigh

Shelby Forest General Store

2951 CELA 382-1576

The No Hit Wonders Friday, April 27, 9 p.m.

7729 BENJESTOWN 876-5770

Steak Night with Tony Butler and the Shelby Forest Pioneers Fridays, 6-8 p.m.; Reel McCoy Saturday, April 28, 12-3 p.m.;

Stage Stop Blues Jam hosted by Brad Webb Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Open Mic Night and Steak Night Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

No Men, Aquarian Blood, Relaxer Friday, April 27, 9 p.m.midnight.

Railgarten

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Bar DKDC 964 S. COOPER 272-0830

November Friday, April 27, 6:30 p.m.; Marquee Mayfield Friday, April 27, 10 p.m.; Inna Gorilla Saturday, April 28, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Restivo 4 Sunday, April 29, 11 a.m.; Radio Incorporated Sunday, April 29, 4 p.m.; Tim Easton Sunday, April 29, 8 p.m.; Josh Hoyer and Soul Colossal Monday, April 30, 6 p.m.; Kyndle & Adam Tuesday, May 1, 5:30 p.m.; Christopher Pietrangelo Tuesday, May 1, 8 p.m.; Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans Wednesday, May 2, 5:30 p.m.; Finney and Norman

19


Inside Art An

unforgettable, family gallery.

7

hands-on ways to learn about art. • 7 exciting activities • Children of all ages • Have fun, gain visual literacy • Sights, Sounds, Textures

April 26-May 2, 2018

• Pose, Climb, Create, Explore

BROOKS

CALENDAR of EVENTS: APRIL 26 - MAY 2

Wed 10 a–8 p, Thur & Fri 10 a–4 p, Sat 10 a–5 p, Sun 11 a–5 p Members & under 6 Free, Adults $7, 65+ $6, Students $3 Wednesdays are always free!

Inside Art was generously funded by The Plough Foundation. Brooks gratefully acknowledges the financial support of ArtsMemphis, AutoZone, Hyde Family Foundations, the Jeniam Foundation & Tennessee Arts Commission.

Amurica World Headquarters

Squaring Up, a multi-media theatrical experience to raise awareness about the issue of Human Sex Trafficking in Memphis. Touching stories of three women, based on real-life accounts of HST survivors. $10 Suggested donation. May 2-3, 7-8:30 p.m. 410 CLEVELAND.

Circuit Playhouse

Stupid F**king Bird, discover how disappointing love, art, and growing up can be in this irreverent, contemporary, and very funny remix of Chekhov’s The Seagull. www.playhouseonthesquare.org. $25-$40. ThursdaysSaturdays, 8 p.m., and Sundays, 2:30 p.m. Through May 13. 51 S. COOPER (725-0776).

Landers Center

Camelot, an idealistic young King Arthur hopes to create a kingdom built on honor and dignity, embodied by his Knights of the Round Table. www.dftonline.org. $22. Fri.-Sun. Through April 29. 4560 VENTURE, SOUTHAVEN, MS (662-280-9120).

Hattiloo Theatre

Screening of Human Flow and Q&A with Ai Weiwei at Memphis College of Art, Sunday, April 29th OT H E R A R T HAPPE N I NGS

41st Annual Original Art Auction

Jitney, the owner of an unlicensed cab station descends into an emotional spiral when his son, Booster, comes home from jail. Characters who come in and out of their lives pose questions about an uncertain future. www.hattiloo.org. $22-$30. Sundays, 3 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., and Thursdays, Fridays, 7:30 p.m. Through May 13.

Auctioneers Gene Katz, Michael Detroit, and Whitney Jo help to create a party atmosphere featuring hors d’oeuvres by Iris Etc. Catering. $40-$100. Sat., April 28, 6:30 p.m.

37 S. COOPER (502-3486).

Tour the local galleries and shops on South Main. Last Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m.

Hernando High School Performing Arts Center

Kudzu Playhouse Call for Male Vocalists: The Hunchback of Notre Dame, be part of the choir in upcoming production. Show dates are July 13-22. Rehearsals begin May 5. www.kudzuplayers.com. Through April 30. 805 DILWORTH LANE, HERNANDO, MS.

Theatre Memphis

August: Osage County, www. theatrememphis.org. $25. Sundays, 2 p.m., and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Through May 13. 630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).

PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE, 66 S. COOPER (726-4656), WWW.PLAYHOUSEONTHESQUARE.ORG.

Art Trolley Tour

SOUTH MAIN HISTORIC ARTS DISTRICT, DOWNTOWN.

“Beneath the Surface: Life, Death & Gold in Ancient Panama” Exhibition of finds from Pre-Columbian cemetery of Sitio Conte in central Panama, a mysterious and complex society that thrived there more than 1,000 years ago. Ongoing. MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Casting Demonstration ArtsMemphis Gallery

Opening reception for 2018 Spring MFA Shows, exhibition of works by Darcie Beeman-Black will be on view in the ArtsMemphis Gallery in the Easterwood House, 156 N. Tucker. Exhibition of works by Li Chen will be on view in the Tom Johnston Gallery in the Faiers House, 150 N. Tucker. www.mca. edu. Fri., April 27, 6-8 p.m. 156 N. TUCKER (272-5100).

20

DUE TO SPACE LIMITATIONS, ONGOING WEEKLY EVENTS WILL APPEAR IN THE FLYER’S ONLINE CALENDAR ONLY.

TH EAT E R

A R TI ST R E C E PT I O N S 1934 Poplar Ave. 901-544-6200 | brooksmuseum.org

Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a brief description, and photos — two weeks in advance — to calendar@memphisflyer.com or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

Saturdays, Sundays, 3 p.m.

METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380), WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.

Jazz-A-Fire

Bring your own instrument to join. $12. Last Sunday of every month, 4-7 p.m.

10 a.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

MicroCinema Club: Live From Memphis Retrospective

Homage of over 10-plus years of films, projects, and events from Live From Memphis — a volunteer organization in support of music, film, and art from local creatives. Proceeds benefit Sarah Fleming and Chris Reyes’ legal fund. PWYC. Wed., May 2, 7-9 p.m. CROSSTOWN ARTS, 430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030), WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

Open Late

Galleries and gardens will be open late. Free with admission. Every third Thursday, 6-8 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Resident Artist Talks

Resident artists Averell Mondie, Vanessa Gonzalez, Josh Short, and Carrie Rubinstein will discuss their work. Thurs., April 26, 6-8 p.m. CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE (FORMERLY SEARS CROSSTOWN), N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

V&E Artwalk

Featuring over 60 artists selling their crafts, silent auction, children’s area, local musicians, food, craft beer, wine, and soft drinks benefiting Midtown’s V&E Greenline. Free. Sat., April 28, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

BRINSON’S, 341 MADISON (524-0104), WWW.MEMPHISBLACKARTSALLIANCE.ORG.

V&E GREENLINE, AVALON AND TUTWILER (482-4387), WWW.VEGREENLINE.ORG/ VE-ARTWALK/.

Looking Inward: Mindfully Looking at Art

O N G O I N G ART

Program, led by Stephen Black, delves into the restorative powers of art and meditation to help participants quiet the mind, observe art, and let go of mental clutter to experience art in new ways. Free. Fourth Saturday of every month,

20Twelve

“The Visceral World,” exhibition of color photography by William Eggleston, Huger Foote, Adam Bartos, and Stephen Shore. www.20twelve. com. Through July 25. 2531 BROAD.

Art Museum at the University of Memphis (AMUM)

“Monster Marks,” exhibition of work from Memphis collections that make us think about how we define monsters. www.memphis. edu/amum. Through July 28. “Africa: Art of a Continent,” permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and Robert Fogelman collection. Ongoing. 142 COMMUNICATION & FINE ARTS BUILDING (678-2224).

ArtsMemphis Gallery

2018 Spring MFA Shows, exhibition of works by Darcie Beeman-Black will be on view in the ArtsMemphis Gallery in the Easterwood House, 156 N. Tucker. Exhibition of works by Li Chen will be on view in the Tom Johnston Gallery in the Faiers House, 150 N. Tucker. mca.edu. Through April 28. 156 N. TUCKER (272-5100).

ANF Architects

“Suburban Cigar” and “A Perfect Home,” exhibition of photography by Bruce Meisterman and sculpture by Nikii Richey. www.anfa. com. Through May 17. 1500 UNION (278-6868).

Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

“Chinese Symbols in Art,” ancient Chinese pottery and bronze. www. belzmuseum.org. Ongoing. 119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE SQUARE BUILDING (523-ARTS).

Bingham and Broad

“My Kin Is Not Like Yours,” exhibition of works by Debra Edge. Ongoing. 2563 BROAD (323-3008).

Clough-Hanson Gallery

Senior Thesis Show, www.rhodes.

continued on page 22


DON’T MISS YOUR LAST CHANCE!

mind + body + skin

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LET YOUR FACE BE YOUR BEST ACCESSORY LASER TREATMENTS

Ashtoria is the first in the Mid-South to offer the advanced technology of the Fotona laser system, which has the highest ratings of both safety and efficacy and can safely treat ALL skin tones. We offer a variety of laser treatments for skin resurfacing as well as unique therapies for sleep apnea, vaginal rejuvenation, and the removal of benign skin lesions.

MEDICAL FACIAL TREATMENTS

Our unique facials combine result-driven therapies with medical-grade skincare for one all-inclusive price. Each Medical Facial Treatment is customized to your specific skincare needs and may include Diamond Microdermabrasion, Hydrofacial, Targeted peels, and LED/ Photodynamic Light Therapy just to name a few.

APRIL 26

LAURELWOOD UNPLUGGED IN THE COURTYARD

JOIN US IN THE COURTYARD NEXT TO PANERA BREAD FOR AN EVENING WITH SOME OF MEMPHIS’ FINEST MUSICIANS. BRING YOUR FRIENDS AND ENJOY FREE LIVE MUSIC EACH THURSDAY IN APRIL 6PM-8PM.

