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Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

THE FACES AND PLACES ISSUE

THE CITY MAGAZINE

USA $4.99

VOL XLII NO 1 2 | M A R C H 2 018

the

m i n d’s e y e

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0 3

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—1

!1

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New Ballet Ensemble dancers Jayme Stokes and Gene Seals. DISPLAY UNTIL APRIL 10, 2018

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VOL XLII NO 12 | MARCH 2018

THE MIND’S EYE

70 Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

THE FACES AND PLACES ISSUE

THE CITY MAGAZINE

VOL XLII NO 1 2 | M A R C H 2 018

Features 56 Now!

The Brooks Museum’s “African Print Fashion Now!” exhibit is right on time. ~ by chris davis

60 great homes

At Home in the Forest The Elkington family’s residence provides a “country in the city” feel. ~ by anne

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Swing dancers on Beale Street DISPLAY UNTIL APRIL 10, 2018

on the cover New Ballet Ensemble dancers Jayme Stokes and Gene Seals. Special thanks to New Ballet Ensemble & School.

newballet.org PHOTOGRAPH BY BRANDON DILL

Up Front 12 14 18 20 24

in the beginning on the town fine print city journal out and about

cunningham o’neill

66 Battle Royal

For many, the upcoming race for Shelby County mayor may seem much ado about nothing. But for those who care about the future of our city and region, next fall’s county election may prove critically important. ~ by jackson baker

70 the mind’s eye Brandon Dill

Keeping people, places, events, and issues in focus in the Mid-South. ~ by michael finger

108 Diamonds & Chocolate

Marco Pave and Zandria Robinson talk rap, resistance, and reimagining the Memphis sound. ~ by anna traverse

112 Drumroll Please

Drumline members keep the beat for the Grizz. ~ by shara clark

Columns

116 travel

Unearthly Paradise The island nation of Turks and Caicos endures after the worst hurricane season in history. ~ by chris mccoy

122 faith

Rabbi James Wax (1913-1989) Remembering the leader of Temple Israel.

~ by joan beifuss

158 ask vance

Abe Goodman Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. ~ by vance lauderdale

161 garden variety

How Do I Love Thee, Dear Daffodil? There are plenty of ways to count the popularity of this beautiful flower. ~ by chris arpe gang

163 end game

Herbo Humphreys, Treasure Hunter

164 dining out

Play with Fire For chefs Michael Hudman and Andrew Ticer, The Gray Canary on Front Street is a dream come true. ~ by pamela denney

166 city dining Memphis (ISSN 1622-820x) is published monthly for $15 per year by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 © 2018. Telephone: 901-521-9000. For subscription info, please call 901-521-9000. Subscription customer service mailing address is Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. All rights reserved. • Periodicals Postage Paid at Memphis, TN. Postmasters: send address changes to Memphis, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

Tidbits: The Liquor Store; plus the city’s most extensive dining listings.

176 last stand

Tiger Type A (and Types B and C) A look at the three distinct subspecies of Memphis Tiger basketball fans. ~ by frank murtaugh

MARCH 20 18 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • 7

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Store Closing March 31st

Furniture Gas Logs Umbrellas Cushions Selected Grills

BONUS

In This Issue 2018

2018

FACES OF THE

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CATERING

PARADOX CATERING & CONSULTING >>> Chef Jimmy Gentry Chef/Owner Jimmy Gentry of Paradox Catering was formally trained at Johnson and Wales College of Culinary Arts. Before starting his own business with partner Alia Hogan, he led kitchens across the Mid-South to win multiple awards. Almost 9 years ago, Paradox Catering was created with the vision in mind to redefine what people expected not only from the food itself, but from the presentation and service as well. Paradox's Jessica Lambert and Chef Gentry work closely with clients to define their personal style, which we then translate into every aspect of their event so we can provide that one-ofa-kind experience they always envisioned. We have been truly fortunate to be embraced by the Mid-South and have in turn seen tremendous success with our creative and innovative approach to catering.

THE FACE OF

CATASTROPHIC INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH LAW PEEL LAW FIRM >>> David B. Peel, injury attorney

INJURY ATTORNEY DAVID PEEL BRINGS A PERSONAL TOUCH TO FAMILIES TOUCHED BY TRAGEDY For over 20 years, David B. Peel has assisted those Attorney David Peel has a small, suburban office, families impacted by the negligence of others, but achieves big results. He was inducted as a and his recent book on Tennessee injury law was life member of the exclusive Multi-Million Dollar an Amazon best-seller. He sees tragedies resulting Advocates Forum, reserved for those with a case from tractor-trailer and car crashes, malpractice, result of $2,000,000 or more. Named as a Midor industrial incidents. Clients are often initially South Super Lawyer for the last six years, he has uncomfortable talking to a lawyer or making a long been recognized by his peer attorneys as claim against insurance. But, as one of Peel Law "AV-Preeminent," the highest lawyer rating. He has Firm’s many Five-Star reviews attests: “He actually been voted “Best of the Best Attorney” in local cares about you and your situation more than Readers' Choice Awards for five years in a row. the money!! Awesome man of GOD!! (How many Peel, a proud father of three and husband to Trish, Lawyers have you had to pray for you and your also serves on boards of directors of Love Worth situation?)” -T.Graves Finding Ministries and the Bellevue Foundation.

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very 80 seconds, a woman dies of cardiovascular disease, which is a statistic the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign is striving to change. The campaign launched in 2004 with a simple goal: increase women’s awareness of their leading killer — heart disease. Since then, around 280 fewer women die each day of heart disease and stroke, and more women are aware of their risk factors. “Eighty percent of cardiovascular disease is preventable through a healthy lifestyle,” says Kim Cherry, senior vice president of communications for First Tennessee and the chair of the 2017 Go Red for Women campaign in Memphis. “It is so important for us to do whatever we can to not only raise awareness of this health threat among women, but also to educate women about the healthy habits necessary to live a heart-healthy life.” Since last summer, Cherry and fellow campaign leaders have been fundraising and planning for the 2017 Go Red for Women

Luncheon, which will take place on Thursday, June 1st, at the Great Hall and Conference Center in Germantown. “Through the Go Red for Women luncheon, the American Heart Association educates female leaders in the Mid-South on risks associated with heart disease and shares simple tips for living a heart-healthy life,” Cherry says. “Our guests are then able to take and share that knowledge with other women in their lives as they return to the workplace and home.” Doors open at 11 a.m. with a Wellness Expo

• 50,000sq ft • Pinball Arcade • Over 150 Vendors • Cafe • Live Auctions • Monthly Events

For more information on the Go Red for Women Luncheon, visit memphisgored.heart. org or call 901-248-7954.

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PE T GUIDE

PET GUIDE

Our annual guide to the best ways to keep our furry and feathered friends healthy and happy.

More than Man’s Best Friend Service animals are more than pets — they save lives.

by shara clark

K

nox’s best friend has already saved his life twice. Seven-year-old Knox was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 2, and with the deadly risk of his blood sugar dipping too low, his mother, Ashley Bittick, knew she had to have a plan. “I do a blood glucose check on him 10 to 12 times a day, and he gets a minimum of four shots a day,” Bittick says. “Every time he eats, he has to get insulin, but if his sugar is low, he would have liquid sugar — a juice box or something of that nature — to immediately bring up his blood sugar.” While a sudden change in Knox’s behavior is typically a good indicator of a blood-sugar dip, “One low blood sugar can kill,” Bittick says, so she sought out another tool — a diabetic alert dog. Through the Senatobia, Mississippi-based nonprofit organization Retrieving Freedom, Knox met Nellie, a yellow lab who, over the course of 18 months, has grown to be much more than a pet. “Knox actually picked her out,” Bittick, a mother of three who lives in Arlington, says. “When we went down there, they gave him

several options and let the dogs interact with Knox. When Nellie went up to him, they immediately bonded.” Much of the training for service dogs includes standard obedience training, as service dog recipients often take their animals into public places. For diabetic alert dogs, the process also involves scent work. In the early phases of Nellie’s training, while she was housed at the Senatobia facility, Bittick would watch at home for Knox’s sugar to drop. “When he would drop to 70 or under, I would have to put a cotton ball in his mouth

and saturate it,” she says. “I couldn’t touch it; he would spit it into a glass vial, we’d double-Ziploc it, and freeze it.” The package would be dated and marked with Knox’s blood sugar level. After collecting several saturated cotton balls during each low-sugar episode, the Bitticks would pass them off to the trainer, who’d thaw out the samples and work with Nellie to recognize the scent. Since the thawed cotton balls didn’t always retain a strong odor, the next phase of training involved “live alerts,” where Knox and Nellie worked one-on-one to teach Nellie that the cotton ball and Knox’s low-sugar scent were one and the same. “Of course, we wouldn’t always know when his sugar was going to drop, but there were times we were training [in person] and it would drop, and we would work with her in a short period of time to identify the low sugar,” says Bittick. Nellie has been taught to paw at Knox or his mother when she senses a low-sugar episode. She has responded to two live alerts

Knox and Nellie stand with Charles Dwyer at the Mississippi-based nonprofit Retrieving Freedom, where service dogs are trained for placement.

After 18 months of rigorous training, a portion of which was done in public spaces to address possible distractions, Nellie came home with Knox.

Nellie and Knox bonded immediately and have since grown inseparable. Knox knows his best friend is by his side if an emergency arises.

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY ASHLEY BITTICK

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

featuring CPR training, health messaging, and screenings. Makeup artists from Macy’s, a national sponsor of the Go Red for Women campaign, will provide free mini-makeovers. The campaign is also sponsored nationally by CVS Health. Local sponsors include the First Tennessee Foundation, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, Cigna, Caesar’s Entertainment, Regional One Health, Ring Container Technologies, and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Media sponsors include Local 24 Cares, La Prensa Latina, Entercom and Contemporary Media, Inc. The luncheon program includes education on heart health and culminates with a survivor’s testimony and survivor fashion show, which is presented by Macy’s.

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MIDSOUTH MARKETPLACE

2016 Go Red for Women chair Monica Wharton, senior vice president and chief legal counsel for Regional One Health, and 2017 campaign chair Kim Cherry, executive vice president of corporate communications for First Horizon National Corporation.

We partner with the American Heart Association to boost awareness of heart disease and prevention.

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Coming In June 2018 T OP DOC T ORS Results of a survey conducted by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., which recognizes the toprated physicians in our area as chosen by their peers.

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For more information on advertising or our upcoming special sections, please contact Margie Neal at margie@memphismagazine.com

8 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • MARCH 20 18

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Memphis THE C IT Y MAGAZ INE

General Excellence Grand Award Winner City and Regional Magazine Association 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014

&7

PUBLISHER/EDITOR kenneth neill EXECUTIVE EDITOR michael finger MANAGING EDITOR frank murtaugh SENIOR EDITOR shara clark ASSOCIATE EDITOR samuel x. cicci ARTS & LIFESTYLE EDITOR anne cunningham o’neill FOOD EDITOR pamela denney CONTRIBUTING EDITORS jackson baker, joan beifuss,

john branston, michael donahue, christine arpe gang, vance lauderdale, jon w. sparks, anna traverse EDITORIAL INTERN julia baker

4

CREATIVE DIRECTOR brian groppe PRODUCTION OPERATIONS DIRECTOR margie neal SENIOR ART DIRECTOR carrie beasley ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR christopher myers GRAPHIC DESIGNERS jeremiah matthews,

bryan rollins PHOTOGRAPHY justin fox burks, brandon dill,

michael donahue, karen pulfer focht, chip pankey, cole shots ILLUSTRATION chris honeysuckle ellis

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SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES joy bateman,

sloane patteson taylor ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE jacob woloshin ADVERTISING ASSISTANT roxy matthews

4

published by contemporary media, inc. memphis, tn 901-521-9000 p • 901-521-0129 f subscriptions: 901-521-9000

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CONTROLLER ashley haeger DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT jeffrey a. goldberg EDITORIAL DIRECTOR bruce vanwyngarden DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC INITIATIVES anna traverse DIGITAL DIRECTOR kevin lipe SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER matthew preston DISTRIBUTION MANAGER lynn sparagowski SPECIAL EVENTS DIRECTOR molly willmott EMAIL MARKETING MANAGER britt ervin

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IN THE BEGINNING | by kenneth neill

Lost in the Silo?

The more we get together on-line, it seems, the more we drift apart.

I

n everyday life, we use language as if our words describe established concepts and ideas in a never-changing fashion. In fact, the meaning of individual words is rarely set in stone for all time. Our English language evolves from generation to generation, and sometimes even more quickly than that.

CELEBRATING 38 YEARS SELLING

Jimmy Reed, President

Memphis

Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

ALL AROUND TOWN

Take, for example, the word “queer.” When dot the cyberspace in which we now all dwell, my mother was a child, the word was used in the same way that old-style silos once dotregularly to describe anyone who was odd ted the Wisconsin countryside. It’s not exactly or unusual —the crazy uncle living in the what the early developers of the World Wide attic, the guy down the street who wore heavy Web expected; they yearned to perfect a platcoats in August. But by the time I came along, form that would share near-infinite volumes in the 1960s, the definition of of information and knowledge THE FACES AND PLACES ISSUE queer had been transformed with anyone and everyone who almost completely. By then, the could get access to a connection. Alas, that wonderful World word was used pretty much exclusively to describe someone Wide Web is fast becoming, *7 who was a homosexual. rather frighteningly, a world *7 Within a dozen years, howevfull of silos, a place where *7 er, “queer” fell by the wayside, groups come together, not to *7 learn something new, but to only to be replaced by “gay,” *7 which quickly came to signify reinforce the beliefs and prethe art of every aspect of homosexual life. dilections they already possess. Willy Bearden Funny, if my mother were still A cacophony of rowdy voicApril 2014 here (she would have been 101 es now reverberates through last month), she’d be totally confused by now; Facebook newsfeeds, and presidential in her heyday, being “gay” was simply all about tweets rattle the windows. Given that the being lively and happy. current political climate is perhaps as toxic For some odd reason, I found myself as it has been at any time since the eve of the thinking lately the same way about the Civil War, it’s hard to fathom where exactly word “silo.” Mr. Webster tells us “silo” is a we as a nation go from here. word of nineteenth-century origin, derived For what it’s worth, we here at Memphis from Spanish, one that describes “a pit to magazine like to think we are building, online put corn in.” By the time I drove around ru- and in print, an entirely different kind of silo. ral New England as a child with my parents, Yes, you can be sure that subscribers and regsilos had gone vertical, becoming places ular readers of this magazine come from just where farmers could keep hay dry during about every spot along this country’s politilong, wet winters. Then it wasn’t too long cal and cultural spectrum. But they come to before silos went back underground, be- Memphis on account of one great commonality coming places where we kept our nuclear of interest: They care about what happens missiles, ever ready to take to the Cold War here. Hate it sometimes; love it more times; skies to reap mutually assured destruction. our city is for all of us a very special place. Today, the word “silo” has evolved yet We hope this March issue — our fifth again, describing something entirely ab- annual “Faces and Places” issue — gives you a stract. That abstraction started in business sense of just how special and unique Memphis schools maybe a decade ago, with the word is. Take a close look at the work of photograused to describe a management structure pher Brandon Dill, a regular contributor to that was full of what my parents might have this magazine. I think you will agree his portcalled dead-end streets. (Wiktionary help- folio certainly captures the “face” of our city. fully provides an example: “Our networking Black, white, pink, or purple, we all are is organized in silos, and employees lose devout Memphians. We know our metropolis time manually transferring data.”) Only is far from perfect, but we cherish it all the in the past few years has the word “silo” same, warts and all. And hopefully, Memphis morphed into something a bit more sinister. is and will remain our own special silo, the Now silo describes, says Wiki, “a self-en- magazine our readers still call home. closed group of like-minded individuals, Kenneth Neill usually connected through the internet.” For better or worse, silos are beginning to editor/publisher THE CITY MAGAZINE

VOL XXXIX NO 1 | APRIL 2014

Memphis Goes to

DOWNTON ABBEY

KROC CENTER It’s Working Out!

Insider’s Guide to

NASHVILLE

Since 1868

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Sister Act Sisters Maeve Brophy, piano, and Linnaea Brophy, violin, will perform Schubert’s Fantasy for Violin and Piano, Scherzo-Tarentella by Wienawski, and the Shostakovich Violin Sonata. As a solo, Maeve will share Rachmaninoff’s Moments Musicaux. JOIN US

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DISPLAY UNTIL MAY 10, 2014

pictures worth a thousand words

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2

3

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on the town

^6 with michael donahue ^6 WHAT: Cirque du CMOM

WHERE: Children’s Museum of Memphis

T

WHEN: February 3, 2018

he Memphis Grand Carousel was the favorite toy for guests at Cirque du CMOM, held February 3rd at the Children’s Museum of Memphis. Suits and cocktail dresses instead of cowboy hats and boots were appropriate attire for the guests, who whirled around the room on wooden horses at the annual fundraiser, held in the Grand Carousel Pavilion and Ballroom. “Over the Top, Under the Big Top” was the catchy theme of the event, which drew more than 900 people. In keeping with the tradition of lots of activities going on at this party, aerialists and jugglers performed, Atlanta-based Rhythm Nation and Memphis’ own DJ Jordan Rogers played tunes, and guests listened to music with headphones as they danced at the silent disco. More than 20 food vendors supplied the eats and drinks. More than $200,000 was raised, said Ramona Johnson, the museum’s public relations/marketing manager. “It remains our largest fundraiser and has been around for over 27 years.”

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1 Morgan Patrick and Shaina Ross 2 Rachel Elkins and John Spence 3 Gabrielle Pappas and Stephen Duckett 4 Marianne and Derick Garner 5 Jonathan and Jennifer Stokes 6 James Lammey, Anthony Lammey, Bradley McGlaughlin, and Will Murphy 7 Claire Crain and Matt Rasberry 8 Lindsay Hammond, Matt Brinner, and Angie Garibaldi 9 Rachel and Brett Jenné 10 Sophie and Chad Cunningham 11 Troy and Caroline Parks 12 Stephen and Leslie Moten 13 Ned and Hallie Biggs 14 Nishel Patel, Dara Vongphrachanh, and Tejal Karawadra 15 Kelsey and Tyler McMillon 16 Eric and Erin Callan, and Kelly English 6

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WHAT: Staxtacular WHERE: Stax Museum of American Soul Music WHEN: January 27, 2018

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taxtacular, the annual event where Memphis Grizzlies players can wear long pants, ties, and jackets instead of shorts and jerseys, was held January 27th at the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. Memphis Grizzlies guard Mario Chalmers and Paije Speights hosted the event. Former Grizzlies forward Shane Battier and his wife, Heidi — both former Staxtacular hosts — made a special appearance. Each year the Soulsville Foundation, in partnership with the Memphis Grizzlies, presents Staxtacular, the foundation’s largest fundraiser. Since it began, Staxtacular has raised more than $1 million for Stax Music Academy. This year’s event included entertainment by Stax Music Academy members and the Stax Music Academy Alumni Band. A total of 550 people attended, and $220,000 was raised.

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1 Heidi and Shane Battier, and Mario Chalmers and Paije Speights 2 Elliot and Kimberly Perry 3 Mollie Miller and Ben Prudhomme 4 Stax Music Academy Alumni Band 5 Jordan and Alex Castle 6 Lauren Crowder and Nick and Missy Barnhardt 7 Joe Birch, David Porter, and Michael Drake 8 Ian and Katie Haywood 9 Dillon Brooks 10 Barbara Van, Steven Hoang, Chawan Rasheed, and Belinda Duong 11 Cameron Kawell, James West, Caroline West, Henry West, Carrie West, and George Kawell 12 Tonya Summers and Royale Lyons

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FINE PRINT

The Famous and the Notorious The new civil-rights museum in Jackson, Mississippi, remembers troubling times.

by john branston

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY MISSISSIPPI CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM BY TOM BECK

herently unequal” and drives it home with side-by-side pictures of segregated classrooms in 1954. The black kids sit on crowded benches or stand against the wall. I stopped counting when I got to 40. Freedom Riders in 1961 got hauled to Parchman prison if they were arrested. They were fed soft white bread. One of them chewed it into a glob and made a complete set of chess figures that is on display. The “black” pieces were stained in blood. My wife is from Mississippi. In the museum memorabilia, I had the uneasy feeling we might come across the name of some old family acquaintance. We lived in Jackson from 1979 to 1982 while I was a reporter covering the state for United The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum’s black empowerment gallery. Press International. Some of the old heroes and villains were still around then, and I had a cup of ix years in the making, the Mississippi Civil coffee with Meredith’s nemesis, Rights Museum aims to make visitors uncomfortable. former Gov. Ross Barnett, and It succeeds, and you should definitely go see it. watched Ronald Reagan speak at Emmitt Till. James Meredith few of the displays are so graphic the Neshoba County Fair in 1980 and Ole Miss. Neshoba County that young children are discourwith the notorious deputy Cecil aged from entering them. 1964. Freedom Riders 1961. Price. The years, I wrote then, had Fannie Lou Hamer and “sick The museum opened in Desoftened them. They weren’t so and tired of being sick and tired.” cember as part of the Mississippi bad. How little I knew. Medgar Evers, killed outside Bicentennial. President Trump Driving through Jackson on his Jackson home in 1963. The came and black elected officials Interstate 55 is sort of like drivfamous and the notorious are stayed away in protest ing through Memphis on The famous and the notorious are here, here, in eight dramatically lit Poplar Avenue. You see a of the president. Frankmultimedia galleries along with, ly, the museum needs lot of the wealth — the in eight multimedia galleries along with, the publicity. Located as the entrance mural says, “local medical center, the capitol as the entrance mural says, “local people a few blocks from the people — men, women, and building and the skyline, children from every corner of the Capitol, it is state-fundthe new office buildings, — men, women, and children from every state” who risked and sometimes ed and looks like a state the Belhaven neighborcorner of the state” who risked and building you could easilost their lives for civil rights. hood — and not so much The focus is on the years 1945ly overlook. There are no of the poverty. Jackson’s sometimes lost their lives for civil rights. 1970 but engraved columns bear signs or banners, at least population of 173,000 is the names of 600 lynching vicnot yet. The formal name is “Two date is off by so much as one day down from 184,000 in 2000 due tims dating back to the nineMississippi Museums,” the other it gets changed. largely to white flight to the suburbs in neighboring counties. In teenth century for “crimes” inone being the adjoining MissisLike good journalism, the cluding bystander, race prejudice, sippi State History Museum. museum believes in “show, don’t February, 60 Minutes featured incendiarism, well poisoning, As a Memphian, I found myself tell.” The school desegregation Jackson in a story about the ease conjuring, and talking back to comparing it to the National Civ- gallery starts with the wellof gun ownership and the high a white person. Recorded voices il Rights Museum with its iconic known U.S. Supreme Court murder rate. bark, “What you lookin’ at!” and location and look on Mulberry Brown v. Board of Education ruling Troubling times, but things “Your kind don’t come in here!” A Street at the old Lorraine Mo- that “separate facilities are inhave been worse.

S

tel. Martin Luther King is not a central figure in the Mississippi museum, but he is featured in a timeline that gives context. “Martin Lut her K i ng a nd Rosa Parks [the Montgomery bus boycott] were not from Mississip pi and this is the Mississippi museum,” explained Joyc e L aw s o n , an employee who walked through the galleries with me. She grew up in Vardaman, Mississippi, in a shack with an outhouse, kerosene lamps, and diapers made from sheets. When she was 11 she moved to Jackson, and was living there when Jackson State University student protesters were shot in 1970. The museum gets a lot of visitors who lived through the events on display, including Meredith and Charles Evers, brother of Medgar. Some of them are fact-checkers. If a

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2/21/18 1:13 PM


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CITY JOURNAL

Better Bait Memphis can learn when we lose “big fish” like Amazon to other cities.

T

he willingness of some Memphians to trashtalk their own city has long been as much a part of this city’s DNA as the Mississippi River. How often do we see self-hating comments online and, just as often, in conversations with friends and neighbors? Nothing seems to discourage the gripers, but hopefully, it’s not Pollyannaish to believe there are fewer of them these days as a result of new momentum and $9.2 billion in new projects that suggest that after 15 years of sluggishness, the regional economy may hint at stepping up its performance. The opportunity before us now is to tap into that current energy to address locals’ low expectations about our city’s ability to compete. This behavior was on display following Amazon’s rejection of Memphis as one of the final 20 candidates for its $5 billion second headquarters and 50,000 jobs. Generally, the public response to the announcement was that we did our best and it was a long shot in the first place. After all, Memphis was in good company: 217 other cities also didn’t make the cut. Rather than rationalize away the rejection, however, we might use this as a teachable moment.

Former Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. often observed that our community is fishing downstream while the big fish are being caught upstream. The Amazon exercise is the latest reminder of this, and here’s the thing: While the company’s gluttony for tax incentives was record-setting, the real bait Amazon was looking for was the same that other big fish are seeking — a quality workforce for a technology economy, high-performing public services (particularly public transit), high-quality university research, and a quality of life that attracts millennial workers. Our teachable moment should begin with an in-depth, candid analysis of the things that the Top 20 finalists have that Memphis doesn’t, characteristics that inspire higher expectations for the Memphis regional economy, which is now lingering on the lower economic rungs for the 50 largest metros. We need

years ago, the plan was intended to be temporary until the MidSouth workforce was improved. Instead, the incentive-based program is still with us today, with approximately $70 million in tax money waived every year. “We goofed,” says David Ciscel, former chairman of the Economics Department at the University of Memphis and a senior consultant for the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. “Most specifically, we maintained the labor force of the past. The city had always prospered on a hardworking unskilled and semiskilled work force. That workforce was segmented by race. African Americans provided a a plan that sells Memphis based large unskilled labor pool that on quality rather than cheapness. worked anywhere, anytime — It was instructive to see that agricultural or industrial. White every one of the 20 Amazon fiworkers, though poorly educatnalists has a higher cost of living ed, provided the industrial prothan Memphis, and most have letariat of the Mid-South economy. By the end of the 1980s, this higher tax burdens. Selling ourselves for cheapness requires us kind of labor force was no longer to waive taxes to attract compaa road to prosperity.” nies, which ultimately is a net In order to shift from businegative, beness as usual to cause the coma plan of action We need a plan that sells p a ny get s a for an innovaMemphis based on quality publicly funded tion-driven ecorather than cheapness. subsidy while nomic growth government itand higher payself loses money that could help ing jobs, we have to spurn silver fund education, crime prevenbullets, low expectations, and tion, and infrastructure. lack of self-worth, and instead, In the end, rather than define aim higher and seek the kind success by the cost of buildings of disruptive innovation that in under construction or the numbusiness allows a smaller comber of tax waivers approved, the pany to leapfrog over its larger economic development plan has competitors. to produce success defined by It’s been said in the wake of the higher median family incomes, Amazon decision that Memphis needs to tell its story better, and lower poverty rates, more opportunity, broader prosperity, and a that is true, but it also needs a more diverse jobs mix. better story to tell. Ultimately, we Additionally, success is found should all consider a serious postin the kind of workforce that mortem regarding the Amazon can compete in today’s econodecision, a process by which we can determine to put better bait my by emphasizing technology on the hook for the big fish that and creativity. When the current we need to attract.   PILOT program was created 35

PHOTOGRAPH BY DENNIZN | DREAMSTIME

by tom jones

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OU T A ND A BOU T |

MARCH 2018

compiled by julia baker

Southern Women’s Show

3.9-3.11

Southern Women’s Show

An annual favorite for women, this event will feature boutiques filled with the latest fashions, jewelry, delicious foods and treats, health and beauty, and more. Celebrity guests include Vern Yip of TLC’s Trading Spaces and celebrity nail artist Naja Rickette. Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Rd. southernshows.com

3.7-3.25 Wicked at the Orpheum

Wicked

B

roadway sensation Wicked comes to Memphis this month, telling the tale of an unlikely friendship between the “Good Witch” and the “Bad Witch.” The Orpheum Theater, 203 S. Main St. orpheum-memphis.com

3.5-3.11

Black Restaurant Week

3.2-3.4

This weeklong event, meant to raise awareness of our local blackowned restaurants, will feature foods from 14 local restaurants, including The Waffle Iron, HM Dessert Lounge, Laura’s Kitchen, and more. Various Locations blackrestaurantweek.com

Vintage901 Festival

The second annual Vintage901Fest will span three days with three unique winepairing experiences. Friday’s Grand Tasting at Crosstown Concourse will feature grub from restaurants like Farm Burger, I Love Juice Bar, and Mama Gaia. Saturday’s Perfect Pairings Dinner at Memphis College of Art will include a special fourcourse meal prepared by Chef Kelly English. Sunday’s Sparkling Brunch at Shelby Farms Park will be prepared by Chef Jimmy Gentry. All meals will be paired by The Wine Coach, Laurie Forster. Various Locations vintage901.org

3.8-3.11

Memphis Comedy Festival

3.3

Fleet Foxes

PRESENTS NEWSONG'S

024_MM03_2018_Calendar_CC18.indd 24

MidSouthCon

MidSouthCon, the Mid-South’s longest-running science-fiction convention, covers various genres, including science fiction, comics, horror, anime, and more. This event will feature 100 panelists and guests. Hilton Memphis, 939 Ridge Lake Boulevard midsouthcon.org/

3.10

This annual Christian music tour will feature such notable artists as Grammy Award-nominated founder and host NewSong, Skillet, Cody Carnes, Building 429, and more. Comedian John Crist and evangelist Nick Hall will also take the stage. FedExForum, 191 Beale St. fedexforum.com

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3.9-3.11

This festival will have festivalgoers laughing for four days, featuring headliner and head writer for The Daily Show, Lizz Winstead, along with dozens of other comedians (local and non-local). Events will take place at the P&H Cafe, Hi-Tone, and Theatreworks. Midtown memphiscomedyfestival.com

Winter Jam 2018 Tour Spectacular

Vintage 901 Festival

MidSouthCon

Indie folk band Fleet Foxes come to the Cannon Center to delight the eardrums with hits like “Mykonos” and “White Winter Hymnal.” Cannon Center for the only Performing Arts, 255 N. Main ticketmaster.com DONATION AT THE DOOR

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building 429 MEMBERS RECEIVE FREE & EARLY ADMISSION!

C OM E D I A N

john

skillet

2/22/18 10:01 AM


OU T A ND A BOU T

contin u ed from page 25

3.10

Bad Boy Bill and Richard Vission

EDM and house music revolutionaries Bad Boy Bill and Richard Vission will be taking it “Back to Vinyl” with a unique vinyl experience. The New Daisy Theatre, 330 Beale St. Ticketfly.com

3.12

Grizzlies vs. Bucks

MVP candidate Giannis Antetokounmpo — “the Greek Freak” — makes his lone Memphis appearance this season. The playoff-bound Bucks beat the Grizzlies in their only other meeting this season (last November). FedExForum, 191 Beale St. fedexforum.com

3.15

SuicideGirls: Blackheart Burlesque at Minglewood

SuicideGirls, known for redefining beauty since 2003, will be showcasing their sexy, quirky, and nerdy sides with a unique burlesque experience. Minglewood Hall, 1555 Madison Ave. minglewoodhall.com

3.17

St. Patrick’s Day Parade on Beale

Beale Street hosts a weekend-long event filled with parties and parades in celebration of St. Patrick’s day. The parade will feature bands, cars, floats, dancers, and more. Beale Street, bealestreetmerchants.com

Forging on the River Conference 2018

3.23-3.25

Forging on the River Conference 2018 Metal Museum

This three-day event is the perfect chance for metalsmiths and enthusiasts to network and exchange ideas while exploring the museum’s exhibits. Shona Johnson and Peter Hill will be this year’s guest demonstrators. On Saturday, March 24th, the museum will host a dinner and auction along the river. Metal Museum, 374 Metal Museum Dr. metalmuseum.org

3-24

Memphis Parent Camp Expo

Showcasing area summer camps, overnight camps, and summer-camp programs. Guests can speak directly with camp reps to explore which camps are best for their child’s interests. Presented by Orion. 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. Memphis Botanic Garden memphisparentcampexpo.com

Alturas Foundation Hearne Fine Art Perry Broadcasting of Arkansas Philander Smith College Esther Silver-Parker Tony Waller Walmart AAOC Deborah Wright James and Emily Bost Sara Friedlander and Matthew Segal Denise and Hershey Garner

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2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (ADR) HOFFMAN LAW AND MEDIATION OFFICE >>> Left to right: Kim Wall, Sheree Hoffman, and Jenna McDonald The Hoffman Law and Mediation Office offers different options to our divorcing clients, all of which help them achieve satisfactory resolution while avoiding the risk and cost of litigation. We are a boutique law firm specifically trained in negotiation, mediation, and collaborative law. Attorneys Sheree Hoffman and Jenna McDonald have an excellent track record of giving good advice, understanding client’s needs, and

implementing creative solutions to troubleshoot and problem-solve rather than fight. Both attorneys have over 37 years of combined experience in the local Circuit, Chancery, and Juvenile courts. We are proud that most of our clients come from direct referrals. We handle all aspects of divorce, family law and juvenile law, including dependency and neglect issues and litigation, when necessary. Call Kim Wall to schedule your appointment today.

7515 Corporate Centre Drive, Germantown, TN 38138 901.754.9994 | Sheree@HoffmanFamilyLaw.com | MemphisDivorceHelp.com/Faces SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANIMAL CARE

WALNUT GROVE ANIMAL CLINIC >>> With every patient and client, we are guided by our core values: Integrity, Excellence, and Compassion. Our professional staff is highly trained and well educated. All employees participate in regular training and development

programs. Walnut Grove Animal Clinic is a fullservice, state-of-the-art, small animal hospital located in the center of Memphis at the corner of Walnut Grove Avenue and Tillman. New clients are always welcome.

2959 Walnut Grove Road, Memphis, TN 38111 | 901.323.1177 | MyMemphisVet.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ANTIQUE & ESTATE JEWELRY

VAN ATKINS JEWELERS >>> Left to right: Van Cooper, Chuck Cooper, and Sam Cooper What began as a family-owned group of department stores is now known for all things jewelry! Van Atkins Jewelers, the South's leader in Estate Jewelry and diamond solitaires, was opened by Chuck Cooper in 1990. Today three of his sons are leading the way. Chuck, Van, Sam and

Ray have all graduated from Gemological Institute of America in California. The original store is in historic downtown New Albany, Mississippi, where you will ďŹ nd Chuck most days and his son Sam. Chuck's eldest son Van is at the helm in the new location on the square in Oxford, Mississippi.

129 W. Bankhead Street, New Albany, MS 38652 | 662.534.5012 124 Courthouse Square, Oxford MS 38655 | 662.236.5012 VanAtkins.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

APARTMENT MANAGEMENT FOGELMAN PROPERTIES >>>

Fogelman Properties is one of the country’s largest and most experienced privately-owned multifamily investment and property management companies. As a fully integrated company, Fogelman specializes in multifamily acquisitions, property management, construction management, and asset management. Founded in 1963, Fogelman presently operates 80 multifamily communities totaling 28,000 apartment homes with more than $3.4 billion dollars in asset value, spread across 10 states in the Southeast, Southwest and Midwest regions of the country. Fogelman is headquartered in Memphis, TN, with offices in Atlanta, GA; Raleigh, NC; Dallas, TX; Houston, TX; Kansas City, KS; and Jacksonville FL. Memphis area properties: • ADDISON AT COLLIERVILLE 400 Orchard Cir. W., Collierville, TN 38017 | AddisonCollierville.com • BRISTOL ON UNION 205 Pasadena Place, Memphis, TN 38104 | TheBristolOnUnion.com • CHEROKEE CABANA 3204 Sharpe Ave., Memphis, TN 38111 | CherokeeCabana.com • THE EDGE OF GERMANTOWN 1730 Hunters Trace Dr., Memphis, TN 38120 | TheEdgeOfGermantown.com • LEGACY FARM 1130 Legacy Farm Ct., Collierville, TN 38017 | Legacy-Farm.com • LEGENDS AT WOLFCHASE 8840 Bristol Park Drive Bartlett, TN 38133 | LegendsAtWolfchaseApts.com • MADISON HUMPHREYS CENTER 330 N Humphreys Blvd., Memphis, TN 38120 | LiveAtMadison.com • THE PARK AT FOREST HILL 8285 Irene Blvd Memphis, TN 38125 | TheParkAtForestHill.com • THE PRESERVE AT SOUTHWIND 7991 Capilano Dr., Memphis, TN 38125 | ThePreserveAtSouthwind.com • THE RETREAT AT GERMANTOWN 7865 Grove Court West, Germantown, TN 38138 | TheRetreatatGermantown.com • THE SUMMIT 4981 Hidden Lake Dr., Memphis, TN 38128 | TheSummitMemphis.com • THE TENNESSEE BREWERY 495 Tennessee St. Memphis, TN 38103 | AtTheBrewery.com • THORNWOOD 7794 Kings College Ave., Germantown, TN 38138 | TheResidencesatThornwood.com Fogelman.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ARKANSAS REAL ESTATE

FARMS CABINS RANCHES & OUTDOOR PROPERTIES >>> TEAM BURCH — Joey Burch, Arkansas Principal Broker, and Pat Burch, Horseshoe Lake Agent For 23 years Joey Burch, broker, has traveled the region networking with sellers and potential buyers of real estate. Joey specializes in traditional sales and listings, 1031 tax exchanges, auction services, cabin designs, and agri tours. Pat specializes in lakefront homes and lots at Horseshoe. If you’re in the market for real estate there’s a good chance that Joey and Pat have it in inventory! Whether you’re looking for a weekend home on HORSESHOE LAKE, a cotton plantation along the MISSISSIPPI RIVER, a trout-fishing cabin near MOUNTAIN VIEW, a ranch on CROWLEY’S RIDGE, or a duck-hunting club on the L’ANGUILLE RIVER, Joey and Pat can assist you. FEATURED LISTINGS: HORSESHOE LAKE — The Historic Snowden House, 1527 Bream Road — 6,000 sq. ft. plantation home, 5BR 6BA, grand entry, lake front. $1,325,000 — 200 Pecan Circle cottage $95,000; CROWLEY'S RIDGE — 200 acre trophy deer hunting, $350,000; ARKANSAS FARM LAND — 626 acres row crop farm $2,456,000; MISSISSIPPI — 915-acre corn and rice farm near Sledge $3,929,000; ARKANSAS; MOUNTAIN VIEW, ARKANSAS — Trout-fishing cabin on White River, $159,000; OZARK MOUNTAINS — 371 acres near the town square with views and cabin sites $659,000. Visit more than 200 listings online FARMANDCABIN.COM or OUTDOORPROPERTIES.COM, Outdoor Properties, LLC Real Estate with offices in Arkansas and Tennessee Contact: Joey Burch or Pat Burch 501.454.1782. SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BBQ

TOPS BAR-B-Q >>> George Montague, President and General Manager J.W. Lawson started Tops Bar-B-Q back in 1952. Granville Messick came into the business in 1964 and George Montague in 1974. We have 11 locations in Memphis, two in Mississippi, one in Arkansas, and one in Millington. TOPS proudly celebrated our 60th anniversary in 2012. Now serving our third generation of customers, we still cook our pork shoulders just

the way we did 60 years ago, with hardwood charcoal and green hickory wood. Thank you for keeping TOPS in mind for mouth-watering barbecue, and freshly ground cooked-to-order hamburgers for more than six decades. We offer the best ribs and brisket in the Mid-South. We look forward to serving the Mid-South for many more years to come.

TopsBarBQ.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL FACES

THE LANGSDON CLINIC >>> Phillip R. Langsdon, MD, FACS and Carol H. Langsdon, RNP Celebrating over 30 years in practice, Dr. Phillip Langsdon, facial plastic surgeon, has been treating one face at a time. He is the only surgeon in the Mid-South whose practice is limited to facial plastic surgery. Seeing each person’s face as unique, he treats the common and complicated cases and believes in “Compassionate Care with Natural Looking Results”. Carol Langsdon, RNP, provides expert nonsurgical aesthetics such as Botox®, dermal fillers, skin resurfacing and customized medical-grade skin care. Dr. Langsdon will take the office as President of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) 2018. Dr. Langsdon is Board Certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. To view before and after photos, visit drlangsdon.com. 7499 Poplar Pike, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.755.6465 | DrLangsdon.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

ager

THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL SKIN

THE SKIN CLINICS >>> Dr. George Flinn, Heidi Shafer, Tomi Beckemeyer, Claudette Hawkins, Catherine Woodson, Dede Sellers, Dr. Scott Nelson, Bari Metz, Kate France Parsons, Aisha Rogers, Stephanie Brick, Emily Van Epps, Sam Colvin, Courtney Brown, Courtney Browning, Sarah Rasmussen, Amethyst Comacho, Selena Stuckey, Stacy Hubbard, Madelyn Smith, Jordan Baxter, Sheila Smith, Karen Elledge, Dani Battles, and Alicia George

At The Skin Clinics, we know that real beauty comes from love: being loved and loving others. That includes loving the body God gave you, and treasuring it as a temple. Our expertly trained staff feels privileged to help you bring out your natural beauty! The Skin Clinics team has over 250 years of combined experience in medicine and aesthetics, and we are continually learning the newest techniques, products, and safety protocols to ensure the best, most natural outcome. We always want you to look and feel fresh, rested and radiant: never overdone. We want you to love YOU! • Replacing lost volume or correcting imbalance through subtle injections helps you look the way you remember yourself. • Laser skin rejuvenation and micro needling help you bring back the smaller pores and even skin

tone of your youth, help with acne/acne scarring, and tighten the skin. • Venus Multipolar RF will amaze you at reducing cellulite! (How long have you been wishing something REALLY worked on cellulite?!!) • Brow and lash restoration and care have an unbelievable impact on your face. • Signature facials and top-of-the-line, carefully selected medical-grade products help you preserve and protect your beautiful skin • Custom spray-tanning gives you the perfect golden glow. • Therapeutic massage helps you shed stress and stay healthy and energetic. • Ideal Protein Weight Management protocol helps you finally get to your ideal weight ... and stay there!

EAST MEMPHIS: 1102 Brookfield, 38119 | direct: 901.474.7636 GERMANTOWN: 1300 Wolf Park Drive, 38138 | direct: 901.345.7546 GREENWOOD, MS: 115 Howard Street, 38930 | direct: 662.374.5008 901.345.SKIN SPECIAL PROMOTION


THE FACE OF

BEAUTIFUL SMILES CHRISTOPHER COOLEY, DDS >>>

When you visit the office of Dr. Christopher Cooley, you become part of a caring dental family. Along with his highly trained, professional staff, Dr. Cooley is committed to listening to your needs and providing care that works for your lifestyle. Dr. Cooley’s dental practice is devoted to restoring and enhancing the natural beauty of smiles using conservative, state-of-the-art procedures that will result in beautiful, long lasting smiles. A standard of excellence in personalized dental care enables him to provide the quality dental services his patients deserve. Dr. Cooley takes the time necessary to constantly improve his skills and the technological capabilities of the practice. He has trained with many of the best clinicians in the country, and insists on the best materials and highest quality lab work available. Thereby, you benefit from the latest treatment techniques, including innovative advances in patient comfort, the highest-quality and longest-lasting materials, and the most aesthetically pleasing results. Dr. Cooley is a lifetime Memphian who

graduated in 1976 with honors from the University of Tennessee Knoxville, then from the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry in 1982. Dr. Cooley has undergone training with the Hornbrook Group and PAClive, the country’s top program for hands-on continuing education for dentists. Dr. Cooley is also a proud member of: the American Dental Association, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, Tennessee Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and the Crown Council. These organizations keep Dr. Cooley abreast of developing studies in the fields of cosmetic, restorative and general dentistry. Dr. Cooley and his entire team love to volunteer their time and efforts both locally and globally taking care of patients in Memphis and Shelby Co. and on mission trips to the Dominican Republic. Dr. Cooley always welcomes new patients into his office with most referrals coming from existing, very satisfied patients. The highest compliment we receive is when our patients refer their family and friends.

7938 Wolf River Blvd., Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.754.3117 | CooleyDDS.com


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

LAKESIDE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SYSTEM >>> Bottom row: Lori Deason, Lindsey Hightower, Ben Sudduth, Lenora Coleman, and John Fisher Top row: Hal Brunt, Rita Dailey, Thomas Joyner, Gail Outland, Debra Williams, Theresa Jarvis, Cathy Houpt, Kevin Parker, Teresa Scott, and Joy Golden Since 1969, Lakeside has had one to seniors who struggle with behavioral mission: to provide specialized behavioral health issues, addictive diseases or cohealth care and addiction treatment in occurring diagnoses. In addition to a welcome environment for people in providing targeted treatment for our search of healing. Our 37-acre campus patients, Lakeside is committed to helping near Memphis, Tennessee, was designed our community better understand and to make recovery an accessible, effective recognize the complexities associated with reality for everyone — from adolescents behavioral health and addiction. 2911 Brunswick Road, Memphis, TN 38133 | 901.377.4700 | LakesideBHS.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

BRANDING

TACTICAL MAGIC >>> Trace Hallowell is a brand visionary who understands the power of words and design — and how the world responds to them. Trace has spent more than 30 years in the creative branding business and his success is evident by the numerous national and international honors he has received from advertising and creative competitions. All the while, his work has been published in books, magazines, and college textbooks as examples of branding excellence. Trace founded Tactical Magic in 2001. The firm’s diverse clientele includes Gould’s, Leadership Memphis, Sterling National Bank (New York), Trousseau, and Uniform Masters. 1460 Madison Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 901.722.3001 TacticalMagic.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

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BRIDAL REGISTRY BABCOCK GIFTS >>>

Babcock Gifts has been helping brides and Mid-Southerners set tables and choose the perfect gifts for more than 40 years. Even in the 21st century, with the conveniences of technology, our goal remains to provide Memphis a stellar

collection of tabletop selections and gifts, coupled with exemplary customer service. If you have not been to Babcock Gifts lately, we invite you to come in soon and let us assist you with all your entertaining and gift-giving needs.

Laurelwood Shopping Center, 4538 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.763.0700 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

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BUSINESS BANKING TRIUMPH BANK >>>

Triumph is proud to serve as a local community and anywhere or offering our business customers bank in the greater Memphis area, deeply a diverse menu of cash management services invested in serving our community and helping from which to choose that help protect their individuals and businesses grow, which in turn companies’ assets and improve their bottom line helps our economy grow. Our team strives to by enabling them to better manage their cash make banking easy for our customers, whether flow and cash position. It gives you more control it’s by offering the latest in online and mobile and confidence that when we say you matter, platforms so our customers can bank anytime you really matter. Let’s talk growth. 5699 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.333.8800 | TriumphBank.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

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MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

CATASTROPHIC INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH LAW PEEL LAW FIRM >>> David B. Peel, injury attorney

INJURY ATTORNEY DAVID PEEL BRINGS A PERSONAL TOUCH TO FAMILIES TOUCHED BY TRAGEDY For over 20 years, David B. Peel has assisted those Attorney David Peel has a small, suburban office, but achieves big results. He was inducted as a families impacted by the negligence of others, and his recent book on Tennessee injury law was life member of the exclusive Multi-Million Dollar Advocates Forum, reserved for those with a case an Amazon best-seller. He sees tragedies resulting from tractor-trailer and car crashes, malpractice, result of $2,000,000 or more. Named as a MidSouth Super Lawyer for the last six years, he has or industrial incidents. Clients are often initially uncomfortable talking to a lawyer or making a long been recognized by his peer attorneys as "AV-Preeminent," the highest lawyer rating. He has claim against insurance. But, as one of Peel Law been voted “Best of the Best Attorney” in local Firm’s many Five-Star reviews attests: “He actually cares about you and your situation more than Readers' Choice Awards for five years in a row. the money!! Awesome man of GOD!! (How many Peel, a proud father of three and husband to Trish, Lawyers have you had to pray for you and your also serves on boards of directors of Love Worth Finding Ministries and the Bellevue Foundation. situation?)” -T.Graves 8582 U.S. Highway 51 North, Millington, TN 38053 | 901.872.4229 | DavidPeel@PeelLawFirm.com | PeelLawFirm.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

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CATERING

PARADOX CATERING & CONSULTING >>> Chef Jimmy Gentry Chef/Owner Jimmy Gentry of Paradox Catering was formally trained at Johnson and Wales College of Culinary Arts. Before starting his own business with partner Alia Hogan, he led kitchens across the Mid-South to win multiple awards. Almost 9 years ago, Paradox Catering was created with the vision in mind to redeďŹ ne what people expected not only from the food itself, but from the presentation and service as well. Paradox's Jessica Lambert and Chef Gentry work closely with clients to deďŹ ne their personal style, which we then translate into every aspect of their event so we can provide that one-ofa-kind experience they always envisioned. We have been truly fortunate to be embraced by the Mid-South and have in turn seen tremendous success with our creative and innovative approach to catering. 901.619.1196 Event@ParadoxCuisine.com ParadoxCuisine.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

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MID-SOUTH

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CHRISTIAN COLLEGE-PREPARATORY EDUCATION HARDING ACADEMY >>>

Love. Think. Live. These three words are central to the mission at Harding Academy. We teach students to love others as Christ loves them, to think creatively and learn with open minds, and to live courageously to the glory of God. At Harding, students build a foundation for life that goes beyond chapel and daily Bible classes. They learn about God’s perfect design in science and engineering. They learn about justice and

advocacy in African-American History. And they learn empathy in theatre by mentally stepping into someone else’s shoes. Beginning in August 2018, Harding will offer a one-stop shop in the heart of the city for families with children in senior kindergarten–grade 12. Little Harding, our offering for 18 months–junior kindergarten, will continue at two locations in East Memphis and Cordova.

HARDING ACADEMY (Sr. K–Grade 12): 1100 Cherry Road LITTLE HARDING (18 mos.–Jr. K.): 8350 Macon Road | 1106 Colonial Road 901.767.4494 | HardingLions.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

KW COMMERCIAL >>> Sam Mitchell, Principal Broker, Managing Director of KW Commercial After a successful 35-year career in Industrial Distribution, as the President and owner of the Blackstone Co. and President of their national trade organization in 1999, “I decided to get re-potted.” Commercial Real Estate seemed to be a natural path to pursue with my business background.

Now in my 18th year, I have endeavored to develop relationships with clients and peers based on integrity, honesty, and professionalism. Contact me for your investment, retail, office, industrial, or land needs, whether to purchase, lease, or sell.

930 S. White Station, Memphis, TN 38117 | SamMitchell@kw.com | SamsMitchell.com 901.569.2307 (C) | 901.261.7926 Direct (O) SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

COMMUNITY BANKING INDEPENDENT BANK >>>

Strong. Safe. Customer Focused. Local. Since our founding in 1998, Independent Bank has been committed to supporting our customers and communities by helping you achieve your dreams and financial success. We are a full-service bank with personal and business loans, a variety of deposit and cash-management options, mortgage loans and wealth management. We offer innovative solutions, effective products and heroic service. We invite you to experience the i-bank difference — it’s a better way of banking. Proud to be the face of community banking. 5050 Poplar • 844.5051 | 1711 Union • 844.2050 | 450 Perkins • 842.2620 6209 Poplar • 842.2600 | 5995 Stage • 842.1210 | 2116 W. Poplar • 842.1170 | 40 S. Main • 312.8900 3295 Poplar • 844.2075 | 7635 Poplar • 842.1190 i-bankonline.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

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COMPOUNDING PHARMACY PEOPLE'S CUSTOM RX >>>

Since 1969 People's Custom Rx, the oldest and largest compounding pharmacy in the Memphis area, has been helping people feel better. We are equipped with state-of-the-art technology to prepare your customized medications. Our pharmacists and technicians work

hard to increase our knowledge and stay up to date with training in the ďŹ elds of bio-identical hormone therapy, sterile compounding, pediatric compounding, veterinary compounding, dermatological compounding and so much more. How can we help you feel better?

785 E Brookhaven Circle, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.682. 2273 | PeoplesCustomRx.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

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CONSTRUCTION

GRINDER, TABER & GRINDER, INC. >>> Building Memphis since 1968. 1919 Lynnfield Road, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.767.2400 | GrinderTaber.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


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CONSTRUCTION & INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS HAULING, RECYCLING & DISPOSAL EBOX >>> Seated left to right: Jonalyn Medling, Amy Carroll, Gina Brown, Jennie Tummins, and Loretta Sommer Standing left to right: Jennie Berrie, Don Lemons, Herb Honeycutt, Glyn Moore, Norman Brown III, President, and Tabitha Nance EBOX is a family owned business with a mission to provide our customers with the highest quality products and services at competitive prices. EBOX serves the construction, commercial and industrial industries in West Tennessee, North Mississippi and Eastern Arkansas by providing an environmentally

safe solution for construction, demolition and industrial waste created on jobsites and at businesses. In addition to our hauling services, EBOX also delivers mulch, soil mix, topsoil, sand and gravel. Our goal is to pursue recycling, LEED projects, and related sustainable enterprises with superior on-time service.

10636 Shelton Road, Collierville, TN 38017 | 901.850.9996 | eplexebox.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

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MID-SOUTH

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CORPORATE TRAVEL

A & I TRAVEL MANAGEMENT, AN ALTOUR COMPANY >>> Left to right: Terri Melton, Elaine Simpson, Gail McCaleb, and Susie Johnson Introducing four of the 28 travel professionals at A & I Travel. Would you trust your travel plans to these fun-loving people? Thousands of smart business travelers do! Meet Terri Melton, Corporate Travel Consultant Terri is our “go to” agent for groups and special projects. She loves her customers, she sweats the small stuff, and it shows in every booking she makes!

Meet Gail McCaleb, Corporate Travel Consultant Gail started her travel career with A&I, pursued a different opportunity for a while, and thankfully came back home to the delight of her A&I coworkers and her very happy A&I customers!

Meet Elaine Simpson, Onsite Corporate Travel Consultant Elaine makes her home at Orgill, Inc., a Memphisbased hardware distributor, where she has built great customer relationships and hammered together a wonderful service product!

Meet Susie Johnson, Corporate Travel Consultant If you need to book a trip and also be entertained and uplifted, call Susie. She is smart, funny and cheerful. We promise you will love the experience!

CONTROL YOUR COSTS. OPTIMIZE YOUR SPEND. SUPPORT YOUR TRAVELERS. aitvl.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

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MID-SOUTH

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COSMETIC DENTAL VENEERS MEMPHIS CENTER FOR FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY >>> Miles C. Moore, DDS

Creating beautiful smiles is just another day in the office for Miles C. Moore, dentist at Memphis Center for Family & Cosmetic Dentistry. With a friendly staff, a soothing atmosphere, and the latest technology, Dr. Moore’s practice offers all dental services, but specializes in cosmetic dentistry. Whether you seek a complete smile makeover, “invisible” braces, or teeth whitening, cosmetic dentistry can transform your smile in several ways. Dental veneers from Dr. Moore improve the form and function of your teeth, leaving results that you have to see to believe. 725 W. Brookhaven Circle Memphis, TN 38117 901.761.2210 | BeautifulSmiles.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

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MID-SOUTH

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CRIMINAL DEFENSE

LAW OFFICE OF STEPHEN R. LEFFLER, P.C. >>> Stephen R. Leffler If you're facing a serious legal situation, you need an experienced trial attorney. Stephen Leffler leverages 34 years of successful practice devoted to aggressively protecting his clients. Leffler handles a full range of federal and state criminal charges and appeals. His civil practice has secured multi-million dollar judgments in

cases that involve automobile and premises injuries, wrongful death, and traumatic injuries. Leffler offers experienced, insightful counsel and remains personally involved with the details of the case from start to finish. The firm offers 24-hour assistance through investigator and litigation consultant Timothy Norris.

707 Adams Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105 | 901.527.8830 | LefflerLaw.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

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MID-SOUTH

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CUSTOM AND WEDDING CAKES

TWO GIRLS AND A WHIP >>> Left to right: Caroline Dean, Courtney Lollar, and Mary Katherine Dunston Two Girls and a Whip Cakery creates elegant, on-trend custom cakes for weddings, corporate events, birthday parties, showers and other special occasions. They take pride in crafting beautiful cakes that taste every bit as sumptuous as they

look. At the Two Girls and a Whip retail store located downtown on Front Street, they offer wedding cake tastings by appointment and sell delectable cupcakes and gourmet cakes featuring a seemingly endless array of unique and classic flavors.

363 S. Front St., Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.472.CAKE | TwoGirlsAndAWhip.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

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CUSTOM HOME BUILDING & REMODELING RKA CONSTRUCTION >>>

Formed in 2011, RKA Construction is a custom builder located in Memphis, Tennessee. Created out of a love for building and a desire to provide a better client experience, our focus is simple — provide superior quality, craftsmanship, and customer service in everything we do. 901.674.5522 | rka.build SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

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DERMATOLOGY

UT DERMATOLOGY, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Left to right: Sarah Smith, MD, FAAD and Emily Jones, MD, FAAD UT Dermatology — the clinical faculty practice plan of the Kaplan-Amonette Department of Dermatology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center — is a premiere full-service dermatology practice in the MidSouth, offering academic expertise and compassionate care in medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology for all ages.

As board-certified dermatologists, our physicians have expertise in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases of the hair, skin and nails. With two convenient locations serving both the Downtown and East Memphis areas and appointments available within days, taking care of your skin has never been this easy.

930 Madison Ave., Suite 801 | 1065 Cresthaven, Suite 500 | 901.866.8805 UniversityClinicalHealth.com/UT-Dermatology/ SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

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MID-SOUTH

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DIVORCE LAW THE RICES >>>

Need a divorce? Consider yourself fortunate if you can hire the Rices. Their credentials show that they represent more than simply their three generations of family law experience. The ABA publishes the Rices’ Complete Guide to Divorce Practice. Fellow lawyers designated Larry as a Super Lawyer and Nick as a Super Lawyer Rising Star. NAFLA awarded Larry with its National Top Ten Ranking, while the AIOFLA placed Nick in the Tennessee Top Ten Under Forty in granting the Client Satisfaction Award. Avvo.com rates both with its highest ranking possible. Their divorce guide can be found at AboutDivorce.com. SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

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DOGGY HOTEL, DAYCARE & SPA BROWNDOG LODGE >>>

Locally established in 2007, BrownDog Lodge is the premier destination for the pampered pup, offering luxury boarding, grooming, and daycare, complete with shuttle service! Whether your dog needs a play day, spa day, or an overnight vacation of its own, your furry family member will enjoy the finest

accommodations and personal attention throughout our indoor and outdoor lodge. Let our friendly staff of dog lovers cater to your pet’s every need in an environment designed for fun and safety. Stop by our East Memphis or Germantown Lodge for a tour and make your reservation today.Your dog will thank you!

EAST MEMPHIS: 4953 Black Road (near Poplar & Mendenhall) | 901.767.1187 | memphis@browndoglodge.com GERMANTOWN: 426 S. Germantown Pkwy (next to Lowe’s) | 901.266.9100 | germantown@browndoglodge.com BrowndogLodge.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


!

NOW

THE BROOK S MUSEUM’S A FR ICA N-

PR IN T FA SHION E X HIBIT IS R IGHT ON TIME . by c h r i s d av i s

left: Francis K. Honny (b. Elmina, Ghana, 1914–1998) Portrait of man and woman, Elmina, Ghana, circa 1975 Black and white photograph Courtesy Tobias Wendl

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left: Senegalese rapper and musician Ibaaku wears a classic dashiki. Dakar, Senegal, October, 2014

© Djibril Drame

W

hat’s in a name? Shakespeare said a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but for the manufacturers and merchants of African-print textiles, there’s a different kind of conventional wisdom at work. Unlike most manufacturer-branded products, African prints are named by the consumers who buy, sell, and use them. The process creates meaning after the fact, transforming mass-manufactured patterns into classics that may speak to a specific occasion, commemorate an event, or simply reflect the objects and attitudes of day-to-day life.

right: Patricia Waota, designer (b. Côte d’Ivoire) K-Yélé, based in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire Lady Evening Dress, made for the Vlisco Fashion Show, March 28, 2015, in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire Vlisco wax print

Courtesy Uniwax (the Vlisco Group), Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire Photo: Joshua White/JWPictures.com

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Inge van Lierop, designer (b. the Netherlands) Vlisco, the Netherlands Dress, “Hommage à L’Art” collection, 2013 Vlisco wax print

Courtesy Vlisco Museum, Foundation Pieter Fentener van Vlissingen, Helmond, the Netherlands Photo: Koen Hause

The importance of naming is reflected in the title of this exhibition from the Los Angeles-based Fowler Museum, running at Memphis Brooks Museum of Art now through August 12th. Bringing together more than 100 historic and contemporary print designs, and contextualizing them with relevant samples of twentieth-century black-and-white photography and twenty-first-century art, “African-Print Fashion Now!” earns its exclamation point. Subtitled “A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style,” the exhibit shows how African taste and tradition impacted the Indonesian art of wax-resist dyeing, and how everything from meaning to manufacturing was changed by technology as production moved to Europe, China, and Africa itself. It’s a story that may result in fashionistas adding Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, to their lists of destination cities, alongside Paris, New York, and Milan.     “It’s gone through some very interesting changes and become part of international fashion and the work of fashion designers,” says “African-Print Fashion Now!” curator Suzanne Gott, who’s been studying the traditions and techniques of the field since making her first trek to Ghana in 1990. “It’s become an increasingly interesting story over the past 20 years, and now seems like the perfect time to have an exhibition.” So what is African-print fashion, exactly? And just how African is it? Not to be confused with kente

cloth or other West and Central African weaving traditions, the materials and patterns collected for this exhibit represent a distinct kind of cotton textile created through a mechanized resist-dyeing process using wax or resin. As is the case with many examples featured, contemporary African-print fashion often is manufactured through mechanical processes designed to mimic the traditional dyeing process. In the late-nineteenth century, Dutch manufacturers began to imitate Indonesian batik, developing a new genre of printed cloth aimed for African markets. Although it was an imported good, African consumerism and taste played a considerable role in determining its color and content. To illustrate a complicated relationship, Gott describes cloth produced in 1957, when Ghana became the first British colony to gain independence. The cooperative work, laden with precolonial iconography, was a gift from European manufacturers. “This was [African] culture, and the fact that it was being made in Europe didn’t negate its value or the sense of African ownership,” Gott says. “When it began to be made locally, the cloth was more affordable, and I think there was pride in wearing locally produced cloth. But it did not stop people from buying the imported cloth.” The product’s unique process of consumer naming also became a key feature of acculturation, as

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prints took on a meaning and life completely detached from design and production. Descriptive titles like “Night and Day” literally describe a fabric’s iconography. Proverbial titles like ‘Money Flies’ are a means of indirect communication for those with something to say and others who’ve been silenced by societal norms. Other names may commemorate politicians and important events or celebrate everyday objects (“iPod”) and pop culture (“Michelle Obama’s Handbag”). Speaking of pop culture, there’s a moment near the very beginning of Marvel’s inestimably influential Black Panther film when the camera pans up to show all the citizens who’ve come out to see Prince T’Challa’s elevation to the throne of Wakanda, a fictional African nation that’s never been conquered or colonized. This colorful moment of pure Afrofuturist eye candy occurs as the camera scans up a cliff face dotted with people wearing every color of the visible spectrum. The movie’s much ballyhooed costumes are a pan-African blend of tropes and style, mixing sci-fi profiles along with traditional fabrics and accessories that include African print. It’s difficult to imagine a fashion-forward hit this big won’t make an impression on the ready-to-wear market, making the Brooks Museum’s timing of this exhibit just about perfect. Brooks chief curator Marina Pacini is happy for this synchronicity between “African Print Fashion

Now!” and an Afro-centric and fashion-forward superhero film that’s dominating the box office. “I love that you can enjoy this strictly on the level of the beauty and creativity of the clothes themselves,” Pacini says. “But the person who’s interested can dig down deep and learn things about the politics, the social history, the cultural history, the making of the textiles, and the independence movement. “Or you can just come in and graze,” she continues. “We are absolutely proud of the fact that we have an exhibition that celebrates the creativity, the culture, the artistry, and the global reach of African-print fabric and the designers themselves.” Special events associated with the Brooks exhibit include a head-wrap workshop and special guided tours led by community experts like Ugandan-native Grace Byeitima of Mbabazi House of Style and professor Sonin Lee from the University of Memphis Department of Fashion Design and Merchandising. African designer Ituen Basi, whose work is prominently featured in the catalog for “African-Print Fashion Now!”, will be visiting Memphis for Fashion Week next month and will speak at the Brooks on Wednesday, April 11th.

Lekan Jeyifo (b. Nigeria) and Walé Oyéjidé (b. Nigeria, 1981) Johannesburg 2081 A.D. Africa 2081 A.D. series, 2014 Digital print Courtesy Ikiré Jones

“African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style,” at Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, February 24th-August 12th. For more details go to brooksmuseum.org. M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 59

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GREAT MEMPHIS HOMES

The Elkington home’s classic and timeless architectural style is made even more beautiful with the use of reclaimed Mississippi brick.

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AT HOME IN THE FOREST

G

riffin Elkington is known for his quality construction in established Memphis neighborhoods.

He owns Griffin Elkington Residential Construction and Development, as well as a real estate and property management firm, River City Land Company. Interestingly, he originally bought his lot in the Yorkshire Forest area of East Memphis with the intention of building a home on it and selling it. However, he and his wife, Alison, fell in love with the property and ended up keeping it for themselves to build a custom home for their own family. And so it was

The Elkington family’s residence provides a “country in the city”feel.

that in October 2016, the family moved from their beautiful Doug Enoch-designed Boxwood Green home, closer to town on Poplar, to the “wilds” of the forest.

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great memphis homes The Yorkshire Forest area is rolling with towering trees and a “country in the city” feel. The architectural styles are mixed, and there are a large number of mid-century modern homes with their generous use of glass, surely built in that fashion to take full advantage of the beautiful setting. The Elkington home sits on a sunny half-acre lot, and the façade is built in a classic, timeless style,

making my fi rst impression as we drove up that the home has an elegant, old Virginia feel — think the Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg. T he a rch ite c t fo r t h i s 4,430-square-foot house was David Anderson, with whom Elkington has worked on 20 homes over the past five years. The brick is particularly beautiful, with an incredible back story here. It seems that the bricks,

which were found in Memphis at Christie Cut Stone, had been reclaimed from the Indianola Brick Company in Indianola, Mississippi, which is where Griffin Elkington’s grandmother worked many years ago. Inside, the stylish home is modern, open-plan, and lightfilled. Anne Canale was the interior designer, and colorful motifs and patterns add interest to the relaxing neutral walls

above: The counters are clutter-free and the look is formal in the home’s kitchen that adjoins the living room. right: The well-appointed and spacious screened porch with its raised ceiling overlooks the property’s beautiful backyard. far right: Handsome paired sconces and urns along with an interesting rustic wooden piece add up to a wonderful entry.

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and light upholstery. The sofas in the living room are from Ger mantow n’s Sensational Sofas, and the gorgeous limestone fireplace is from Christie Cut Stone. Blue-and-white is the color scheme used in many places throughout the house; as Alison says, she loves the beach. The lighting f ixtures are all from Graham’s. As Griffi n Elkington walked me around the home, he pointed out several special design elements, including the shiplap walls, the Howe casing around doors and windows, and the rounded corners

which, in his experience, make a house more livable. His attention to detail included having the cabinet knobs plated at Memphis Plating Works to

The stylish home is modern, open-plan, and light-filled. match the Newport Brass kitchen fixtures. The kitchen counters are marble and leathered granite from Tops Unlimited, and the

backsplash is from Venice Tile. With regard to the kitchen, the couple pointed out what they call “the scullery,” i.e. the butler’s pantry, where they store small kitchen appliances, such as the coffee maker, microwave, and blender, to keep the kitchen counters clutter-free and more formal — very important in an open-plan layout. The refrigerator and dishwasher are hidden behind handsome panels. A laundry and mudroom are also adjacent to the kitchen. And now for the piece de résistance, Griffin Elkington’s pride

above: Blue-and-white is clearly the favored color scheme in this elegantly casual living room.

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great memphis homes

left: This UT-themed room is the man cave to beat all man caves! above: Cooper, the Elkingtons’ German shepherd, poses under portraits of the family’s children. below: The master bath features a free-standing bathtub and paintings that mimic the marble floors.

and joy: his man cave. The metal signage courtesy of Memphis’ Kingfish Metal Works says “I will give my all for Tennessee today,” which surely gives you an idea of why and how so much care went into designing this particular room. There are gray shiplap walls, custom artwork by local artist Adam Exelbierd, a Kegerator for draft beer, and custom furniture situated on an authentic replica of the UT football locker room floor, complete with the Power T in the center. In fact, this is indeed a very handsome man cave, well-situated between the kitchen and the spacious screened porch, and not buried in a basement. Alison is a talented artist, and she has a beautiful studio in this home that is overflowing with her paintings. Her proud husband says he often uses them to stage homes that he is in the process of

selling. Alison modestly explains that she “paints for herself and family and friends,” describing her style as “whatever hits me at the time”; her works are both representational and abstract. The downstairs master bedroom suite is luxurious with its marble-floored bathroom that features gold-plated Kohler fixtures and a steam shower. Another special place is the upstairs bunkroom with its double-decker beds, desks for homework and extra play space — all specially fashioned for their two young children, son Webb, age 6, and daughter Emery, age 8, and their friends. Griffin told me that he’s preoccupied with finishing several projects at the moment, all three closer to town — properties on Lafayette, Lorece Lane, and in High Point Terrace. For her part Alison is delighted to be just where the Elkingtons now

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below: The modern dining room features inherited chairs and a colorful painting by Alison Elkington. right: This light-filled studio is every artist’s dream and a very special room for Alison to call her own. bottom: The neutral color palette of the master bedroom is soft and dreamy while the window shades and rug add touches of texture.

live, in a beautiful, established neighborhood with wooded scenery and older homes full of character. And while the area may feel secluded, in truth it’s just a handy hop, skip, and jump from the bustle and many amenities of East Memphis. And what makes their location extra special is the fact that they have very dear friends living in beautiful homes on either side of them, and the backyards are connected by gates so the families can visit one another and the pets can play. The Elkingtons jokingly remark that they’ll never need to build a pool, since both of their neighbors have them. The three sets of friends go back and forth among their homes all the time; what a wonderland this is for the children and parents alike. All this and heaven too. The Elkington place sounds just like that to me!

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BATTLE ROYAL For many, the upcoming race for Shelby County mayor may seem much ado about nothing. But for those who care about the future of our city and region, next fall’s county election may prove critically important.

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★ ★ ★ ✪ ★ ★ ★ by jackson baker

iven this year’s harsh winter weather here in Memphis — not to mention unrelenting chaos in the nation’s capital and a tragic St. Valentine’s Day massacre in Broward County, Florida — we head into spring looking for sensible distractions. Take a moment, then, to consider next fall’s Shelby County mayor’s race, an election that surely will determine the future shape and direction of our local politics. A prospective battle royal, involving at least four local eminences, has already gotten started. The field of party candidates running for county mayor became final on February 15th, with four well-known candidacies intending to participate in the Republican and Democratic primary elections on May 1st. Along with independents who may declare, the two primary winners will participate in the county general election on August 2nd. That date is paired with the Democratic and Republican primary

elections for statewide and federal office; this year’s November 6th elections will include all nine U.S. House of Representative seats in Tennessee, one of the state’s two U.S. Senate seats, and a replacement for term-limited incumbent Governor Bill Haslam.* But the fun begins here in Shelby County in early May, when Republican and Democratic voters choose their party nominees in 13 countywide races, most notably their nominees for Shelby County mayor. Because Memphis city government generates so much local media attention — after all, 70 percent of the county’s population lives in Memphis — the fact that our county government is ordained by the state constitution and ultimately has fiscal sway over important matters of both daily life and essential services often escapes notice. Never forget that the annual budget of county government normally exceeds that of the city by as much as half a billion dollars.