LAURELWOOD SHOPPING CENTER

POPLAR AT GROVE PARK ROAD S. LAURELWOODMEMPHIS.COM FOR MORE INFO, PLEASE CALL 901.682.8436

WE ALSO TREAT: acne, broken capillaries, brown spots, eczema, moles, rosacea, skin tags, under-eye hollows, and more.

CONSULTATIONS ARE ALWAYS COMPLIMENTARY! CALL 901-310-3530 TO SCHEDULE YOURS TODAY.

Located at the Shops at Carriage Crossing in Collierville, TN 901-310-3530 • www.ashtoria.com Open Monday–Saturday by appointment only

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

DANCIN’ JIMMY

We offer treatments for volume replacement, scar revision, and wrinkle reduction with temporary and long-term biostimulating fillers. Our services also include Botox, Dysport and Xeomin for muscle relaxation and to alleviate symptoms such as migraines, clenching and grinding of teeth, under arm sweating, and neuropathy pain in the hands and feet.

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

INJECTABLES

21


C A L E N DA R: A P R I L 2 6 - M AY 2 edu. Through April 27. “Enter Through the Window,” exhibition of thesis work by graduating seniors Reagan Alley, Frank Beiser, Mattie Boyd, Erin Burman, Hope Hudson, and Olivia Thomas. Through April 27. RHODES COLLEGE, 2000 N. PARKWAY (843-3000).

The Cotton Museum

“Went Out for Cigarettes,” exhibition of images and titles that explore and rediscover the American South with contradictions and hidden meanings by Ryan Steed, grandson of a cotton farmer and son of a literature teacher. Through May 31. 65 UNION (531-7826).

Crosstown Concourse

“Goodnight My Love,” exhibition of photographs from the Ernest Withers collection, including works from Withers’ archive of more than one million negatives that have never been seen by the public. www. crosstownarts.org. Through May 13. N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY.

David Lusk Gallery

“Abstracted Still Life,” exhibition of new paintings by Kit Reuther. www.davidluskgallery.com. Through May 19. 97 TILLMAN (767-3800).

Resident Artist Talks at Crosstown Concourse, Thursday, April 26th at 6 p.m.

www.memphisbotanicgarden. com. May 1-31. 750 CHERRY (766-9900).

Germantown Performing Arts Center

The Dixon Gallery & Gardens

“Reflections on Beauty,” exhibition of landscape paintings by Matthew Lee. www.gpacweb.com. Through May 9.

“Contemplating Character: Portrait Drawings & Oil Sketches from Jacques Louis David to Lucian Freud,” exhibition of portrait drawings and oil sketches extends almost two and a half centuries organized thematically, providing the viewer with provocative visual juxtapositions. www. dixon.org. Through June 24.

1801 EXETER (751-7500).

Harrell Performing Arts Theatre

“Where We Gather,” exhibition of works by Erika Roberts. www.erikaroberts.studio. Through June 25. 440 POWELL, COLLIERVILLE (853-3228).

4339 PARK (761-5250).

Java Cabana

FireHouse Community Arts Center

“Ice Cream Cake,” exhibition of new paintings by Colleen Laurel. Through April 30.

“I Am Here,” exhibition of work by Najee Strickland, Immon Johnson, Rahn Marion, and Naima Peace. www. mbaafirehouse.org. Through April 30. Mosal Morszart, exhibition of works by Black Arts Alliance artist. www.memphisblackartsalliance.org. Ongoing.

2170 YOUNG (272-7210).

Jay Etkin Gallery

“Snippets,” exhibition of work in group show featuring Marc Rouillard, Nathan Yoakum, Mickey Bond, David Malkin, and others. www.jayetkingallery.com. Through May 12.

985 S. BELLEVUE (948-9522).

Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art, University of Memphis

“Proxemics,” exhibition of spring 2018 BFA thesis work by Alexandra Barnett, Megan Chen, Lizzie Dean, Natalie Eddings, Paige Ellens, Whitney Gresham, Kit Huddleston, Emilio Norman, and Denise

942 COOPER (550-0064).

L Ross Gallery Wakeman. www.memphis. edu/amum. Through April 27. 3715 CENTRAL.

Fratelli’s

“Papercutting of Countryside and Cities,” exhibition combining the art of papercutting with the beauty of landscapes

in cities, towns, and countryside by Gillian J. Furniss. Through April 28. Brad Behnes Art Show, exhibition of original oil paintings, large and miniature, of the moods and moments of Memphis and the Mississippi River.

“Under a Midnight Rainbow,” exhibition of paintings by Chuck Johnson and ceramics and sculpture by Niles Wallace. www.lrossgallery.com. Through April 28. 5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).

Marshall Arts Gallery

“Love of Art” and “Memphis,”

the ARCADE at

April 26-May 2, 2018

ST. GEORGE’S

Antique, Home & Garden Show

Celebrating vintage for 46 years! PREVIEW PARTY: Friday, April 27 | SHOW AND SALE: April 28 & 29 TRUCKS & TREASURES: Saturday, April 28 | BLUEGRASS BRUNCH: Sunday, April 29

Featuring dealers from throughout the U.S. specializing in antiques, art, garden pieces, and interior design. The weekend will include food trucks, live music, guest speakers, and plant sales. Benefitting: Church Health, Emmanuel Center, MIFA & Room In The Inn-Memphis

For ticket information and more visit stgchurch.org or call 901.754.7282 22

ST. GEORGE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH | 2425 S. GERMANTOWN RD. | GERMANTOWN, TN 38138

RESEARCH VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

continued from page 20

exhibition of work by Nikki Gardner and Debra Edge by appointment only. (647-9242), Ongoing. 639 MARSHALL (679-6837).

Memphis Botanic Garden

“Art of a Scientist,” exhibition of paintings by Dr. K. Gopal Murti. All paintings are for sale with 30 percent of the proceeds going to Memphis Botanic Garden. www. memphisbotanicgarden.com. May 1-31. 750 CHERRY (636-4100).

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

“Black Resistance: Ernest C. Withers and the Civil Rights Movement,” exhibition focuses on and commemorates the 50th anniversary of the events from March 27 through April 8, 1968. Through Aug. 19. “African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style,” exhibition of dynamic traditions of African dress featuring colorful, boldly patterned printed cloth highlighting the interplay between regional preferences and cosmopolitanism. Through Aug. 12. “Rotunda Projects: Lisa Hoke,” exhibition of over-the-top installation of recycled and repurposed materials reflecting aspirations for the work and fears of expecting too much.

continued on page 24

CirQuest Labs is currently seeking adult volunteers for clinical studies. We have studies involving anemia (low blood), heart failure and heart disease. If you would like to learn more about participation, please give us a call for detailed information! To find out more call: 901-866-1700 or visit cirquestlabs.com/ study-participants


Agricenter Showplace Arena May 8, Tuesday 2- 5 pm

MemphisStormWater.com FREE event with activities for kids PK- 5th grade! *Puppetshow *Recycle Relay *WOW! Water Mobile *Hands-On Tables *Watershed Maze *Live Animals & More!

BENEFITING

MARIA MONTESSORI SCHOOL

Researchers are developing therapies that could program a person’s own white blood cells to target and destroy these types of cancer. If you have been diagnosed with one of these types of cancer, your blood cells may be useful to help with development of new ways of treating the disease in the future. The researchers would use your blood cells only for research and they would not be used to create a therapy for you. Financial compensation is provided.

APRIL 29

NOW SHOWING IN 3D AT THE PINK PALACE!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Los Cantadores

Email: info@keybiologics.com or call: 901-252-3434

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

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23


C A L E N DA R: A P R I L 2 6 - M AY 2

continued from page 22 Through June 3. “About Face,” exhibition located in the Education Gallery highlighting the different ways artists interpret the connection between emotion and expression. Ongoing. “Drawing Memory: Essence of Memphis,” exhibition of works inspired by nsibidi, a sacred means of communication among male secret societies in southeastern Nigeria by Victor Ekpuk. www.brooksmuseum.org. Ongoing. 1934 POPLAR (544-6209).

Memphis Jewish Community Center’s Shainberg Gallery

“Collaborations,” exhibition of work by 16 pairs of Mid-South artists. www. tennesseecraftsouthwest.com. Through April 26. 6560 POPLAR (761-0810).

Metal Museum

“Alchemy4,” exhibition of jewelry, objects, and wall sculpture by 98 enamelists highlighting enameling techniques and innovations within the field. www. metalmuseum.org. Through April 29. 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380).

April 26-May 2, 2018

Ross Gallery

“Looking at the World,” exhibition of paintings by Claudia Tullos-Leonard. www.cbu. edu/gallery. Through May 2. CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY, PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY

Talbot Heirs

Debra Edge Art. Ongoing. 99 S. SECOND (527-9772).

TOPS Gallery

“The Daily Avalanche,” exhibition of new drawings and prints by John Shorb. www. topsgallery.com. Through May 13. 400 S. FRONT.

Village Frame & Art

“20th Century Memphis Photographs,” exhibition of work by Charlie Ivey and Virginia Schoenster, Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 540 S. MENDENHALL (767-8882).

PO ET RY / S PO K E N WO R D

Epiphany Lutheran Church

Centering Prayer, opportunity for silent contemplation, followed by inspirational poetry and readings. www. epiphanylu.org. Sundays, 5 p.m., and Wednesdays, noon. 7887 POPLAR (861-6227).

High Cotton Brewing Co.

Spillit Center Stage: All Stars, your stories. www.spillitmemphis.org. Thurs., April 26, 7 p.m. 598 MONROE (896-9977).

LECT U R E /S P EA K E R

Beyond the Brand Panel Brunch

WKNO Studio

Learn from fellow women entrepreneurs of Memphis about entrepreneurship for the brave and fearless business woman of today. Brunch and mimosa bar. Free. Sun., April 29, 1-4 p.m.

7151 CHERRY FARMS (458-2521).

CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE, N. CLEVELAND AT NORTH PARKWAY, WWW.CROSSTOWNARTS.ORG.