* F o r fu r th e r i nfo r m at i o n o n c a n di date s , p o ll l o c at i o n s , a n d e a r ly - v o t i n g date s , go to shelby vo te .c om . 66 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 8

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY JACKSON BAKER

The current position of county mayor dates from the Shelby Country Restructure Act of 1975, which also created the 13-member Shelby County Commission, which serves as a mini-legislature for the county. A serious disagreement over disposition of funds developed during the 2015 budget season, and since then, now-outgoing Mayor Mark Luttrell and a Terry Roland bipartisan commission majority have been battling furiously over the right to maintain control over that budget. Ironically, one of the three serious Republican candidates for county mayor this year is Commissioner Terry Roland, who, along with GOP colleague Heidi Shafer, has been a leader of the lengthy revolt against Luttrell. Roland, who effectively has been runTerry Roland remains ning for mayor for over two years now, claims that combative, somewhat the reforms he has been in the vein of a local seeking provide more fiscal oversight to the Donald Trump, commission, weakening whose Shelby County the power of the mayor’s campaign chairman office. Roland, a one-time rohe was in 2016. deo roustabout who operates a tire store in Millington and possesses an admittedly shaky command of basic grammar, even when debating aspects of school policy and administration, is, to say the least, an atypical candidate for county mayor, or, for that matter, political office of any kind. At least three colleagues on the current commission — all, as it happens, fellow Republicans — have reported being the object of physical threats from Roland after arguments over the commission’s agenda items. Said GOP colleague Mari Billingsley: “Terry has threatened to beat me up in front of several county staffers in the hallway. He consistently displays bullying behavior. Anybody who disagrees with him about anything is met with great hostility. That’s unbelievably unprofessional. There’s no place for it in government, and it sets a very poor example for a community that already has too much hostility on its hands.” And former Democratic Commissioner Steve Mulroy, a professed liberal whose day job is that of University of Memphis law professor, had repeated showdowns with Roland during the one four-year commission term they shared, a pattern that culminated one day in the commission library when, according to Mulroy, Roland approached him with fists balled up and these words: “You and I are never going to agree. There’s only one way to settle things. We’re going downstairs, and I’m going to whip your ass!”

It must be said in the Millington roughneck’s defense, however, that, over the course of his nearly eight years on the commission, he has sanded down some of his rougher corners, even as his politics has evolved from rants against gay rights and citified liberal spendthrifts to ever more centrist positions. While serving as commission chair in 2015-16, he took the lead Conceivably, Lenoir in putting the commission has also benefited on record against school vouchers and for Governor from the recent Bill Haslam’s unsuccessful efforts on behalf of Medic- public endorsement aid expansion in Tennessee. he received from And the erstwhile bad-boy popular incumbent populist has become a deMayor Luttrell. pendable advocate for any and all initiatives benefiting county employees. So unexpectedly smooth and conciliatory was his conduct as chairman that Roland, upon relinquishing the office after his year in charge, received two separate standing ovations from his colleagues.) Even so, Terry Roland remains combative, somewhat in the vein of a local Donald Trump, whose Shelby County campaign chairman he was in 2016. A constant object of his verbal attacks these days is County Trustee David Lenoir, who has been in Roland’s rhetorical gunsights ever since it became obvious, a year or two back, that Lenoir, too, hankered to be county mayor. During the last budget season, for example, Roland made a point of charging Lenoir with padding the trustee’s payroll and hiring employees who weren’t required to do any work. He also has referred to his rival publicly as “Mr. Drysdale,” the unsympathetic moneybags character in the old The Beverly Hillbillies TV sitcom. This was his way of saying that Lenoir, a financial-indusDavid Lenoir try veteran and a fairly conventional personality close to the center of gravity of the Shelby County Republican establishment, will raise more money in his mayoral race than anybody else and consequently will have more to spend. Such would definitely seem to be the case, given end-of-2017 financial-disclosure reports that show Lenoir leading the pack of county-mayor candidates by a hefty margin — $345,438 on hand, versus $210,055 for County Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos, running second in money-raising, while Roland has lagged behind his rivals in terms of dollars, with but $16,319 in his coffers. Conceivably, Lenoir has also benefited from the recent public endorsement he received from popular incumbent Mayor Luttrell. For all his affinity for the GOP establishment, Lenoir may also have M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 67

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crossover potential, since he has kept the county’s level of revenues up while introducing several user-friendly mechanisms in the Trustee’s Office for delinquent or confused taxpayers. Despite his apparent advantages, however, and despite a résumé that includes his once having been a starting defensive end for Alabama’s Crimson Tide, David Lenoir has a modest and relatively laid-back personality that will no doubt be put to the test by the more rambunctious Roland, whose modest campaign funding at this point is Joy Touliatos somewhat alleviated by his unrivaled ability to press hot buttons and grab free media. Lenoir’s challenge is to enhance his name recognition as the campaign warms up. Doing better in the name game is also an imperative for the third member of the Republican triad, Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos, who recently has taken concrete steps to solve her anonymity problem, having sent out two polished mailers on behalf of her candidacy. She also has the distinction of having been the first county-mayor candidate to go billboard, with large signs advertising her name and countenance at several strategic points on local thoroughfares. Like David Lenoir, Touliatos belongs to the Republican establishment, and, like him, she has a reputation for competence at her job. In a sense, she is in competition with Lenoir for the core dollars available from longtime Republicans. In this unusual year of #MeIn this unusual year of Too and #TimesUp #MeToo and #TimesUp adjustments to the patriarchal universe, adjustments to the Touliatos’ gender patriarchal universe, itself also may well become a political Touliatos’ gender itself advantage. She heralso may well become a self has a beguilingly American story, political advantage. as the daughter of Greek immigrants who, as a young girl growing up, did the dishes and other grunt work that helped establish the family business, the Fairview Drive-In on East Parkway, a favorite stop on the fringe of Cooper-Young for students and families during the 1970s and 1980s. From a practical point of view, Touliatos has already done some useful on-the-job political training, as a member of current Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s brain trust, serving as campaign co-chair during the latter’s successful upset campaign of 2015. Early on in her own campaign, she

also availed herself of the services of Stephen Reid, the consultant and sometime pollster who guided Strickland’s win; subsequently, she has enlarged her campaign staff, taking on Jordan Powell of Dallas-based Red Right Strategies as a digital strategist, and Patrick Lanne of Virginia-based Public Opinion Strategies as her pollster. Also on board are such veterans of the local political wars as former city councilmen Brent Taylor and John Bobango as treasurer and co-chair, respectively. Two of Touliatos’ campaign themes — public safety at all costs and the streamlining of county government — are reminiscent of the bottom-line simplicities that Strickland used to ride into City Hall in 2015. And while she’s expected by many to finish third among the Republicans, the judge may well have the makings of a sleeper candidate, one capable of raising relatively big bucks and slipping ahead of the big boys somehow. Roland in particular has to treat her as a second front. So, for that matter, does Lenoir.

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he results in recent Shelby County elections have been so favorable to Republicans that the GOP has a certain headiness of expectation going into the 2018 fray. Even though Shelby County now has a narrow African-American majority (52.7 percent), Republicans have swept most countywide elective positions this decade. Statewide, there has been a red tide of GOP control, with Republicans now owning super-majorities in both the state House and state Senate, and Republicans firmly in control of the executive and judicial branches of government as well. One-party Republican government has become the norm in Shelby County. Yet it used to be the other way. For well over a century, Democrats dominated everything in Tennessee, state and local, until the Civil Rights era relatively quickly swung a majority of white Southerners out of the Democratic Party and into the Republican. Today, however, the basic demographics of Shelby County — growing numbers of white progressives in the urban core along with an overwhelmingly Democratic African-American community — should provide the raw numbers for victory. But that can only happen if the Democrats figure out how to marshal their resources effectively. National events — particularly the growing resistance to a distrusted and doubted president — may create 2018 opportunities across the state for Democrats in open races for governor and U.S. senator. Democratic hopefuls like ex-Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh are plausible candidates for governor, and former Governor Phil Bredesen, now a candidate for the U.S. Senate, has already demonstrated, in two victorious gubernatorial races, his ability to buck the Republican wave. These will be the ticket-heading shock troops this year hoping to boost a Democratic renaissance at lesser elective levels. An impressive number of fresh faces and young unknowns are challenging every seat available in the legislature, on the county commission, and in several available judgeships; at least some of them have a good chance to stick, the way Democrat Dwayne Thompson did two years ago in ousting an entrenched and over-confident Republican incumbent in suburban District 96 of the state House of Representatives. And Democrats should have a decent shot at the county

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mayor’s job as well. State Senator Lee Harris — a professor at the University of Memphis Law School — is now the leading Democratic candidate for that position, having spent his formative political years battling the leftovers of the erstwhile Ford Machine, first in the winning of a city council seat and, in 2014, his present seat in the Tennessee Senate, where his abilities so impressed his mere handful of party colleagues there (the state senate currently consists of 27 Republicans and but five Democrats) that they promptly elected him to serve as Minority Leader, days after he took his oath of office. Going into the county mayor’s race, Harris, an African American with a Morehouse/London School of Economics/Yale Law Going into the county School pedigree, sees mayor’s race, Harris, an himself as a potential crossover candiAfrican American with date, with progresa Morehouse/London sive-enough views to excite a youthful School of Economics/Yale rank-and-f ile that Law School pedigree, sees may combine with himself as a potential his record of bipartisan relationships in crossover candidate. Nashville to convince middle-of-the-road conservatives of his bona fides. He has reason to count on the loyalty of his party’s black voting core, and, potentially as well, to middle-class independents and moderate Republicans. All this points to a kind of dilemma, of course — one that was illustrated in the course of a recent meet-and-greet in suburban Lakeland, when he was asked, point-blank, if he was “the liberal candidate.” The literal answer to that would be yes — among other things, Harris had been the sponsor on the city council of an anti-discrimination ordinance on behalf of the city’s LGBTQ community and, in the General Assembly, of economic-empowerment legislation aimed at the social under-class. In answering, however, Harris softened the edges of his politics, keeping to the profile of a Democrat who had co-sponsored bills with Republicans — notably criminal-justice reform meaLee Harris sures introduced in tandem with the likes of arch-conservative GOP state Senator Brian Kelsey. Harris has been no slouch on the financial front, his endof-2017 disclosure form showing that he had raised $108,846 in the final quarter of last year. That contrasted with the meager fundraising of his one declared Democratic rival, longtime political broker Sidney Chism, who raised $10,555. Chism, the last county commissioner to serve consecutive terms as chairman, still has longstanding allies from his decades in the Teamster movement and a loyal following of sorts in South Memphis, but he has been reduced in stature from years of having to fight private battles, over the right to vote on the commission for

wraparound services for his day-care centers, for example, or over his propensity to cozy up publically to Sheriff Bill Oldham when members of his own Democratic Party were seeking simultaneously to unseat that Republican office-holder. At his late-fall campaign opener, Chism unloosed a stream of invective against Harris, whom he described as one “chosen by the fat boys that make the decisions for this town” and whom he resolved to “beat up on: morning, noon, and night.” It remains to be Sidney Chism seen whether Chism has the means to do anything like that. More likely seems a scenario where Harris, who has artfully squeezed in bouts of campaigning during time off from his legislative obligations, will be fixed at the end of the primary cycle with enough spare change and political support to hold his own against whichever of the three Republicans survives their shootout with enough left over in the exchequer to make a general election race feasible. At one time it seemed likely that another Democrat might run for county mayor in 2018. This would have been Harold Byrd of the Bank of Bartlett Byrds, a true gentleman of the business/ political breed who, as president of that family-owned institution, has long been at the helm of a core suburban enterprise, which over the years has endowed many a successful politician with the means to success. Byrd himself served several terms in the state House of Representatives and made an unsuccessful race for Congress before preparing to run for county mayor in 2002. He had gotten fairly along in that endeavor when some of the powers-that-be went out and recruited Public Defender A C Wharton as an alternative Democrat candidate. Byrd would eventually drop out as the dollar ante kept rising, but, ambition-wise, he was left with uncooked seeds. The popular Byrd seemed to be a cinch to run and win in 2010, but that was a year in which his bank was still dealing with the aftermath of the Great Recession, while he himself was unexpectedly preoccupied with a battle against cancer. In the pink of health this year, with the bank business unthreatened, he took another extended look, but saw too many other candidates holding a piece of his platform, and regretfully decided against a last chance to finish cooking his seeds with another run this year. If Byrd was a potential candidate past his time, another last-minute dropout was a candidate who may be well ahead of his. This would be Shea Flinn, member of one of the more unusual father-son political combinations to be found anywhere. He’s conspicuously more at ease, both in his own skin and in public circumstances, than his father, George Flinn, who has been hugely successful as a radiologist and broadcast execucontin u ed on page 16 0 M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 69

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THE MIND’S EYE

by michael finger

Brandon Dill

KEEPING PEOPLE, PLACES, EVENTS, AND ISSUES IN FOCUS IN THE MID-SOUTH.

ABOUT THIS SERIES: Memphis has played muse over the years to artists across the spectrum, from the music of Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, Al Green, and the collective at Stax Records, to the prose of Peter Taylor, Shelby Foote, and John Grisham. But what about visually? The look of Memphis has been described equally as gritty, dirty, active, eerie, beautiful, and captivating. In this series, titled “The Mind’s Eye,” Memphis magazine takes a closer look at some of this city’s most prominent photographers, a few homegrown, many transplanted, but all drawn in by that grittiness, that activity, that beauty. Is there something special about the look of Memphis? We ask each and, along the way, learn what makes these photographers tick, what got them started on their professional paths, and what it is that keeps them looking around every corner and down every alley. We turn the camera on the cameramen, as it were, capturing their portraits and seeing what develops. At the same time, we showcase each photographer’s own remarkable work. Hopefully, that will speak for itself. The work of other “Mind’s Eye” photographers — including Bob Williams, Murry Riss, Saj Crone, Karen Pulfer Focht, Willy Bearden, and Jamie Harmon — is available through our online archives (memphismagazine.com).

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he most endangered amphibian in the world didn’t feel like cooperating. The Mississippi Gopher Frog — one of only 50 known survivors of that species — was part of the Memphis Zoo’s program to collect and preserve tissue and sperm samples from creatures whose survival was threatened. On assignment for this magazine, Brandon Dill was trying to photograph the little frog, who wouldn’t hop or even move, and the story required the creature to look, well, alive. But Dill tried different shots and angles, and finally got the image he needed for the March 2010 article called “Animal Attraction,” one of his early assignments for Memphis magazine. Quickly packing up his gear, he hopped in his car for his next job, an event at Latino Memphis — all part of a day’s work for one of this city’s busiest freelance photographers.

above: Dressed in their best blue-and-white, Victoria Foth hugs her poodles Ginger, Flame, and Bridgette after winning the pet/owner

look-alike competition during Pet Day at the Collierville YMCA. The annual event benefits the Collierville Animal Shelter.

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“I feel a sense of place like I haven’t gotten anywhere else, and I’m really proud when I can contribute to the greater narrative here. That’s the one role I can play.”

above: Brandon’s older daughter, Eliza, stands on Rockwood Bar, an island in the Mississippi River south of Chester, Illinois, where

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Dill doesn’t like to talk about his work — “it makes me feel like an egomaniac,” he says — but his digital portfolio speaks for itself, filled as it is with thousands of images that represent a wide range of experiences in this area: the “Death House” at an Arkansas state prison, the marijuana research lab at Ole Miss, Memphis City Council meetings, the Black Lives Matter protests on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and at Graceland, the removal of the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue from Health Sciences Park, Grizzlies home basketball games, the city’s storm drain system, portraits of celebrities and regular folks, and more. Work for The Commercial Appeal, Memphis magazine, the Memphis Flyer, and commercial clients drew Dill to Memphis, while national clients include The New York Times, LA Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Reuters, Getty Images, and the Associated Press. right: Dancers Lil Buck (left) and G-Nerd compete in a Memphis Jookin Battle. below: Bobby James cleans up his yard after heavy winds broke limbs from trees on his property near Gould, Arkansas. Dill had traveled to the area to photograph the “Death House,” where Arkansas prisoners on Death Row are executed, on assignment for a story in The Intercept.

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orn in 1980 in Springfield, Missouri, Dill says he “moved around quite a bit” when he was a kid. His family lived in Tulsa and Denver before finally settling in Hendersonville, Tennessee, where his father was a regional restaurant manager and his mother worked in a bank. In the fourth grade, Dill joined other elementary school students producing the school yearbook, and “that’s where I got my first camera — a little point-and-shoot thing called a Snappy Q, and I guess I’ve been taking pictures ever since.” He studied photography for two years at Middle Tennessee State University but took a break from school in 2003 to take part in a study-abroad program in the Czech Republic. “This had a huge impact on me,” he says. “The teachers were Czechoslovakian New Wave art and documentary photographers, who worked during the Soviet occupation, and I was the assistant for Miro Svolik, who was at the forefront of the new creative explosion after communism fell there.” Returning to MTSU for another year of classwork, Dill took a job with a school portrait company, where he took class pictures and also photographed sports around the Nashville area. When that company opened a baseball complex called Game Day Sports in Cordova, Dill and a colleague, Toby Sells (now the associate editor of the Memphis Flyer), were sent to photograph the games there, and “that’s how I started dipping my toe in Memphis.” He was still living in Nashville when he met his wife, Amanda. “We both did a lot of irresponsible

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traveling and at the end of that we decided we didn’t want to move back to Nashville,” he says. “We had met a lot of really good people during visits to Memphis, and I started getting some lucky breaks and getting good work, so we moved here in 2008.” Today, the Dill family — which now includes daughters Violet, age 5, and Eliza, age 7 — occupies a two-story home i n C o op er-You ng. Amanda works as a professional auctioneer, a job that takes her around the region selling commercial and residential properties. He looks back on his days as a school photographer as a learning experience. “All the classes I took

at MTSU were still using film — darkroom and wet-process photography. But even though it was a really baseline, rudimentary-type job aesthetically, the school portrait company was ahead of the curve as far as technology goes, so we had brand-new cameras all the time.” These days, Dill is rarely seen around town — or the Mid-South — without a Nikon D4 slung over his shoulders. At the same time, he admits missing certain aspects of the “old” kind of photography. “I do miss never touching an object, ever,” he says. “Here, you look at the back of the [camera] screen, and then I send you some electrons, and you look at it on another screen, but it never really exists anywhere.” His first projects included a range of feature stories for the CA and project photography for Askew Nixon Ferguson Architects. As a freelancer for the local newspaper, Dill quickly realized that the regular “beats” were covered by the staff photographers, but that proved to be an advantage. “It was my privilege to gain access to so many other situations,” he says. “I shot an average of five or six assignments a week for almost 10 years as a freelancer for the CA. So within that is a feature on everything you can imagine.” At the same time, Dill began to feel what he calls “a photographic schizophrenia, where I would go directly

left: Sisters Caroline (left) and Anna Calvo interact with the “Barrier Free” art exhibit, an installation designed by their mother, artist Yancy Villa-Calvo, for Latino Memphis. below: Helen Putnam, 94, waves as she is introduced during the grand opening of the Crosstown Concourse. Putnam began working in the building in 1943 as the first female advertising artist in the retail department of Sears.

Dill began to feel what he calls “photographic schizophrenia, where I would go from one crazy situation to another.”

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above: Toastmaster the Clown, portrayed by Harry Bungard, waits to perform during the Al Chymia Shrine Circus inside the Shelby Farms Showplace Arena.

from one crazy situation to another.” He recalls the day “where I was photographing family members at the scene of a juvenile homicide, only to be called away to shoot an immediate feature on a pet adoptathon.” He was “constantly jumping” with photo assignments that ranged from a story about a homeless center to the Munford High School marching band, from an Airport Authority board meeting to a dining review, and everything in between: education, music, healthcare, sports, politics, bluegrass festivals, jookin battles, environmental activism, and even “skateboarding bulldogs.” He’s also the official Associated Press photographer for the Memphis Grizzlies, and says that “you can find me sitting on the ‘e’ of Memphis on the FedExForum court at every home game.” There’s one area, however, he won’t touch: fashion. “I don’t like that because I don’t like to tell people what to do,” he says. “I’m much better at finding pictures than I am at creating pictures.”

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ver time, Dill began to draw national assignments, doing nine shoots last year for The New York Times. These were often complicated stories that required an expert’s touch to convey them visually. “I don’t want to gloat,” he says now, in his self-effacing way, “but the one that got the most coverage last year involved a controversial herbicide made by Monsanto. States like Arkansas and Mississippi were considering banning it because it has a ‘drift problem,’ meaning it tends to float over other farmers’ fields.” If that other farmer hadn’t purchased genetically modified seeds — from Monsanto, of course — designed to handle this chemical, his whole crop could be destroyed. “Over in Arkansas two farmers were arguing over that and one of them got shot,” he says. “I didn’t cover the murder, but they sent me to photograph a similarly tense situation in Missouri.” The NYT also sent Dill to Cleveland, Mississippi, where a Trump Hotel property had stalled. “It was part of a larger story about how the Trump business was doing

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left: Memphis City Council members take a break during a heated budget meeting at City Hall. bottom left: Janis Fullilove reacts as early polls show her in the lead during the 2011 race for City Council Super District 8, Position 2.

There’s one area he won’t touch: fashion. “I don’t like to tell people what to do,” Dill says. “I’m much better at finding pictures than I am at creating pictures.”

right: John “Bad Dog” McCormack, popular dj on Rock 103, continued to broadcast live from his hospital bed while he was being treated for leukemia. He died three months after this photo was taken.

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above: Demonstrators occupy the I-40 Bridge during a Black Lives Matter rally on July 10, 2016. below: Protesters confront a line of policemen to explain why they are blocking the Hernando DeSoto Bridge. This was another shot taken by Dill that same evening.

during his presidency,” he says. “They try to pair you, I think, with your style, and since I guess I’m really good at photographing empty stuff, I guess they thought, ‘Here’s an empty field. Here’s an empty hotel. Go shoot it.’ They usually tell me who or what to shoot, but they actually give me pretty free rein with what I do with it. “Most of my national stories are outside of Memphis, strangely enough,” says Dill. “I go to Mississippi all the time.” The LA Times hired him to photograph the only federally funded marijuana research lab in the country, located at Ole Miss. Shortly after, The Wall Street Journal

called, wanting a story about the college football tailgating culture, so it was back to Oxford to photograph students partying in The Grove. He certainly stays busy. “When anyone calls and asks if I can shoot this, I always say, ‘Oh yeah, absolutely.’ I always tell people I’m available even when I’m not, really.” Some of those assignments involve considerable risk. Dill did a feature on Navy stunt pilots that required him to hang out the open door of an airplane. “That was definitely interesting,” he says. “They opened the whole side door and they lock you in just a little bit, so you can lean out the door and take pictures of the other planes.” For five years, he covered a heart-pounding event for Maxim magazine called “Maximum Warrior.” Sitting at a table at home, laptop open, Dill laughs as he looks over the photos he shot for this project: “There’s this strange paramilitary training facility over in Arkansas. It’s like a secret camp in the middle of a cornfield, and it’s a big deal. They do secret training for the State Department, for private security companies, and other groups.” For Maxim, the project involved “these special ops guys paired up with Maxim’s ‘Hometown Hotties’ and they would compete against each other in a reality show, all involving live fire.” Meaning: real bullets and explosives. “It was just insane,” he laughs. “Of course, it was pretty dangerous and you had to sign a waiver, and in the back of their minds they figured, I’d signed a waiver, so, ‘Uh, Brandon, do you think you can get a little closer?’” He certainly got close to the action. Later, meeting with the Memphis magazine staff, he pulls up a pants leg to show a nasty shrapnel scar — a “souvenir” from that assignment.

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below: The peculiar bend in this tree struck Focht as evoking the Native American fertility deity Kokopelli, an artful juxtoposition with the headstones below.

Looking over his shoulder as Dill clicks on a photograph of a jeep careening through a ball of fire, those Hotties seemingly in imminent danger, his daughter Eliza opens her eyes wide and asks, “Daddy, was that a real bomb?” He reassures her, “Yes, but they set if off on purpose. It’s just part of a show.” The reality show never developed, although scenes from “Maximum Warrior” can be found on YouTube.

D

ill is much more pleased with his coverage of civil-rights issues and activities in Memphis. “When the Black Lives Matter bridge protest happened two summers ago, I was lucky enough to get to shoot what I thought was a good collection of images,” he says. He managed to get right in the thick of the action, with hundreds of photos showing protesters face-to-face with police, as tensions mounted but never escalated to violence. One photo made the cover of the Flyer the following week, while others were used inside. Despite his connections with national media organizations, however, he was frustrated: “I tried really hard to get somebody to pick those up. I was on the phone with AP and The New York Times and Getty and whoever else, but I didn’t get much feedback.” But he had better luck with the events of last year. “Fast forward to when the statues [of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis] came down,” he says. “It was almost impossible to get to Health Sciences

Park, because the police had blocked everything off, but I managed to do so, sneaking down an alley next to the old Scottish Rite temple.” Dill’s photographs of the Forrest statue being lifted from its pedestal, and the dramatic reactions from the crowd watching the event, made the front page of The New York Times and inside editorial pages. “Everything here relating to those two events is still ongoing, of course,” he says, “but I think those photographs are bookends for a certain period in my career.”

top: The Nathan Bedford Forrest statue is removed from Health Sciences Park. This photograph appeared in The New York Times. below: Baxter Leach and Ozell Ueal, from the 1968 Sanitation Workers Strike, are honored at the National Civil Rights Museum.

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top: Carts are lined up behind one of the “big box” stores on Summer Avenue. left: A melting ice cream cone run over by a car is an example of the scenes Dill finds for himself. A simple

B

image, Dill says it “holds a lot of personal significance for me” since it was taken during a trip to Canada when he was on a “ninemonth-long, soul-searching, midlife crisis.”

ut he’s not always working on freelance projects for other people. Dill takes plenty of shots for his pleasure. “I learned photography in a fine arts program, and a lot of the photos that are my personal favorites have never been seen by anyone,” he says. “Many of them are just quiet, empty spaces.” He f lips through these images: a neat row of orange Garden Ridge carts against a stained concrete wall; a trio of oddly painted homes in Frayser; a mosaic of color that, at closer look, turns out to be piles of garbage from a landfill; eerily beautiful scenes from ancient brick-lined storm-drain tunnels (used to illustrate the cover story, “Underground Memphis,” in the March 2015 issue of this magazine). Everyone today has an iPhone, or something similar, but carrying a “real” camera sometimes invites trouble. While visiting a local hospital, Dill was captivated by a patch of greenery in the parking garage. “I was in this weird, tortured landscape space,” he says, noting the rough concrete walls, “and I think, these are pretty.” Within seconds, it seems, of snapping the photograph, “Here comes some security person in a 78 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 8

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right: A road in Cleveland, Mississippi, ends at a stop sign. This photo was part of an assignment on the long battle over school-district desegregation in the region for The New York Times.

cart, and they accuse me of criminal trespass.” He finally convinced the guards that he meant no harm. Looking over his collection of photographs, Dill again notes, “It’s very strange for me to just be gushing about myself,” but (almost reluctantly, it seems) he observes, “There’s plenty of whimsy and fun perspective on the breadth of the human experience here.” It’s clear that he’s pleased with his work, and he’s especially proud of his family and their decision to move to Memphis. “I have a special kind of relationship with this city because I’ve been in so many different situations and worked so closely with people from every walk of life,” he says. “Everywhere I go, it seems there’s a historic photo overlay where I can see the people I photographed the last time I was there. I feel a sense of place like I haven’t gotten anywhere else, and I’m really proud when I can contribute to the greater narrative here. That’s the one role I can play.”  For more on Brandon Dill, please visit brandondill. com or follow him on Instagram @bdillphoto. M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 79

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Abdu brings minimally invasive hope to women’s care Rarely does a day go by that Dr. A. Ben Abdu, MD, isn’t amazed at the strength of his female patients. Dr. Abdu focuses on minimally invasive gynecological surgeries at Regional One Health. His training focused on advanced laparoscopy, minimally invasive female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery, vaginal surgery, tubal reversals, female urology and pelvic pain medicine. He primarily works out of Regional One Health’s East Campus, which houses a hub of super sub-specialty women’s services including minimally invasive GYN surgery, urogynecology and reproductive medicine. It’s there that Dr. Abdu interacts with patients who never cease to amaze him by their resiliency to continue on despite pelvic issues. “I think women are amazing and innovative in their approach to their problem,” he said. “Women find unique ways to deal with their problems and live with them. They think it’s just part of aging. They’re thinking, ‘I’m 56, I’ve had three kids and it’s just par for the course.’ No ma’am, it’s not par for the course. It always blows my mind and I say to them, ‘You know I can fix that?’ It makes me in awe of women.” Dr. Abdu works with women experiencing a range of pelvic issues that have been undiagnosed or inadequately treated. Those issues include chronic pelvic pain, history of endometriosis, painful periods, pain during intercourse, leaking urine or a vaginal bulge. Dr. Abdu also is the only surgeon in Memphis who does tubal reversal procedures robotically. Dr. Abdu’s laparoscopic approach is a low-risk, minimally invasive procedure. There are only small incisions for the use of a laparoscope, which basically is a long, thin tube with a high-resolution camera at the front that allows the physician to see the internal organs without open surgery. “I think the benefit of a laparoscope, whether it’s traditional or robotics, is visualization,” Dr. Abdu said. “It’s the ability to see the anatomy, to see a magnified view of the abdomen and, in the case of the robot, a 3D view.”

Dr. Abdu received his medical degree at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston and later interned at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Chattanooga where he stayed and worked in private practice for several years before being asked to join UT Regional One Physicians in Memphis.

I love what I do and I love Memphis. The one thing I can give at the end of the day is my 100 percent guarantee that I’m meticulous, and I give the care to my patients that I would expect for a family member. DR. BEN ABDU Dr. Abdu had a conversation with the medical director of Regional One Health’s High Risk Obstetrics center, Dr. Giancarlo Mari, MD, about becoming the director of the Division of Minimally Invasive GYN Surgery at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and bringing his skills to Regional One Health. Dr. Abdu moved to Memphis in summer 2016. While he has great respect and admiration for his patients and how they find ways to manage their health, Dr. Abdu said it is also a challenge. “A lot of times I see a woman who just lives with it until they just can’t. They go to other places and they’re dismissed or have the wrong surgery and by the time they get to me they’re frustrated sitting across from me with their arms crossed and thinking, ‘What’s this guy going to say now?’ That’s challenging,” Dr. Abdu said. But Dr. Abdu immediately goes to work breaking down those walls, letting a patient know that while he will review their chart and records from previous doctors, he also will step back with a fresh set of eyes and reconsider everything and understand

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901.515.EAST every possibility before he proceeds. “I’m here to help,” he said. “I love what I do and I love Memphis. I say this to a lot of patients and I say it sincerely. There are no guarantees in medicine. But the one thing I can give at the end of the day is my 100 percent guarantee that I’m meticulous, and I give the care to my patients that I would expect for a family member.”


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2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

DOWNTOWN DINING BLEU RESTAURANT & LOUNGE >>>

With over 80 years of combined hospitality and culinary experience, our management team invites you to experience Bleu Restaurant & Lounge. We serve breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily as well as Sunday brunch. Bleu’s menu is both healthy, with a focus on Superfoods for a better you, and indulgent with social plates perfect for sharing, steaks, seafood, and pasta with nuances of Asian, California, Creole, and Italian cuisine.

Bleu’s Lounge features daily beverage specials from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., handcrafted cocktails with fresh botanicals and house-made syrups, a wide array of liquors, wine, bottled and draft beer as well as an inviting atmosphere. Bleu offers free valet parking through the Westin Memphis Beale Street for our dining guests and is a short walk from FedExForum and the Orpheum Theatre. We encourage you to drop in at Bleu.

221 S. 3rd Street, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.334.5950 | DowntownBleu.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY >>> Dr. John Smarrelli Jr.

Dr. John Smarrelli Jr. serves as president of the city's oldest institution of higher education, Christian Brothers University. Dr. Smarrelli’s influential leadership has advanced the University’s mission to prepare students from all faiths and backgrounds for lives informed by the Lasallian values — faith, service, and community. Dr. Smarrelli spearheads efforts to develop partnerships across sectors to tackle problems facing the region, especially in the STEM and healthcare sectors. A nationally recognized leader in higher education immigration policy, Dr. Smarrelli serves on boards locally, regionally, and nationally. CBU.edu

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ELDER LAW

THE BAILEY LAW FIRM >>> Olen M. "Mac" Bailey, Jr. We are all getting older. Father Time marches past birthdays, reunions, anniversaries and holidays, setting or re-setting the clock each time. As we age, our concerns and needs change. As an Elder Law Attorney, Mac assists clients with legal issues affecting older Americans in such areas as estate planning, wills, trusts, powers of attorney, long-term care planning, Medicaid eligibility, Veterans BeneďŹ ts and probate.

A member of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys since 1996, Mac has been recognized as a Super Lawyer, a Five Star Professional, and one of the Mid-South’s "Top 40 Under 40." Proving that education is not reserved only for the young, Mac earned his Master of Laws in Elder Law in 2015. Learn more about Mac and Elder Law at TheBaileyLawFirm.com.

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS THE SIMS FINANCIAL GROUP, INC. >>>

The Sims Financial Group, Inc. is an independent Financial Services firm comprised of experienced Financial Professionals. We can assist you in all areas of Financial Management. EMPLOYEE AND EXECUTIVE BENEFITS Helping your business attract and retain qualified employees.

RETIREMENT PLANNING Making the most of your employer-sponsored retirement plans and IRAs. Determining how much you need to retire comfortably. Managing assets before and during retirement. RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE Review existing insurance policies. Recommending policy changes when appropriate. Finding the best policy for your situation.

855 Ridge Lake Blvd. Suite 303, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.682.2410 | SimsFinancialGroup.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

EMPLOYMENT LAW

THE CRONE LAW FIRM >>> Attorney Alan Crone, Founder

The Crone Law Firm provides tireless, compassionate, and effective counsel for clients facing employment law disputes — any legal situation that impacts our clients' ability to make money, including: • Workplace Harassment and Discrimination • Executive and Employment Contracts • Buy/Sell, Buyout, Nondisclosure and NonCompete Agreements • Compensation Disputes

• Commercial and Business Disputes • Business Partner and Shareholder Disputes • Accident and Injury Cases “We focus on creating solutions that work, so that our clients can work. We aim to restore control and predictability in the lives of employees, executives and entrepreneurs while providing proactive counsel to help avoid costly lawsuits and disputes.” — Alan G. Crone, Firm Founder

88 Union Avenue, 14th Floor, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.737.7740 | CroneLawFirmPLC.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ENDLESS PURSUIT OF JUSTICE HORNE AND WELLS, PLLC >>> Murray B. Wells

Justice for all? Whether it’s forcing chemical companies to clean up contamination in homes and yards in north Memphis, obtaining a not-guilty verdict for a battered woman charged with 1st degree murder, or protecting the rights of those discriminated against for any reason, Horne and Wells have proven their dedication to the fight.

No challenge is too big or small for these relentless attorneys who have historically stood up for the little guy, and the notion that everyone deserves the same brand of justice. If you have been injured, discriminated against or find yourself in trouble, call the trial attorneys that remember why they are here.

81 Monroe Ave., Suite 400, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.507.2521 | HorneWells.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ENT

UT OTOLARYNGOLOGY, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Left to right: Joel Kahane, PhD, CCC-SLP, FASHA, Neal Beckford, MD, FACS, Sanjeet Rangarajan, MD, M.Eng, and Tonya Newsom, DNP, FNP-C AG-ACNP UT Otolaryngology — the clinical faculty practice plan of the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center — is a multidisciplinary ear, nose and throat practice comprised of board-certified medical professionals equipped to handle everything from chronic sinus infections to even the most complicated cases. Our specialists include a general ENT who focuses on problems

with voice, swallowing and thyroid/parathyroid disease, speech/language pathologists providing state-of-the-art evaluation and treatment of voice, speech and swallowing disorders and even a sinus specialist, treating complex sinus problems and performing minimally invasive skull base surgery. With our comprehensive team of experts in the field, you are in good hands with UT Otolaryngology.

7675 Wolf River Boulevard, Suite 202, Germantown, TN | 901.737.3021 UniversityClinicalHealth.com/UT-Otolaryngology/ SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH THE FACE OF

ESTHETIC DENTISTRY SNEED DENTAL ARTS >>> Kathryn A. Sneed, DMD, MBA

Dr. Kathryn Sneed understands passion. As a wife, a mother of three, and an owner of a dental practice, it is obvious she is passionate about serving the needs of others. She is the founder and CEO of Sneed Dental Arts with locations in Collierville, Cordova, and East Memphis. Dr. Sneed and her team of dental professionals provide gentle and compassionate care in a warm friendly environment. Dr. Kathryn Sneed is dedicated to staying at the top of her field, and has completed advanced training in dental implants, sedation, orthodontics, cosmetic dentistry, and family and general dentistry. She is considered the “best of the best” with facial esthetics utilizing Botox and fillers. With over 4,000 Facebook likes, she is known by her colleagues and her patients as a leader, both in the dental office and beyond. When not in the office, she can be found teaching exercise classes at Lifetime Fitness or teaching Bible Study at Central Church. Come visit Sneed Dental Arts, and enjoy an experience unlike any other. Now serving patients in Collierville, Cordova, and East Memphis! 1122 Poplar View Lane N., Collierville, TN 38017 | 8095 Macon Road, Suite 109, Cordova, TN 38016 1655 International Drive, Suite 203, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.321.5335 901.853.2575 | SneedDentalArts.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FASHION COUTURE

PAT KERR, INC. >>> Pat Kerr Tigrett, President

Pat Kerr, America’s first couture bridal designer, whose career was launched by Neiman Marcus, developed a worldwide clientele early on. She was warned she would never succeed unless she moved from Memphis and she chose to remain in the city she loves, commuting to New York regularly. Her label remains: “Pat Kerr, Memphis." Her gowns have graced sacred aisles from the Vatican to Versailles: regal drawing rooms and gardens of global palaces, castles, Texas ranches, California vineyards, charming English country estates, and Southern churches, homes and gardens. Pat Kerr brides have said ‘I do’ in underwater weddings in the Caribbean and Haciendas in Mexico. Babies are sacredly christened wearing Pat Kerr gowns in American and European cathedrals across the globe … as

debutantes curtsied in New York, Switzerland, and Texas ballrooms. Honored with numerous awards in the fashion industry including the top honor in the bridal industry, Kerr remains active in New York as a voting member of the selection committee for the International Best Dressed List (for 25 years). A member of the Couture Council Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, and the Council of Fashion Designers of America. We design everything from royals to little rascals … including taking fragments from your great grandmother's dress, incorporating shreds into your design to be a treasured heirloom for many generations. Let us welcome you into our world creating for the celebrations of life.

By appointment: 901.525.5223 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FINE JEWELRY

BOB RICHARDS JEWELERS >>> Bob, Polly, and Anthony Richards, Owners Bob Richards has been in the jewelry business his entire life. His formative years were spent in the family’s retail jewelry operation his father established in 1927. Bob Richards Jewelers opened in 1984 after spending 10 years with Brodnax jewelers.

Bob Richards Jewelers is the only store in the Mid-South with four watchmakers and two jewelers on premises. Fine-jewelry lines include JB Star, Simon G, Spark Creations, Vahan, Gabriel, Mastoloni Pearls, and Tacori. Watches by Rolex, Tag Heur, Breitling, and Swiss Army.

1696 S. Germantown Road, Germantown TN 38138 | 901.751.8052 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FULL-SERVICE PLASTIC SURGERY

UNIVERSITY PLASTIC SURGEONS, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Left to right: Petros Konofaos, MD, Kalyan Dadireddy, MD, Roberto Lachica, MD, Robert Wallace, MD, Edward Luce, MD, Ram Velamuri, MD, and Xi Lin Jing, MD Not pictured: Sonia Alvarez, MD, and William Hickerson, MD, FACS University Plastic Surgeons is a unique plastic surgery practice in Memphis and the Mid-South. Its renowned team of surgeons specializes in both cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery procedures. The group provides care for treating the full spectrum of plastic surgery problems including the most complex cases in craniofacial and cleft surgery, pediatric plastic surgery, breast reconstruction including the latest microsurgery techniques, burn acute and reconstructive surgery, head and neck 1065 Cresthaven, Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119 |

cancer reconstruction, trauma reconstruction including head and peripheral nerve surgery. The physicians of University Plastic Surgeons bring extensive experience and the latest techniques to the ďŹ eld of cosmetic surgery of the face, breast, and body as well. Each doctor is a member of the faculty of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and are the teachers of future plastic surgeons training in the UTHSC plastic surgery residency. For more information or an appointment, contact us today! 901.866.8525 | UTUniversityPlasticSurgeons.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

FURS

HOLLOWAY FURS >>> Jim Holloway Holloway Furs, located at 404 Perkins Extended, was established in 1992 by Master Furrier Jim Holloway after eight years of apprenticeship with four different Master Furriers. We specialize in custom-made garments, fur coat enlargements, reductions, and remodeling. All types of repairs, monograms and appraisals. Cold storage and cleaning/glazing are also offered by Holloway Furs. We have a newly remodeled cold storage

and cleaning facility located in East Memphis. We have the largest inventory with the best prices in the Memphis area. We accept tradeins and offer a 12-month layaway program. All work is done in house by Jim Holloway and his staff. Jim also specializes in the manufacturing of beaver and mink blankets/throws. Open six days a week. Come meet Jim, his son Casey (now on an apprenticeship) and the friendly staff at Holloway Furs.

404 Perkins Extended | 901.685.3877 SPECIAL PROMOTION


THE FACE OF

GAMING

SOUTHLAND GAMING & RACING >>> David Wolf, President and General Manager David Wolf is the face of gaming at Southland Gaming and Racing, the area’s fastest growing gaming destination. As President and General Manager Wolf leads the property that offers superior service, award-winning dining and the most favorable Player rewards in the area. All in addition to a wide variety of the latest and greatest gaming options. The facility, located in West Memphis, Arkansas, has been a major racing venue for more than 50 years and now boasts over 2,000 gaming machines and table games on the largest gaming floor in the MidSouth. Southland features a multi-purpose event center and is home to several restaurants, such as the World Market Buffet, Bourbon Street Steakhouse Grill and Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar and Grill. Southland has long been a pivotal fixture in the community — providing jobs, business stability and economic contributions. It has consistently won awards for outstanding customer service and has donated millions of dollars to neighborhood charities and educational institutions. Wolf looks to continue the success of the property and build upon its history of community service and impact. “Southland has always been engaged in the community,” says Wolf. “We’re committed to the community we serve and as we continue to grow our engagement will grow as well.” 1550 North Ingram Blvd., West Memphis, AR 72301 870.735.3670 | SouthlandPark.com


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

GASTROENTEROLOGY BMG/GI SPECIALISTS FOUNDATION >>>

COMMITTED TO EXCELLENCE: THE ART OF TREATMENT AND CARE Suffering from unpleasant stomach and bowel conditions can be challenging enough, without having to worry about finding a top-quality doctor! The highly skilled medical professionals at GI Specialists are experts in helping prevent, diagnose and treat everything from heartburn, food allergies and hemorrhoids, to colon and pancreatic cancers.

HIGH QUALITY AND CONVENIENT CARE The physicians and staff focus on each patient’s comfort in their on-site surgery center. For added convenience, choose from five other satellite locations: Brighton, Collierville, Covington, Millington, and Marion. Whether you need screening or treatment, our group is passionate about providing excellent care for every patient.

Main Office and Surgery Center: Baptist East, 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 901.761.3900 | GISpecialistsMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

GIRLS EDUCATION

HUTCHISON SCHOOL >>> Head of School Dr. Kristen Ring with two pre-kindergarten students Hutchison opens girls’ eyes to possibilities and inspires them to become creative, independent thinkers. It all starts in early childhood when girls begin to connect ideas through inquiry, exploration, and play, and build the strong foundation necessary for future

academic achievement. At Hutchison, girls experiment with new ideas, ask lots of questions, and embrace challenges. As they grow, they learn that through hard work, curiosity, and courage they can realize their full potential and impact the world for good.

1740 Ridgeway Road, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.762.6672 | HutchisonSchool.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HAIR RESTORATION HAIR TRANSITIONS STUDIO >>>

Over 80 percent of men and women (and 10 percent of children) will experience hair loss at some point. Hair Transitions Studio understands that hair loss is not only a cosmetic issue. Many times, loss of hair creates loss of conďŹ dence and upsets emotional well-being. From the moment you enter Hair Transitions Studio you become family. The friendly,

professional staff and comfortable environment welcomes each client to offer an individualized solution, restoring both hair and conďŹ dence. With 33 years of experience, Hair Transitions Studio knows how to address every situation from typical pattern types to hair loss caused by medical conditions, chemo/radiation hair loss, or burns and scars.

5736 Stage Road, Memphis, TN 38134 | 901.384.1680 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HEALTH AND WELLNESS

TRUBALANCE HEALTH >>> Dr. Traci Kiernan, DC — Doctor and Founder of TruBalance Health Dr. Traci Kiernan, owner and founder of TruBalance Health, is a wellness physician, successful health coach, radio host and dynamic speaker committed to setting people free from their health concerns, so they can live their lives to their fullest

potential. She is on a mission to build healthier lives by inspiring, educating and equipping. With the development of a cutting-edge weight-loss program, she and her team are seeing people regain their health in record time.

9056 Poplar Pike, Suite 104, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.623.3310 | TruBalanceMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HEMATOLOGY

UT HEMATOLOGY, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> The UT/UCH Hemophilia and Thrombosis Treatment Center operates under the directorship of Sandeep Rajan, M.D., Board CertiďŹ ed Hematologist-Oncologist. He is an expert in the management of hemophilia, hemostasis, and thrombosis. Dr. Rajan is joined by Michelle Chi, M.D. (Hematology boarded) and a multi-disciplinary care team

which includes skilled nurses, social work, physical therapy, lab specialists, dentistry, and infusion therapy. The center is 1 of only 129 designated treatment centers in the USA delivering comprehensive care to patients with bleeding disorders. In Memphis, it is the only of its kind for the treatment of adults.

6401 Poplar Ave., Suite 195, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.866.8547 | ut_httc@uthsc.edu SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

HOSPITALITY

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Diamonds & Chocolate Marco Pavé and Zandria Robinson talk rap, resistance, and reimagining the Memphis sound.

by anna traverse ell her about when you were an 8-year-old gangster rapper,” Zandria Robinson nudges Marco Pavé. A rapper, newly minted librettist, and her husband, Pavé has settled into a mahogany leather chair in the living room of the four-square house that he and Robinson, an author and Rhodes professor, share. It’s a bright January afternoon. Clear winter light flirts through the vividly painted rooms: turquoise, ochre, phlox. Pavé answers by mentioning a recent controversy surrounding a billboard featuring rapper Yo Gotti, “a product of Shelby County Schools.” The billboard has been removed, amid discussion about whether Gotti is not an appropriate role model. “He is a role model,” Pavé retorts. “He’s my role model. I remember, sixth grade — I was at Cypress [Middle School] — he shot ‘Gangsta Party’ at the Watkins Market on the corner of Watkins and Brown. I remember skipping school to go to that video. This is before I really knew who they were, but I just had to be there.” Pavé grew up around a culture that he describes as “hyperviolent.” When he was in sixth grade, a woman was murdered in front of the family’s house (“sixth grade dead body in front of the crib / even if I know who did it, ain’t gonna say who it is,” he raps on the track “One Hunnid”). Seventh grade, a man was shot in the head around the corner. That same year, another man was shot behind the house. Inside the house, Pavé and his sisters used to stage family talent shows; Pavé wanted to be a singer. “Usher was my favorite singer and my favorite rapper — which was weird. He only had one rap song. I wanted to be that ” — not exactly a rapper, but the rapping version of an R&B singer. Quite a specific niche. Robinson bursts out laughing: “Career paths!”

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ext month, Pavé will premiere his first — and Memphis’ first — original hip-hop opera. Based on the songs in his 2017 full-length debut, Welcome to GRC LND (vowels missing “because the Grace is broken,” he has said), the opera, whose libretto he’s just finished, is about “the city of Graceland.” That is to say, it’s about Memphis, through the looking glass and projected into the near future — around 2030. There’s a yellow fever outbreak, a new mayor who only cares to talk about crime. The characters witnessing this infected city, says Pavé, are “the quote unquote disconnected youth, 18 to 24, people who aren’t working, aren’t in school. If people look at me with a different lens, last year I was a disconnected youth. I didn’t have a job and I wasn’t in school.” Pavé is 25 now. He spent the last year of his tenure as a “disconnected youth” releasing an album to critical acclaim, and touring nationally in support of his work. “I know plenty of ‘disconnected youth’ that are doing things that are changing the face of Memphis,” he retorts. The opera will be performed April 7th and 14th as part of the Midtown Opera Festival.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY COLE SHOTS

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Marco Pavé & Zandria Robinson The rapper’s “government name” is Tauheed Rahim. As a senior at East High, he and a friend were always competing in “battles to be the freshest, have the most jewelry — I was always trying to one-up him.” Pavé was going by Young Kano, then Kano Marco Pavé (at the suggestion of that very friend), finally Marco Pavé. “And ever since, that’s been the vibe.” Over the years, the metaphorical significance of the name has deepened, smoothed. In a pavé setting, diamonds are arranged in one continuous flow. “You can’t tell the sequence apart,” Pavé says. “It’s a metaphor for how I move through the world, for how people can be in the world — together.”

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andria Robinson grew up in East Whitehaven Park when the neighborhood was mid-flux demographically. Nearby, the airport was expanding; white neighbors were moving out, going east. “That was a strange thing to see as a child — like, ‘what just happened?’” In her new book, Chocolate Cities, co-authored with Marcus Anthony Hunter, Zandria Robinson (below) presents an “alternative cartography” of the United States, showing how Black people and culture have defined what many know as American culture. PHOTOGRAPH (BELOW) BY COLE SHOTS

Robinson’s mother began to impart race-theory lessons early — lessons about the contexts and nuances of growing up non-white in the South. “I was thinking, ‘I am good enough, I am super smart, and a violinist,’ or whatever, like a young person would think — like there was a logic to it. There was no logic to it — or it was a racial logic.” The dysfunction in Robinson’s home stayed relatively hidden. Her father, who had come to Memphis in 1972, was a prescription-drug addict; for a time, Robinson assumed it was crack. But he went to work every day, pre- and post-rehab. In May 2016, he died while serving on the jury for a murder trial in its final day. Alternate jurors having been dismissed already, his death resulted in a mistrial. “One Black man was accused of killing another Black man,” his daughter recalls. Raised in the Mississippi county where Emmett Till was lynched, her father would have been 3 or 4 at the time. “There are so many things [about him] I just don’t know — what may have happened to him, how it affected him,” Robinson muses. “We got race theory from

him, too, but in indirect ways. “I think for both of us — both my sister and I — that led to a lot of overachieving, or just excellence, perfection. Which didn’t abate for a very long time. Now I’m cruising.” Pavé cracks up at the notion that Robinson, 35, is doing anything akin to “cruising.” Relatively speaking, though, maybe? Robinson finished college (Northwestern) in three years, walked across the stage to get her diploma eight months pregnant, then propelled herself directly into a master’s in sociology program. Her daughter’s father committed suicide 10 days before classes started when Assata, now 14, was a baby. “And I’m back at the computer with a Boppy pillow doing stats. There were no messages. No one said, ‘You think you need to grieve?’ “It was that childhood thing: Dad’s on drugs, but you just keep going. Be excellent and everything will be okay.” These days, Robinson has found “a flow that I’m thoughtful about — not this almost violent amount of labor.” She’s released a new book, Chocolate Cities: The Black Map of American Life, co-authored with Marcus Anthony Hunter, a grad school colleague who’s now associate professor of sociology at UCLA. She and Hunter were the only two Black people in their cohort at Northwestern and would compare their “urban sociological notes and experiences” drawn from her native Memphis, his Philadelphia. In Chocolate Cities, Robinson and Hunter present an alternative cartography of the United States, a “Black map” — showing how Black people and culture have shaped what we know as American culture. The book’s two central premises: first, that Black American social life is fundamentally Southern; second, that as Black people radiated from the South to the North and the West, they brought Black “customs, worldview, and cultures with them to their new homes,” redefining those places around “chocolate cities” (cities with majority-Black populations). Robinson is now working on an essay collection about mourning, Memphis, and music — more than a strictly academic endeavor. Before her father died, she was working on a project to be titled Soul Power, exploring Memphis soul music and the Memphis neighborhood, Soulsville, from an academic perspective. Now the direction of that work has shifted, becoming more of a “sociological memoir” about her father, his adopted neighborhood, the culture, and the sound shaped by that time, in that place. In 1972, her father arrived to a “funky, post-King Memphis.” Robinson sees her narrative as more than either memoir or academic text. “The story’s still happening,” she explains.

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f I got suspended license, they got license to kill. / They probably think I’m ISIS, but it is what it is.” On the track “Hold Us Down” from Welcome to GRC LND, Pavé alludes to his dual identifications as a Black man and as a Muslim named Tauheed Rahim. “This is a thousand-year-old thing, the Christianity and Islam thing. September 11 was another chapter,” he comments. Pavé was only 8 years old in 2001, but still, “I was on the brunt of it, being in the South. Everybody saying, oh, did you have anything to do with that? Do you know anybody that was over there? And how’d you get that name?”

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“But at the same time,” Robinson interjects, “you were writing all that gangster rap!” Pavé continues, “Any youth that’s acting up — they’re upset about something, something is going on, and this is how they’re expressing themselves.” When he graduated from high school, he was encouraged to go to college. “People were like, “I don’t know why you’re not in college, you’re so smart.” But he had charted his own course, and set to work pursuing and expressing it, urgently. After all, he shrugs, “If I do it in a college class, I get a grade for it. If I do it in real life, I get paid for it.” With a line that scans as melodically as that one, I’m half-expecting to hear a drum machine in the background. “When we met,” Robinson says, “he would say all the time, ‘Music is the thing. There is no backup plan.” They met, as it happens, at The Word, a local spoken-word event now held at Slice of Soul on Madison. Pavé was performing as a favor for a friend, and Robinson was there to see off Tonya Dyson, a musician in the “new soul underground.” The couple have a perfectly calibrated Bogart-Bacall patter, so in their own words: MP: I was there performing, and she was there in the back. I had never seen her before. I had been doing some shows all around, and I was doing some promo runs, passing out flyers. She said she wanted to blog about my music. ZR: It had been 10 years since I had done the research for my thesis, which then became part of a book. I was like, I should see what’s going on in the Memphis hip-hop scene today. MP: I hadn’t really had any press from any reputable people at the time, so I was excited. She followed me on Twitter, something like that … ZR: … and then he kept @ing me on Twitter, like “HEY! HEY!” MP: I was trying to get this project, trying to get this review, and then she added me on Facebook. And I was like, OK, it’s something else, she’s not trying to write no review, she’s trying to get reviewed. ZR: I was new to social media, trying to figure it out — MP: ‘New to social media’?! ZR: He was in my messages. He asked, what do you do? I was like, I’m a sociologist and a writer. Like 10 messages in, he was like, are you married? I was like, oh my god! Is this the way the youngsters are doing dating nowadays?! Then we kinda went from there. That was what, March, April, and then in November [2014] we were married.

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e’re back to the Yo Gotti billboard and the topic of role models, spinning now into a conversation about rap and identity. Pavé and Robinson are both scholars of rap history and motif; they’ve observed how audiences and critics ascribe autobiographical certainty to rap in a way that we don’t assume of other art forms. If a rap artist uses the first person, we assume he is talking about his own experiences, not inhabiting a character he’s created.

Hip-hop artists, like all artists, are, Robinson offers, “witnesses to some things that we otherwise would not know about, and need to. All witnesses are role models — they tell us about the world, they teach us that we should tell of our experiences.” That’s why Pavé wrote so many different voices — enough to fill an opera, as it turns out — into Welcome to GRC LND: to tell of a range of experiences. Black Lives Matter protesters marched in downtown Memphis in July 2016, beginning at FedExForum and ultimately shutting down the Interstate 40 bridge for four hours. Pavé wasn’t there. But when the group gathered again the next month, at Graceland — the night of the annual Elvis vigil — he was present, witnessing. And, simply, living within his own skin. “What easier way to describe what’s going on, than just being a Black man. I’m a full human being, a full person. But I go to the club, have fun, get drunk, use cannabis — all these things Marco Pavé, shown here on stage (left) or relaxing in the living room of his home (below), is set to release Memphis’ first hip-hop opera, based on the songs in his 2017 full-length debut album, Welcome to GRC LND. The vowels are missing, he says, “because the Grace is broken.” PHOTO CREDITS: (LEFT) COURTESY MARCO PAVÉ; (BELOW) BY COLE SHOTS

happen as a Black person. And I also go to protests, as a Black person, and I’m upset with Trump being president, as a Black person but also as a full human being. “When I was 15, I didn’t have studios, didn’t have places to go. And somebody’s in that position right now, which means I still need to work to make sure that doesn’t continue to happen. It’s taken over my life through my art, because that’s my life if I didn’t do art.”

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obinson has absorbed the protest moment of the last few years in her own way. She’s been turning inward, finding stillness. When this political and cultural moment ends, she says, “whether it be in 2018, 2020, 2024 — things will change. We will go back to our post-racial fantasy, and then it will be time to get back to work. And I will have been charged up.” “Before this moment, this particular moment, I was that almost stereotypical protest person on campus, always doing advocacy work. My parents came from the Civil Rights tradition, and my father was a super contin u ed on page 121 M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 111

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DRUM Drumline members keep the beat for the Grizz.

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y car window is down as I head home from our downtown office on a Friday evening in late January. Cold air rushes in, but from Front Street, I can hear a distant rumbling of what sounds like war drums. It’s a game night — Grizzlies vs. Los Angeles Clippers — and the source, I find, of the echoing beats is the Grizzline performing an energetic pre-game show for a group of fans and revelers on Beale Street. The energy is palpable as witnesses gather — heads bobbing, hips swaying — around the Grizzline, the official drumline for the Memphis Grizzlies. Formed in 2006 by then University of Memphis drumline instructor Adam Clay, the line, which not only performs before and during games but also around town throughout the season, has become synonymous with the excitement and vigor surrounding our beloved basketball team — an on-the-scene point of reference that embodies the thrill of attending a game in FedExForum.

by shara clark

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M RPleaseLL Stephen Doorley plays with the Grizzline on Beale Street. PHOTOGRAPH BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

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in music business and several something they usually see, or (his siblings played f lute and years’ experience with the they haven’t heard since they trumpet) but later moving to his University of Memphis Mighty were in high school. I remember original love, percussion. Sound of the South marching everybody’s faces: They have He continued performing, band, Memphis Sound Drum a smile, then the smile grows, front ensemble and marching and Bugle Corps, and the then their mouth drops open. bass drum, at Bartlett High Phantom Regiment Drum and School before joining the And then they start cheering Bugle Corps, David now writes Dubuque, Iowa-based Colts for us, even before we finish all of the line’s original playing.” The group remusic and helps plan out ceives similar reactions “When I play toward the crowd, I can each performance, along today. w it h show d e s ig n e r feel them get into it, I can see them get Doorley’s knack for muand manager Pat r ick sic, according to his musiinto it,” Doorley says, “and it’s like this McNicholas. cian mother, began when loop back and forth where I’m feeding he was a child, clapping It’s more than just mualong with the radio, in sic. Members must carry, off their energy and they’re feeding off time with the beat, in the play, and maneuver inmine. It’s a lot of fun.” back seat of the car. His struments while engaging parents bought him his the crowd, both in the FoDrum and Bugle Corps and first drum set around age 6. A rum and at outside appearances, traveling across the country Bartlett native, Doorley joined via choreographed movements. with the professional marchthe Elmore Park Middle School “We have a certain time limit band, first playing French horn ing band for three summers. As that we’re allowed on court a college sophomore, Doorley during time-outs [for example],” joined the University of MemDavid says. “When I’m writing the music, I try to keep in mind phis drumline and played with the group for two years. what they’re actually going to “It was pretty cool, in that be doing on court.” What they’re doing often inshort span for my music career, cludes synchronized marching, doing drum corps during the summer, Memphis band in the dancing, and perfectly timed fall, and Grizzline in the winter,” drumstick f lips. And getting it he says. “I got to play with all my down takes practice. In addifriends from college and other tion to a string of rehearsals at the beginning of the year when friends I made along the way.” members learn the music, they Today, with a degree in mechanical engineering, Doorley is hold three-hour practice sesa plant manager at a polystyrene sions on Sundays before each manufacturing facility in Oakgame to nail the music and choland, Tennessee. While his career reography for the upcoming is not musically oriented, he still performance. enjoys the highs of performing. Outside of Grizzlies games, the group does pop-up shows ne of my favorite throughout the season, called things is the energy that “van blitzes,” where they’ll surprise people at local breweries, I can get,” he says. “As cheesy as it sounds, it is real for schools, and other spots around me — when I play toward the town. They also perform at fescrowd and I can feel them get tivals, parades, and corporate into it, I can see them get into and private events. “You’d be it, and it’s like this loop back surprised how many people love and forth where I’m feeding off having a drumline perform at their energy and they’re feedtheir event for 20 minutes at a ing off mine. It’s a lot of fun.” time,” David says. “We’ve done Zeke David, the 29-yearweddings, beer tastings, Redold general manager of the birds games.” Gr i zzl i ne , ha s a lso b een While there are currently 32 involved with the group since members in the line, typically its first season, originally as a only 6 to 15 play at a time, deThe Grizzline performs pre-game shows for Grizzlies fans and tourists. performer on snare drum. A pending on the event and venPHOTOGRAPH BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS U of M graduate with a degree ue. Members rotate and sign

longtime member and current bass drummer, 29-year-old Stephen Doorley remembers the first-ever Grizzline performance, in 2006, for which he played cymbals. Lined up in “the tunnel” alongside event staff, the Grizz Girls, and others, Doorley heard the announcement roar through the loudspeakers: “Please welcome the Grizzline!” “I was the second person to run out on the court,” he recalls. “It was the first time anyone’s ever heard of us — our debut.” The lights dimmed, then brightened; the group began to play, swells of snares, cymbals, tenor, and bass drums. “You could see people’s faces, questioning what we’re doing — like, a drumline at a basketball game? That’s not

O

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Quinton Johnson (right) entertains the crowd during a game in FedExForum. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES

up for shows based on their availability. Auditions are held in the summer before the season starts, in July or August. Hopefuls must be 18 or older and know how to read music. For the first part of the audition, David says, “We’ll put you on different instruments and see if you can move around while playing and are able to sight-read. For the callback audition, we’ll send out a prepared piece that everyone has to learn, and we’ll have them wear the drums and do a semi court routine to see if they can actually handle moving and playing and performing.”

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uinton Johnson, 29, didn’t make it the first time he tried out two years ago, but that didn’t stop him from giving it another shot. “I came back last year and tried out again,” he says. “I did some-

thing different, tried out on a dif— Johnson is a “man of many the crowd and never performferent instrument, and gave it all hats” at White Station High ing the same show twice, the I had.” He’s now in his second School, where he coaches basguys have a lot of fun with the routines. season with Grizzline, mostly on ketball, facilitates study halls, “It gives you an outlet to just and works with the band and cymbals, but he plays bass drum on occasion. Johnson’s love for track team. He keeps himself go be as creative and as goofy music came early, in part due busy, but “it’s all so rewardas you can possibly be,” Johnson to his uncle Farsha Jones’ says. “You put out so much influence. “My uncle is a energy. I literally leave ev“It gives you an outlet to be as creative professional drummer, so erything I have out there, and as goofy as you can possibly be,” and people soak it up. It’s I grew up sitting in front Johnson says. “You put out so much a joyous situation.” of his drum set at church,” he says. He started playing Recalling a conversaenergy. I literally leave everything I piano at age 5 and joined tion he had with friends have out there, and people soak it up. the band at White Station at a game before beMiddle School and played coming a member of the It’s a joyous situation.” through high school. Grizzline, Johnson says, While studying music education ing,” he says, and enjoys shar“I told them, ‘One day I’ll be at the University of Memphis, ing “the creative gifts I’ve down here sitting courtside.’ he became a part of the Mighty been bestowed.” That next season I was workSound of the South drumline, As a cymbal player for the ing for the Grizzlies. Every time I’m [in the Forum perwhere he met David and Doorley. line, “We are the movement of When not performing with the group because we’re not forming], it’s like I can’t bethe Grizzline — or as a memrestricted to a drum, so we get lieve I’m here, I can’t believe to run around and stand on top ber of the Gr izzlies Claw I get to do this and get paid Crew, throwing T-shirts and of stuff and talk to people,” he to do it. It’s a real thrill. I’m otherwise entertaining fans says. For the sake of engaging living the dream right now.” M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 115

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ROAD TRIP

UNEARTHLY PARADISE

^6 THE ISLAND NATION OF TURKS AND CAICOS ENDURES AFTER THE WORST HURRICANE SEASON IN HISTORY.

^6

by chris mccoy

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plashing into the ocean off Pine Cay in Turks and Caicos is to enter a different world. The tropical sun refracts into turquoise beams. The only sounds are the gentle lapping of water and my own breathing, amplified through the snorkel. The pristine white sand of the sea floor is about 20 feet below. I rotate to my left and see a huge mound of pale rock over a bed of waving sea grass. It’s the reef; that’s what I’m here to see. As I swim toward it, I can see it’s flecked with greens, purples, reds, and oranges, all forming a spectrum I’ve never seen before. Ahead, a sunbeam reflects off the gentle swells. Then I notice another, identical sunbeam next to it. And another. There are dozens of them, perhaps hundreds. They’re not sunbeams, they’re fish, long and skinny, bright on the bottom and dark on the top, perfectly camouflaged from predators above and below. I’ve swum right into

their school, and now they’re all around me, quietly going about their piscine business. I feel like I should apologize for intruding in their space. I’m almost to the reef when I notice a f lurry of activity to my right. It’s my guide, a dreadlocked man named Chilla, waving to me underwater. Out of a brilliant underwater sunburst, a gray ghost approaches. It’s a stingray, gracefully undulating toward the reef. I don’t know how big stingrays get, but this one is enormous and it’s coming my way. It sees Chilla and dives to the bottom, disappearing into a cloud of sand its wings kick up. In a matter of seconds, it’s invisible — if I hadn’t watched it bury itself, I wouldn’t know the two dark spots on the ocean f loor were eyes watching me. For the first, but not the last, time on this trip I wish I had brought an underwater camera.

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urks and Caicos describes an archipelago of about 40 islands, only eight of which have permanent inhabitants. The landscape is precarious, the visible tip of a seamount

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in the Lucayan chain that starts north of Hispaniola and stretches through the Bahamas and almost to Florida. At last count, the total population is 34,800 — 20,000 of whom live on Providenciales, a long skinny sliver of land on the territory’s northern border. The citizens call the island Provo. Its northern shore sweeps from east to west in a perfect crescent, which defines Grace Bay. Just a couple thousand feet off of the wide white beaches lies a 14-mile-long barrier reef, the third largest in the world. Beyond the reef, the sea floor dives 4,000 feet into the depths. The space between the beach and the reef is Princess Alexandra National Park, an underwater habitat with a tropical rain forest level of biodiversity. The area is currently on the shortlist to become a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

There have never been very many people in this part of the world. The native Lucayans who were here when Juan Ponce de León arrived in 1512 were soon wiped out by disease or captured for slave labor. In the early 1700s, pirates hid here, and after the American Revolution, a group of British Loyalists f leeing the mainland set up shop on Ambergris Cay. A goodly portion of the current population is descended from the survivors of a pair of slave ships that sank off Grand Turk in the 1830s. The shipwrecks lived in the eastern parts of the archipelago, where their take from the sea could be supplemented with farming from the rough ground. Up until the 1960s, virtually no one lived on Provo, which, for all its beauty, is basically a desert island. Then, a group of Americans built a small airstrip, and Club Med built a resort on Grace Bay, and things have been expanding ever since. The night of September 7, 2017, less than two weeks after Hurricane Harvey submerged much of Houston in the biggest f lood in American history, Hurricane Irene roared through these islands. It sustained 185 mph winds for 37 hours, a record unsurpassed in meteorological annals. Grand Turk, a popular port for cruise ships, and Salt Cay in the east took the brunt of the storm, but no one escaped unscathed. Initial government estimates of the damage on Provo exceeded $500 million. Fortunately, the islands were prepared. Hanging out here on the border of the Caribbean and the North Atlantic, hurricanes are an obvious and perennial threat. However, because of the islands’ location and orientation, they are often bypassed by the storms. Before Irene, the last direct hit had been in 1960. Driving from the airport last December, a couple months after the disaster, the occasional blue roof tarp was still visible, but the biggest sign that something was amiss was that all of the electrical poles were brand new. My driver tells me that Irene destroyed the islands’ entire electrical and communications infrastructure. Miraculously, there were no reported deaths from the storm, which the driver attributes to strict building codes. What was it like that night, I ask? She shakes her head. “That’s an experience I don’t ever want to do again.” M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 117

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’m staying at the Gansevoort, a relatively new resort hotel on Grace Bay built by a company whose first hotel was in New York’s über-hip meatpacking district. As I’m checking in, the concierge pours me a stiff rum punch made with Bombaro, a local rum that my driver said “goes down smooth, then kicks you in the butt.” I find the driver’s description accurate. The view from my second-floor room is nothing short of incredible. The room has a full kitchen, king-sized bed, a soaking tub, a rain shower, and spacious lounge area. The property is built around a massive infinity pool that, from the open lobby, appears to vanish into the ocean. The Exhale spa offers facials, detox treatments, and yoga classes, and I had what was probably the best massage of my life there. But the best part of my stay at the Gansevoort was just sitting on my balcony’s chaise lounge, looking out over the beach to the water and sky beyond. Grace Bay faces north. If you’re used to the beaches of Florida, which all face east or west, that can be disorienting. The next stop north of Grace Bay is Cape Cod, so the visibility is as close to infinite as it gets. Prevailing winds, from the east, propel a parade of clouds in the near and far distance. These are serious stratocumulus numbers that have been building higher and higher since the moisture first coalesced around Saharan dust. There’s no sunset or sunrise over the water. Instead, dawn and dusk are long, slow light shows as the sun reflects on different layers of clouds at various distances and heights, creating a stunning tableau of pinks, reds, grays, and blues. I made a point of being there for the sunset every evening. Inside the Gansevoort is Stelle, a fine dining restaurant in the charge of chef Joel Vallar, a culinary veteran who has practiced his trade from his native Philippines to Greece. The chef says he tries to keep it local, incorporating native tomatoes, okra, and habanero whenever he can. “It’s very limited. We get some ingredients from small gardens on North Caicos.” We’re in the middle of some of the richest fisheries in the world. One of Vallar’s specialties is tuna tartar with salmon roe, avocado puree, and sesame seeds, with a little togarashi. His grouper is wrapped in banana leaves and steamed with lemongrass, ginger, shallots, and red curry paste. When you open the leaves, you can smell ginger and fresh mushrooms. Another highlight is the chef’s beetroot salad, made with chardonnay vinegar and sprinkled with goat cheese. “It’s very light, very healthy,” he says. “In my imagination, it’s a little garden on the plate.”