“Green Lights and Lifelines,” exhibition of mosaics, pottery, and paintings by Kristi Duckworth and terrariums by Nancy Morrow. www.wkno. org. Through April 27.

DAN C E

New Ballet Ensemble: Springloaded

New and exciting works by Francesca Harper, Elizabeth Corbett, Noelia Garcia Carmona, and Robin Sanders. Contemporary and modern dance, flamenco, hip-hop and more. Fri., April 27, 7 p.m., Sat., April 28, 5:30 p.m., and Sun., April 29, 2:30 p.m.

Bob Zellner: Influential Leader of the Civil Rights Movement

Untold stories of the civil rights movement and experience guiding the movement, Zellner presents a modernday message for combating deep-seated racism, discrimination, and prejudice. Free. Wed., May 2, 7-9:30 p.m. MEMPHIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, 6560 POPLAR (761-0810), JCCMEMPHIS.ORG/JUSTICE.

S. (321-3000).

GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500).

Slavehaven Underground Railroad Museum

Obscura: Smoke & Mirrors

The Perfect Lawn

GROWLERS, 1911 POPLAR (244-7904).

COLLIERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 501 POPLAR VIEW PARKWAY (853-2333), WWW.COLLIERVILLELIBRARY.LIBCAL.COM.

“Images of Africa Before & After the Middle Passage,” exhibition of photography by Jeff and Shaakira Edison. Ongoing. 826 N. SECOND (527-3427).

Stax Museum of American Soul Music

24

Dishes for Wishes at Felicia Suzanne’s, Sunday, April 29th at 5 p.m.

“The Chaos and the Cosmos: Inside Memphis Music’s Lost Decade, 1977-1986,” exhibition of photography by Patricia Rainer. www.staxmuseum. com. Through July 31. 926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535).

Dance to rhythms that call across time. Dig into your closet of Endless; wrap yourself in the regalia of your Golden Age. $5-$10. Sat., April 28, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.

These Walls: Tales from Annesdale

Dynamic site-specific dance by Tennessee Ballet Theater. $30. Fri., April 27, 8 p.m., and Sun., April 29, 2:30 p.m. ANNESDALE HISTORIC MANSION, 1325 LAMAR (490-9460).

Master Gardener Tom Rieman talks about simple steps for a beautiful lawn as well as alternatives to grass for a lowmaintenance landscape in the Halle Room. Free. Wed., May 2, 6-7 p.m.

Tech Career Discovery Day

Meet alumni, recruiters, industry professionals, and instructors. Speakers will focus

continued on page 26


Better Outcomes for Your Career

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING SHELBY COUNTY NATIONAL DISASTER RESILIENCE GRANT MID-SOUTH RESILIENCE PLAN PUBLIC INPUT WORKSHOPS

You’re Invited to JoinShelby Us!Government’s Office of Resilience and Shelby County’s

Friday, September 16, 2016 Now Hiring 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

partners in the National Disaster Resilience Grant will host three workshops to continue to gather public input on the creation of the Mid-South Regional Resilience Plan and to review input from the workshops held from January 30, 2018 through February 1, 2018. The second round of Public Meetings will be held on May 22 – 24, 2018 at the following locations and times:

Nurse Supervisor • Monday – Friday, 11p – 7a Free Food & Give-Aways • $5,000 Sign-on Bonus to the • BenefitsOpen Available onPublic Day 1 (start date) ember 16, 2016 Registered  Clinical and Non-Clinical Nurses Job Opportunities • Weekend – 7p & 7p –Rehabilitation 7a  Tour of 7a HealthSouth Hospital . – 2:00 p.m. • M – F, Evening Shift; 3p – 11p Tuesday May 22, 2018  Meet & Greet with the CEO, CNO, Therapy Director, Give-Aways • $5,000 Sign-on Bonus Hernando Public Library HR Director & other Senior Leaders • Benefi ts Available on Day 1 (start date) Community Center l Job Opportunities

ed to Join Us!

 Bring & Submit Resume

habilitation Hospital Physical Therapists  On-the-Spot Application Completion CEO, CNO, Therapy Director, & Therapy Team Lead, PT nior Leaders Monday Openings for Nursing, CNA, Environmental • – Friday, Dayshift e Nutritional Services, • & $7,500 Sign-on Bonus Medical Records, etc. n Completion Equal Opportunity Employer • BenefitsAn Available on Day 1 (start date) CNA, Environmental Medical Records, etc. mployer

370 West Commerce St. Hernando, MS 38632 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Wednesday May 23, 2018 Millington, TN — Baker Community Center 7942 Church Street Millington, TN 38053 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Thursday May 24, 2018

University of Memphis Highland Branch Library 460 South Highland Street, Memphis, TN 38111 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

The purposes of the Resilience Plan are to identify unmet recovery needs 4100 Austin Peay Hwy  Memphis, TN 38128  901 213 5400

4100 Austin Peay Hwy, Memphis, TN 38128

in the Mid-South Region following three storms in 2011, identify potential future resilience activities which will make the Mid-South Region less susceptible to and more secure from future disasters, and to develop and prepare resilience strategies to storms, flooding, snow and ice, and other climate- and weather-related events which can be addressed as potential funding becomes available. The geographic extent of the plan includes all of Shelby and DeSoto Counties, as well as parts of Fayette and Marshall Counties.

Visit: healthsouthnorthmemphis.com to apply An Equal Opportunity Employer

SPRING

LOADED

If you plan to attend the public hearing and have special needs, please contact the following individual by 4:30 p.m. Tuesday May 15, 2018 and we will work to accommodate you: Jared Darby, NDR Planning Manager, Office of Resilience, 125 N. Main, Room 443, Memphis, TN 38103, (901) 636-7166, jared.darby@ memphistn.gov. Citizen input and public participation is strongly encouraged from all sectors of the Shelby County community. Shelby County does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or disability in employment or the provision of services. Equal opportunity/equal access provider.

AN ARRAY OF NEW WORKS FEATURING

WWW.NE WBALLE T.ORG

FRIDAY, APRIL 27 • 7:00 PM SATURDAY, APRIL 28 • 5:30 PM SUNDAY, APRIL 29 • 2:30 PM GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER TICKETS: GPACWEB.COM • 901.751.7500

Photography: Andrea Zucker

PETRUSHKA REMIX!

Development of the Mid-South Regional Resilience Plan is part of ongoing implementation of the Mid-South Regional Greenprint which can be viewed at midsouthgreenprint.org and is funded by a National Disaster Resilience Grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Learn more at about the National Disaster Resilience Grant at ResilientShelby.com. Para mas información en Español, por favor llame al 901-222-2088. TTY at 901-222-2301 Mark H. Luttrell, Jr. Mayor Jim Vazquez, Administrator Shelby County Office of Resilience

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

All interested residents, parties, and stakeholders are invited to join the master planning team at any one of the three workshops listed above and share their opinions on the best strategies for handling and recovering from future weather-related incidents. All three events will share the same agenda.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

mphis, TN 38128  901 213 5400

25


C A L E N DA R: A P R I L 2 6 - M AY 2 continued from page 24 on educational opportunities for youth and adults. Discover your career in technology. Free. Sat., April 28, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. I AM IT TRAINING OFFICE, 3612 COMMERCE CIRCLE (300-6396), WWW.IAMITTRAINING.COM.

CommUnity at Snowden

Featuring bounce houses, face painting, performances, live music, 30-plus local vendors/businesses, Amurica photo booth, food trucks, and more. Free. Sat., April 28, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

reliving a musical revolution powered by raw emotion. $119. Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.

SNOWDEN SCHOOL, 1870 NORTH PKWY (416-4621).

GUEST HOUSE AT GRACELAND, 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322), WWW.GRACELAND.COM.

TO U R S

Calvary Episcopal Church Tours

Down to Earth Festival

Featuring live music, highadventure play, eco-friendly vendors, local/sustainable food options and clean, green fun for the entire family. Sat., April 28, 12-5 p.m.

Graceland Excursions Trips: Tupelo, Mississippi — Birthplace of Elvis Presley

Docent-led tours discuss stained glass windows, architecture, and symbols in Christian art. In addition, private tours are available by appointment for a suggested donation of $10 per person. Free. Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Experience the rural setting of Elvis’ upbringing and see where it all began in the two-room house where he was born, the church he attended in his youth, and artifacts from his modest beginnings. $99. Fridays, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 102 N. SECOND (525-6602), WWW.CALVARYMEMPHIS.ORG.

City Tasting Tours

Savor tastings at five eateries, interact with chefs and managers, and sample local flavors while strolling down Main Street and enjoying new art installations and historic landmarks. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 1:30 p.m. WWW.CITYTASTINGTOURS.COM.

Graceland Excursions Trips: Musical Landmarks of the Mississippi Delta

These Walls: Tales from Annesdale at Annesdale Mansion, Friday and Sunday

Take a detour down the backroads and explore the deep roots of blues culture and history, while

GUEST HOUSE AT GRACELAND, 3600 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322), WWW.GRACELAND.COM.

Old Forest Hike

Walking tour of the region’s only urban oldgrowth forest. Last Sunday of every month, 10 a.m. OVERTON PARK, OFF POPLAR (276-1387).

Yellow Fever Rock & Roll Ghost Tour

See what used to be, Memphis style, with Mike McCarthy. Call to schedule a personal tour. Ongoing.

SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK), WWW.SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.

Jubilee’s Mardi Gras in Memphis and Education That Works Out 5K

E X PO S/ SA L E S

Memphis Mineral, Fossil, & Jewelry Show Over 50 dealers and exhibitors, kids areas with gem and fossil dig, geode bowling, and rocks around the clock. Includes Rock Banquet, a full table display of rocks that look like real food. $5. Sat., April 28, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sun., April 29, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL, 7777 WALNUT GROVE (490-3575), WWW.THEEARTHWIDEOPEN.COM.

(486-6325), WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ YELLOWROCKGHOST/.

Show & Sale the Arcade 2018

Featuring 14 antique home and garden dealers, 10 local artists, cooking and design demonstrations, book signings on Saturday, live plant sales, food trucks, bake sale, dealers, and Bluegrass Brunch on Sunday. $10 for two-day pass. Sat., April 28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sun., April 29, 12-4 p.m. ST. GEORGE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (754-7282), WWW.STGCHURCH.ORG.

F EST IVA LS

Arlington in April

Spring celebration. Sat., April 28, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. HISTORIC DEPOT SQUARE, ARLINGTON, TN, WWW.TOWNOFARLINGTON. ORG.

Bring Your Soul Block Party

Celebrate the UAC new home on the Cleveland strip featuring after-work beer or wine. Thurs., April 26, 4-8 p.m. URBANART COMMISSION, 422 N. CLEVELAND (454-0474), WWW.URBANARTCOMMISSION.ORG.

Bring chairs, blankets, and umbrellas for live music, bouncy castles, face-painting, corn hole, gumbo cook-off, 5K on Sunday, and more. Sat.Sun., Apr. 28-29, 1-5 p.m. MEMPHIS CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL, 61 N. MCLEAN (276-1221), WWW.JUBILEESCHOOLS.ORG.

Memphis in May

Join the fun at MIM Music Festival and World Championship Barbecue Contest. Honored country, Czech Republic. Visit website for more information and ticketed events. May 1-31. TOM LEE PARK, OFF RIVERSIDE DR., WWW.MEMPHISINMAY.ORG/.

Authentic Mexican Dining

May 5th

April 26-May 2, 2018

DJ’s (2-5pm) and Live Band (5pm til closing) Cinco de Mayo

• Free T-Shirts* & Drink Specials *1 t-shirt per table (minimum of 4 guest) • $3 mixed drinks; Walk Me Downs, Long Island Ice Tea & more! Mother’s Day Tradition Continues... A free Rose for every mother in our restaurant on Mother’s Day. (We appreciate you!) 7565 Goodman Road

@ Hwy 78 Olive Branch

26

662.890.7174

LOCATIONS: 1100 Church Road 3875 Hacks (just west of Landers Cross Road

@ Winchester (behind Costco) Memphis

901.756.1187

Center) Southaven

662.280.5160

*NO DJ & BAND AT CHURCH RD. LOCATION.

535 Perkins Extended

Poplar Ste 101 Memphis

901.779.4115 PAID FOR BY TN DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION


C A L E N DA R: A P R I L 2 6 - M AY 2 Taste of Science Festival: Comedy of Science

Laughter and learning packed into one evening. $5. Thurs., April 26, 7-9 p.m. BELLE TAVERN, 117 BARBORO ALLEY (249-6580), WWW.TASTEOFSCIENCE.ORG/MEMPHIS.

S P O RTS / F IT N ES S

7th Annual Bad Dog 5K Sat., April 28, 8-11 a.m.

OVERTON SQUARE, MIDTOWN.

Madonna Learning Center and St. Louis Inclusive 5K Join students and families of Madonna Learning Center and St. Louis School for Monarch Cardinal 5K. Registration opens at 8 a.m., 5K at 9 a.m., and one-mile fun run is at 10 a.m. Sat., April 28, 8 a.m.-noon.

KIDS

S P E C IA L E V E N TS

Through May 21.

Teen Girls’ Therapeutic Art Group

30 Thursdays at the Garden

HIGH COTTON BREWING CO., 598 MONROE (896-9977), WWW.BLUFFCITYPINBALL.COM.

Designed for teens ages 14-17 to give your teen the tools to develop healthy relationships, selfconfidence, and coping strategies for dealing with the challenges her world can bring. Thursdays, 6-7 p.m. Through May 31. FERREN FAMILY COUNSELING, 895 S. COOPER (498-9126), WWW.FERRENFAMILYCOUNSELING.COM.

Tennessee Shakespeare Company Education Programs

Featuring an opportunity for students to participate in playshops, performances, and learn about TSC. For more information, visit website. Through June 30. WWW.TNSHAKESPEARE.ORG.

On Thursday nights throughout Daylight Saving Time extended hours until sunset. Thursdays. Through Oct. 31. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Annual Tribute Luncheon

Assembles more than 2,000 people to celebrate a legacy of philanthropy, leadership, and collaboration. $125. Thurs., April 26, 11:30 a.m.-1:15 p.m. MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (5789346), WWW.WFGM.ORG.

The Bluff City Pinball League

The first seven weeks of the program are considered qualifying rounds, and the eighth week is the League Finals. $35 for series. Mondays, 7 p.m.

Downtowners’ Bike to Lunch

Mid-day bicycle ride with Revolutions Bicycle CoOp. Meet at the northwest corner of Front and Monroe and ride with downtowners to a restaurant within 15 minutes of The Fourth Bluff. First Tuesday of every month, 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. COSSITT LIBRARY, 33 S. FRONT (726-6409), WWW.REVOLUTIONSMEMPHIS.ORG.

Friday Night Dance Party

Themed dance parties featuring illuminated dance floor, food vendors on site, and beer and wine available with a valid ID. Free. Fridays, 6-9 p.m. MEMPHIS PARK (FOURTH BLUFF), FRONT AND MADISON, WWW.THEFOURTHBLUFF.COM.

continued on page 28

ST. LOUIS CATHOLIC CHURCH, 203 WHITE STATION (682-6606), WWW.MADONNA-LEARNING.ORG.

Memphis Roller Derby vs. Roller Girls of Central Kentucky

CASH & PROMO CASH GIVEAWAY

MRD’s season begins with a bout against the Roller Girls of Central Kentucky. Enjoy a pre-game show with drink specials, aerial pole dancing, and food truck festival. $10. Sat., April 28, 5-7:30 p.m.

APRIL 28

REIGN SUPREME AND BE ONE OF 38 TOTAL WINNERS! Promo Cash prizes get bigger throughout the day and become large CASH prizes at 10pm.

MID-SOUTH FAIRGROUNDS, PIPKIN BUILDING, EAST PARKWAY AT CENTRAL.

South Memphis Glide Ride

The Big Jump Teen Ambassadors take scenic routes through South Memphis and consider how to improve bicycle facilities and connectivity within the area. Free. Thursdays, 6-7 p.m. Through May 31.

2pm 5 winners of $100 Promo Cash 4pm 5 winners of $200 Promo Cash

6pm 5 winners of $300 Promo Cash 8pm 5 winners of $400 Promo Cash

10pm Finale - It’s ALL about the money! 5 winners of $500 Promo Cash 1 winner of $2,500 Cash 5 winners of $500 Cash 1 winner of $5,000 Cash 3 winners of $750 Cash 1 winner of $10,000 Cash 2 winners of $1,000 Cash

SOUTH MEMPHIS FARMERS MARKET, CORNER OF MISSISSIPPI BOULEVARD AND SOUTH PARKWAY EAST (726-6409), WWW.REVOLUTIONSMEMPHIS.COM.

St. Francis Gravel Classic Bike Ride for Off-Road Cycle Enthusiasts

Safe, gravel roads to ride in Marion, Arkansas, with routes for riding 12, 25, and 55 miles in the Mississippi River State Park and St. Francis National Forest. For more information, visit website. $45. Sat., April 28, 7:30 a.m.

Earn entries April 1 - April 28, 2018 Earn 1 entry for every 10 points earned playing slots on your Key Rewards. 10X entries on Sundays, 15X entries on Mondays, 20X entries on Tuesdays

WWW.PR-EVENTMANAGEMENT.NET.

Triathlon Ninja Transition Clinic

Athletes will learn to shave 1-2 minutes off their race time by learning a few simple skills to give them a leg up on their next multi-sport race event. Coached by Dale Sanford. Pre-registered online. Mon., April 30, 6:30-8 p.m. HOPE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 8500 WALNUT GROVE (INFO, 755-7721, EXT. 1900), WWW.BUILDPEAKCOMPETE. COM/MEMPHIS-TRIATHLON-WORKSHOP/.

M E E TI N G S

BACC Chamber 101

BARTLETT AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 2969 ELMORE PARK (372-9457), WWW.BARTLETTCHAMBER.ORG.

GFWC Metro Memphis Woman’s Club

Volunteer community service organization for Memphis women. Monthly guest speaker, service project, and other activities. Projects include domestic violence, advocates for children, arts, and more. Free. Fourth Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. COMMUNITY RESOURCE CENTER, 3475 CENTRAL, WWW.GFWC.ORG.

Nashville Songwriter’s Assn. Intnl. (NSAI) Memphis Chapter Meeting

Lessons and discussion on songwriting. Share songs in progress and provide feedback. Bring a song to share and 8-10 copies of your lyrics. Every third Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. OFF THE SQUARE CATERING, 19 S. FLORENCE (361-0584), WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/NSAIMEMPHISCHAPTER.

Republican Women of Purpose

Guest speaker will be Kathy Desjarlais, Navy Lt. Commander, retired, sharing her insights about the changing role of women during her 25 years in the Navy. Reservations required. RSVP to rwoplunch@gmail.com. Wed., May 2, 10:30 a.m. TPC AT SOUTHWIND, 3325 CLUB AT SOUTHWIND (833- 1898).

FitzgeraldsTunica.com • 1-662-363-LUCK (5825) • Must be 21 and a Key Rewards member. See Cashier•Players Club for rules. While supplies last. Tax and resort fee not included in listed price. Advance hotel reservations required and subject to availability. $50 credit or debit card is required upon hotel check-in. Arrivals after 6pm must be guaranteed with a credit card. Management reserves the right to cancel, change and modify the event or promotion. Gaming restricted patrons prohibited. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

For new and seasoned members who want to know more about the chamber and how to fully utilize their membership. Register online. Open to members only. Tues., May 1, 3:30-5 p.m.

27


C A L E N DA R: A P R I L 2 6 - M AY 2 continued from page 27 GCT Spring Gala: An Evening of All Stars

EDWIN MCCAIN MAY 10 7:30pm

Called the “great American romantic.” Edwin recorded two of the biggest love songs ever, I’LL BE – and I COULD NOT ASK FOR MORE. Experience Edwin McCain live in our intimate 350 seat theatre.