T UR K S A ND C A IC O S THE BEST PART OF MY STAY AT THE GANSEVOORT WAS JUST SITTING ON MY BALCONY’S CHAISE LOUNGE, LOOKING OUT OVER THE BEACH TO THE WATER AND SKY BEYOND.

Twilight at Grace Bay (upper left). Among the resorts that dot Provinciales, Gansevoort Turks & Caicos offers the choice of a luxury hotel on Grace Bay Beach (lower left) or a newly constructed villa on the cliff overlooking Caicos Bay (upper right, lower left). PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRIS McCOY

The south side of the island is very different from the north. A Gansevoort staffer drives me to Turtle Tail, where the hotel has carved its latest project out of the side of a limestone cliff. Five sleek modernist villas look out over the pristine, white-bottomed Caicos Bank. A wooden staircase leads down the cliff from each villa to the sea to a small dock, which is also equipped with a trampoline. The clarity of the water, scrubbed by the bank’s vast seagrass beds, is startling. “It’s crystal clear,” my guide says. “This is the purest sand in the world. The whole island is made of limestone. It was all one big reef at one point.” Several times throughout my stay, I ask people what to do while I’m here. I get a few answers, like shopping at the upscale Regent Village, going to the weekly fish fries, or hanging out at Boogaloo’s nightclub. There’s parasailing, jet ski rentals, and a kiteboarding school. But the most common answer is, “Why do you want to do anything but go to the beach and get in the water?”

This place is about nature, and about recuperation. I snorkeled every day, and sorely regretted never learning to scuba dive. The undeniable highlight of the entire trip was the half day I spent on the Island Dream boat tour. The aforementioned Chilla and his captain Tino sailed a group of eight of us around the archipelago. The islands are home to the world’s only conch farm, and Chilla dove into the conching grounds and came up with a number of huge shells covered in seagrass he called dreadlocks. Later, we put in at Pine Cay, a tiny island Tino claimed was the only place in the world you could walk from the Caribbean Sea to the Atlantic Ocean in less than five minutes. As we marveled at the wild iguanas, the island’s only inhabitants, and swam in Half Moon Bay, where Sports Illustrated and Victoria’s Secret bring their models for photo shoots, the crew made fresh conch ceviche that we ate on the beach. Even here, there were signs of Irene — all of the scrub pines were pointing away from the direction the storm blew in.

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Chilla, a guide with Island Dream Tours, with a freshly caught conch which flourishes in the warm, shallow waters of Turks and Caicos. The tender, lobster-like meat is the national dish. bottom: Conch ceveche from Turks Head Brewery. PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS McCOY

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norkeling all day burns a lot of calories, so you don’t feel guilty about eating a lot. I visited the Shore Club, a brand-new, state-of-the-art resort with eye-popping architecture, and dined on yaki at Sui-Ren. For lunch, it was the Somewhere Cafe, open to the beach, just beside Bight Reef, where I swam beside enormous sea turtles and lion fish. But the one restaurant whose name came up more than any other was Coco Bistro. Set among a thick palm grove, chef Stuart Gray has created a genuine phenomenon. His Conch Two Ways is a unique and fabulous take on the national dish, half sweet and sour with fresh pineapples, half lemon ceviche with a dash of hot pepper. August to March is spiny lobster season, and Coco Bistro’s take on the crustacean is legendary. “The Caribbean lobster is spiny. It’s different, but very rich in flavor,” says Aldolpho, the general manager. As we sit beneath the palm grove, it begins

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ROAD TRIP

T UR K S A ND C A IC O S

Chilla searches for conch in the pristine waters off Mangrove Cay.

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The Somewhere Cafe on Grace Bay Beach is a great place to refuel after a morning of snorkeling.

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS McCOY

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRIS McCOY

to rain. The staff passes out umbrellas, and no one in the packed eatery moves to go inside. Aldolpho looks up wistfully. “Before the hurricane, you couldn’t see the sky through the palms. We didn’t need the umbrellas as much,” he says. “It’s just going to take time.” It could have been worse, I say. “We empathize with what is going on over there in Puerto Rico,” he says. “We were really lucky.” Later, as I’m heading back, I ask my driver about the night of the hurricane. “My friends saw the tidal wave come in and turn back, away from Grace Bay Beach,” he says. “It only can be God. I don’t care what anybody says. To see a 30-foot wave come in and turn back … man couldn’t turn that back. It would have wiped us right off the map. We depend on tourism. Grace Bay Beach is the stretch that the resorts are all on. Everything would have been wiped right off. God kept us safe.”

myself following one bright blue fish making his morning rounds through the brain coral while singing ELO’s “Mr. Blue” into my snorkel. For a moment, I panic. Have I been washed out to sea, into this alien environment? Could I get back? Poking my head above the waves to get my bearing, I discover that I’m only about 20 yards from the beach. I let the current carry me past three more alien worlds. But even here, the reality of the recent disaster intrudes. Wedged between a pair of coral mounds is a big chunk of what used to be a dock, with a tattered rope waving forlornly in the waves. At some point, I reluctantly pull myself onto the shore. I’ve got to be on a plane at 2 p,m, but I don’t want to leave. On the long walk back to the Gansevoort, I meet a newlywed couple strolling the beach, holding hands. Lorenza Brascia, a producer for CNN, and her new husband, Peter Ingram, have just arrived on Provo. “We had decided on Turks and Caicos before the hurricane,” she says. “After, we were a little back and forth. Do we really want to go into a disaster zone? But we realized at that point that we were being selfish. This is an island that needs tourism money. That’s why we decided to see this through. We could have changed things up, but we wanted make sure we brought our tourism money here, to a place that needs it.” I point the happy couple toward Smith’s Reef and wish them well in their new life together. Despite all of the fascinating wildlife and high-end luxury, my lasting impression of Turks and Caicos is not as another world. Provo is a small town, much like the one I grew up in, full of friendly, resilient people trying to return to normal after unimaginable disaster.

I

t’s early morning on my last day in paradise, and I’m tromping down the beach as fast as I can. When I told Aldolpho I was spending most of my time snorkeling, he asked “Have you been to Smith’s Reef? It’s the best.” Turns out Smith’s Reef is a mile walk down the beach from the Gansevoort. The only marker on it is a metal pole in the sand. I walk past it and keep going until a channel blocks my way, where I discover a small sign with a crude map marking what has been called the best beach-accessible snorkeling reef in the world. I wade into the surf and quickly find myself caught in a strong current, moving over a seagrass bed like a Cessna flying over a forest. Then, the first reef appears. The variety of life is mind-boggling. I find


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Marco Pavé & Zandria Robinson

contin u ed from page 111 union guy; I was immersed in resistance as a way of life. Then when all the media stuff happened in 2015, I felt very alone, even though I was part of this emergent protest moment.” She’s referring to a tweet of hers that resulted in death threats and online recrimination: she typed, “Whiteness is most certainly and inevitably terror.” These days, she hears more people using similar language. “It was after that, a lot of people started saying, ‘Let’s talk about whiteness,’ and there was much more of a swell. I was like, ‘Good: I’m tired.’” The stillness she’s cultivated is its own kind of statement, its own kind of defiance. Pavé notes that “Black women bear the burden for everybody. So the silence, the stillness, saying no — it’s very much a form of resistance; probably more than going to a protest with a pitchfork.” Turning inward has meant folding herself into domesticity, at home and with the children. A s sat a , Robi nson’s introspective 14-year-old daughter, draws quietly, or watches anime. Jordan, the couple’s 4-year-old son, is a ball of boy energy. “I would have said gender was all socialization,” she says, “and then he’s just, like, jumping off of things, jumping into things.” Pavé jumps in, “It’s all personality, before anything. Gender norms are us putting it, but personality is personality.” As in his home, so in his work: Pavé’s rap has become more aware, more awake. “Once you’re introduced to different perspectives, and think about all people, all ways, from LGBTQ to women’s rights,” he expands, “you can’t just go back to rapping normal. It’s like, OK, I’ve got more responsibility now. I got to do a little bit more. No, not a little bit more: a lot more.”

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an, it’s the dream right now.” Pavé has been part of the Memphis hip-hop scene for long enough to know when things are sparking, flowing, connecting. When he graduated from high school in 2011, FreeSol had just been signed to a record label; “Yo Gotti was still riding his wave, Drummer Boy was still here — a lot of folks were still here. And then,” he pauses, “everybody from the trap house up and moved to Atlanta. Everybody that was anybody moved away.” Pavé has been chasing the success — and the feeling — of those earlier days of Memphis hip-hop ever since. “And now — it’s here. It’s back.”

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

Rabbi JamesWax

The leader of Temple Israel played a key role in the Memphis civil-rights movement.

During those dark Memphis days of March and April of 1968, a handful of familiar names seemed to be ever-present — Henry Loeb, Andrew Young, Lucius Burch, and, of course, Dr. Martin Luther King. But for many years before April 1968, a handful of progressive Memphis leaders, black and white, had been quietly working behind the scenes to make this city a better place for citizens of all colors and all creeds. Among them was Rabbi James Wax (1913-1989) of Temple Israel, then as now the oldest and largest Jewish congregation in Tennessee. In this magazine’s February 1981 issue, Joan Beifuss, today best remembered for At the River I Stand, her 1990 groundbreaking book on the King assassination, profiled the senior rabbi of Temple Israel for Memphis magazine. Below is a condensed version of her story.

“Speak out in favor of human dignity for every person. Let us not hide behind legal technicalities. Let us not wrap ourselves up in slogans. Let us do the will of God for the good of the city.” — Rabbi James Wax

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he Rabbi stood before the mayor that grim April morning in 1968 like some Old Testament prophet confronting an errant king. The blood of Martin Luther King was hardly dry on the Lorraine Motel balcony; he had been dead some 16 hours now. Now all eyes were on Memphis; millions of Americans were watching this confrontation between Rabbi James Wax and Mayor Henry Loeb on their television screens. Rabbi Wax was president of the Memphis Ministers Association that year. He and his fellow clergymen had struggled mightily to solve the sanitation strike. They had relied on behind-the-scenes efforts to get the city and union together. They had failed. Now fire and smoke were rising from the hearts of cities across America. That morning, some 150 ministers, priests, and rabbis had held their own memorial service at St. Mary’s Cathedral; afterward, they marched to City Hall and crowded behind Rabbi Wax into the mayor’s office. “Speak out in favor of human dignity for every person,” Wax told Loeb. “Let us not hide behind legal technicalities. Let us not wrap ourselves up in slogans. Let us do the will of God for the good of the city.” Public reaction to the rabbi’s stand was mainly negative. “The hostility was very deep,” Wax would say later. But most would eventually come around. At his retirement ten years later, in 1978, many who had castigated him in the past came forward with warm wishes. “That experience confirmed [for me] that if you stand for moral principles,” he says, “in time you become vindicated. It’s the faith I’ve always had.” A native of Missouri, Wax came to Memphis as co-rabbi of Temple Israel in 1949. He found himself somewhat “stunned” by the racial situation in those years just after World War II. One incident stuck in his mind. He was downtown on a hot summer day outside the old Peabody Hotel drugstore. A black man asked him, “Do you think I can go in there and get a glass of water?” “I just said to him, ‘I’m afraid you can’t.’ I’ve never forgotten that,” he says. “Here was a human being who was thirsty and couldn’t get a glass of water. It just exemplified the situation.” The “situation” was something that Wax was

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convinced should change. He worked closely with Temple Israel’s senior rabbi, Harry Ettelson, whom he eventually succeeded in 1954. The two Reform rabbis shared the same basic philosophy about Judaism — that religion should be related to life and concerned with the issues of the world. By the mid-1950s, Wax was a fixture on the boards of all sorts of Memphis community associations. He worked for the mentally and physically handicapped, with the Rotary and the Masons, with history groups and welfare organizations. The rabbi’s interest in improving race relations led to his involvement with the first groups that attempted to deal with the enormous gap that divided the black and white communities in Memphis. Ironically, two separate committees were formed to study the problem — one black, the other white. “To deal with the race question on a segregated basis seemed kind of ironic to me,” Wax says. “Here were two groups going through the motions of trying to maintain harmony without solving even the first problem.” Not surprisingly, the first effort ended in failure. But the second attempt, launched when the Memphis Committee on Community Relations (MCCR) was formed in 1957, proved much more fruitful. In fact, this organization — now practically forgotten — was primarily responsible for the relatively painless integration of Memphis’ public facilities in the early 1960s. Black and white Memphians served together; the MCCR’s ranks included attorney Lucius Burch, Memphis Press-Scimitar editor Edward Meeman, Urban League director J.P. McDaniel, Tri-State Bank president Jesse Turner, and clergymen like Paul Tudor Jones and James Wax. These community leaders all realized that racial integration was now just a matter of time, and were determined that Memphis would avoid the confrontations that had already occurred in Little Rock and New Orleans. To a large extent they were successful. MCCR tried to defuse potentially dangerous situations by dealing with them quietly, quickly, and efficiently. MCCR, quite literally, kept one step ahead of the law. Take the way that downtown Memphis restaurants were integrated. MCCR would send a delegation — all white, of course — to talk to the management of a particular restaurant to explain how integration could and should be carried out peacefully. A few blacks — usually prominent community leaders who were MCCR members — would be chosen to eat at the restaurant on a certain day. The help would be told to serve them; other than employees, no one would know they were coming until they got there. By the time the general public found out about what had happened, integration of the restaurant would be an accomplished fact. Something similar happened when Memphis State was due to enroll its first black students in 1958. “We got word that a group from Jackson, 124 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 8

Mississippi, was coming to stir up trouble,” says Wax. “So it was suggested to the university president that the black students be enrolled a few days early.” They were. Progress was made on the employment front as well. “At bakery companies, for example,” says the rabbi, “blacks could carry boxes but never be salesmen. A couple of people talked with them, and they hired blacks to be salesmen.” Integrating the banks proved considerably more difficult. Rabbi Wax tells of one bank that hired black women but put them on the second floor, out of sight; the excuse was that seeing blacks on the main floor would be too unsettling an experience for their white Mississippi customers. By and large, however, MCCR’s efforts were successful. A key ingredient, of course, was the cooperation of the local news media, which insured that publicity was kept to a minimum. “The newspapers sat on stories,” concedes Wax. “I don’t believe in suppressing the news, but [that] made it possible for these various efforts to succeed. If all these things had been announced ahead of time, there would have been rocks thrown.” The MCCR was not without its problems. Although they cooperated, most black community leaders were unhappy with the pace of progress. Some regarded the efforts of MCCR as token; others considered the blacks who served with the organization as little more than Uncle Toms. But in the context of the times, MCCR’s achievements were little short of revolutionary. Nearly all public facilities were integrated in Memphis without violence; few other Southern cities could make such a claim. So unusual was Memphis’ handling of the problem that the Kennedy Administration sent observers to the city to see how such progress had been made. Unfortunately, Memphis’ image as a city of peace evaporated late one April afternoon in 1968. Were it not for the King assassination, the efforts of Rabbi Wax and his colleagues might be recalled as often as they deserve to be. While he has retired from active work with Temple Israel, Rabbi Wax is still a teacher, appropriately enough, at Memphis Theological Seminary. Here, in a graduate school founded by Presbyterians, he gives a course on the history and development of the Jewish religion. The new Temple Israel, built during the Wax years and dedicated in 1976, is set among high trees and rolling land off Massey Road in East Memphis. In a sense, the new Temple is a sign of the congregation’s loyalty, of the financial success of the Jewish community in Memphis, and of the leadership of Rabbi Wax. “I’m not great on ritual and ceremony,” he says, visiting the new complex. “If I did anything to be remembered for, I hope it’s not for this new building, but because I believed in the brotherhood of man.”  


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THE FACE OF

LUNG CANCER PREVENTION

WEST CANCER CENTER >>> Front row: Margie Zacher, BS-Clinical Research; David Portnoy, MD-Medical Oncologist; Suzie Glass, MSN, RN-Nurse Navigator Second row: Alisa Harber, BS-Clinical Research; Brian Lam, PA-C/Thoracic Surgery; Benny Weksler, MBA, MD-Chief of Thoracic Surgery; Kurt Tauer, MD-Chief of Staff Not pictured: Holger Gieschen, MD-Radiation Oncology At West Cancer Center, we know that a healthy lifestyle and regular screenings are paramount for cancer prevention. Our Lung Screening Program and lung cancer specialists at West Cancer Center include a team of Researchers, Medical and Thoracic Surgical Oncologist, Radiologist and Nurse Navigators — all dedicated to providing early detection of lung cancer at its earliest stage, when treatment is most effective. To learn more about the program and eligibility guidelines go to https://www.westcancercenter.org/education/health--wellness/lung-screening-/ or contact lungscreening@westclinic.com. SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MEDICAL AESTHETICS GLO MEDICAL AESTHETICS >>>

Lisa Street, Nurse Practitioner and owner of Glo Medical Aesthetics in Midtown Memphis has been in nursing for 24 years. Her strong clinical background — including ER, ICU, and nursing education — has paved the way to a successful 13-year practice in Medical Aesthetics. As a national clinical educator for Allergan Medical Institute, Lisa is passionate about continuing education and keeping up with the latest innovations. Her priority when seeing aesthetic patients is always to ensure 703 New York St., Memphis, TN 38104

patient safety and satisfaction. Her philosophy on beauty is “the glow that makes people beautiful starts from within . . . if you love others, are kind to yourself, and strive to be the best person you can be, then that beauty will show on the outside." Glo offers ONLY the gold standards in medical-grade skin care, injectables, lasers and treatments. Known for their warm, welcoming vibe, the professionals at Glo strive to make each patient feel “uniquely beautiful." | 901.552.3461 | GloMedMemphis.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MEMPHIS HAIR COLOR DIVA COLOUR STUDIO >>>

Ted Cortese, Master European-trained corrective organic hair colorist, loves hair color. His fascination with color began early in his career when he ďŹ nished 9th in the world competition in Paris, France and was subsequently featured by Vogue magazine. Through his world travels, Cortese ďŹ netuned his unique style. Cortese's specialty is

beautiful hair color with natural-appearing enhancements. He assisted in developing two color lines sold worldwide. Using skin tone and eye color, Cortese customizes the perfect shade to enhance each person. His salon, DiVa colour studio, attracts women from 17 states, England, and France as well as his regular Memphis clients.

1068 Brookfield Rd., Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.761.4247 | DivaColourStudio.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

MORTGAGE LENDING

LUDY CALLAWAY — THE MORTGAGE LADY >>> "It's not just a house. It's your home. I get that! I know how hard you work to get the home you want." As Vice-President of Independent Bank, Ludy's passion is to provide successful, problem-free mortgage loans. With her radio program ("The Mortgage Lady," 8 a.m. Mondays, The Voice FM107.9 / AM990) and website, (YourMortgageLady.net), Ludy is able to finance homes throughout the United States and to help you make smart mortgage decisions that will benefit you for years to come. To teach, guide and help. That's "The Mortgage Lady." 901.494.4400 ludy@i-bankonline.com

NMLS #267872 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

NEPHROLOGY

>>>> >> >> MINESH PATHAK, MD >>

Kidney disease is an often unrecognized, silent disease caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure and diabetes. The diagnosis and treatment of kidney-related diseases requires an in-depth evaluation of various risk factors. Obesity, vascular abnormalities, autoimmune diseases, and kidney stones have been linked to renal failure. Dr. Pathak is a board-certified Nephrologist and member of The American Society of Nephrology and The National Kidney Foundation. He provides compassionate care with the highest-quality treatment of kidney disease. His goal is to provide early, preventive education along with diagnosis and relevant treatments of specific conditions to lessen the risk of progression to kidney failure and to improve a patient's quality of life. Dr. Pathak takes great interest in understanding the needs of his patients and providing them with quality care with the least invasive treatment. 6025 Walnut Grove Road, Ste. 400 Memphis, TN 38120 901.382.5256

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

OB-GYN

MID-SOUTH OB-GYN A Division of Women’s Care Center of Memphis, MPLLC >>> Front row: Judi L. Carney, MD, Candace D. Hinote, MD, and Dominique Butawan-Ali, MD Back row: Paul D. Neblett, MD, Mary Katherine Johnson, MD, and Thomas D. Greenwell, MD Mid-South OB-GYN provides comprehensive Gynecological and Obstetrical health care for women of all ages. Some of our services include yearly wellness exams, fertility counseling, weight management, contraceptive options, MonaLisa Touch for vaginal atrophy and other in-office procedures. Our physicians deliver at Baptist Women’s Hospital and Methodist Germantown Hospital. All expectant mothers receive a complimentary 3D/4D ultrasound. Other services include mammograms, bone density, total body composition, PelleFirm body treatments and

cosmetic Laser procedures. The physicians of Mid-South OB-GYN have received award recognition from Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women for their leadership roles. They have also been recognized by The University of Tennessee for excellence in clinical teaching and have received certification by the American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology. At Mid-South we don’t believe in a one-sizefits-all approach to women’s health care; we treat each patient with personalized plans, courtesy and compassion. We look forward to caring for you.

6215 Humphreys Blvd., Suite 100, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.1200 | MidSouthObgyn.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH THE FACE OF

OCULOFACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY HAMILTON EYE INSTITUTE, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Brian Fowler, MD is an Oculofacial plastic surgeon at Hamilton Eye Institute. He is the Vice Chair of clinical operations and associate residency program director for the department of ophthalmology. He specializes in treating conditions of the eyelid and orbit including cosmetic facial and eyelid surgery, eyelid reconstruction, tear duct repair, cancer surgery, and trauma reconstructive surgery. He also devotes considerable time each year to mission work internationally in Guatemala and Panama and leads various HEI initiatives to end curable causes of blindness in Memphis. Patients can schedule an appointment with Dr. Fowler at HEI by calling 901.448.6650. 930 Madison Ave. Suite 200 8001 Centerview Parkway Suite 101 901.866.8580

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

OFFICE FURNITURE

MBI + IMAGEWORKS COMMERCIAL INTERIORS >>> With locations in Memphis and Little Rock, MBI + ImageWorks Commercial Interiors is committed to being the Partner of Choice. We accomplish this by utilizing a “Single Source. Smarter Spaces” approach in the areas of architectural products, furniture, technology, sound masking, and other related services to assist our clients in

creating innovative solutions for engaging environments. We want each customer to have an exceptional experience which results in the best solution to meet their needs. Our principal partner is Steelcase, the industry leader known for research and development, using products and design to unlock human promise within the workplace.

4539 West Distriplex Drive, Memphis, TN 38118 | 901.360.8899 1 Allied Drive Building 3, Suite 3200, Little Rock, AR 72202 | 501.379.8552 GoImageWorks.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORIENTAL RUGS TAGHAVI ORIENTAL RUGS >>>

At Taghavi's Oriental Rugs, we take great pride in our 60+ years in business and the type of services we offer, including sales, hand cleaning, reweaving, color-run restoration, moth-damage repair, stain and odor removal, and much more! With every customer, we are guided by our core values: integrity, experience, excellence, and professionalism. We have not only the largest stock in new and antique rugs, but also the best cleaning and restoration method in the country. We have built our reputation for more than 60 years, not on false promises, but integrity and excellence. 3554 Park Avenue Memphis, TN 38111 901.327.5033 TaghaviRugs.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORTHODONTICS

MEMPHIS ORTHODONTIC SPECIALISTS >>> Dr. Scott Werner and Dr. Stanley Werner Celebrating more than 75 years of combined orthodontic experience, Dr. Scott Werner and Dr. Stanley Werner have ofďŹ ces in Memphis, Munford, and Collierville. They have cared for numerous generations of families, specializing in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics for children and adults. Both understand how a beautiful smile can change a

patient’s life, improving health and selfesteem with traditional appliances or Invisalign. Dr. Scott and Dr. Stanley have been included in the annual Memphis Top Dentists awards every year since its inception, achieved status as Diplomats of the American Board of Orthodontics, and are members of the American Association of Orthodontists.

6425 Quail Hollow Road, Suite 201, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.767.5415 843 South Tipton Road, Suite A, Munford, TN 38058 | 901.837.7708 2002 Houston Levee Road, Collierville, TN 38017 | 901.854.6493 WernerOrthodontics.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ORTHOPAEDICS AND SPORTS MEDICINE CAMPBELL CLINIC ORTHOPAEDICS >>>

Campbell Clinic has helped Mid-Southerners reach their peak performance and get back in the game faster for more than a century. The organization has built a reputation of excellence since 1909 by providing care in Memphis and the Mid-South that touches the world. The practice serves as the Official Sports Medicine Provider for the Grizzlies, Redbirds,

and Tigers, along with Rhodes College, Christian Brothers University, and countless other athletic programs throughout the region. Whether we’re treating NBA All-Stars or local Little Leaguers, our patients trust us as the Face of Sports Medicine in Memphis and the Mid-South. CampbellClinic.com

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

OXFORD DINING MCEWEN'S OXFORD >>>

Bert Smythe and John Littlefield, McEwen’s Memphis, are longtime members of the Memphis food scene. The two were presented the chance to partner with Lee Cauthen of Oxford to open a sister restaurant, McEwen’s Oxford. Voted by citizens as “Best Fine Dining Restaurant in

2017,” McEwen’s Oxford is located on the famous soil of the Oxford Square. With an eclectic blend of styles, they have a passion for good food and service, emphasizing Southern dishes raised to new heights. McEwen’s Oxford has established itself as one of Oxford’s most popular destinations.

1110 Van Buren Avenue, Oxford, MS 38655 | 662.234.7003 | McEwensOxford.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PAIN MANAGEMENT

MAYS AND SCHNAPP PAIN CLINIC AND REHABILITATION CENTER >>> Left to right: Moacir Schnapp, MD and Kit S. Mays, MD Kit S. Mays, MD, and Moacir Schnapp, MD, have been pioneers in the management of chronic pain for over 30 years. The physicians at Mays and Schnapp Pain Clinic and Rehabilitation Center are dedicated to providing state-of-the-art care for patients suffering from chronic pain. Continually certified by the Commission for Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities since its inception, it is still the only certified pain clinic within 500 miles of Memphis. The physicians' philosophy of care is to treat the whole patient by relieving

pain, restoring function and improving quality of life. That approach starts with taking a comprehensive and fresh look at each suffering individual. This unique multidisciplinary approach may include nerve blocks, physical therapy, and medical management, as well as psychological support when needed. Every patient is evaluated personally by a physician during each office visit. "When the problem is pain, we're here to help, offering world-class care in the heart of the Mid-South."

55 Humphreys Drive, Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.0040 | MaysAndSchnapp.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PIZZA

BROADWAY PIZZA >>> Legendary Broadway Pizza, one of Memphis’ favorite family-owned-and-operated restaurants, was opened by Lana Jeanette Cox in 1977 at 2581 Broad. Third-generation family members now offer Broadway East at 629 S. Mendenhall. Elder family members raised in extreme poverty

find it important that faithful friends “get their money’s worth and don't leave hungry.” Not just a pizzeria, Broadway offers salads, whole wings, fish, spaghetti, chicken parmesan, burgers; homestyle plate-lunch specials. Cakes made in-house daily. Call-in orders welcomed.

2581 Broad Ave., Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.454.7930 629 S. Mendenhall, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.207.1546 BroadwayPizzaMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PODIATRY

UT PODIATRY, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Expert podiatrists Dr. Brian N. Kiel, D.P.M. and Dr. David M. Moinester, D.P.M., have provided the premiere podiatry service to the Mid-South community for over 30 years, beginning with their partnership as founders of the Podiatry Centers of Memphis in 1985. Acquired in 2017 by University Clinical

Health — the clinical faculty practice plan of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center — the newly rebirthed UT Podiatry practice boasts a team of professionals led by Drs. Kiel and Moinester offering a wide variety of foot, ankle, and lower-extremity care from routine checkups to surgical procedures.

995 S. Yates, Suite 2, Memphis 901.767.5620 | 6575 Stage Rd., Bartlett 901.382.0393 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PROFESSIONAL TREE SERVICE ROBINSON TREE SERVICE >>>

Robinson Tree Service, family owned since 1948. Jason Sengel and his wife, Cynthia, acquired the business from Pop Robinson’s grandson in 2001. Jason was well prepared to take the helm with a degree in Urban Forestry from Texas A&M. With the company came Wesley Rutherford,

hired way back by Pop in 1965. Robinson Tree has grown into one of the most respected and recommended tree services in the area. Much of that has to do with their emphasis on customer satisfaction and their experienced, professional crews. We Know Memphis Trees!

2807 Farrisview Blvd. #101, Memphis, TN 38118 | 901.363.3539 | RobinsonTree.net SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

PUBLIC RELATIONS

MORRIS MARKETING GROUP >> >>>> >> >> Left to right: Valerie Morris, President, and Patrick Collins, Executive Vice President With over 45 years of combined experience working in public relations, communications, and marketing, Valerie Morris and Patrick Collins are arguably the most experienced and accomplished public relations professionals overseeing local, regional, and national public relations efforts in the Mid-South. Morris and Collins have a long track record of working with media professionals to provide

accurate and up-to-date information during crisis or high-stress media situations for corporate clients and high-profile individuals. Businesses, organizations, and government entities trust Morris and Collins to provide creative news angles to garner earned media and provide consult on internal and external communications to keep audiences engaged and messages delivered and optimized.

456 Tennessee Street, Suite 102, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.425.3770 | MMGMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE

FERTILITY ASSOCIATES OF MEMPHIS >>> Left to right: Paul Brezina, MD, William Kutteh, MD, PhD, Amelia P. Bailey, MD and Raymond Ke, MD

Fertility Associates of Memphis is a state-of-the-art practice providing comprehensive reproductive healthcare to couples of the Mid-South and beyond . . . treating patients struggling with infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss, and reproductive disorders. Our highly specialized team utilizes cutting-edge techniques, including in vitro fertilization with laser blastocyst biopsy, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and fertility preservation has been designated as a Center of Excellence. Our compassionate physicians, board-certified in reproductive endocrinology and infertility, have been bringing dreams to life for more than 20 years. 80 Humphreys Center, Suite 307, Memphis, TN 38120 | 901.747.2229 | FertilityMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE JOSHUA SPOTTS >>>

Joshua Spotts, a premier, top-producing Realtor® with Crye-Leike, Realtors, specializes in residential real estate in Memphis. Spotts uses his unique high-touch, personalservice style by accepting a limited number of listings and working diligently to ensure efficient results are produced for each client. Spotts uses years of market knowledge, the latest technology, a well-defined marketing plan, a cohesive network, energy, enthusiasm, and the excitement of a job well done to achieve great results. Crye-Leike, Realtors 6525 N. Quail Hollow Road Memphis, TN 38120 Josh@JoshuaSpotts.com (E) JoshuaSpotts.com (W) 901.361.4211 (C) 901.756.8900 (O)

SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RETIREMENT LIVING TREZEVANT >>>

Trezevant, located in the heart of Memphis, is the Mid-South’s premier LifeCare retirement community. From the views to the floor plans to the finishing touches, no two apartments or garden homes are the same. We customize each to fit your style and your life for years to come. It’s warm and inviting and more

than a place to call home. Enjoy unparalleled services and amenities and the peace of mind should you ever need more care in Assisted Living, Memory Support, or Skilled Nursing it is all available on one campus. Come see why Memphians have been calling Trezevant home for over 40 years.

177 North Highland Street, Memphis, TN 38111 | 901.515.2800 | trezevantmanor.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RHEUMATOLOGY

UT RHEUMATOLOGY, A UNIVERSITY CLINICAL HEALTH PRACTICE >>> Vaishnavi R. Pulusani, MD and Bradley Postlethwaite, MD the University of Tennessee Health Science In 2017, University Clinical Health recognized a need for a strong — and Center — specialize in complex autoimmune accessible — Rheumatology practice to diseases including arthritis and lupus and serve the Mid-South community and hired a wide spectrum of Rheumatic conditions two highly qualified Rheumatologists to that result in joint pain, bone pain, musculoskeletal disorders, organ system create the new UT Rheumatology practice. Leading the charge, Vaishnavi Pulusani, MD dysfunction and other unique symptoms. and Bradley Postlethwaite, MD — both Along with physician services, UCH provides board-certified by the American Board of easy coordination of imaging, labs, infusion therapy and pharmacy management. Internal Medicine and faculty members at 930 Madison Avenue, Suite 800 | 6401 Poplar Avenue, Suite 190 | 901.866.8700 SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

ROOFING

M-TOWN CONSTRUCTION, LLC >>> Michael Ingalsbe Often described as the “roof whisperer,” Michael has been in the roofing industry for over 20 years. He started from the ground up building roofs in Buffalo, New York, but has called Memphis home for the past 10 years walking over 10,000 roofs. The MidSouth’s weather more and more frequently damages roofs, enough for replacement. Hail, wind, and storm damage are considered “an Act of God” and do not count against you on your homeowner’s insurance policy.

Most insurance policies will pay the entire cost of the roof and/or interior, less your deductible. Our involvement at MTown Construction prevents you from receiving a settlement that won’t entirely cover your costs, or even worse, getting denied. When it comes to representing you, Michael’s unique background as a skilled roofer and a master adjuster sets him apart from all others, making MTown Construction A+ rated with the Better Business Bureau.

901.232.7732 | MtownConstruction.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

RUNNING

FLEET FEET SPORTS >>> Passion — defined as a strong feeling of enthusiasm or excitement for something — demands action. Passion for running, fitness, and a healthy lifestyle have continually inspired Fleet Feet Sports to be the local fixture for active Memphians. From training programs, fun runs, track workouts, and sponsoring

races to hosting yoga classes and various social events, community is central to Fleet Feet Sports’ identity. What began 25 years ago as the journey to become the best place in Memphis to get fit for running gear has shaped a shop that strives to be so much more.

4530 Poplar in Laurelwood | 901.761.0078 | FleetFeetMemphis.com | Facebook.com/FleetFeetMemphis SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SLEEP MEDICINE

TMJ AND SLEEP THERAPY CENTER OF GERMANTOWN MODERN DENTISTRY OF MEMPHIS >>> Dr. John Reddick and Dr. Mark MacGaw Drs. John Reddick, Mark MacGaw, and the team at Modern Dentistry of Memphis are proud to have become a certified office of the International TMJ & Sleep Therapy Centre organization. Today's dentistry has matured beyond art and science, and we now realize it plays an integral role in the entire health of an individual. Not only a beautiful, proportional face and smile, but the ability to greet each day with vigor and less pain. We address your body's inflammation, mouth breathing, poor sleep or apnea, and the

resulting head, neck, jaw and ear pain that ensues. Offering alternatives to CPAP therapy with custom oral appliances as treatment for sleep apneas, we also use 3D imaging to visualize obstructions in the nose and airway to obtain proper diagnosis and optimal treatment. Jaw pain, clenching and grinding of teeth, as well as other health issues are highly correlated to poor sleep. Utilizing the very best technologies we help to decrease pain, increase energy, and improve sleep. Visit us at memphistmjsleep.com.

6750 Poplar Avenue, Suite 700, Forum 1 Building, Germantown, TN 38138 901.754.3033 | memphistmjsleep.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

SOCIAL CHANGE

THE NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM >>> The National Civil Rights Museum, located at the historic Lorraine Motel where civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, gives a comprehensive overview of the American Civil Rights Movement from 1619 to the present. Since the Museum opened in 1991, millions of visitors from around the world

have come, including more than 90,000 students annually. Serving as the new public square, the Museum is steadfast in its mission to chronicle the American Civil Rights Movement, examine today’s global civil and human rights issues, provoke thoughtful debate and serve as a catalyst for positive social change.