GARY MORRIS MAY 19 7:30pm

His music spans country, adult contemporary & Broadway. Songs include WHY LADY WHY – 100% CHANCE OF RAIN – BRING HIM HOME and WIND BENEATH MY WINGS.

Tickets & Info – BPACC.ORG

BOX OFFICE HOURS / 10AM TO 2PM / M – F / 901.385.5588

presents

toward justice:

t A City-Wide Upstanders’ Projec !

April 26-May 2, 2018

All events are FREE and at the

MJCC

May 1–31 • More events at jccmemphis.org/justice

Bob Zellner KEYNOTE SPEAKER MAY 2 @ 7:00 PM

BESA: THE PROMISE FILM SCREENING MAY 15 @ 7:00 PM

CONTACT US TO RESERVE SEATING.

Participating agencies include the National Civil Rights Museum & MLK 50, Facing History and Ourselves, Arts Memphis, Crosstown Arts, Indie Memphis, Latino Memphis, OUTMemphis, Paragon Bank, Memphis Islamic Center, Tennessee Arts Commission, and The Shelby County Government Office of Multicultural and Hispanic Affairs.

28

6560 Poplar Ave., Memphis, TN 38138 jccmemphis.org • (901) 761-0810

For more information, go to jccmemphis.org/justice or contact Marcy Stagner at mstagner@jccmemphis.org or (901) 259-9230.

Cocktail attire requested for honoring the inaugural class of Leading Luminaries. Includes food, wine pull, auction, cash bar, and entertainment. $75. Fri., April 27, 6 p.m. GERMANTOWN COUNTRY CLUB, 1780 KIMBROUGH (754-4290), WWW.GCTCOMEPLAY.ORG.

Independent Bookstore Day

Featuring giveaways of advance reading copies, drawings for prizes, kid’s activities, cookies, and more. Available in limited supply will be exclusive day-of merchandise by major publishers and authors. Sat., April 28. BURKE’S BOOK STORE, 936 S. COOPER (278-7484), WWW.BURKESBOOKS.COM.

MLK50 Celebration: Music for Martin

Featuring musical and dance performances. Admission: three can goods or a jar of peanut butter to benefit the Mid-South Food Bank. Thurs., April 26, 6:30 p.m. CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (TICKETS, 525-1515), WWW.THECANNONCENTER.COM.

Nature at Night

Each Thursday night throughout Daylights Saving Time all 96 acres will be open to members at no cost and to guests with daily fee. Thursdays, 6 p.m. Through Oct. 18. MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW. MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.

Peabody Rooftop Parties

Live music and beautiful views of the sun setting over the Mississippi River. Ladies get in free before 7 p.m. Visit website for scheduled entertainment. 21-plus $10$15. Thursdays, 6-10 p.m. Through Aug. 16.

THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION (529-4000), WWW.PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

Preview Party for the Arcade 2018

Featuring 14 antique home and garden dealers, 10 artists, silent auction, food, wine, and live music. $60. Fri., April 27, 6-10 p.m.

Registration for the 2017 National Service Animal Eye Exam Event

American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO) offers free eye exams for service animals. Owners or handlers of eligible animals are invited to register for the free eye exams in May. Visit website for more information and registration. Through April 30. WWW.ACVOEYEEXAM.ORG.

VR Gaming Date Night $20. Fridays, 6-10 p.m.

BLUFF CITY VIRTUAL REALITY, 1026 N GERMANTOWN PKWY (585-5964).

FO O D & D R I N K EVE NTS

Breakfast for Dinner: A Benefit for Room in the Inn

Hotcakes, flapjacks, maple syrup sponges. Whatever you call them, they’re delicious. Enjoy them to your heart’s content, benefiting Room in the Inn. $10-$20. Sat., April 28, 6-9 p.m. FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 1000 S. COOPER (859-9430), ROOMINTHEINN-MEMPHIS.ORG.

Dishes for Wishes

Food tasting event that celebrates Downtown’s finest chefs’ latest culinary creations, along with a one-of-a-kind live auction and more. $200. Sun., April 29, 5-8 p.m. FELICIA SUZANNE’S, BRINKLEY PLAZA, 80 MONROE, SUITE L1 (680-9474), WWW.MIDSOUTH. WISH.ORG.

Food Truck Fridays

Fri., 11 a.m. Through April 30. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

Makeda’s Dine, Sip, Paint

Featuring dinner by Kisha’s Kitchen, dessert by Makeda’s Cookies and Meekies Munchies, and complimentary wine with dinner. Only 20 tickets will be sold for each event. $40. Last Sunday of every month, 5-8 p.m. MAKEDA’S COOKIES DOWNTOWN, 488 S. SECOND (745-2667).

Music at St. Mary’s

ST. GEORGE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 2425 SOUTH GERMANTOWN (7547282), WWW.STGCHURCH.ORG.

Hear Wednesday Morning Musicians at Eucharist in Sisters’ Chapel. The program will feature a wide variety of musical styles with instruments and vocals. Wednesdays, 8 a.m.

Reflection Site/Plant Red Flowers for King

ST. MARY’S CATHEDRAL, 700 POPLAR (527-3361), WWW.STMARYSMEMPHIS.ORG.

Rallying point for those who want to understand Dr. King’s impact on Memphis and reasons for King being in the city. Memphis City Beautiful is encouraging Memphis to plant red flowers. Seed packets available at MCB office, 664 Adams. Through April 30. CORNER OF MLK BLVD AND 2ND STREET, CORNER OF MLK BLVD AND 2ND STREET, WWW.MLK50. CIVILRIGHTSMUSEUM.ORG.

Peabody Sunday Brunch

Variety of breakfast dishes, entrees and desserts, including salads, pastas, freshly-baked breads, croissants, pastries, eggs benedict, smoked salmon, Belgian waffles, applewood smoked bacon, prime rib, and champagne. $40, $14 kids. Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE, 149 UNION, THE PEABODY (529-4199), WWW.PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

A Serving for Tennis

Sample dishes from Memphis restaurants, enjoy creative beverages, and join friends to benefit Tennis Memphis’ National Junior Tennis and Learning (NJTL) programs. $75. Fri., April 27, 7:30-11 p.m. PROPCELLAR VINTAGE RENTAL, 2585 SUMMER (374-0603), WWW.TENNISMEMPHIS.ORG.

Sundays on Tap

Local draft beers for $3 each and half-priced pizzas. Sundays, 1-7 p.m. CORNER BAR AT THE PEABODY, 149 UNION (901 529-9000), WWW.PEABODYMEMPHIS.COM.

Taste of Memphis

Sample food from over 20 of Memphis’ finest restaurants, listen to live music, enjoy carousel rides, and bid on auction items benefiting the work of Young Life. $35. Thurs., April 26, 6:30-8:30 p.m. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF MEMPHIS, 2525 CENTRAL (820-0760), WWW.YLMEMPHIS.COM.

Trap. Drank. Paint. 901!

Local paint party with a real twist featuring art, music, drinks, and more. $30. Fri., April 27, 7-9 p.m. THE 1524, 1524 MADISON (949-1731).

Wine Down: Spring Wines and Sangria

Featured wines include Joya Red Sangria, Pral Beaujolais Cuvee Terroir Rouge 2015, La Bella Prosecco, Valoroso Toscano White, and 90+ Cellars Lot 33 Rosé. 21-plus $25 members, $40 nonmembers. Fri., April 27, 6-8 p.m. THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.

F I LM

Beauty and the Beast Sat., Sun., 4 p.m. Through April 30.

CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Dream Big 3D

From the Great Wall of China and the world’s tallest buildings to underwater robots, solar cars, and smart, sustainable cities, this film celebrates the breath-taking human ingenuity behind engineering marvels. Through Nov. 16. CTI 3D GIANT THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.

Human Flow Screening and Livestream Q&A with Ai Weiwei

Public screening of this film about massive human migration. Webcast Q&A with Ai Weiwei live from the University of Chicago will follow. Free and open to the public. Free. Sun., April 29, 1:30-5 p.m. MEMPHIS COLLEGE OF ART, 1930 POPLAR (272-5100), WWW.MCA.EDU.


BOOKS By Corey Mesler

True Tales

of incidents, supernatural or otherwise,” he says, “told and retold, in which the psyche is trying to communicate what it knows, trying to slip something past the guards of the dictator ego …” Each of these tales is emblematic of something the author wants to delineate about the human psyche or soul. In ancient stories — myths, folklore — there are deeper truths that may explain us to us. In other words, these fairy tales are more than true. Bly calls on Freud, Jung, Rilke, Yeats, Vallejo, Ibsen, D.H. Lawrence, and other earthly gods to illustrate the interpenetration of myth into our literature and into our lives. He quotes Antonio Machado: “When heaven and earth have passed away/my word will remain./What was your word, Jesus?/Love? Affection? Forgiveness?/All your words were/one word: Wakeup!” He speaks of the shadow: “We used to say that the proper study of mankind is man … But now we don’t bother with the chthonic, the under-worldly energy as it lives in us.” And he speaks of “inner work,” the process we are honing or ignoring, the part that can be reached through the plumbing of the unconscious. “Now, with social media and worldwide conversations on every imaginable topic, more people are likely to recognize other people’s shadows and failures. Whether we can recognize our own is still in question.” Fairy tales are one connection to the shared unconscious. Dreams are another, and perhaps poetry, ritual, and religion. Toward the end, Bly says, “Possibly fairy tales themselves are ways to keep the early joys of our life concealed and yet not lost.” I love that: And yet not lost. And further: “We mustn’t assume from the jokey tone tellers of fairy tales use that there is little at stake here. Everything is at stake.” While this book doesn’t have the clarity or unity of purpose of Iron John, it is still an enthralling and welcome addition to Bly’s remarkable oeuvre and to the ongoing study of fairy tales and myths and what they say about us today. It is a book full of marvels and timeless insight.