450 Mulberry Street, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.521.9699 | CivilRightsMuseum.org SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

STEAKS

FOLK’S FOLLY PRIME STEAK HOUSE >>> When real estate developer Humphrey Folk opened his namesake restaurant in 1977, friends scoffed at his endeavor, so he dubbed his fledgling steak house Folk’s Folly. To this day, the restaurant remains a true Memphis original. Consistently voted the best steak house in the city, Folk’s

Folly serves prime cuts, fresh seafood, and a variety of traditional favorites and innovative specials. Tennessee Restaurant Manager of the Year Diane Kauker and her staff invite you to enjoy fine dining in a relaxed, comfortable atmosphere.

551 S. Mendenhall, Memphis, TN 38117 | 901.762.8200 | FolksFolly.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

STEM CELL RESEARCH

SCHRADER ORTHOPEDIC & STEM CELL TREATMENT CENTER >>> Lawrence F. Schrader, MD, FACS THE FOREFRONT OF CELLULAR THERAPIES Dr. Schrader has pioneered/championed many new technologies in his 35-year medical career. In 2012 he was invited to join a Californiabased research group to be part of their IRB-approved clinical research study of stem cell therapy. He became a patient as well as a provider. Training involved education in

the current science of stem cell therapy and surgical and medical techniques used for patient care and research protocols. Only approved techniques are used for any stem cell procedure following strict guidelines for treating these conditions. Dr. Schrader has personally developed many of these over the past ďŹ ve years.

927 Cordova Station Ave., Cordova, TN 38018 | 901.465.4300 | SchraderOrthopedicsAndStemCell.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

THE MEDICAL GROUP

CONSOLIDATED MEDICAL PRACTICES OF MEMPHIS, PLLC >>> Doctors include: Derene Akins, Michelle Allmon, Jeremy Avila, Reuben Avila, Robert Burns, John Buttross, Tommy Campbell, Laura Engbretson, Arthur Franklin, Maher Ghawji, Malini Gupta, Ara Hanissian, Gina Hanissian, Greg Hanissian, Raza Hashmi, Mary Margaret Hurley, David Iansmith, Kashif Latif, Shannon Malone, Sonal Mehr, Edward Muir, Lisa Myers, Mohammad Qureshi, Nidal Rahal, Rabia Rehman, George Van Rushing, Mohamed Shala, Henry Stamps, Allison Stiles, T. George Stoev, Ralph Taylor, Barton Thrasher, Randy Villanueva, and Angela Watson CMPM, a “group practice without walls,” was established in 2008 to provide compassionate, convenient, and efficient care for those in the Mid-South. Its 34 physicians are located across the area, from Midtown to Oakland. CMPM is a unique alternative to the current employed physician practice models. The physicians enjoy practice autonomy while benefiting from the economies of scale and scope provided by a larger group. CMPM is the new face of the Medical Practice in a rapidly changing healthcare environment. 6799 Great Oaks Drive #250, Germantown, TN 38138 | 901.821.8300 | MedicalofMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WEALTH MANAGEMENT

WADDELL AND ASSOCIATES, LLC >>> David Waddell Waddell & Associates is a wealth management firm led not just by one person, but by a host of talented people driven to see others succeed. Among our 20-member team are eight master’s degrees and 23 professional designations, all put to service in providing families with thoughtful financial counsel. We commit to staying on the forefront of investment thought and personal financial strategies. We commit to being available to you, whatever the need. We commit to treating your situation with integrity and compassion. WaddellAndAssociates.com 901.767.9187 Locations in Memphis and Nashville SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WINE & LIQUOR KIRBY WINES & LIQUORS >>> Left to right: Nicole Tate, Stephen Newport, Zach Scott, Philip Forman, and Brian Herrera Thirty-three years ago the owners and staff at Kirby Wines & Liquors started with the mission of providing the best selection, pricing, and service to the Mid-South. Fast-forward and our goal is the same today. Our experience and dedication to the customer animates this endeavor,

providing a broad international selection of wine and liquor, as well as ever-changing and seasonal beer offerings. It is also our great pleasure to assist in planning parties from 2 to 2,000, including party supplies, gifts, and delivery too. We are truly your one-stop-shop.

2865 Kirby Road, Memphis, TN 38119 | 901.756.1993 | KirbyWines.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


2018

FACES OF THE

MID-SOUTH

THE FACE OF

WOOD-FIRED ITALIAN SPECIALTIES SPINDINI >>>

Spindini is a Memphis-favorite Italian restaurant. We concentrate on traditional Italian food prepared with a modern twist. You’ll also see that our menu features dishes cooked in a wood-burning oven. Everything in this trendy, South Main

neighborhood is oh, so nice. With dreamy food, a passionate staff, and warmth that goes beyond ambiance, Spindini is truly a local’s favorite. Pasta, chicken, seafood, and veal comprise the menu, along with the occasional special that relies on gutsy, robust flavors.

383 South Main Street, Memphis, TN 38103 | 901.578.2767 | SpindiniMemphis.com SPECIAL PROMOTION


ASK VANCE

Abe Goodman Our trivia expert solves local questions of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Well, sometimes.

by vance lauderdale

DEAR VANCE: Who was Abe Goodman and why is this his clubhouse? Was he indeed a good man? — l.b.t., memphis.

top: Constructed in 1926, the clubhouse was designed to resemble an English cottage. above: A framed photograph of Abe Goodman from 1888 is displayed inside the front door. right: This dedication plaque is mounted above the fireplace.

This is Goodman’s clubhouse because he and furnished their $25,000 clubhouse, and who had paid for it, and by any standards he was certainly a done much for the city’s parks and playgrounds during good man, a benefactor who, by word and deed, made his terms on the Memphis Park Commission.” significant contributions to our city. The golf course, supposedly the first municipal I never met the gentleman, so most of what I’m about (or public) course in the South, opened in 1906. The to tell you is gleaned from newspaper clippings archived handsome clubhouse was constructed in 1926. The in the Memphis and Shelby County Room of the BenjaTudor-style building featured a vaulted-ceiling dance min L. Hooks Central Library. hall, massive brick fireplace, But I think they present an snack bar, golf shop, and kitchen facilities on the ground floor. accurate portrayal of a fellow who was involved in more civic Downstairs, players could find endeavors than just the public showers and changing rooms. golf course at Overton Park. In Upstairs was a cozy apartment fact, upon his death in 1943, at for the resident golf pro. A Memthe age of 79, The Commercial Apphis Park Commission plaque peal described him in this way: mounted above the fireplace “Mr. Goodman was a man of reads: “This building is presented by Abe Goodman to the City many facets. Bankers knew him as an astute financier, real esof Memphis, with the sincere “But what sets Abe Goodman apart tate men relied heavily upon his hope that its use may bring addfrom the Lauderdales, who have judgment, and business leaders ed pleasure and happiness to sought his opinions.” those of its citizens who enjoy done just as much — if not more — Wait, there’s more: “To the healthful outdoor life.” for our city?” Now, right about here I know children of Oakville Sanatorium, where he was the chairman of the board, he was you’re thinking, “But what sets Abe Goodman apart a white-haired Santa Claus who brought them gifts from the Lauderdales, who have done just as much — if and happiness. Scottish Rite Masons knew him as the not more — for our city? Who was this fellow, anyway?” treasurer of their organization.” And here’s the part Parts of his background are a bit vague, if you ask me. that concerns your question, L.B.T.: “Golfers at the Newspapers mention “a few years spent in Mississippi Overton Park links knew him as the man who donated in early manhood” but also claim that he was born here DEAR L.B.T.:

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GOODMAN PHOTO COURTESY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSIT Y OF MEMPHIS LIBRARIES

far left: A park visitor ponders the wooden sign at the entrance to the clubhouse. left: Most visitors probably never notice the sundial above the main entrance. below: An old newspaper photograph shows Abe Goodman in the late 1930s.

in 1864, “at his parents’ home at the corner of Main and Washington.” His father, Joseph, came to America from Germany and began working at a jewelry store in Hernando, Mississippi. I assume Abe began working at that store, but in 1891 he teamed up with a brother, Ben, and moved to Memphis, where they opened a nice jewelry store on Main Street, a popular establishment which drew customers for decades. But Abe apparently wasn’t content standing behind a counter, selling rings and watches. Just look at this list of his other business accomplishments: After selling the jewelry store to other family members, he started his own real estate firm, founded the Commercial Trust & Savings Bank, organized the Clover Farm Dairy, opened the Memphis Motor Car Company (one of this city’s first automobile dealerships), and organized the Memphis Hotel Company, which constructed the original Peabody, Gayoso, and Chisca Hotels. He was also chairman of the board of the American Finishing Company (a cotton processing firm) and the Memphis Cold Storage Warehouse. Oh, and in his spare time, Abe served on the boards of the various groups that constructed the Mid-South Fairgrounds, Shelby County Jail, and Ridgeway Country Club. Whew! If you’ve been paying attention, you will recall that I mentioned his involvement with the Oakville Sanitorium. Out of all these endeavors, that was apparently his favorite. The Commercial Appeal observed, “One of his best feats was reacting to the little plays the children staged for him as if these plays had been Noel Coward productions. Friends have said that Mr. Goodman’s

presence and love for the children were as good as any doctor’s care they might have received.” Somehow he and his wife, Bobye, found time to journey around the world several times, making yearly jaunts to Mt. Everest, Hong Kong, the Andes, Fiji, and — if you can believe the newspaper accounts — “the spot where the Garden of Eden was located.” Reporters followed their expeditions, and one newspaper described the Goodmans as “probably Memphis’ greatest travelers.” Abe once claimed that because he was so widely known anywhere and everywhere he went, “he was never in a country where he was unable to cash a personal check.” You might think that such a successful businessman would live in a rather grand home, and you’d be right. The Goodman estate, a columned mansion at the southwest corner of Poplar and East Parkway, has long been considered one of our city’s finest private residences. After extensive renovations a few years ago, it is now the residence of Dr. Cary Fowler, chairman of the board of Rhodes College, and the brains behind the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway, featured in the July 2017 issue of this magazine. So, L.B.T., even though you and I probably think the handsome Overton Park clubhouse is a special place, it’s only one of many contributions that Abe Goodman — who was indeed a good man — made to this city.

got a question for vance? EMAIL: askvance @memphismagazine.com

MAIL: Vance Lauderdale, Memphis magazine, 65 Union Avenue,

Suite 200, Memphis, TN 38103 ONLINE: memphismagazine.com/ask-vance

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B AT T L E R O YA L contin u ed from page 69 tive but conspicuously less so as a Republican in several self-financed races for public office. Shea Flinn is universally considered the natural politician of the pair. Flinn the Younger served a brief interim term as a Democratic state senator (thanks largely to his father’s service at the time on the Shelby County Commission, the body charged with filling vacancies), and maintained good relations on both sides of the aisle despite a penchant for proposing legislation significantly ahead of its time (like a proposal to legalize recreational marijuana outright). Shea Flinn was then elected to two terms on the city council, serving all of the first and most of the second as an influential, deadlock-breaking member before resigning in 2015 to accept a position as vice president of the Greater Memphis Chamber of Commerce. There he has remained, and may well stay for some time to come, having considered a county mayor’s race this year as an independent before finally abandoning that long-odds idea early in February. An avowed independent, his deadline would have been April 5 — but, to Flinn’s mind, the handwriting was already clear and legible on the wall. As a would-be apostle for the idea that only bipartisan elections can redeem the Founders’ small-d democratic dream, he explained his decision, “It became obvious to me that the partisan fever was not yet ready to break.” Indeed, Flinn sees 2018 in the same way as the nation’s established punditry does, as a typical off-year opportunity for voters to levy judgment on the results so far of the previous presidential-year victor. The situation, as he perceived it, with known-quantity Democrats prepared to contest Republican dominance in major statewide races and with a flood of young Democratic unknowns ready to contest down-ballot races, was the mirror image of the Republicans’ party-building enthusiasm in the latter part of the previous century and with the Tea Party in more recent times. The Democratic candidacy of U of M law professor Harris more neatly fit into that pendulum-swing thesis, and, with clear reluctance, Flinn dropped back in the end — perhaps, as Byrd did this year, to check his options again at another later time. So the county-mayor field is set. Three strong Republicans — Roland, Lenoir, Touliatos — will conclude their elimination contest in May, with one of them left alive and kicking, and maybe with enough money left to take on the Democrat Harris. It may or may not be a change year politically, but it certainly does look to be an entertaining one. Stay tuned.  Jackson Baker covers local politics in the Memphis Flyer; you can keep up with his 2018 election coverage at memphisflyer.com.

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G A R D E N VA R I E T Y

How Do I Love Thee, Dear Daffodil? There are plenty of ways to measure the popularity of this beautiful flower.

by christine arpe gang

T

he daffodil offers many reasons for its enduring popularity with gardeners. Just a few: You are low on maintenance and high enjoyment. In the unpredictable early days of spring your bright yellow flowers assure me the annual season of rebirth and renewal is about to unleash its beauty upon this earth.

in full sun or under deciduous trees. Though you’ll try hard to survive in the deep shade of evergreens or the north side of the house, I won’t plant you there because you will never reach your potential This daffodil features a double dose of yellow petals.

flower power. But given adequate sunlight you will likely outlive me and for more than a few generations of my progeny. I even like it that all of your parts, especially your bulb, contain lycorine, a toxic chemical that could cause considerable tummy troubles. I am not going to eat you and neither are the pesky voles, rabbits, squirrels, chipmunks, and deer that ravish the fleshy roots and tasty leaves of many other plants. Hybridizers love you so much they can’t stop tampering with your pollen to produce more charming forms of you. I’d be overwhelmed selecting a few among the more than 25,000 registered varieties, so a dozen or two is enough to satisfy my every whim from the big yellow trumpets that grow over 20 inches tall with f lowers three inches or more in diameter

PHOTOGRAPHS BY HANNAH UNDERHILL

Not all daffodils are yellow. This beauty is white with a bright orange center.

to diminutive miniatures that pack a lot of charm into tiny flowers displayed on stems averaging 6 to 8 inches tall. I (and you) can have daffodils blooming in the garden for six or more weeks if I choose some that bloom early, some that f lower in mid-season, and some that bloom later. To keep blooms coming abundantly, all I need to do is occasionally feed you with a sprinkling of 5-10-10 fertilizer on the top of the soil when your leaf tips emerge from the

ground in early spring. There is only one maintenance chore you insist upon: I must not cut back your leaves until they have turned yellow or brown, about six to eight weeks after you bloom. Your foliage must be allowed to soak up energy from the sun so your bulb is nourished enough to produce more flowers the next spring. It saddens me to see you flop over and slowly fade, but if I worked as hard as you did, I’d be doing the same thing. Q: I understand that daffodil stems exude a sappy substance that can clog the stems of other flowers if they are placed together in the same arrangement. How can I avoid this? A: There are two ways to display cut daffodils: Place them in a vase with clean shallow water for 6 to 24 hours. (Some sources recommend hot tap water for this soaking period; others prefer warm water and some say cool water.) Refill the vase with fresh water and only place the daffodils in it. Any more sap that oozes will not bother other daffodils. Or make your arrangement with daffodils prepared in the same vase and other flowers that have been allowed to soak up water in a separate container for the same long period. Then group them together in one vase with fresh water. Some experts caution against re-cutting the daffodil stems lest they ooze the sap again but I’ve never known anyone who could make a floral design without snipping stems. Have a question about plants or planting for our resident gardening expert, to be answered in a future “Garden Variety” column? Send your queries to christine.gang@gmail.com.

It is, I confess, hard to suppress my urge to lop off your leaves or weight them down with bricks or tie them up to hide your only ugly stage of life. The best way to handle the awkward period, experts suggest, is to give you companions like daylilies, ferns, or hostas, whose foliage emerges after you are bloomed out, and hides your aging leaves. You are affordable, too. Many home improvement warehouses and nurseries stock your bulbs in the fall, often as blends of several kinds. That’s when you want to be planted. Now is the time for us to do some daffodil detecting to find the best varieties for our climate, our gardens and our fancies.

T

he best place to do this is at the Mid-South Daffodil Society’s Show March 24-25 at The Dixon Gallery and Gardens. At this free event you can get upclose and personal with a huge variety of daffodils thriving in area gardens. I remember the wonderment I felt while attending my first dafDaffodils with short and small center cups like this one are called “poeticas.”

fodil show some 25 or so years ago in the DeSoto County Courthouse in Hernando, Mississippi. I saw daffodils with petals so fluff y they looked at bit like yellow carnations next to others with clusters of small flowers attached to their stems. Some were sweetly fragrant; others more orange than yellow; rings of green could be seen at the center of others. Blue ribbons told me and will tell you which ones the judges liked best, too. Members of the society, like Molly and Kennon Hampton, will be glad to answer questions, too. For Molly to become a show judge certified by the American Daffodil Society, they must have at least 100 varieties representing 8 of the 12 divisions of daffodils in their Rosemark garden. (Divisions are groupings of daffodils with similar characteristics categorized for competition purposes.) Neither Molly or Kennon, who both grew up on farms just north of Memphis, M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 161

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ART a new festival April 6 – 8

Food - Music - ART! Ridgeway Loop Road

between Briarcrest Avenue & Ridge Bend Rd.

can remember a spring without daffodils. Both of their mothers, grandmothers, and aunts grew them in abundance. Kennon remembers the fun he had searching for Easter eggs hidden among their f lowers and leaves. Today they live in a house once owned by Molly’s aunt and uncle and are still enjoying the daffodils her relatives planted in the 1940s. I asked Molly and Ruthie Taylor, who are co-chairing the show along with Kathy Adams and Buff Adams, to share the names of their favorite daffodils for early, mid-season and late blooms. Early: Gigantic Star, Monal, Jetfire and Tetea-Tete (miniature), Red Devon, Tweety Bird Mid-Season: Avalanche, Tahiti, Bravoure, Pink Charm, Avalon Late Season: Geranium, Salome, Tripartite, Cheerfulness, Sir Winston Churchill, Daphne, Baby Moon, Sun Disc. You can buy these and other great daffodil

Daf fodil Doin’s at the Dixon March 21st at noon, L A R R Y F O R C E will present a program on new miniature and standard daffodils. Force, who lives in Southaven, is an internationally known daffodil hybridizer and his flowers usually win top honors at shows across the country. The event is free with regular admission. March 24th from 2 to 5 p.m. and March 25th from 1 to 4 p.m., the public can see and study hundreds of daffodils entered in the show presented by the M I D - S O U T H D A F F O D I L S O C I E T Y and the D I X O N . Admission is free.

Hours: FR 12n - 7p; SA 10a - 6p; SU 11a - 4p presented by ArtWorks Foundation

www.artintheloop.org sponsored by

THE CITY MAGAZINE

162 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 8

A monarch butterfly making its annual journey northward stops to feed on the nectar of a daffodil in a bed at Dixon Gallery and Gardens.

bulbs at the sale presented by the Mid-South Daffodil Society, typically on the first weekend of November at The Dixon Gallery and Gardens. In the meantime, get to Googling and you’ll see the nuances of each. Oh, and one more thing. Daffodils are the cause of a highly contagious disease known by its victims as “yellow fever.” It’s NOT, I stress, the horrible plague that ravished Memphis three times during 1800s. This is a benign condition characterized by an extreme passion for these addictive plants.  


ENDGAME

Herbo Humphreys The golden life of Memphis businessman James Herbert Humphreys Jr. (1948-2018)

by valerie moore

A

ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS HONEYSUCKLE ELLIS

t the age of 7, a boy found a gold coin on the beach in front of his father’s villa in the Bahamas. He spent the rest of his life searching for more treasure. James Herbert “Herbo” Humphreys Jr. was the son of the late James Herbert Humphreys Sr. — “Big Herb” — who was co-founder of Humko Products, a successful cooking oil and shortening company which merged with Kraft in 1951. (Humphreys Boulevard in Memphis is named after the family.) Young Herbo attended Presbyterian Day School and Memphis University School, graduating in 1966. He had many opportunities to travel as a youth and, partly to feed his insatiable curiosity about the world (his hero was Memphis writer-adventurer Richard Halliburton), he joined the Navy in 1967. Humphreys’ business sense surfaced early on. When he was just 16, he invested $5,500 that he won in an equestrian jumping contest, buying Philippine gold stock at 25 cents a share; it soon rose to $30 per share. Later, on his travels, he was intrigued by the beautiful warm waters off Grand Cayman and predicted that in the future the island would become a tourist mecca. Putting his money where his mouth was, at the age of 22 he developed a Holiday Inn franchise on Grand Cayman — at a time when the island had only two hotels — and parlayed its success into a business empire that included the Holiday Inn Grand Cayman, the Treasure Museum in Grand Cayman, and a treasure museum in the Bahamas. In Memphis, his home base, Humphreys was a majority stockholder in the Summit Club and part owner of George Garner/Ask Mr. Foster Travel, Inc. But most of his time was spent with M-A-R Ltd. and its associated corporation Marex International. M-A-R Ltd., founded by Humphreys in 1984, was dedicated to searching for sunken treasure. Marex International, an adjunct of M-A-R founded in 1990, looked for investors to help fund the treasure-hunting expeditions. The flagship of Marex was the R.V. Beacon, a super-sophisticated salvage and recovery ship cur-

It was his treasure-hunting exploits that brought Humphreys his real celebrity. rently anchored off the Bahamas, where it salvaged the wreck of the seventeenth-century Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora de la Maravillas, one of the greatest

treasure troves of all time. Far from being a swashbuckling adventurer, Humphreys was a boyish-looking, low-key man with a speaking voice

so soft you sometimes had to strain to hear it. His cabin on the Beacon ref lected his unpretentiousness: It looked more like a library with a bunk thrown in as an afterthought. The books on the shelves ref lected his interest in adventure and his love of the sea. One of his most prized volumes was a copy of Fell’s Guide to Sunken Treasure Ships of the World, a gift from Big Herb on Herbo’s sixteenth birthday. On the inside cover it said, “Hope you find $10 million. Love, Dad.” Humphreys, a husband and the father of two children, kept his family life private, but he was quite public on most of his other ventures, including his longtime support for the Nicaraguan Contras (he was a major general in the FDN Legion, a Contra organization). It was his treasure-hunting exploits, however, that brought Humphreys his real celebrity. In 1983, he made his first important undersea discovery: the wreck of the H.M. S . Thunderer, a British warship that went down in 1780 off Honduras. He called the discovery “one of my biggest thrills.” Several cannons from the Thunderer were donated to the Royal Naval Engineering Col lege near Ply mouth, England. Humphreys’ expedition to uncover the treasures of the Maravillas was followed by explorations of wreck sites in Central America, South America, Madagascar, and the Mediterranean. At his funeral service, treasure-hunting partner Tim Hudson said, “I think his greatest legacy was his enthusiasm and adventurous spirit. … He was always looking for the next treasure project to get involved in. That was his passion.”  

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DINING OUT

Play with Fire For chefs Michael Hudman and Andrew Ticer, The Gray Canary on Front Street is a dream come true.

by pamela denney | photographs by justin fox burks

B

efore heading downtown, we get dressed up. I wear my flowered skinny skirt and insist my husband pull out the new sweater I gave him for Christmas. At the restaurant, other people are also wellheeled and celebratory, like guests at a wedding reception awaiting the bride and groom.

Behind the cocktail bar — 20 seats and crafted from whitegray marble — bartenders hustle with élan, pouring drinks like the “Confluence,” a mix of gin, vermouth, lime, amber-colored brandy, and a cap of egg whites, whipped and frothy. Across the lounge are views of Front Street, along with a raw bar with stools, where shuckers keep the oysters

coming: Sweet Petites from Martha’s Vineyard and Alabama’s own Murder Points, plump and buttery and served with horseradish, cocktail sauce, and red wine mignonette. From the dining room windows, the Mississippi River looks dark and a little foreboding, but the lights on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge twinkle in the rain.

Like everyone else, we are excited, and why not? The rollout of The Gray Canary feels like the party of the year, even though the calendar hasn’t flipped yet to February. Located downtown in Old Dominick Distillery’s renovated warehouse, The Gray Canary is the fifth Memphis restaurant for chefs Michael Hudman and Andrew Ticer. The vibe is both classy and casual with crystal chandeliers and textured finishes in blue and gold. The restaurant’s food showcases a similar dichotomy. Although complex to prepare, the cold and cooked plates feel friendly, riffing on fla-

vors from a backyard grill. Hudman and Ticer, who frequently cook together at home, did in fact develop recipes on their Big Green Eggs for dishes now prepared in The Gray Canary’s giant brick hearth, the heart of the restaurant’s open below, left to right: The restaurant’s lounge includes a curved raw bar; parsley and garlic chips garnish a T-Bone; wood-fire cooking drives the kitchen’s heartbeat; oysters sourced from Canada, New England, and the Gulf Coast are served with dipping sauces. opposite page: Executive chef de cuisine Ryan Jenniges, above, and server Alex Grant at work in The Gray Canary.

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PAM’S PICS: THREE TO TRY

THE REVELRY: With its gorgeous copper

color, sparkling apple cider, and hometown roots, the Revelry is about doing something slightly unexpected. Explains Nick Talarico: “The fresh citrus from the Honeybell Vodka and the tart apple just make sense.” ($11) kitchen. Exuberant about the possibilities of wood, smoke, embers, and ash, the restaurant, they say, is a dream come true that mixes the whimsy of play with the bravura of fire cooking. “This is the most fun creatively we can have with food because there are no boundaries,” Ticer explains. “This is everything we are as diners and cooks right now. We want oysters and rosé. We want roasted meats over embers. We want cocktails and crudos, ceviches and tartares.” Notably missing from The Gray Canary are pastas, menu cornerstones at the chefs’ other restaurants in Memphis and New Orleans. Instead, the new menu, executed by executive chef de cuisine Ryan Jenniges and chef de cuisine Ysaac Ramirez, is influenced by the Mediterranean,

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS: Brushed with lard and crispy onion crumbles, pastry chef Kayla Palmer’s Parker House rolls are reinterpreted from their Boston roots and a hands-down table favorite. Pro tip: Don’t share. You need a roll to call your own. ($6)

SCALLOPS: Even in the clutch of win-

but more vegetable-forward and liberated from constraints. With its chilled seafood and crackling kitchen fire, The Gray Canary embodies a bold American spirit, not unlike the country’s iconic chophouses from the 1960s. Think Four Seasons, but au cou-

var transformed by its roast in the hearth’s hot coals; a hearty platter of country ham, dusted with cornbread panna gratta and grated Gruyere; and steamed clams, chopped and folded together with ham and celery root puree, scooped back into their petite shells, and garnished with tarragon, crispy sunchokes, and peanut sprinkles. My, oh, my! We settle into our comfy banquette with a pinot noir from Willamette Valley as more shared plates arrive: spinalis, the tender end cap of a ribeye served with leeks and black pepper confit, and piccolo farro — the world’s smallest and oldest cultivated grain — transformed by a short ferment in mash from the distillery next door. (“It brings out the grain’s funky nature,” Jenniges explains.) For dessert, we order a dressed-up s’more made with frozen fior di latte (“flower of the milk” ice cream) and marshmallow fluff scorched on the edges like Baked Alaska. Service at The Gray Canary is smart and efficient, thanks to its veteran team. Director of operations Nick Talarico has been with Enjoy AM Restaurant Group since its start and equates The Gray Canary to an “Alice in Wonderland” moment: “When you step in, you are transported.” Wine director and sommelier Ryan Radish praises the Canary’s large basement where he will keep cellar wines: “We finally can store vintages for two, three, or four years and wait for the right time to put them on

“This is everything we are as diners and cooks right now. We want oysters and rosé. We want roasted meats over embers. We want cocktails and crudos, ceviches and tartares.” rant, less pricey, and way more fun. Perhaps the restaurant’s cando attitude is why we decide on reinterpreted American classics for our first meal: A mixed greens salad called Misticanza, wilted on the edges and dressed with buttermilk dressing and Pecorino cheese; butterball potatoes cooked with brown butter, lemon, garlic, and parsley, finished over coals, and warmed with Raclette, a melted Swiss cheese; a scrumptious T-bone, sprinkled with garlic chips and sliced perpendicular to the bone; and Maitake mushrooms grilled in their coral-like clusters and destined to become a signature dish. On a subsequent visit with friends, we explore the menu more fully. “Just decide what you want to eat and let me worry about how to serve it,” our server Kaitlyn says, and so we do: Kohlrabi, a stout cabbage culti-

ter, The Gray Canary’s scallops, roasted along with radishes on the fire’s embers, feel like spring. The plate’s pretty accoutrements add to its allure: sorrel, pineapple sabayon, and green apple slices. ($18)

THE GRAY CANARY 301 S. Front Street 901-249-2932 ★★★★

★★★★ ★★★ ★★ ★

Exceptional Very good Satisfactory Skip it!

EXTRAS: The restaurant’s name, The

Gray Canary, embodies the canaries that were traditionally carried underground with miners to help monitor the oxygen levels. UP NEXT: Weekend brunch is on tap, along with artwork that plays off the restaurant’s original inspiration from the children’s book, Where the Wild Things Are. PRICES: Oysters and raw plates ($3.50 to $15); shared plates from the hearth ($6 to $27); desserts ($7 to $9); cocktails ($12 to $14); wines by the glass ($9 to $17). OPEN: The lounge opens at 4 p.m. followed by dinner service at 5 o’clock Tuesday through Sunday.

the list.” And restaurant general manger Praveena Anandraj, who relocated from Los Angeles, is happy to call Memphis her new home: “Memphis has a sense of community, and that’s what drew me here.”

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the

MEMPHIS DINING guide

by pamela denney

W

hen Salisbury steak on a red-rimmed plate arrives at my table, I sit in a moment of reverie about TV dinners on the rare evenings growing up when my mother didn’t cook. Then I spin back to now — a weekend dinner at The Liquor Store on Broad — and dig in: mashed potatoes, warm mushroom gravy, pearl onions bobbing in a sea of green peas, and the patty itself made with a custom burger blend from Charlie’s Meat Market. “The blend has a little beef brisket which helps give it a wonderful rich texture,” explains owner Lisa Toro. Toro and her husband, Luis Toro, who also own the nearby coffee shop, City & State, opened their diner and cocktail bar in mid-November. The menu’s f lirt with retro dishes — chilled shrimp cocktail and a blended cheese ball served with Ritz crackers — was intentional. “These dishes felt

reminiscent and fun,” Lisa says. “We said, let’s do it, but let’s do it better.” In many ways, the restaurant is an amalgamation of influences. Alcohol-forward cocktails (try the smoky Mescal Old-Fashioned or $6 mimosas for weekend brunch) recognize the building’s earlier use as a neighborhood liquor store and its signature neon sign. And along with Lisa’s nostalgic food, the menu also includes Latin dishes important to Luis, who is a Venezuelan native. The restaurant’s pork, he says, tastes like Christmas. “When we celebrated Christmas, we didn’t eat turkey like here,” he says. “We ate pork shoulder low-roasted for 12 or 14 hours.” At The Liquor Store, pork roasted with mojo sauce plays leading roles for lunch, dinner, and breakfast served all day. In a bowl of sweet potato hash, succulent chunks of pork cradle spinach, caramelized onions, and a soft fried egg. The Cuban — unequiv-

ocally, one of the best sandwiches in the city — stacks pork, ham, Swiss cheese, and dill pickles on a house-made Cuban loaf brushed with a little honey. Baker Ali Rohrbacher’s many talents energize the diner’s menus from thick-cut sourdough for avocado toast to butter-rich biscuits for shitake mushroom gravy, creamy and flavorful and sausage-free. She creates desserts, as well, including tres leches cake with snowy whipped icing and pop tarts filled with almond dark chocolate and raspberry jam. “We wanted to do something unique with a building we love,” Luis says. “So we created a concept that we hope builds community and brings attention to Broad.” Up next: a backyard with painted aqua picnic tables and an outdoor bar.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

Tidbits: The Liquor Store

The Liquor Store, 2655 Broad Ave. (901-405-5477) $-$$ .

We celebrate our city’s community table and the people who grow, cook, and eat the best Memphis food at M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M / F O O D - D I N I N G 166 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • M A R C H 2 0 1 8

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CIT Y DINING LIST

A Curated Guide to Eating Out

M

emphis magazine offers this curated restaurant listing as a service to its readers. Broken down alphabetically by neighborhoods, this directory does not list every restaurant in town. It does, however, include the magazine’s “Top 50” choices of must-try restaurants in Memphis, a DINING SYMBOLS group that is updated every August. Establishments open B — breakfast less than a year are not eligible for “Top 50” but are noted as L — lunch “New.” This guide also includes a representative sampling D — dinner of other Bluff City eating establishments. No fast-food SB — Sunday brunch facilities or cafeterias are listed, nor have we included WB — weekend brunch establishments that rely heavily on take-out business. X— wheelchair accessible Restaurants are included regardless of whether they adMRA — member, Memphis vertise in Memphis magazine; those that operate in multiRestaurant Association ple locations are listed under the neighborhood of their $ — under $15 per person without drinks or desserts original location. This guide is updated regularly, but we $$ — under $25 recommend that you call ahead to check on hours, prices, $$$ — $26-$50 and other details. Suggestions from readers are welcome; $$$$ — over $50 please contact us at dining@memphismagazine.com.

CENTER CITY

At The Liquor Store, Bailey Biggers serves Salisbury steak and breakfast dishes like steak and eggs and pancakes the size of dinner plates. Baker Ali Rohrbacher’s scrumptious biscuits with house-made jam also come as breakfast sandwiches or smothered with shitake mushroom gravy. Handcrafted cocktails, bold laminate table tops, and light fixtures that float from the ceiling like luminescent orbs update the traditional diner with a big-city feel, thanks to owners Luis and Lisa Toro, pictured above.