149

S PA S PA

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

R

obert Bly first came to fame as a poet and activist, slightly on the fringe of the beats, publishing an early book, The Teeth Mother Naked at Last, with City Lights Books. He won the National Book Award for his poetry collection, The Light Around the Body. If you’ve seen Robert Bly read (perform) his poetry, you know that it’s like witnessing a conjureman or shamanistic scop perform. He’s the Wise Man of the Forest, part Joseph Campbell, part Allen Ginsberg. Then, in 1990, he published his book, Iron John: A Book About Men, an often misunderstood work because of its association with the mythopoetic men’s movement. This movement became notorious for its sweat lodges and men’s retreats, but more to the point, the book seems to me to be an enchanting employment of Jungian archetype psychology, and the analysis of fairy tales and other mythic reverberations that follow from that. This new book, More Than True: The Wisdom of Fairy Tales (Henry Holt, $26), is in that vein. It is similar to the work of Robert A. Johnson and MarieLouise von Franz, whose 1974 book, Shadow and Evil in Fairy Tales, parallels many of Bly’s themes, though Bly is still more interested in the masculine leitmotifs of folklore. I was in Jungian therapy for a dozen years — I know I should be more mentally sound — and Iron John was a key text to me, a real gift from my therapist. Taking an oft-used image from fairy tales, in that book Bly said, “I think we can regard therapy, when it is good, as a waiting by the pond. Each time we dip our wound into the water, we get nourishment, and the strength to go on further in the process.” There is a pond, a well, a key, and a magic tablecloth in the six fairy tales Bly has chosen to explicate in his new book; there are talking animals, mysterious dark men, enchanted creatures, witches, and serpents. “Sometimes fairy tales are stories

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Robert Bly’s More Than True: The Wisdom of Fairy Tales.

29


FOOD NEWS By Susan Ellis

Eat Here Now open: Slice of Soul and Smackers.

Howard Bell (left) and Anthony Latiker of Slice of Soul Pizza Lounge includes the Memphis Meat Mafia with sausage, beef, pepperoni, and bacon; the Cooper-Young Cheese; and the barbecue pizza Bar-BQ-Kays. A stand-out among the pizzas is the Al B. Green, which is dense with fresh veggies like spinach, olive, and mushrooms. The pizzas are cut into square slices, so that will bring you back to your school days (daze?). These guys love their neighborhood, their city. It’s reflected all over the menu in the names of the

dishes. Slice of Soul also serves gumbo and salads and a nice selection of wings. The wings were Latiker’s idea. Bell needed convincing. Latiker had cooked the wings for large crowds and knew Memphis as a wing city. “If you think wings are going to hit … ” Bell remembers saying. Bell has since become a convert to the wings. In fact, he says, “They’re the best wings in the South. I put our

JUSTIN FOX BURKS

H

oward Bell and Anthony Latiker are childhood friends who grew up across the way from each other. They rode bikes. They played in the band together at TSU. Bell played the trumpet, Latiker the saxophone. They are Westwood proud. This is reflected in the Westwood Whole Wings, an item on the menu at Slice of Soul Pizza Lounge, the pair’s new restaurant on Madison near Cleveland in Midtown. “We didn’t have a place like this when we both came up,” says Bell. And by like this, he means terrifically old school — paintings of Isaac Hayes, old Bee Gees albums, Soul Train on the TV. A place to hang out and have pizza. Slice of Soul’s bread and butter is the flatbread pizza. The menu

wings up against anyone else.” Neither Bell nor Latiker have any restaurant experience; they are running Slice of Soul on common sense. Like serving pizza, which is relatively easy to put together (the flat breads are bought) and most

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E AT H E R E

Enthusiasm for this drive-thru spot on Airways is evidenced by the line of cars around the building. There’s a menu signed by Anfernee Hardaway. They bought the building in September. It was a complete mess, and they had to gut it. The plan, they say, is to open a second sit-down place sometime in 2019, ideally in Midtown. For now, it’s about perfecting the craft, according to Jamerson. “We try to be different. With our freshness and quality, there’s none that can compare.” Smackers, 1525 Airways, 308-2556, smackersmemphis.com

9

$

LUNCH

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HALF POBOY

CHOOSE A SIDE: FRIES, CHIPS, or SIDE SALAD

Drink Included. Upgrade the side to a cup of gumbo or etouffee for $1.

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PLATE LUNCH

CHOICE OF MEAT & TWO SIDES with roll and drink included.

SUNDAY BRUNCH (11-3) with live bluegrass music

535 SOUTH HIGHLAND AVE.

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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

“They hear so much about it. They’re so impressed with this type of food from a little spot,” says Kevin Jamerson, owner of Smackers, along with Jerry Luellen. Enthusiasm for this drive-thru spot on Airways is evidenced by the line of cars around the building. There’s a menu signed by Anfernee Hardaway tacked to the wall. A few weeks ago, gubernatorial candidate Karl Dean stopped by for a community event. Smackers opened in December. The motto is “Small place … big taste.” The menu includes the classics: hamburgers, chicken tenders, nachos, sandwiches, slushes, and milkshakes. Jamerson is particularly proud of his grilled salmon club sandwich with its house-made remoulade. The burgers, he says, “are amazing, cooked to perfection.” The signature Smackers burger comes with grilled onion,

bacon, and a fried egg topped with smack sauce, a chipotle/Thousand Island combo. The salad, they say, is tasty too, and pretty much the only one around. “It’s some of the freshest in the area, if you can find one in this area,” Jamerson says. The restaurant’s origin story starts with a food truck, Lick the Plate. Jamerson liked the name, but settled on Smackers, as in “smack your lips.”

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

everybody likes. The plan is to have music, comedy, and open mic, and to continue to represent the city. Each has had issues with the city over the years, but they say, “Memphis is still No. 1 to us.” Slice of Soul Pizza Lounge, 1299 Madison, 509-2087, sospizzalounge.com

Kentucky Derby, May 5 See the Lucky North Club for details. Players must be 21+ to game and 18+ to bet at the race track. Play responsibly; for help quitting call 800-522-4700.

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4/20/18 3:08 PM


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That $2.99 bottle of red is probably overpriced.

S

ince I started writing this column, I’ve been told that no wine is too cheap for me to drink. Invariably, this comment is punctuated with theatrically rolling eyeballs. This makes me blue. Until the other week, I generally answered the jab with something along the lines of “Well. Now, it’s true, you really can’t judge a wine by its price.” Or, depending how much tasting there was of said Bacchus, “You probably haven’t bought as much sophistication as you think you have with that overpriced Pinot, you half-wit.” Wine sales in supermarkets have increased wine distribution in Tennessee, which has brought on a sudden availability of really cheap wine — vino at bottled-water prices, and not the reverseosmosis stuff with electrolytes either. There was a certain profane integrity with the old Night Train and Thunderbird rotgut; you knew what they were for. These nouveau-cheaps are masquerading as something else, altogether. Yet, I’m a professional, so I felt compelled to dive in. If we don’t learn from our experiences, what good are they? What I’ve learned recently is that there is an end to exactly how deep I’ll go down the cheap-wine rabbit hole. Evidently my breaking point is somewhere above $2.99, which even a cheap bastard like myself has to admit is a comically low price point. I won’t mention where I got it, because the retailer didn’t make the stuff, so it isn’t their fault. Not entirely, at any rate. The RICO statutes of this country make it clear that anyone taking part in any element of a crime is potentially guilty of the entire crime. Whatever it is that Burlwood Cellars is churning out is something of a crime. This wine did to my soul what the villainous Le Chiffre did to James Bond in that infamous cane-chair-and-

knotted-rope scene. You know what I mean — right in the pills! According to the label, it was a Pinot Noir, and I doubt they were technically lying. It is perfectly legal to call a wine a single varietal, even if it’s only 75 percent of said variety. Still, my sophisticated wine-writer palate also detected hints of Jungle Juice, unwashed hair, and shame. The only terroir — earth — I could detect was Tom Lee asphalt after Music Fest. When I was in the Middle East, I once drank bootleg whiskey that had been smuggled into the country in heavy plastic IV bags. The plastic did exactly what you expect it to do to the bourbon. I’ve had brandy made in Serbia and moonshine made in Union County, Mississippi. This was worse. Standard winespeak simply fails to convey a complete picture, because to say that “it lacked subtlety” isn’t quite right. There was a very vague feeling that some hag from an early Disney movie had just given me some draught to make me sleep for 100 years, or possibly turn me into a fearsome goat-man. So, in that regard, I suppose we could call it “enchanting.” The vintners recommend pairing this enchanting number with a “spicy meat dish,” and this is good advice. The operative word here, though, is spicy, not meat. I’d recommend a spoonful of that Sambal Oelek chili paste or some other condiment that the Vietnamese invented to stick it to the French colonists. Still, I try to find the silver lining in these things. If you have children in the house and you’d like to throw them off the road to under-age drinking, stock the liquor cabinet with Burlwood — at this price get as many bottles as you need! When the little knee-biters inevitably raid the cellar to experiment, they’ll probably develop a lifelong fear of booze. Either that or they’ll turn to the harder stuff. You never can tell with children.

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33


FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy

The Professional Joaquin Phoenix hunts humans in You Were Never Really Here.