ALDO’S PIZZA PIES—Serving gourmet pizzas — including Mr. T Rex — salads, and more. Also 30 beers, bottled or on tap. 100 S. Main. 577-7743; 752 S. Cooper. 725-7437. L, D, X, $-$$ THE ARCADE—Possibly Memphis’ oldest cafe. Specialties include sweet potato pancakes, a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich, and breakfast served all day. 540 S. Main. 526-5757. B, L, D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, MRA, $ AUTOMATIC SLIM’S—Longtime downtown favorite specializes in contemporary American cuisine emphasizing local ingredients; also extensive martini list. 83 S. Second. 525-7948. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BANGKOK ALLEY—Thai fusion cuisine includes noodle and curry dishes, chef-specialty sushi rolls, coconut soup, and duck and seafood entrees. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. at Brookhaven location; call for hours. 121 Union Ave. 522-2010; 2150 W. Poplar at Houston Levee (Collierville). 854-8748; 715 W. Brookhaven Cl. 590-2585. L, D, X, $-$$ BARDOG TAVERN—Classic American grill with Italian influence, Bardog offers pasta specialties such as Grandma’s NJ Meatballs, as well as salads, sliders, sandwiches, and daily specials. 73 Monroe. 275-8752. B (Mon.-Fri.), L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ BEDROCK EATS & SWEETS—Memphis’ only Paleocentric restaurant offering such dishes as pot roast, waffles, enchiladas, chicken salad, omelets, and more. Closed for dinner Sun. 327 S. Main. 409-6433. B, L, D, X, $-$$ BELLE: A SOUTHERN BISTRO—Brisket in a bourbon brown sugar glaze, and chicken with basmati rice are among the specialties; also seafood entrees and such vegetables as blackened green tomatoes. Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon. 117 Union Ave. 433-9851. L (Sat. and Sun.), D, WB, X, $-$$$ BELLE TAVERN—Serving soups, salads, sandwiches, and more, including smoked turkey and homemade dumplings with jalapeno Johnny cakes and beef short rib tamales. 117 Barboro Alley. 249-6580. L (Sun.), D, $ BLEU—This eclectic restaurant features American food with global influences and local ingredients. Among the specialties are a 14-oz. bone-in rib-eye and several seafood dishes. 221 S. Third, in the Westin Memphis Beale St. Hotel. 334-5950. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ BLUEFIN RESTAURANT & SUSHI LOUNGE— Serves Japanese fusion cuisine featuring seafood and steak, with seasonally changing menu; also, a sushi bar and flatbread pizza. 135 S. Main. 528-1010. L, D, X, $-$$ BRASS DOOR IRISH PUB—Irish and New-American cuisine includes such entrees as fish and chips, burgers,

sandwiches, salads, and daily specials. 152 Madison. 572-1813. L, D, SB, $ CAFE KEOUGH—European-style cafe serving quiche, paninis, salads, and more. 12 S. Main. 509-2469. B, L, D, X, $ CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE— Offers prime steaks, fresh seafood (lobster tails, grouper, mahi mahi), pasta, and several northern Italian specialties. 149 Union, The Peabody. 529-4199. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$$ CAROLINA WATERSHED—This indoor/outdoor eatery, set around silos, features reimagined downhome classics, including fried green tomatoes with smoked catfish, a buttermilk fried chicken sandwich, burgers, and more. 141 E. Carolina. 321-5553. L, D, WB, $-$$ CATHERINE & MARY’S—A variety of pastas, grilled quail, pâté, razor clams, and monkfish are among the dishes served at this Italian restaurant in the Chisca. 272 S. Main. 254-8600. D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CHEZ PHILIPPE—Classical/contemporary French cuisine presented in a luxurious atmosphere with a seasonal menu focused on local/regional cuisine. The crown jewel of The Peabody for 35 years. Afternoon tea served Wed.-Sat., 1-3:30 p.m. (reservations required). Closed Sun.Tues. The Peabody, 149 Union. 529-4188. D, X, MRA, $$$$ COZY CORNER—Serving up ribs, pork sandwiches, chicken, spaghetti, and more; also homemade banana pudding. Closed Sun.-Mon. 745 N. Parkway and Manassas. 527-9158. L, D, $ DIRTY CROW INN—Serving elevated bar food, including poutine fries, fried catfish, and the Chicken Debris, a sandwich with smoked chicken, melted cheddar, and gravy. 855 Kentucky. 207-5111. L, D, $ EVELYN & OLIVE—Jamaican/Southern fusion cuisine includes such dishes as Kingston stew fish, Rasta Pasta, and jerk rib-eye. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun.-Mon. 630 Madison. 748-5422. L, D, X, $ FELICIA SUZANNE’S—Southern cuisine with low-country, Creole, and Delta influences, using regional fresh seafood, local beef, and locally grown foods. Entrees include shrimp and grits. Closed Sun. and Mon. A downtown staple at Brinkley Plaza, 80 Monroe, Suite L1. 5230877. L (Fri. only), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FERRARO’S PIZZERIA & PUB—Rigatoni and tortellini are among the pasta entrees here, along with pizzas (whole or by the slice) with a variety of toppings. 111 Jackson. 522-2033. L, D, X, $ FLIGHT RESTAURANT & WINE BAR— Serves steaks and seafood, along with such specialties as bison ribeye and Muscovy duck, all matched with appropriate wines. 39 S. Main. 521-8005. D, SB, X, $-$$$ FLYING FISH—Serves up fried and grilled versions of shrimp, crab, oysters, fish tacos, and catfish; also chicken and burgers. 105 S. Second. 522-8228. L, D, X, $-$$

(This guide, compiled by our editors, includes editorial picks and advertisers.)

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Join us as Academy Award-winning actress and activist, Marlee Matlin, shares the highs and lows of her Hollywood career and her journeys as an activist. Immediately following the keynote, keep the conversation going by attending one of three breakout sessions. $50 per person / $500 table of 10 Purchase tickets at www.methodisthealth.org/livingwellbreakfast or call 901.516.0500.

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THE FRONT PORCH—Beale Street Landing eatery serves Southern-inspired appetizers, such as Crispy Grit Bites, along with burgers, sandwiches, and salads. Closed Monday. 251 Riverside Dr. 524-0817. L, X, $ THE GRAY CANARY—The sixth restaurant from chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman, offering small plates and entrees cooked on an open flame. Oysters, octopus, and hearty steaks are among the menu options at this eatery in Old Dominick Distillery. Closed Mon. 301 S. Front. 4666324. D, WB, X, $-$$$. GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN—Serves chicken with signature spicy batter, along with homemade beans, slaw, and pies. 310 S. Front. 527-4877; 215 S. Center St. (Collierville). 853-6005; 2965 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 373-9111; 730 S. Mendenhall. 7672323; 505 Highway 70 W., Mason, TN. 901-294-2028. L, D, X, MRA, $ HAPPY MEXICAN—Serves quesadillas, burritos, chimichangas, vegetable and seafood dishes, and more. 385 S. Second. 529-9991; 6080 Primacy Pkwy. 683-0000; 7935 Winchester. 751-5353. L, D, X, $ HUEY’S—This family friendly restaurant offers 13 different burgers, a variety of sandwiches and delicious soups and salads. 1927 Madison. 726-4372; 1771 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 527-2700; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Malco Blvd. (Southaven). 662-349-7097; 7825 Winchester. 624-8911; 4872 Poplar. 682-7729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. (Germantown). 318-3030; 8570 Highway 51 N. (Millington). 873-5025. L, D, X, MRA, $ ITTA BENA—Southern and Cajun-American cuisine served here; specialties are duck and waffles and shrimp and grits, along with steaks, chops, seafood, and pasta. 145 Beale St. 578-3031. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$
 KOOKY CANUCK—Offers prime rib, catfish, and burgers, including the 4-lb. “Kookamonga”; also late-night menu. 87 S. Second. 578-9800; 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. 1-800-2453 L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ THE LITTLE TEA SHOP—Downtown institution serves up Southern comfort cooking, including meatloaf and such veggies as turnip greens, yams, okra, and tomatoes. Closed Sat.-Sun. 69 Monroe. 525-6000, L, X, $ LOCAL GASTROPUB—Entrees with a focus on locally grown products include truffle mac-and-cheese and braised brisket tacos. 95 S. Main. 473-9573; 2126 Madison. 725-1845. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ LOFLIN YARD—Beer garden and restaurant serves vegetarian fare and smoked-meat dishes, including beef brisket and pork tenderloin, cooked on a custom-made grill. Closed Mon.-Tues. 7 W. Carolina. 249-3046. L (Sat. and Sun.), D, $-$$ THE LOOKOUT AT THE PYRAMID—Serves seafood and Southern fare, including cornmeal-fried oysters, sweet tea brined chicken, and elk chops. 1 Bass Pro Dr. 620-4600/291-8200. L, D, X $-$$$ LUNA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE—Serving a limited menu of breakfast and lunch items. Dinner entrees include Citrus Glaze Salmon and Cajun Stuffed Chicken. 179 Madison (Hotel Napoleon). 526-0002. B, D (Mon.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ LYFE KITCHEN—Serving healthy, affordable wraps, bowls, sandwiches, and more; entrees include herb roasted salmon and parmesan crusted chicken. 272 S. Main. 526-0254. B, L, D, WB, X, $ MACIEL’S TORTAS & TACOS—Entrees include tortas, hefty Mexican sandwiches filled with choice of chicken, pork, or steak. Also serving fried taco plates, quesadillas, chorizo and pastor soft tacos, salads, and more. Closed Sun. 45 S. Main. 5260037. L, D, X, $ THE MAJESTIC GRILLE—Housed in a former silent-picture house, features aged steaks, fresh seafood, and such specialties as roasted chicken and grilled pork tenderloin; offers a pre-theatre menu and classic cocktails. Wellstocked bar. 145 S. Main. 522-8555. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ McEWEN’S ON MONROE—Southern/American cuisine with international flavors; specialties include steak and seafood, sweet potato-crusted catfish with macaroni and cheese, and more. Closed Sun., Monroe location. 120 Monroe. 527-7085; 1110 Van Buren (Oxford). 662-234-7003. L, D, SB (Oxford only), X, MRA, $$-$$$


CIT Y DINING LIST MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE—The focus here is on steaks, including prime fillet, rib eyes, and prime-aged New York strip; also, some seafood options. 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-8902467; 88 Union. 527-5337; 3165 Forest Hill-Irene (Germantown). 249-5661. D, SB (Germantown), X, $$-$$$ MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE—Specializes in tapas (small plates) featuring global cuisine. Closed Sun.-Tues. 679 Adams Ave. 524-1886. D, X, MRA, $ OSHI ASIAN KITCHEN—Eatery offers Asian cuisine, including sushi and nigiri, with such entrees as Sticky Short Ribs, Wagyu Flank Steak and Quail Eggs, and Bi Bim Bap. 94 S. Main. 729-6972. L, D, X, $-$$ PAULETTE’S—Presents fine dining with a Continental flair, including such entrees as filet Paulette with butter cream sauce and crabmeat and spinach crepes; also changing daily specials and great views. River Inn. 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3300. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEARL’S OYSTER HOUSE—Downtown eatery serving seafood, including oysters, crawfish, and stuffed butterfly shrimp, as well as beef, chicken, and pasta dishes. 299 S. Main. 522-9070. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ PONTOTOC—Upscale restaurant and jazz bar serves internationally inspired Tapas menu; more than 30 wines available. Closed for dinner Sun.  314 S. Main. 207-7576. D, WB, X, $-$$ RENDEZVOUS, CHARLES VERGOS’—Menu items include barbecued ribs, cheese plates, skillet shrimp, red beans and rice, and Greek salads. Closed Sun.-Mon. 52 S. Second. 523-2746. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, X, $-$$ RIZZO’S DINER—Chorizo meatloaf, lobster pronto puff, and lamb belly tacos are menu items at this upscale diner. Michael Patrick among the city’s best chefs. 492 S. Main. 304-6985. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ SABOR CARIBE—Serving up “Caribbean flavors” with dishes from Colombia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, and Cuba. Closed Sunday.  662 Madison. 949-8100. L, D, X, $ SOUTH MAIN MARKET—Food Hall featuring a variety of vendors serving everything from bagels and beer to comfort food and healthy cuisine. 409 S. Main. 341-3838. $-$$ SOUTH MAIN SUSHI & GRILL—Serving sushi, nigiri, and more.  520 S. Main. 249-2194. L, D, X, $ SPINDINI—Italian fusion cuisine with such entrees as woodfired pizzas, gorgonzola stuffed filet, and fresh seafood; large domestic whiskey selection. 383 S. Main. 578-2767. D, X, $$-$$$ SUNRISE MEMPHIS—From owners of Sweet Grass and Central BBQ. Serves breakfast all day, including house-made biscuits, frittatas, kielbasa or boudin plates, and breakfast platters. 670 Jefferson. 552-3144. B, L, X, $ TERRACE—Creative American and Continental cuisine includes such dishes as filet mignon, beef or lamb sliders, chicken satay, and mushroom pizzetta. Rooftop, River Inn of Harbor Town, 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3366. D, X, MRA, $$ TEXAS DE BRAZIL—Serves beef, pork, lamb, and chicken dishes, and Brazilian sausage; also a salad bar with extensive toppings. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 103. 526-7600. L (Wed.-Fri.), D, SB, X, $$-$$$ TUSCANY ITALIAN EATERY—Menu includes paninis, deli subs and wraps, soups, and desserts. Closed Sat.-Sun.  200 Jefferson, #100. 505-2291. B, L, X, $ UNCLE BUCK’S FISHBOWL & GRILL—Burgers, pizza, fish dishes, sandwiches, and more served in a unique “underwater” setting. Bass Pro, Bass Pro Drive, 291-8200. B, L, D, X, $-$$ THE VAULT—Shrimp beignets, stuffed cornish hen, and bacon-wrapped chicken roulade are among the dishes offered at this Creole/Italian fusion eatery. 124 G.E. Patterson. 591-8000. L, D, SB, X, $-$$

COLLIERVILLE 148 NORTH—French cuisine meets Southern comfort food here with menu items such as chicken and waffles, duck confit, and JKE’s Knuckle Sandwich, made with lobster knuckle and puff pastry. 148 N. Main. 569-0761. L, D, WB, X, $-$$

CAFE PIAZZA BY PAT LUCCHESI—Specializes in gourmet pizzas (including create-your-own), panini sandwiches, and pasta. Closed Sun. 139 S. Rowlett St. 861-1999. L, D, X, $-$$ CIAO BABY—Specializing in Neapolitan-style pizza made in a wood-fired oven. Also serves house-made mozzarella, pasta, appetizers, and salads. 890 W. Poplar, Suite 1. 457-7457. L, D, X, $ EL MEZCAL—Serves burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, and other Mexican cuisine, as well as shrimp dinners and steak. 9947 Wolf River, 853-7922; 402 Perkins Extd. 761-7710; 694 N.Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-1447; 1492 Union. 274-4264; 11615 Airline Rd. (Arlington). 867-1883; 9045 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 383-4219; 7164 Hacks Cross Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-3337; 8834 Hwy. 51 N. (Millington). 872-3220; 7424 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 417-6026. L, D, X, $ EMERALD THAI RESTAURANT—Spicy shrimp, pad khing, lemon grass chicken, and several noodle, rice, and vegetarian dishes are offered at this family restaurant. Closed Sunday. 8950 Highway 64 (Lakeland, TN). 384-0540. L, D X, $-$$ FIREBIRDS—Specialties are hand-cut steaks, slow-roasted prime rib, and wood-grilled salmon and other seafood, as well as seasonal entrees.  4600 Merchants Circle, Carriage Crossing. 850-1637; 8470 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 379-1300. L, D, X, $-$$$ RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— This Memphis institution serves family classics such as Elfo’s Special and chicken ravioli, along with lighter fare and changing daily chef selection. Closed Sun. Sheffield Antiques Mall, 684 W. Poplar. 850-0191. L (Mon.-Sat.), D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ JIM’S PLACE GRILLE—Features American, Greek, and Continental cuisine with such entrees as pork tenderloin, several seafood specialties, and hand-cut charcoal-grilled steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 3660 Houston Levee. 861-5000. L, D, X, $-$$$ MULAN ASIAN BISTRO—Hunan Chicken, tofu dishes, and orange beef served here; some sushi, too.  2059 Houston Levee. 850-5288; 2149 Young. 347-3965; 4698 Spottswood. 609-8680. L, D, X, $-$$ OSAKA JAPANESE CUISINE—Featuring an extensive sushi menu as well as traditional Japanese and hibachi dining. Hours vary for lunch; call. 3670 Houston Levee. 861-4309; 3402 Poplar. 249-4690; 7164 Hacks Cross (Olive Branch). 662-8909312; 2200 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 425-4901. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE SEAR SHACK BURGERS & FRIES— Serving Angus burgers, fries, and hand-spun milkshakes. Closed Mon. 875 W. Poplar, Suite 6. 861-4100; 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 103. 567-4909. L, D, X, $ STIX—Hibachi steakhouse with Asian cuisine features steak, chicken, and a fillet and lobster combination, also sushi. A specialty is Dynamite Chicken with fried rice. 4680 Merchants Park Circle, Avenue Carriage Crossing. 854-3399. L, D, X, $-$$

CORDOVA BOMBAY HOUSE—Indian fare includes lamb korma and chicken tikka; also, a daily luncheon buffet. 1727 N. Germantown Pkwy. 755-4114. L, D, X, $-$$ THE BUTCHER SHOP—Serves steaks ranging from 8-oz. fillets to a 20-oz. porterhouse; also chicken, pork chops, fresh seafood.  107 S. Germantown Rd. 757-4244. L (Fri. and Sun.), D, X, $$-$$$ FOX RIDGE PIZZA—Pizzas, calzones, sub sandwiches, burgers, and meat-and-two plate lunches are among the dishes served at this eatery, which opened in 1979. 1769 N. Germantown Pkwy. 758-6500. L, D, X, $ G. ALSTON—Food Network Star finalist and owner Chef Aryen Moore-Alston serves New Southern cuisine at this fine dining establishment. Shrimp beignets are among the appetizers, and entrees include Sous Vide Rosemary Lavender Lamb and Sauteed Scottish Salmon. 8556 Macon. 748-5583. Closed Mon. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ GREEN BAMBOO—Pineapple tilapia, pork vermicelli, and the soft egg noodle combo are Vietnamese specialties here. 990 N. Germantown Parkway, #104. 753-5488. L, D, $-$$ KING JERRY LAWLER’S MEMPHIS BBQ COMPANY—Offers a variety of barbecue dishes, including

brisket, ribs, nachos topped with smoked pork, and a selection of barbecue “Slamwiches.” 465 N. Germantown Pkwy., #116. 509-2360. L, D, X, $ JIM ’N NICK’S BAR-B-Q—Serves barbecued pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, and fish, along with other homemade Southern specialties. 2359 N. Germantown Pkwy. 388-0998. L, D, X, $-$$ MISTER B’S—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. and Mon.  6655 Poplar, #107. 751-5262. L, D, X, $-$$$ PRESENTATION ROOM, THE—American bistro run by the students of L’Ecole Culinaire. Menu changes regularly; specialties may include such items as a filet with truffle mushroom ragu. Service times vary; call for details. Closed Fri.-Sun. 1245 N. Germantown Pkwy. 754-7115. L, D, X, $-$$ ON THE BORDER—Dishes out such Tex-Mex specialties as fajitas and Southwest chicken tacos; also fresh grilled seafood specials. 8101 Giacosa Pl .881-0808; 6572 Airways (Southaven). 662-655-4750. L, D, WB, X, $ SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT—Entrees include tempura, teriyaki, and sushi, as well as grilled fish and chicken entrees. 2324 N. Germantown Pkwy. 384-4122. L, D, X, $-$$ TANNOOR GRILL—Brazilian-style steakhouse with skewers served tableside, along with Middle Eastern specialties; vegetarian options also available. 830 N. Germantown Pkwy. 443-5222. L, D, X, $-$$$

EAST MEMPHIS

(INCLUDES POPLAR/ I-240) ACRE—Features seasonal modern American cuisine in an avante-garde setting using locally sourced products; also small-plates and iconic bar. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 690 S. Perkins. 818-2273. L, D, X, $$-$$$ AGAVOS COCINA & TEQUILA—Camaron de Tequila, tamales, kabobs, and burgers made with a blend of beef and chorizo are among the offerings at this tequila-centric restaurant and bar. 2924 Walnut Grove. 433-9345. L, D, X, $-$$ AMERIGO—Traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine includes pasta, wood-fired pizza, steaks, and cedarwood-roasted fish. 1239 Ridgeway, Park Place Mall. 761-4000. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ ANDREW MICHAEL ITALIAN KITCHEN— Traditional Italian cuisine with a menu from two of the city’s top chefs that changes seasonally with such entrees as Maw Maw’s ravioli. Closed Sun.-Mon. 712 W. Brookhaven Cl. 347-3569. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE—Offering several varieties of eggs benedict, waffles, omelets, pancakes, beignets, and other breakfast fare; also burgers, sandwiches, and salads. 6063 Park Ave. 729-7020; 65 S. Highland. 623-7122. B, L, WB, X, $ BENIHANA—This Japanese steakhouse serves beef, chicken, and seafood grilled at the table; some menu items change monthly; sushi bar also featured. 912 Ridge Lake. 767-8980. L, D, X, $$-$$$ BLUE PLATE CAFÉ — For breakfast, the café’s serves old-fashioned buttermilk pancakes (it’s a secret recipe!), country ham and eggs, and waffles with fresh strawberries and cream. For lunch, the café specializes in country cooking. 5469 Poplar. 761-9696; 113 S. Court. 523-2050. B, L, X, $ BRYANT’S BREAKFAST—Three-egg omelets, pancakes, and The Sampler Platter are among the popular entrees here. Possible the best biscuits in town. Closed Mon. and Tues. 3965 Summer. 324-7494. B, L, X, $ BUCKLEY’S FINE FILET GRILL—Specializes in steaks, seafood, and pasta. (Lunchbox serves entree salads, burgers, and more.)  5355 Poplar. 683-4538; 919 S. Yates (Buckley’s Lunchbox), 682-0570. L (Yates only, M-F), D, X, $-$$ BUNTYN CORNER CAFE—Serving favorites from Buntyn Restaurant, including chicken and dressing, cobbler, and yeast rolls.  5050 Poplar, Suite 107. 424-3286. B, L, X, $ CAPITAL GRILLE—Known for its dry-aged, hand-carved steaks; among the specialties are bone-in sirloin, and porcini-rubbed Delmonico; also seafood entrees and seasonal lunch

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Memor a ble Memphia ns illustration by chris honeysuckle ellis

Ronnie Grisanti

T

1939-2017

he Grisanti name has been synonymous in Memphis with fine Italian cuisine for well over a century now. And while Grisanti chefs were generally known to be both flamboyant and fantastic, few combined those two qualities as admirably as Ronnie Grisanti did over the nearly 50 years that he was a fixture on the local dining scene. After working with his father Elfo downtown and with uncle “Big John” Grisanti at the latter’s eponymous restaurant at Airways and Lamar, Ronnie proved a true urban pioneer when he opened his own distinctive place on just-renovated Beale Street in 1980. Over the decades his restaurant migrated around the city — next door to Sun Studio for a while, then, perhaps most famously, to Ronnie Grisanti and Sons near Chickasaw Gardens — where he was ably assisted by Judd and Alex -- before finally settling in Collierville in more recent times. Diners could always count on terrific Tuscan cuisine and exceptional Italian wines at every memorable establishment Ronnie Grisanti called home. Happily, my favorite dish — the Elfo Special — was always featured on all his restaurant menus. — Kenneth Neill

plates. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. Crescent Center, 6065 Poplar. 683-9291. L, D, X, $$$-$$$$ CASABLANCA—Lamb shawarma is one of the fresh, homemade specialties served at this Mediterranean/Moroccan restaurant; fish entrees and vegetarian options also available. 1707 Madison. 421-6949; 5030 Poplar. 725-8557 ; 7609 Poplar Pike (Germantown). 425-5908. L, D, X, $-$$ CIAO BELLA—Among the Italian and Greek specialties are lasagna, seafood pasta, gourmet pizzas, and vegetarian options. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  565 Erin Dr., Erin Way Shopping Center. 205-2500. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ CITY SILO TABLE + PANTRY—With a focus on clean eating, this establishment offers fresh juices, as well as comfort foods re-imagined with wholesome ingredients. 5101 Sanderlin. 729-7687. B, L, D, X, $ CORKY’S—Popular barbecue emporium offers both wet and dry ribs, plus a full menu of other barbecue entrees. Wed. lunch buffets, Cordova and Collierville.  5259 Poplar. 685-9744; 1740 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-1911; 743 W. Poplar (Collierville). 405-4999; 6434 Goodman Rd., Olive Branch. 662893-3663. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ERLING JENSEN—For over 20 years, has presented “globally inspired” cuisine to die for. Specialties are rack of lamb, big game entrees, and fresh fish dishes. 1044 S. Yates. 763-3700. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE—Serves wet-aged and dry-aged steaks, prime beef, chops, and seafood, including salmon, Australian lobster tails, and a catch of the day.  6245 Poplar. 761-6200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$

FOLK’S FOLLY ORIGINAL PRIME STEAK HOUSE—Specializes in prime steaks, as well as lobster, grilled Scottish salmon, Alaskan king crab legs, rack of lamb, and weekly specials. Now celebrating their 40th year.  551 S. Mendenhall. 762-8200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FORMOSA—Offers Mandarin cuisine, including broccoli beef, hot-and-sour soup, and spring rolls. Closed Monday.  6685 Quince. 753-9898. L, D, X, $-$$ FRATELLI’S—Serves hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts, all with an Italian/Mediterranean flair. Closed Sunday. 750 Cherry Rd., Memphis Botanic Garden. 766-9900. L, X, $ FRANK GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Northern Italian favorites include pasta with jumbo shrimp and mushrooms; also seafood, fillet mignon, and daily lunch specials. Closed for lunch Sunday.  Embassy Suites Hotel, 1022 S. Shady Grove. 761-9462. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE GROVE GRILL—Offers steaks, chops, seafood, and other American cuisine with Southern and global influences; entrees include crab cakes, and shrimp and grits, also dinner specials. Founder Jeff Dunham’s son Chip is now chef de cuisine. 4550 Poplar. 818-9951. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ HALF SHELL—Specializes in seafood, such as King crab legs; also serves steaks, chicken, pastas, salads, sandwiches, a ”voodoo menu”; oyster bar at Winchester location.  688 S. Mendenhall. 682-3966; 7825 Winchester. 737-6755. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$

HERITAGE TAVERN & KITCHEN—Featuring classic cuisine from the country’s five regions, including lobster rolls, fried chicken, smoked tamales, Green Goddess shrimp, and more. 6150 Poplar, Regalia. 761-8855.L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HIGH POINT PIZZA—Serves variety of pizzas, subs, salads, and sides. Closed Monday. A neighborhood fixture. 477 High Point Terrace. 452-3339. L, D, X, $-$$ HOG & HOMINY—The casual sister to Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen serves brick-oven-baked pizzas, including the Red-Eye with pork belly, and small plates with everything from meatballs to beef and cheddar hot dogs; and local veggies. Closed for lunch Mon.  707 W. Brookhaven Cl. 2077396. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HOUSTON’S—Serves steaks, seafood, pork chops, chicken dishes, sandwiches, salads, and Chicago-style spinach dip. Farmous for first-class service. 5000 Poplar. 683-0915. L, D, X $-$$$  INTERIM—Offers American-seasonal cuisine with emphasis on local foods and fresh fish; macaroni and cheese is a house specialty. Closed for lunch Sat.  5040 Sanderlin, Suite 105. 818-0821. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ THE KITCHEN BISTRO—Tomato soup, pan-roasted ribeye, sticky toffee pudding, and dishes made using in-season fruits and veggies are served at this establishment at Shelby Farms Park. 415 Great View Drive E., Suite 101. 729-9009. L, D, X, $-$$ LA BAGUETTE—An almond croissant and chicken salad are among specialties at this French-style bistro. Closed for dinner Sun.  3088 Poplar. 458-0900. B, L, D (closes at 7), X, MRA, $ LAS DELICIAS—Popular for its guacamole, house-made tortilla chips, and margaritas, this restaurant draws diners with its chicken enchiladas, meat-stuffed flautas, and Cuban torta with spicy pork. Closed Sunday. 4002 Park Ave. 458-9264; 5689 Quince. 800-2873. L, D, X, $ LIBRO AT LAURELWOOD—Bookstore eatery features a variety of sandwiches, salads, and homemade pasta dishes, with Italian-inspired options such as carbonara and potato gnocchi. Closed for dinner Sun. 387 Perkins Ext. (Novel). 800-2656. B, L, D, SB, X, $-$$ LISA’S LUNCHBOX—Serving bagels, sandwiches, salads, and wraps. 5030 Poplar, 761-4044; 5885 Ridgeway Center Pkwy., Suite 101. 767-6465; 2659 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Suite 1200; 2525 Central (Children’s Museum); 166 S. Front. 729-7277. B, L, $ LOST PIZZA—Offering pizzas (with dough made from scratch), pasta, salads, sandwiches, tamales, and more.  2855 Poplar. 5721803; 5960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-892-8684. L, D, X, $-$$ LYNCHBURG LEGENDS—This restaurant with a Jack Daniels’ theme and Southern cuisine serves such entrees as Bourbon Street salmon, buttermilk-fried chicken, and grilled steak and wild mushroom salad. DoubleTree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin. 969-7777. B, L, D, X, $- $$$ MARCIANO MEDITERRANEAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE—Veal Saltimbocca with angel hair pasta and white wine sauce is among the entrees; also steaks, seafood, and gourmet pizza. Closed Sun.  780 Brookhaven Cl. 682-1660. D, X, $-$$
 DAN MCGUINNESS PUB—Serves fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, burgers, and other Irish and American fare; also lunch and dinner specials.  4694 Spottswood. 761-3711; 3964 Goodman Rd. 662-890-7611. L, D, X, $ MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE—Serves tandoori chicken, masala dosa, tikka masala, as well as lamb and shrimp entrees; also a daily lunch buffet, and dinner buffet on Fri.-Sat.  6524 Quince Rd. 753-8755. L, D, X, $-$$ MELLOW MUSHROOM—Large menu includes assortment of pizzas, salads, calzones, hoagies, vegetarian options, and 50 beers on tap. 5138 Park Ave. 562-12119155 Poplar; Shops of Forest Hill (Germantown). 907-0243. L, D, X, $-$$ MOSA ASIAN BISTRO—Specialties include sesame chicken, Thai calamari, rainbow panang curry with grouper fish, and other Pan Asian/fusion entrees. Closed Mon. 850 S. White Station Rd. 683-8889. L, D, X, MRA, $ NAM KING—Offers luncheon and dinner buffets, dim sum, and such specialties as fried dumplings, pepper steak, and orange chicken.  4594 Yale. 373-4411. L, D, X, $
 NAPA CAFE—Among the specialties is miso-marinated salmon over black rice with garlic spinach and shiitake mushrooms. Closed Sun.  5101 Sanderlin, Suite 122. 683-0441. L, D, X, $$-$$$ NEW HUNAN—Chinese eatery with more than 80 entrees; also lunch/dinner buffets.  5052 Park. 766-1622. L, D, X, $

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OLD VENICE PIZZA CO.—Specializes in “eclectic Italian,” from pastas, including the “Godfather,” to handtossed pizzas, including the “John Wayne”; choose from 60 toppings.  368 Perkins Ext. 767-6872. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ ONE & ONLY BBQ—On the menu are pork barbecue sandwiches, platters, wet and dry ribs, smoked chicken and turkey platters, a smoked meat salad, barbecue quesadillas, and more. New on the BBQ scene, but worth a visit. 1779 Kirby Pkwy. 751-3615; 567 Perkins Extd. 249-4227. L, D, X, $ ONO POKÉ—This eatery specializes in poké — a Hawaiian dish of fresh fish salad served over rice. Menu includes a variety of poké bowls, like the Kimchi Tuna bowl, or customers can build their own by choosing a base, protein, veggies, and toppings. 3145 Poplar. 618-2955. L, D, X, $ OWEN BRENNAN’S—New Orleans-style menu of beef, chicken, pasta, and seafood; jambalaya, shrimp and grits, and crawfish etouffee are specialties. Closed for dinner Sunday. The Regalia, 6150 Poplar. 761-0990. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PARK + CHERRY—Partnering with CFY Catering, the Dixon offers casual dining within the museum. Menu features sandwiches, like truffled pimento cheese, as well as salads, snacks, and sweets. Closed for breakfast Sun. and all day Mon. 4339 Park (Dixon Gallery). 761-5250. L, X, $ PETE & SAM’S—Serving Memphis for 60-plus years; offers steaks, seafood, and traditional Italian dishes, including homemade ravioli, lasagna, and chicken marsala.  3886 Park. 458-0694. D, X, $-$$$ PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Specialties are orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef, and chicken in lettuce wraps; also vegetarian dishes, including spicy eggplant. 1181 Ridgeway Rd., Park Place Centre. 818-3889. L, D, X, $-$$ PHO SAIGON—Vietnamese fare includes beef teriyaki, roasted quail, curry ginger chicken, vegetarian options, and a variety of soups. 2946 Poplar. 458-1644. L, D, $ PORCELLINO’S CRAFT BUTCHER—Small plates, charcuterie selections, specialty steaks, house-made pastries, and innovative teas and coffees are offered at this combination butcher shop and restaurant featuring locally sourced menu items. Restaurant open for breakfast and lunch. Butcher shop open until 6 p.m. 711 W. Brookhaven Cl. 762-6656. B, L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PYRO’S FIRE-FRESH PIZZA—Serving gourmet pizzas cooked in an open-fire oven; wide choice of toppings; large local and craft beer selection. 1199 Ridgeway. 379-8294; 2035 Union Ave. 208-8857; 2286 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 207-1198; 3592 S. Houston Levee (Collierville). 221-8109. L, D, X, $ RIVER OAKS—Chef Jose Gutierrez’s French-style bistro serves seafood and steaks, with an emphasis on fresh local ingredients. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5871 Poplar Ave. 683-9305. L, D, X, $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE—Offers prime steaks cut and aged in-house, as well as lamb, chicken, and fresh seafood, including lobster.  6120 Poplar. 761-0055. D, X, $$$-$$$$ SALSA—Mexican-Southern California specialties include carnitas, enchiladas verde, and fajitas; also Southwestern seafood dishes such as snapper verde. Closed Sun. Regalia Shopping Center, 6150 Poplar, Suite 129. 683-6325. L, D, X, $-$$ SEASONS 52—This elegant fresh grill and wine bar offers a seasonally changing menu using fresh ingredients, wood-fire grilling, and brick-oven cooking; also a large international wine list and nightly piano bar. Crescent Center, 6085 Poplar. 682-9952. L, D, X, $$-$$$ STAKS— Offering pancakes, including Birthday Cake and lemon ricotta. Menu includes other breakfast items such as beignets and French toast, as well as soups and sandwiches for lunch.  4615 Poplar. 509-2367. B, L, WB, X, $ SUSHI JIMMI—This food truck turned restaurant serves a variety of sushi rolls, fusion dishes — such as kimchi fries — and sushi burritos. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Mon. 2895 Poplar. 729-6985. L, D, X, $ SWEET POTATO BABY CAFE—The Eggplant Parmesan panini and mac and cheese hushpuppies are among popular

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CIT Y DINING LIST dishes offered. Menu includes a variety of desserts, including Sweet Potato Baby Cake. Closed Sat.-Sun. 1005 Tillman. 6081742. L, D, X, $ TENNESSEE TACO CO.—From the creators of Belly Acres, offers such appetizers as crawfish and chorizo mac-n-cheese and homemade guacamole and specializes in street tacos. 3295 Poplar. 207-1960. L, D, X, $ THREE LITTLE PIGS—Pork-shoulder-style barbecue with tangy mild or hot sauce, freshly made coleslaw, and baked beans. 5145 Quince Rd. 685-7094. B, L, D, X, $ TOPS BAR-B-Q—Specializes in pork barbecue sandwiches and sandwich plates with beans and slaw; also serves ribs, beef brisket, and burgers.  1286 Union. 725-7527. 4183 Summer. 3244325; 5391 Winchester. 794-7936; 3970 Rhodes. 323-9865; 6130 Macon. 371-0580. For more locations, go online. L, D, X, $ WANG’S MANDARIN HOUSE—Offers Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, and spicy Hunan entrees, including the golden-sesame chicken; next door is East Tapas, serving small plates with an Asian twist.  6065 Park Ave., Park Place Mall. 763-0676. L, D, X, $-$$ WASABI—Serving traditional Japanese offerings, hibachi, sashimi, and sushi. The Sweet Heart roll, wrapped — in the shape of a heart — with tuna and filled with spicy salmon, yellowtail, and avocado, is a specialty. 5101 Sanderlin Rd., Suite 105. 421-6399. L, D, X, $-$$ WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM—Chicken-salad plate, beef tenderloin, soups-and-sandwiches, and vegetable plates are specialties; meal includes drink and dessert. Closed Sat.-Sun.  88 Racine. 327-5681. L, X, $ ZAKA BOWL—This vegan-friendly restaurant serves buildyour-own vegetable bowls featuring ingredients such as agave Brussels sprouts and roasted beets. Also serves tuna poke and herbed chicken bowls. 575 Erin. 509-3105. L, D, $

GERMANTOWN BLUE HONEY BISTRO—Entrees at this upscale eatery include brown butter scallops served with Mississippi blue rice and herb-crusted beef tenderloin with vegetables and truffle butter. Closed Sun. 9155 Poplar, Suite 17. 552-3041. D, X, $-$$$ BROOKLYN BRIDGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Specializing in such homemade entrees as spinach lasagna and lobster ravioli; a seafood specialty is horseradish-crusted salmon. Closed Sun.  1779 Kirby Pkwy. 755-7413. D, X, $-$$$ FOREST HILL GRILL—A variety of standard pub fare and a selection of mac ‘n’ cheese dishes are featured on the menu. Specialties include Chicken Newport and a barbecue salmon BLT. 9102 Poplar Pike. 624-6001. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ GERMANTOWN COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches; Mon.-night all-youcan-eat ribs.  2290 S. Germantown Rd. S. 754-5540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ LAS TORTUGAS DELI MEXICANA— Authentic Mexican food prepared from local food sources; specializes in tortugas — grilled bread scooped out to hold such powerfully popular fillings as brisket, pork, and shrimp; also tingas, tostados. Closed Sunday.  1215 S. Germantown Rd. 751-1200; 6300 Poplar. 623-3882. L, D, X, $-$$ MISTER B’S—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. and Mon.  6655 Poplar, #107. 751-5262. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE PASTA MAKER RESTAURANT—This Italian eatery specializes in artisanal pasta. Entrées include Spaghetti allo scoglio, Penne Boscaiola, and Fusilli Primavera. Gluten-free options available. Restaurant closed Mon. and Sun. (cooking classes by reservation Sun.). 2095 Exeter, Suite 30. 779-3928. L (Thurs. only), D, X, $-$$ PETRA CAFÉ—Serves Greek, Italian, and Middle Eastern sandwiches, gyros, and entrees. Hours vary; call. 6641 Poplar. 754-4440; 547 S. Highland. 323-3050. L, D, X, $-$$ PIZZA REV—Specializes in build-your-own, personal-sized artisanal pizza. Choose from homemade dough options, all-natural sauces, Italian cheeses, and more than 30 toppings. 6450 Poplar. 379-8188. L, D, X, MRA, $

RED KOI—Classic Japanese cuisine offered at this family-run restaurant; hibachi steaks, sushi, seafood, chicken, and vegetables. 5847 Poplar. 767-3456. L, D, X $-$$ ROYAL PANDA—Hunan fish, Peking duck, Royal Panda chicken and shrimp, and a seafood combo are among the specialties. 3120 Village Shops Dr. 756-9697. L, D, X, $-$$ RUSSO’S NEW YORK PIZZERIA AND WINE BAR—Serves gourmet pizzas, calzones, and pasta, including lasagna, fettuccine Alfredo, scampi, and more.  9087 Poplar, Suite 111. 755-0092. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SAKURA—Sushi, tempura, and teriyaki are Japanese specialties here. 2060 West St. 758-8181; 4840 Poplar. 572-1002. L, D, X, $-$$ SOUTHERN SOCIAL—Shrimp and grits, stuffed quail, and Aunt Thelma’s Fried Chicken are among the dishes served at this upscale Southern establishment. 2285 S. Germantown Rd. 754-5555. D, SB, X, $-$$$ WEST STREET DINER—This home-style eatery offers breakfast, burgers, po’boys, and more. 2076 West St. 757-2191. B, L, D (Mon.-Fri.), X, $

MIDTOWN (INCLUDES THE MEDICAL CENTER) ABYSSINIA RESTAURANT—Ethiopian/Mediterranean menu includes beef, chicken, lamb, fish entrees, and vegetarian dishes; also a lunch buffet. 2600 Poplar. 321-0082. L, D, X, $-$$ ALCHEMY—Southern fusion, locally grown cuisine features small and large plates; among the offerings are pan-seared hanger steak, quail, and lamb chops; also handcrafted cocktails and local craft beers. 940 S. Cooper. 726-4444. D, SB, X, $-$$ ATOMIC TIKI—Island-inspired dishes such as barbecue nachos with pineapple mango relish, Polynesian meatballs, and shrimp roll sliders are served in a tiki bar atmosphere. Closed Mon. 1545 Overton Park. 279-3935. D, $ BABALU TACOS & TAPAS—This Overton Square eatery dishes up Spanish-style tapas with Southern flair; also taco and enchilada of the day; specials change daily.  2115 Madison. 274-0100; 6450 Poplar, 410-8909. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ BAR DKDC—Features an ever-changing menu of international “street food,” from Thai to Mexican, Israeli to Indian, along with specialty cocktails. 964 S. Cooper. 272-0830. D, X, MRA, $ BAR-B-Q SHOP—Dishes up barbecued ribs, spaghetti, bologna; also pulled pork shoulder, Texas toast barbecue sandwich, chicken sandwich, and salads. Closed Sun. 1782 Madison. 272-1277. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ BARI RISTORANTE ENOTECA—Authentic Southeastern Italian cuisine (Puglia) emphasizes lighter entrees. Serves fresh fish and beef dishes and a homemade soup of the day. 22 S. Cooper. 722-2244. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BARKSDALE RESTAURANT—Old-school diner serving breakfast and Southern plate lunches.  237 Cooper. 722-2193. B, L, D, X, $ BAYOU BAR & GRILL—New Orleans fare at this Overton Square eatery includes jambalaya, gumbo, catfish Acadian, shrimp dishes, red beans and rice, and muffalettas.  2094 Madison. 278-8626. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BEAUTY SHOP—Modern American cuisine with international flair served in a former beauty shop. Serves steaks salads, pasta, and seafood, including pecan-crusted golden sea bass. Perennial “Best Brunch” winner. Closed for dinner Sunday. 966 S. Cooper. 272-7111. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ BELLY ACRES—At this festive Overton Square eatery, milkshakes, floats, and burgers rule. Burgers are updated with contemporary toppings like grilled leeks, braised tomatoes, and sourdough or brioche buns. 2102 Trimble Pl. 529-7017. L, D, X, $ BHAN THAI—Authentic Thai cuisine includes curries, pad Thai noodles, and vegetarian dishes, as well as seafood, pork, and duck entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. and all day Mon.  1324 Peabody. 272-1538. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$

BLUE NILE ETHIOPIAN—Kabobs, flavorful chicken and lamb stew, and injera (flatbread) are traditional items on the menu, along with vegetarian options. 1788 Madison. 474-7214. L, D, X, $-$$ BOSCOS—Tennessee’s first craft brewery serves a variety of freshly brewed beers as well as wood-fired oven pizzas, pasta, seafood, steaks, and sandwiches. 2120 Madison. 432-2222. L, D, SB (with live jazz), X, MRA, $-$$ BOUNTY ON BROAD—Offering family-style dining, Bounty serves small plates and family-sized platters, with such specialties as chicken fried quail and braised pork shank. 2519 Broad. 410-8131. L (Sat. and Sun.), D (Mon.-Sat.), SB, X, $-$$$ BROADWAY PIZZA—Serving a variety of pizzas, including the Broadway Special, as well as sandwiches, salads, wings, and soul-food specials. 2581 Broad. 454-7930; 627 S. Mendenhall. 207-1546. L, D, X, $-$$ CAFE 1912—French/American bistro owned by culinary pioneer Glenn Hays serving such seafood entrees as grouper and steamed mussels; also crepes, salads, and French onion soup. 243 S. Cooper. 722-2700. D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE BROOKS BY PARADOX—Serving grab-and-go pastries, as well as lunch items. Menu includes soups, salads, and sandwiches, such as the Modern Reuben and Grown Up Grilled Cheese. 1934 Poplar (Memphis Brooks Museum of Art). 544-6200. B, L, X, $ CAFE ECLECTIC—Omelets and chicken and waffles are among menu items, along with quesadillas, sandwiches, wraps, and burgers. Menu varies by location. 603 N. McLean. 725-1718; 111 Harbor Town Square. 590-4645; 510 S. Highland. 410-0765. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $ CAFE OLE—This eatery specializes in authentic Mexican cuisine; one specialty is the build-your-own quesadilla. 959 S. Cooper. 343-0103. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ CAFE PALLADIO—Serves gourmet salads, soups, sandwiches, and desserts in a tea room inside the antiques shop. Closed Sun. 2169 Central. 278-0129. L, X, $ CAFE SOCIETY—With Belgian and classic French influences, serves Wagyu beef, chicken, and seafood dishes, including bacon-wrapped shrimp, along with daily specials and vegetarian entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  212 N. Evergreen. 722-2177. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CELTIC CROSSING—Specializes in Irish and American pub fare. Entrees include shepherd’s pie, shrimp and sausage coddle, and fish and chips.  903 S. Cooper. 274-5151. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ CENTRAL BBQ—Serves ribs, smoked hot wings, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken, turkey, nachos, and portobello sandwiches. Offers both pork and beef barbecue.  2249 Central Ave. 272-9377; 4375 Summer Ave. 7674672; 147 E. Butler. 672-7760. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CHEF TAM’S UNDERGROUND CAFE—Serves Southern staples with a Cajun twist. Menu items include totchos, jerk wings, fried chicken, and “muddy” mac and cheese. Closed Sun. and Mon. 2299 Young. 207-6182. L, D, $ THE COVE—Nautical-themed restaurant and bar serving oysters, pizzas, and more. The Stoner Pie, with tamales and fritos, is a popular dish. 2559 Broad. 730-0719. L, D, $ THE CRAZY NOODLE—Korean noodle dishes range from bibam beef noodle with cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables, to curry chicken noodle; also rice cakes served in a flavorful sauce. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 2015 Madison. 272-0928. L, D, X, $ ECCO—Mediterranean-inspired specialties range from rib-eye steak to seared scallops to housemade pastas and a grilled vegetable plate; also a Saturday brunch. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1585 Overton Park. 410-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ FRIDA’S—Mexican cuisine and Tex-Mex standards, including chimichangas, enchiladas, and fajitas; seafood includes shrimp and tilapia. 1718 Madison. 244-6196. L, D, X, $-$$ FUEL CAFE—Focus is on natural dishes with such specialties as bison burgers, quinoa chili, and tacos; also vegan and gluten-free options. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1761 Madison. 725-9025. L, D, X, $-$$

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CIT Y DINING LIST GOLDEN INDIA—Northern Indian specialties include tandoori chicken as well as lamb, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian dishes. 2097 Madison. 728-5111. L, D, X, $-$$ GROWLERS—Sports bar and eatery serves standard bar fare in addition to a pasta, tacos, chicken and waffles, and light options. 1911 Poplar. 244-7904. L, D, X, $-$$ HM DESSERT LOUNGE—Serving cake, pie, and other desserts, as well as a selection of savory dishes, including meatloaf and mashed potato “cupcakes.” Closed Monday. 1586 Madison. 290-2099. L, D, X, $ IMAGINE VEGAN CAFE—Dishes at this fully vegan restaurant range from salads and sandwiches to full dinners, including eggplant parmesan and “beef” tips and rice; breakfast all day Sat. and Sun. 2158 Young. 654-3455. L, D, WB, X, $ INDIA PALACE—Tandoori chicken, lamb shish kabobs, and chicken tikka masala are among the entrees; also, vegetarian options and a daily all-you-can-eat lunch buffet. 1720 Poplar. 278-1199. L, D, X, $-$$ JASMINE THAI AND VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT—Entrees include panang chicken, green curry shrimp, and pad thai (noodles, shrimp, and peanuts); also vegetarian dishes. Closed Mon.-Tues.  916 S. Cooper. 725-0223. L, D, X, $ LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM—Serves such Southern cuisine as po boys and shrimp and grits, and wood-fired pizzas. 2119 Madison. 207-5097. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ LBOE—Gourmet burger joint serves locally sourced ground beef burgers, with options like the Mac-N-Cheese Burger and Caprese. Black bean and turkey patties available. 2021 Madison. 725-0770. L, D, X, $ THE LIQUOR STORE—Renovated liquor store turned diner serves all-day breakfast, sandwiches, and entrees such as Salisbury steak and smothered pork chops. Closed for dinner Sun.-Mon. 2655 Broad. 405-5477. B, L, D, X, $-$$ LITTLE ITALY—Serving New York-style pizza as well as subs and pasta dishes. 1495 Union. 725-0280, L, D, X, $-$$ LUCKY CAT RAMEN—Specializes in gourmet ramen bowls, such as Bacon Collards Ramen, made with rich broth. Bao, steamed buns filled with various meats and veggies, also grace the menu. 247 S. Cooper. 6338296. L, D, X, $-$$ MAMA GAIA—Greek-inspired dishes at this vegetarian eatery include pitas, “petitzzas,” and quinoa bowls. 1350 Concourse Avenue, Suite 137. 203-3838; 2144 Madison. 2142449. B, L, D, X, $-$$ MARDI GRAS MEMPHIS—Serving Cajun fare, including an etouffee-stuffed po’boy. Closed Mon.  496 Watkins. 530-6767. L, D, X, $-$$ MAXIMO’S ON BROAD—Serving a tapas menu that features creative fusion cuisine; entrees include veggie paella and fish of the day. Closed Mon. 2617 Broad Ave. 452-1111. D, SB, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS PIZZA CAFE—Homemade pizzas are specialties; also serves sandwiches, calzones, and salads.  2087 Madison. 726-5343; 5061 Park Ave. 684-1306; 7604 W. Farmington (Germantown). 753-2218; 797 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-7800; 5627 Getwell (Southaven). 662-5361364. L, D, X, $-$$ MOLLY’S LA CASITA—Homemade tamales, fish tacos, a vegetarian combo, and bacon-wrapped shrimp are a few of the specialties.  2006 Madison. 726-1873. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ NEXT DOOR AMERICAN EATERY—The Kitchen’s sister restaurant serves dishes sourced from American farms. Menu features chorizo bacon dates, spicy gulf shrimp, and dry-aged beef burgers. 1350 Concourse Avenue Suite 165. 779-1512. L, D, X, $ ONIX RESTAURANT—Serves seafood dishes, including barbecued shrimp and pecan-crusted trout, and a variety of salads and sandwiches. Closed Sun. 1680 Madison. 552-4609. L, D, X, $-$$ PAYNE’S BAR-B-QUE—Opened in 1972, this family owned barbecue joint serves ribs, smoked sausage, and chopped pork sandwiches with a standout mustard slaw and homemade sauce. About as down-to-earth as it gets. 1762 Lamar. 272-1523. L, D, $-$$

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M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 173


CIT Y DINING LIST PEI WEI ASIAN DINER—Serves a variety of Pan-Asian cuisine, including Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Thai. Noodle and rice bowls are specialties; a small plates menu also offered.  1680 Union Ave., #109. 722-3780; 2257 N. Germantown Pkwy. 382-1822. L, D, X, $-$$
 PHO BINH—Vietnamese, vegetarian, and Cantonese specialties include lemon tofu and spring rolls. Closed Sunday. 1615 Madison. 276-0006. L, D, $ RAILGARTEN—Located in a former rail station space, this eatery offers breakfast items, a variety of salads and sandwiches, and such entrees as short rib mac-and-cheese and fish tacos. Also serves shakes, malts, floats, and cream sodas. 2166 Central. 231-5043. B, L, D, $-$$ RED FISH ASIAN BISTRO—From the former 19th Century Club building, serves sushi, teriyaki, and hibachi. Specialities include yuzu filet mignon and Chilean seabass. 1433 Union. 454-3926; 9915 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 729-7581; 6518 Goodman (Olive Branch). 662-8745254. L, D, X, $-$$$ RESTAURANT IRIS—French Creole cuisine includes shrimp and delta-grind grits, and New York strip stuffed with fried oysters. Chef Kelly English is a Food and Wine “Top Ten.” Closed Sun. 2146 Monroe. 590-2828. D, X, $$-$$$ ROBATA RAMEN & YAKITORI BAR—Serves ramen noodle bowls and Yakitori skewers as well as rice and noodle dishes. 2116 Madison. 410-8290. L, D, X, $ SABROSURA—Serves Mexican and Cuban fare, including arroz tapada de pollo and steak Mexican. Closed Sun. 782 Washington. 421-8180. L, D, X, $-$$ THE SECOND LINE—Kelly English brings “relaxed Creole cuisine” to his newest eatery; serves a variety of po-boys and such specialties as barbecue shrimp, and andouille, shrimp, and pimento cheese fries. 2144 Monroe. 590-2829. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SEKISUI—Japanese fusion cuisine, fresh sushi bar, grilled meats and seafood, California rolls, and vegetarian entrees. Poplar/Perkins location’s emphasis is on Pacific Rim cuisine. Menu and hours vary at each location. 25 Belvedere. 725-0005; 1884 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 309-8800; 4724 Poplar (between Perkins & Colonial). 767-7770; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-0622; 2990 Kirby-Whitten (Bartlett). 377-2727; 6696 Poplar. 747-0001. L, D, X, $-$$$ STANLEY BAR-B-QUE—Serving a variety of barbecue dishes and smoked meats, as well as burgers, sauerkraut balls, and pretzels with beer cheese. 2110 Madison. 347-3060. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ STONE SOUP CAFE—Cooper-Young eatery serving soups, salads, quiche, meat-and-two specials; and daily specials such as Italian roast beef. Closed Monday.  993 S. Cooper. 922-5314. B, L, SB, X, $ STRANO SICILIAN KITCHEN & BAR— Presenting a Sicilian/Mediterranean mix of Arab, Spanish, Greek, and North African fare, Strano serves small plates, wood-grilled fish, and hand-tossed pizzas such as the King Alaska, with salmon and chevre. Closed Mon. 948 S. Cooper. 275-8986. L, D, WB, X, $$-$$$ SOUL FISH CAFE—Serving Southern-style soul food, tacos, and Po Boys, including catfish, crawfish, oyster, shrimp, chicken and smoked pork tenderloin. 862 S. Cooper. 725-0722; 3160 Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 755-6988; 4720 Poplar. 590-0323. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ SWEET GRASS—Chef Ryan Trimm takes Southern cuisine to a new level. Low-country coastal cuisine includes such specialties as shrimp and grits. Closed Mon. Restaurant’s “sister,” Sweet Grass Next Door, open nightly, serves lunch Sat.-Sun.  937 S. Cooper. 278-0278. D, SB, X, $-$$$ TART—Combination patisserie and coffeehouse serving rustic French specialties, including baked eggs in brioche, topped with Gruyere, and French breads and pastries. One Commerce Square, 40 S. Main #150. 421-6276. B, L, WB, X, $-$$ TROLLEY STOP MARKET—Serves plate lunches/dinners as well as pizzas, salads, and vegan/vegetarian entrees; a specialty is the locally raised beef burger. Also sells fresh produce and goods from local farmers; delivery available. Saturday brunch; closed Sunday. 704 Madison. 526-1361. L, D, X, $ TSUNAMI—Features Pacific Rim cuisine (Asia, Australia, South Pacific, etc.); also a changing “small plate” menu. Chef Ben Smith is a Cooper-Young

pioneer. Specialties include Asian nachos and roasted sea bass. Closed Sunday. 928 S. Cooper. 274-2556. D, X, $$-$$$

SOUTH MEMPHIS (INCLUDES

PARKWAY VILLAGE, FOX MEADOWS, SOUTH MEMPHIS, WINCHESTER, AND WHITEHAVEN)

COLETTA’S—Longtime eatery serves such specialties as homemade ravioli, lasagna, and pizza with barbecue or traditional toppings. 1063 S. Parkway E. 948-7652; 2850 Appling Rd. (Bartlett). 383-1122. L, D, X, $-$$ CURRY BOWL—Specializes in Southern Indian cuisine, serving Tandoori chicken, biryani, tikka masala, and more. Weekend buffet. 4141 Hacks Cross. 207-6051. L, D, $ DELTA’S KITCHEN—The premier restaurant at The Guest House at Graceland serves Elvis-inspired dishes — like Nutella and Peanut Butter Crepes for breakfast — and upscale Southern cuisine — including lamb chops and shrimp and grits — for dinner. 3600 Elvis Presley Blvd. 443-3000. B, D, X, $-$$$ DWJ KOREAN BARBECUE—This authentic Korean eatery serves kimbap, barbecued beef short ribs, rice and noodles dishes, and hot pots and stews. 3750 Hacks Cross, Suite 101. 746-8057; 2156 Young. 207-6204. L, D, $-$$ THE FOUR WAY—Legendary soul-food establishment dishing up such entrees as fried and baked catfish, chicken, and turkey and dressing, along with a host of vegetables and desserts. Around the corner from the legendary Stax Studio. Closed Monday. 998 Mississippi Blvd. 507-1519. L, D, $ INTERSTATE BAR-B-Q—Specialties include chopped pork-shoulder sandwiches, ribs, hot wings, spaghetti, chicken, and turkey. 2265 S. Third. 775-2304; 150 W. Stateline Rd. (Southaven). 662-393-5699. L, D, X, $-$$ LEONARD’S—Serves wet and dry ribs, barbecue sandwiches, spaghetti, catfish, homemade onion rings, and lemon icebox pie; also a lunch buffet.  5465 Fox Plaza. 360-1963. L, X, $-$$ MARLOWE’S—In addition to its signature barbecue and ribs, Marlowe’s serves Southern-style steaks, chops, lasagne, and more.  4381 Elvis Presley Blvd. 332-4159. D, X, MRA, $-$$ UNCLE LOU’S FRIED CHICKEN—Featured on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives for good reason: fried chicken (mild, hot, or home-style); jumbo burgers four patties high; strawberry shortcake, and assorted fruit pies. 3633 Millbranch. 332-2367. L, D, X, MRA, $

SUMMER/BERCLAIR/ RALEIGH/BARTLETT ASIAN PALACE—Chinese eatery serves seafood, vegetarian items, dim sum, and more. 5266 Summer Ave. 766-0831. L, D, X, $-$$ ELWOOD’S—Casual comfort food includes tacos, pizza and sandwiches. Specialties include meats smoked in-house (chicken, turkey, brisket, pork), barbecue pizza and steelhead trout tacos. 4523 Summer. 761-9898. B, L, D, X, $ EXLINES’ BEST PIZZA—Serves pizza, Italian dinners, sandwiches, and salads. 6250 Stage Rd. 382-3433; 2935 Austin Peay. 388-4711; 2801 Kirby Parkway. 754-0202; 7730 Wolf River Blvd. (Germantown). 753-4545; 531 W. Stateline Rd. 662-3424544 (check online for additional locations). L, D, X, MRA, $ GRIDLEY’S—Offers barbecued ribs, shrimp, pork plate, chicken, and hot tamales; also daily lunch specials. Closed Tues.  6842 Stage Rd. 377-8055. L, D, X, $-$$ LA TAQUERIA GUADALUPANA—Fajitas and quesadillas are just a few of the authentic Mexican entrees offered here. A bona-fide Memphis institution. 4818 Summer. 685-6857; 5848 Winchester. 365-4992. L, D, $ LOTUS—Authentic Vietnamese-Asian fare, including lemon-grass chicken and shrimp, egg rolls, Pho soup, and spicy Vietnamese vermicelli. 4970 Summer. 6821151. D, X, $ MORTIMER’S—Contemporary American entrees include trout almondine, chicken dishes, and hand-cut steaks; also sandwiches, salads, and daily/nightly

specials. A Memphis landmark since the Knickerbocker closed. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun.  590 N. Perkins. 761-9321. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGASAKI INN—Chicken, steak, and lobster are among the main courses; meal is cooked at your table.  3951 Summer. 454-0320. D, X, $$ PANDA GARDEN—Sesame chicken and broccoli beef are among the Mandarin and Cantonese entrees; also seafood specials and fried rice. Closed for lunch Saturday.  3735 Summer. 323-4819. L, D, X, $-$$ QUEEN OF SHEBA—Featuring Middle Eastern favorites and Yemeni dishes such as lamb haneeth and saltah. 4792 Summer. 207-4174. L, D, $ SIDE PORCH STEAK HOUSE—In addition to steak, the menu includes chicken, pork chops, and fish entrees; homemade rolls are a specialty. Closed Sun.-Mon.  5689 Stage Rd. 377-2484. D, X, $-$$

UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOOD DISTRICT (INCLUDES CHICKASAW GARDENS AND HIGHLAND STRIP)

A-TAN—Serves Chinese and Japanese hibachi cuisine, complete with sushi bar. A specialty is Four Treasures with garlic sauce.  3445 Poplar, Suite 17, University Center. 452-4477. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE BLUFF—New Orleans-inspired menu includes alligator bites, nachos topped with crawfish and andouille, gumbo, po’boys, and fried seafood platters. 535 S. Highland. 454-7771. L, D, X, $-$$ BROTHER JUNIPER’S—This little cottage is a breakfast mecca, offering specialty omelets, including the open-faced San Diegan omelet; also daily specials, and homemade breads and pastries. Closed Mon.  3519 Walker. 3240144. B, X, $ CHAR RESTAURANT—Specializing in modern Southern cuisine, this eatery offers homestyle sides, char-broiled steaks, and fresh seafood. 431 S. Highland, #120. 249-3533. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ DERAE RESTAURANT—Ethiopian and Mediterranean fare includes fuul, or fava beans in spices and yogurt, goat meat and rice, and garlic chicken over basmati rice with cilantro chutney; also salmon and tilapia. Closed Monday. 923 S. Highland. 5523992. B, L, D, $-$$ EL PORTON—Fajitas, quesadillas, and steak ranchero are just a few of the menu items.  2095 Merchants Row (Germantown). 754-4268; 8361 Highway 64. 380-7877; 3448 Poplar, Poplar Plaza. 452-7330; 1805 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 624-9358; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-5770. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ JOES’ ON HIGHLAND—Specializes in fried chicken and comfort sides such as warm okra/green tomato salad and turnip greens. Entrees include salmon patties and chicken fried steak. Closed Mon. 262 S. Highland. 337-7003. L, D, X, $ MEDALLION—Offers steaks, seafood, chicken, and pasta entrees. Closed for dinner Sunday. 3700 Central, Holiday Inn (Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality). 678-1030. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ ROCK’N DOUGH PIZZA CO.—Specialty and custom pizzas made from fresh ingredients; wide variety of toppings. 3445 Poplar Ave., Ste. 1. 512-6760; 7850 Poplar, #6 (Germantown). 779-2008. L, D, SB, X, $$

OUT-OF-TOWN TACKER’S SHAKE SHACK—This family-run establishment offers plate lunches, catfish dinners, homemade desserts, and a variety of hamburgers, including a mac ‘n’ cheese-topped griddle burger. Closed Sun. 409 E. Military Rd. (Marion, AR). 870-739-3943. B, L, D, $ BONNE TERRE—This inn’s cafe features American cuisine with a Southern flair, and a seasonal menu that changes monthly. Offers Angus steaks, duck, pasta, and seafood. Closed Sun.Wed.  4715 Church Rd. W. (Nesbit, MS). 662-781-5100. D, X, $-$$$ BOZO’S HOT PIT BAR-B-Q—Barbecue, burgers, sandwiches, and subs. 342 Hwy 70 (Mason, TN). 901-294-3400. L, D, $-$$

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CIT Y DINING LIST CATFISH BLUES—Serving Delta-raised catfish and Cajun- and Southern-inspired dishes, including gumbo and fried green tomatoes. 210 E. Commerce (Hernando, MS). 662-298-3814. L, D, $ CITY GROCERY—Southern eclectic cuisine; shrimp and grits is a specialty. Closed for dinner Sunday.  152 Courthouse Square (Oxford, MS). 662-232-8080. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ COMO STEAKHOUSE—Steaks cooked on a hickory charcoal grill are a specialty here. Upstairs is an oyster bar. Closed Sun. 203 Main St. (Como, MS). 662-526-9529. D, X, $-$$$ LONG ROAD CIDER CO.—Specializes in hard apple ciders made with traditional methods. Cafe-style entrees include black eye peas with cornbread and greens, chicken Gorgonzola pockets, cidersteamed sausage, and housemade ice creams. Closed Sun.-Wed. 9053 Barret Road. (Barretville, TN). 352-0962. D, X, $

Life is why we encourage you to take care of yourself as you take care of your loved ones.

CASINO TABLES BOURBON STREET STEAKHOUSE & GRILL AT SOUTHLAND PARK—1550 Ingram Blvd., West Memphis, AR, 1-800-467-6182. CHICAGO STEAKHOUSE AT THE GOLDSTRIKE—1010 Casino Center Dr., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-24KSTAY /662-357-1225. FAIRBANKS AT THE HOLLYWOOD—1150 Casino Strip Blvd., Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-871-0711. JACK BINION’S STEAK HOUSE AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. LUCKY 8 ASIAN BISTRO AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. SAMMY HAGAR’S RED ROCKER BAR & GRILL AT SOUTHLAND PARK—1550 Ingram Blvd., West Memphis, AR, 1-870-735-3670 ext. 5208 THE STEAKHOUSE AT THE FITZ —711 Lucky Ln., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-766-LUCK, ext 8213. MANILA FILIPINO RESTAURANT—Entrees include pork belly cutlet with lechon sauce, and shrimp and vegetables in tamarind broth; also daily combos, rice dishes, and chef specials. Closed Sun.-Mon. 7849 Rockford (Millington, TN). 209-8525. L, D, X, $ MARSHALL STEAKHOUSE—Rustic steakhouse serves premium Angus beef steaks, seafood dishes, rack of lamb, and more. Breakfast menu features griddle cakes, and lunch offerings include hamburger steak and oyster po’ boys. 2379 Highway 178 (Holly Springs, MS). 628-3556. B, L, D, X, $-$$$ MEMPHIS BARBECUE COMPANY—Offers spare ribs, baby backs, and pulled pork and brisket, along with such sides as mac and cheese, grits, and red beans. 709 Desoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662-536-3762. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGOYA—Offers traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi bar; specialties are teriyaki and tempura dishes. 7075 Malco Blvd., Suite 101 (Southaven, MS). 662-349-8788. L, D, X, $-$$$
 PANCHO’S—Serves up a variety of Mexican standards, including tacos, enchiladas, and mix-and-match platters; also lunch specials.  3600 E. Broadway (West Memphis, AR). 870-735-6466. 717 N. White Station. 685-5404. L, D, X, MRA, $ PIG-N-WHISTLE—Offers pork shoulder sandwiches, wet and dry ribs, catfish, nachos, and stuffed barbecue potatoes. 6084 Kerr-Rosemark Rd. (Millington, TN). 872-2455. L, D, X, $ RAVEN & LILY—Eatery offers innovative Southern cuisine with such dishes as onion ring and pork rind salad, chipotle hot chicken with spiced cabbage, and shrimp and grits benedict. Closed for lunch Monday. 7700 Highway 64 (Oakland, TN). 235-7300. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ RAVINE—Serves contemporary Southern cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, locally grown foods and a menu that changes weekly. Closed Mon.-Tues. 53 Pea Ridge/County Rd. 321 (Oxford, MS). 662-234-4555. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ STEAK BY MELISSA—Aged, choice-grade, hand-cut steaks are a specialty here. Also serving fresh seafood dishes, plate lunches, burgers, and sandwiches. 4975 Pepper Chase Dr. (Southaven, MS). 662-342-0602. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ WILSON CAFE—Serving elevated home-cooking, with such dishes as deviled eggs with cilantro and jalapeno, scampi and grits, and doughnut bread pudding. 2 N. Jefferson (Wilson, AR). 870-6550222. L, D (Wed. through Sat. only), X, $-$$$

My daughter is why. Everyone has a reason to live a longer and healthier life. What is yours?

M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 175


s,

g

den

Tiger Type A (and Types B and C) A look at the three distinct subspecies of Memphis Tiger basketball fans.

by frank murtaugh

I

moved to Memphis in 1991, just in time for Penny Hardaway’s two brilliant seasons as a Tiger. I began covering Tiger basketball for the Memphis Flyer in 2001, just as John Calipari was getting acquainted with barbecue and the blues. I’ve been around my share of Tiger players and coaches, but I’ve spent far more time — during basketball season or otherwise — with Tiger fans. And I’ve developed a theory. As attendance has dwindled to uncomfortably sparse crowds on game nights at FedExForum, three distinctive types of Tiger fans have made their presence (or lack thereof) felt. The classifications can be defined by how each group sees the basketball program in their lives. A) “The Tigers are our team.” These are the fans you see — with plenty of elbow room — on a Tuesday night in December when Samford is in town. They don’t miss the Siena game. And a late tipoff with 10-degree temperatures and slick Memphis streets? No problem. It’s the UConn game! The Tiger A fans consider the program part of their city’s functionality. They pay attention to the roster’s composition and they follow recruiting reports (and rumors). They obviously prefer the Tigers winning lots of games, reaching the NCAA tournament,

and playing after St. Patrick’s Day. But winning isn’t the reason they follow the team or, importantly, why they attend games. Memphis Tiger basketball is how these fans see themselves. And this is an important component to remember. What makes any of us Memphians? The zip code on our mail? Our high school alma mater? Our workplace? What about the college basketball team we call our own? B) “The Tigers are my team.” For lack of a better (or kinder) term, Tiger B fans are selfish. They are passionate — many of

them outwardly emotional — C) “The Tigers are a team.” about the Tiger program. They I’ve never witnessed a basketball are the most frequent voices crowd like the one I was part of you hear on local call-in radio on February 23, 2008, when an shows. And they are extraordi- undefeated Memphis team — ranked first in the country — narily hard to please. Whether hosted second-ranked Tennesit’s memories (or stories they’ve heard) about 1973, 1985, and 2008, see (second-ranked Tennessee!) at or Penny highlights, or Calipari’s FedExForum. There have been coming-and-going, Tiger B fans Grizzly playoff games (particuplace the program’s standard of larly in 2011 and 2013) when the excellence beyond the reach of building actually shook. But no nearly every program between more than it did during pregame Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and introductions of that Tiger-Vol Tucson, Arizona. showdown, when — for two Not that long ago, Memphis hours — FedExForum was the won an astonishing 64 consecu- center of college basketball’s tive conference games. Trouble universe. The arena was packed that night, and the 17,000 inside was (for Tiger B fans), each of those games featured an oppo- the arena were boosted by a few nent from Conference USA. So thousand more watching in clubs what’s the big deal? That level on Beale Street. of play won’t help the Tigers Memphis Tiger basketball in come March. (Memphis reached 2008 was a happening. Games were events, particularly once the Sweet 16 four straight years the team topped the national during this stretch, the Elite Eight twice, and played for the rankings in late January. If you national title in 2008.) didn’t know the previous night’s McDonald’s All-Americans score (and the team Memphis are the desired recruits among had beaten), you weren’t paying this group of fans. (At least those attention to Bluff City life. Hapleft over when Duke is finished penings and events draw crowds. making calls.) And when a local Tiger C fans stir when the games talent chooses matter in a to play elselarger context. What makes any of us where (see LeA nd games Memphians? The zip code ron Black or against Mercer, Chris Chiozza), Samford, and on our mail? Our high Bryant in Deit’s verifiable school alma mater? Our cember don’t proof that the Memphis pro- workplace? What about the matter beyond gram has “lost a coaching college basketball team we the city.” So staff’s mission call our own? get rid of the to teach and coach. Tiger develop playB fans will boycott games, con- ers. Tiger C fans will return, and they’re critical to selling vinced their empty seats will somehow convince that Mc- out FedExForum. But it will take the program becoming, Donald’s All-American to sign once again, a happening. To with Memphis. Bless Tiger B fans for their visions and dreams. the casual eye — perhaps even Sympathize for them as reality those of current coach Tubby continues to unfold, one winter Smith — this seems a long way after another. to climb. 

PHOTOGRAPH BY LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

tory

LAST STAND

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Join us for our first-ever

S ATU R DAY

M AR

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11am-3pm Rain or Shine!

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN inside Hardin Hall.

Meet the staff of area Camps and plan your Summer. Representatives from area day camps, overnight camps, extracurricular camps, and more will be on hand.

FREE ADMISSION For more info head on over to MEMPHISCAMPEXPO.COM and to the MEMPHIS PARENT FACEBOOK PAGE! MM_MPCampExpo_FP.indd 1

2/22/18 3:42 PM


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CAPABLE OF MORE. Special lease and finance offers will be available at your local Roadshow BMW Center through BMW Financial Services. Roadshow BMW 405 N. Germantown Parkway Memphis Cordova, TN 38018 901-365-2584 roadshowbmw.com ©2018 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.

Memphis magazine, March 2018  

It's our Faces and Places issue! Check out the Brooks Museum's African-print fashion exhibit, read about the County mayoral race, travel to...

Memphis magazine, March 2018  

It's our Faces and Places issue! Check out the Brooks Museum's African-print fashion exhibit, read about the County mayoral race, travel to...