T

April 26-May 2, 2018

here’s an old saying that the difference between acting for the stage and the screen is that stage acting is about acting, but film acting is more about being. The intimacy of the camera exaggerates every nuance on an actor’s face, so emotions that seem natural on stage come across as grotesque and fake on screen. There are few better be-ers in the business than Joaquin Phoenix, and You Were Never Really Here finds him be-ing all over the place. Phoenix plays a demobbed Iraq veteran named Joe who has been reduced to a shell of his former self by PTSD. Director Lynne Ramsay cannily introduces us to his tortured point of view in a long opening sequence where we see visual fragments of the aftermath of something horrific that recently happened in a dingy hotel room in Cincinnati. Joe, the battle-scarred soldier, is officially a civilian again, but he is still a man of violence and a consummate professional. Officially, he lives in New York caring for his octogenarian mother, portrayed with a charming playfulness by Judith Roberts. But his bloody work makes him

a frequent traveler who maintains airtight operational security. He’s able to breeze into town, commit multiple murders, and evaporate like a cloud. Ramsay’s film, which was lauded at Cannes 2017 and picked up by Amazon Studios, has been compared to Taxi Driver. Indeed, there’s a fair amount of Travis Bickle in Joe. He moves easily through the underground of a New York that is teeming with humanity, but his extreme alienation has begun to wear on his sanity. Joe pops pills with abandon, but they do little to keep the vivid flashbacks at bay. I think a more apt comparison would be to Luc Besson’s Léon: The Professional. Joe’s work is dirty, but the people he’s whacking on the head with his preferred weapon, the ball-peen hammer, mostly deserve what’s coming to them. Joe’s current specialty is finding missing girls believed to be in the clutches of human traffickers, rescuing them, and dispatching the kidnapers with extreme prejudice. He deals in cash, cutouts, and dead drops, and if the client requests “make it hurt,” all the better. Like Léon, this detached professional finds himself

True Story:

Joaquin Phoenix (above) masters the thousandyard stare in Lynne Ramsay’s new film. in a situation where he’s suddenly responsible for the well being of a young girl. Nina Votto (Ekaterina Samsonov) is the runaway daughter of a New York State Senator (Alex Manette) who has been imprisoned in a luxury brownstone. Joe finds her easily and, in a brilliant sequence told mostly by security camera footage, cleans out the nest of sex slavers in a particularly brutal manner. But then things go badly awry. Nina’s captors were much better connected than anyone Joe has ever taken on before, and Joe’s little world comes crashing down on him, along with what is left of his psyche. Ramsay’s work is as chilling as it is technically flawless. She’s an avid practitioner of the Kubrick Stare — Phoenix seems to stay blank and immobile for an uncomfortably long time before springing into

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FILM REVIEW By Chris McCoy John Wick stages mass murder as a kind of hyper-violent ballet. Director Ramsay is more concerned with the aftermath of violence. Her elliptical editing reveals the effects — bloody hammers, personal effects gathered for clandestine disposal — without glamorizing the cause. And while Wick is portrayed as a kind of benevolent, detached angel of death, Joe is haunted by the horrors he has seen and caused. Ramsay’s version of the professional may not be as commercial as John Wick’s, but it is no less slick — and much more truthful. You Were Never Really Here Now playing Ridgeway Cinema Grill

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ultraviolence. She and cinematographer Thomas Townsend get a lot of mileage out of symmetrical shots contrasting Joe’s increasingly disheveled and bloody presence and the domestic banality of Brooklyn and New Jersey. Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood composed the floaty score, but the soundtrack makes great use of New York’s terrible plague of soft rock radio, both for creepy counter-scoring and to create a sense of place. You Were Never Really Here seems like a rebuke to the John Wicks of the world. The Keanu Reeves character is a dapper professional killer with a supernaturally competent supporting cast based out of a chain of luxury hotels. Joe, on the other hand, takes his payoffs in brown manila envelopes hidden in the backrooms of bodegas.

35


EMPLOYMENT • REAL ESTATE Business Opportunities

Employment

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.AdvancedMailing.net (AAN CAN)

Drivers/ Transportation EXP. TOW DRIVER Needed: Clean MVR & Background, 24 hr. shifts with set time off. Apply in person at 3614 Jackson Ave. or Call 901-522-9029

Education AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN) _____________________ SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOLS is hiring exceptional educators! Teaching positions available now. Openings in Business, Dance, Economics, ESL, Elementary, English, Government, History, Library, Math, Middle Grades, Music, Physical Education, Science, Spanish, Visual Arts. Must hold bachelorís degree with GPA of 2.75+. Praxis Content Exam may be required. Starting salary is $43,000. Send resume to info@teachmemphis.org. For questions call 901.416.1672.

CLEAN AND PINK Is a upscale residential cleaning company that takes pride in their employees & the clients they serve. Providing exceptional service to all. The application process is extensive to include a detailed drug test, physical exam, and background check. The training hours are 8am6pm Mon - Thur. 12$-19$hr. Full time hours are Mon-Thu & rotating Fridays. Transportation to job sites during the work day is company provided. Body cameras are a part of the work uniform. Uniform shirts provided. Only serious candidates need apply. Those only looking for long term employment need apply. Cleaning is a physical job but all tools are company provided. Send Resume to cleannpink@msn.com COPELAND SERVICES, L.L.C. Hiring Armed State Licensed Officers/Unarmed Officers. Three Shifts Available. Same Day Interview. 1661 International Place 901-258-5872 or 901-818-3187 Interview in Professional Attire _____________________

SAM’S TOWN HOTEL & Gambling Hall in Tunica, MS is looking for the next Direct Marketing Pro, is it you? We need someone who has excellent organizational skills, knows Direct Mail and Database Marketing, previous Casino Marketing experience preferred. Must have strong written and oral communication skills and the ability

to meet deadlines in the fast paced casino environment, proficient in Microsoft Office, CMS and LMS. Must be able to obtain and maintain a MS Gaming Commission Work Permit, pass a prescreening including but not limited to background and drug screen. To apply, log on to boydcareers.com and follow the prompts to Tunica. Boyd Gaming Corp is a drug free workplace and equal opportunity employer. Must be at least 21 to apply.

General ANIMAL LOVERS Bring Your Dog to Work. Carriage Drivers needed downtown. Valid license required. UptownCarriages. com 901-496-2128 _____________________ ASST CNTRIR CBRE, Inc. has an oppty in Memphis, TN for an Asst Cntrlr. Exp in Real Estate acctg incl accnts payable reqd. 5% Intíl trvl reqd. Mail resume to Attn: HR, 2100 Ross Ave, Ste 1600, Dallas, TX 75201, Ref #MEMSWA. Must be legally auth to work in the U.S. w/o spnsrshp. EOE

Hospitality/ Restaurant CAMY’S IS NOW HIRING ALL POSITIONS: Asst. Managers, Drivers, Cooks. Apply in person 2886 Walnut Grove Rd. Anytime. No Phone Calls. _____________________ EAST MEMPHIS MEXICAN RESTAURANT is looking for Servers & Hostess We are looking for Servers and Hostess with prior experience. Must have flexible schedule and be able to work 4-5 shifts lunch and or dinner weekly. Experience is preferred but will train

the right person with the right attitude towards learning and growing from within the restaurant. Hourly pay is negotiable upon hiring for Hostess. Discounted employees meals, fast upbeat environment. We have 26yrs of business in the same location serving East Memphis guests and will need servers of which we do promote from within long term and for the upcoming season.

RAFFERTY’S We are looking for service minded individuals, that don’t mind working hard. We work hard, but make $. Apply in the store. 505 N Gtown Pkwy

IT/COMPUTER IT APPLICATION DEVELOPER III sought by Servicemaster BSC, LLC, in Memphis, TN to provide high-level analysis & estimates for new project requests & assist w/ process reviews & provide suggestions for improvement. Bachís deg in Comp Sci, MIS, Engíg, or relíd field, or frgn equiv & 5 yrs of exp w/ business app sftwr systms. Knwldg of relational database app dvlpmnt; Modular dsgn & dvlpmnt practices; App prfrmnce tuning techniques. Ability to perfrm analysis & dsgn, express complex technical concepts effectively, both verbally & in writing. Ability to communicate effectively w/ all members of user community. Ability to plan & prioritize work & ability to work w/ a team & individually. Send resume to: Servicemaster BSC, LLC, Attn.: Angela Clark, 860 Ridge Lake Blvd., A3-4085, Memphis, TN 38120. EOE/M/F/V/D/sexual orientation/ gender identity.

Volunteer Opportunities IF YOU’RE A GOOD READER and can volunteer to do so please call 901-832-4530

Midtown Apt 2209 MADISON 1 Block from Overton Square. 2BR/1BA Apt, CH/A, hardwood floors. W/D in unit & all appls. Blinds, gated pkg. $1050/mo. No pets. 901-726-1344 _____________________ CENTRAL GARDENS 2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft ceil, crown molding, off str pking. $750/mo. Also Large 1BR, $720/ mo. 833-6483 or 569-0847. _____________________ EVERGREEN HIST. DIST. XL Studio $395, remodeled, hardwood floors,screened porch, pets ok. Great neighbors. Only 1 apt available. $25 cc fee. 452-3945

Shared Housing 1722 SHADOWLAWN BLVD Starting at $140 & up per week. Fully furnished w/ cable & TV. Utilities included. Call 502-9214 _____________________ FURNISHED ROOM in Cordova. Very nice. Next to Greenline & Shelby Farms. Refs. req. $400/mo. 901-385-1872 _____________________ FURNISHED ROOMS Bellevue/McLemore, Willett/ Southern, Airways/Park. W/D, Cable TV/Phone. 901-485-0897 _____________________ HOUSE SHARING Bartlett Area. 1 private bedroom and full bath, big back yard, quiet area, $350/mo & $50 utils + deposit. Call 901-314-9734 _____________________ MIDTOWN ROOM for rent near Medical District. Fridge, utilities, wifi, $100/week + dep. No Drugs. 901-725-0895. _____________________ NICE ROOMS FOR RENT S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable included. Fridge in your room. Cooking and free laundry privileges. Some locations w/sec. sys. Starting at $435/mo. + dep. 901.922.9089

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THE LAST WORD by Randy Haspel

War Stories In which the author recounts a lifetime’s worth of gigs from hell. Several months ago, the Flyer featured a cover story with local musicians recounting their “Worst Gigs Ever.” I wish somebody would’ve asked me. I have so many horror stories, they have to be categorized by decade. I’ve been in other bands and played as an acoustic soloist, but most of my performing career has been with the Radiants, a “rock-and-soul” group that lasted from my teen years in the Sixties until our final show two years ago at Lafayette’s. In a 2011 Flyer, I wrote about being punched out by the bouncers at Club Clearpool, only to be vindicated by Sputnik Monroe. You could look that one up if you’re curious, but first let me tell you about a gig that still gives me the creeps. I was in a band out of Knoxville called Rich Mountain Tower. We had a production deal and were on a mini-tour, opening for Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. Our bass player — we’ll call him Todd — was going through some serious psychological problems resulting from an LSD-fried brain. He had that 1,000-yard stare, even though he’d never been in combat. When we played Charleston, West Virginia, Todd paused and spoke to the audience. Backstage, I asked what he had said, and he told me that he “asked the audience’s forgiveness for being a coward all my life.” The next night’s gig was at the Mid-South Coliseum. We set up shop at the old Downtowner Motel, across from the Peabody, where we returned after the concert. I was chatting with friends, when I heard shouting and screams for help coming from the next room. I ran next door to witness Todd standing on the edge of an open window on the 15th floor, with our guitarist bear-hugging Todd’s mid-section to prevent him from jumping. We succeeded in pulling Todd back into the room, but he was on a bus at the crack of dawn, leaving for his home town and psychiatric help. I had been playing at various joints around Knoxville when an agent booked me and my singing partner, Bob Simon, for a show in Middlesboro, Kentucky, at an Elk’s Club gathering. Or it could have been the Lions Club, I forget. I was dressed in my hippie finery — bell bottoms, flowered shirt, boots, peace sign, and long hair — while we waited in the kitchen for their program to end. Bob looked  at the crowd of rural, middle-aged men in coats and ties and refused to go out. I was in the middle of berating him when we were introduced. He agreed to come out, only after I had sung the first song. When I entered with my guitar, the room exploded with laughter. I don’t mean snickers or giggles, these were howls and belly laughs at my appearance. I stood in front of the microphone, but the laughter went on and on. As I looked out at the rowdy crowd, waiting for their derision to subside, I felt like Edwin Booth taking the stage just months after his brother had killed Lincoln. I sang a song, introduced Bob, and the room erupted again. Bob’s face turned beet red. We changed our entire set and sang one country song after the next until they finally gave us some begrudging applause. We cursed our agent all the way back to Knoxville and learned the benefits of knowing your audience in advance.

Show Biz ain’t for sissies, folks. If you’re unable to tolerate a constant barrage of bullshit and humiliation, there are probably too many singing guitar players out there anyway. Randy Haspel writes the “Recycled Hippies” blog.

THE LAST WORD

The Radiants were playing a gig at an after-hours nightclub in North Little Rock called The Apartment Club. It was a seedy place filled with drunks with nowhere else to go. A scuffle broke out in the crowd and the band went on break. I’ve seen a lot of fistfights. I’ve seen brawls roil from one side of the room to the other while the band continued to play, but this felt different, maybe more menacing. I was standing outside with the bass player when the front doors flew open and a gangly, drunken redneck tumbled onto the ground followed by two huge bouncers. The drunk staggered to his feet, lunged at the bouncers, and threw a punch. Suddenly, a handgun appeared and we dove for cover. While one bouncer held the gun in the air, the other pulled out a blackjack and started pounding the guy in the head shouting, “You done fucked up now, Bobby Gene!” The intoxicated Bobby Gene refused to go down and received a Rodney King-like beating until he finally succumbed to the blows to his head and slumped to the sidewalk. He lay there bleeding for a while, but made it back to his feet. He stumbled toward a pickup truck, but the bouncer gave one last sweeping kick to his ribs that dropped him to the gravel. The band had to regroup. The crowd was visibly shaken by the episode. Things seemed to be calming down a bit, when someone ran in, screaming, “Bobby Gene’s back with a shotgun!” Everyone froze. We were instructed to continue playing, so we did, while an armed Bobby Gene was fighting with the police out in the parking lot. He lost, but all we heard was “Keep playing, boys; that’s what we pay you for.”

m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m

Many years ago, there was a motorbike dirt-track out near Lakeland on I-40. They occasionally staged races and competitions or whatever the hell dirt-bikers do, and I was booked to play an outdoor concert with a four-piece band cleverly named the Hired Hands. We assumed that we would play in a break in the action or after the race. I never imagined they wanted us to play while the race was taking place. We’d start a song and every 30 seconds the whine of a dirt bike would drown us out. It was not only a ridiculous situation, the bikes were kicking up so much dust that I was literally eating dirt while trying to sing. We were coughing and sneezing on our flatbed truck, parked hard against the track while the motorcycles whizzed by, covering the sky in particles of dust. While wiping my tears when the gig was mercifully over, the track’s owner gave me a check. It bounced. I contacted the owner later, and he assured me the account was solvent and wrote me a second check — which also bounced. When I drove out to the track, it had closed. It was the only time, in a lifetime of performing, that anyone ever stiffed me with a bad check.

39


MINGLEWOOD HALL

4/28: NPC Championship 5/8: Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul 5/19-21: SCM Awards 6/1: Gary Clark Jr. (MOVED TO NOV. 1ST) 6/14: Ledisi w/ Melanie Fiona & Tweet 6/28: Trixie Mattel

Celebrating 75 Years JUST ANNOUNCED:

1884 LOUNGE

Sat June 23 – Lyfe Jennings Mon July 2 – Bush

5/11: Of Montreal 6/29: The Steel Woods

UPCOMING:

MORE EVENTS AT MINGLEWOODHALL.COM

Fri April 27 - The Dixie Dregs Sun April 29 - Parkway Drive Mon May 7 - Todrick Hall Tue May 8 - Black Veil Brides /Asking Alexandria Fri May 11 - MoneyBagg Yo Sun May 13 - Jimmy Eat World Mon May 14 - Fifty Shades Male Revue Fri May 18 - Daisyland presents Barely Alive and Virtual Riot Wed May 23 - Stone Temple Pilots Fri May 25 - Butcher Babies w/ Cane Hill and Sumo Cyco Sat May 26 - Sevendust Tue June 5 - Big Boi Sun Jun 17 - Tech N9ne Fri June 22 – Daisyland presents Blunts and Blondes Fri Aug 3 - Tory Lanez

Coco & Lola’s

MidTown Lingerie

Cosabella: Why not get the best? www.cocoandlolas.com

Finest lace - Coolest place 710 S. Cox|901-425-5912|Mon-Sat 11:30-7:00

TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES 421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965

All Bracelets in stock is 50% OFF throughout April 1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings, Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in costume jewelry.

NEW DAISY THEATRE | 330 Beale St Memphis 901.525.8981 • Advance Tickets available at NewDaisy.com and Box Office

YOUNGAVENUEDELI.COM

GROWLERS 1911 Poplar | 901growlers.com

2119 Young Ave • 278-0034 4/25: $3 Pint Night! 4/26: Memphis Trivia League! 4/28: White Animals and Walrus 5/10: Human Society Pup Crawl 5/12: UFC 224 Nunes Vs. Pennington 5/19-5/20: Cooper Young Garden Walk 5/25: Drag Show With Goldie Dee

4/25- California Honeydrops 4/26- Eagle Claw 4/27- Whores. 4/28- Walter Trout (7pm doors) 5/1- The Nude Party 5/2- CF Is Lame Fundraiser 5/3- Vandoliers 5/8- Shawn James 5/10- Clownvis Presley

Kitchen Open Late! Now Delivering All Day! 278-0034 (limited delivery area)

$CASH 4 JUNK CARS$

Non-Operating Cars, No Title Needed.

*MATTRESS LIQUIDATION SALE*

901-691-2687

Queen Sets starting at - $150 First Come First Served Call or Text Mike (901) 426-6616

ROSIE’S HAULING SERVICE • Spring Clean Up • Delivery & Pick Up Service • Light Debris & Junk Removal

Call 901.512.7686 SIMPLY HEMP SHOP

We carry CBD oils, CBD honey sticks, CBD Teas & even CBD for Pets. simplyhempshop.com

DESTINY DUO PLAYING OLDIES

MEMPHIS MADE BREWING Tap Room Hours: Mon, Thurs & Fri 4-10 p.m., Sat 1-10 p.m., Sun 1-7 p.m.

at the Berclair Civic Club on the 2nd & 4th Fridays, 6:30p-9p. Sit-ins are welcome.

768 S. Cooper • 901.207.5343 Free brewery tours Saturday & Sunday at 4 p.m

MEMPHIS IN MAY POSTERS Rare. Signed. Limited Ed. prints for sale. Italy, Israel, Egypt & others. 901-270-8550.

GONER RECORDS

New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs.

BOOK REPAIR

We Buy Records!

Have an old book or bible that needs repair? Call Art, 2nd Editions Bookstore at 901.483.0478.

2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095

Thur 4/26: GGOOLLDD Thursday Night Set, 8p Fri 4/27: Faux Killas + Turnstyles, 8p Sat 4/28: Ghost Town Blues Band at Railgarten, 8p Sun 4/29: Sunday School w/ Tonya Dyson, 12p Sat 5/5: Lucky Seven Brass Band, 8p Sat 5/12: Travis Linville, 7p railgarten.com • 2166 Central Ave • 231-5043

Antiques & Collectibles Antiques & Collectibles 21,000 sq ft. 100 + booths 5855 Summer Ave. (corner of Summer and Sycamore View) exit 12 off I-40 | 901.213.9343 Mon-Sat 10a-6p | Sun 1p-6p

I Buy 45RPM Records & Old Windup Phonographs

CHIP N’ DALE’S ANTIQUES 3457 Summer Avenue • Memphis, TN 38122 EVERYTHING ON SALE! Open Tues-Sat | 901-452-5620 “Celebrating 30 years in Business”

whatevershops.com

And Old 78 RPM’s on labels: Paramount, Okeh, Gennett, Vocalion, Champion, Supertone, Superior, QRS, Black Patti, Perfect, Romeo, Conqueror, Victor, Columbia, Edison, Sun, Meteor, Flip Many others. Call Paul: 901-435-6668

Memphis Flyer 4.26.18  

This week: we continue our Justice Project with a look at wealth inequality in Memphis. Also: our review of You Were Never Really Here, a ne...

Memphis Flyer 4.26.18  

This week: we continue our Justice Project with a look at wealth inequality in Memphis. Also: our review of You Were Never Really Here, a ne...